Western Carolina University Program Assessment Plan Program: School Psychology College of Education and Allied Professions

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1 Western Carolina University Program Assessment Plan Program: School Psychology College of Education and Allied Professions Assessment Plan for Primary Contact: Candace H. Boan, Ph.D. Associate Professor Director of Graduate Program in School Psychology Department Mission Statement: The Department of Psychology provides the state, region, and university with a center of scholarship in the psychological sciences. The most important expression of this scholarship occurs through effective instruction in the undergraduate and graduate degree programs in psychology, service courses for programs in education and other areas of study, and general education courses open to all undergraduates. The Department of Psychology sees collaborative research activities with students as an integral part of its teaching mission and funded and unfunded faculty research as an important means for faculty development. Although less central to the Department's mission than teaching and research, service that provides faculty members with opportunities to share their scholarship and skills with the university and the larger community is valued and encouraged. Statement on Alignment of Program with University and College Mission: Western Carolina University provides education to provide a regional community of scholarship. This is accomplished through the administration of undergraduate and graduate programs. The primary role of the College of Education and Allied Professions is to prepare educators, counselors, psychologists, speech-language pathologists, recreation personnel and other human service specialists at both entry and advanced levels. These professionals will staff public elementary, secondary, postsecondary schools, sport and recreation agencies, and other human service organizations in North Carolina and the region beyond. The College fulfills its mission by developing and maintaining a community of scholars that promotes and recognizes good teaching, service, and research. Of these three scholarly activities, providing optimal learning environments for students is most important, followed by service and research. The School Psychology program develops school psychologists that are eligible for state licensure and national certification as a school psychologist. The program accomplishes

2 this role by: (1) providing a theoretical and applied background grounded in psychology and education that prepares individuals for effective practice as a psychologist in an educational setting, (2) developing the ability to interpret and apply psychological and educational research in a critical manner, (3) developing proficiencies required as a school psychologist in assessment, consultation, direct service provision, develop academic and behavioral interventions, and crisis response, (4) providing an understanding of the systems that influence educational practice, and (5) establishing a thorough understanding of legal and ethical issues relevant for school psychologists. Program Goals/Objectives: The school psychology program has a well-established assessment plan. The data is collected on a yearly basis by the Program Director. The following information will summarize the program goals, how they are addressed in the program, and the data that has been attained over the past three academic years. 1. Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability: School psychologists have knowledge of varied models and methods of assessment that yield information useful in identifying strengths and needs, in understanding problems, and in measuring progress and accomplishments. School psychologists use such models and methods as part of a systematic process to collect data and other information, translate assessment results into empirically based decisions about service delivery, and evaluate the outcomes of services. Data based decision-making permeates every aspect of professional practice. Addressed: Data-based decision making is stressed in all facets of the program. Program goals 2 and 5 are specifically relevant to this domain (School Psychology Program Handbook, pp.3-4). Goal 2 states that graduates from the program will have sufficient academic training to interpret and apply psychological and educational research in a critical manner. This ability to critically analyze and apply research is essential for systematically analyzing data and for selecting empirically based interventions. Goal 5 focuses on specific skills such as interpreting information from different assessment tools and techniques and developing academic and behavioral intervention plans based on the needs of the individual. The program also has several knowledge (#5, #6, and #7) objectives and abilities (#1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, #14, #17, #20, #21 and #22) which are directly relevant to data-based decision making and accountability (pp. 4-6). Most of the courses in the curriculum have elements of data-based decision making incorporated into content and assignments. The statistics (Psy 651) and research methods (Psy 652) sequence aids students in learning about collecting data in a systematic manner. Students are required to conceptualize a research project based on the existing literature in the area. Students must be able to integrate information from the research base, pose a research question, gather data to answer the question, analyze the data using appropriate statistical methods, and explain the relevance of any findings as they relate to previous research. This model of having an adequate knowledge base, identifying questions that need to be answered, gathering relevant data, and then interpreting results in the context of the original question is at the heart of data-based decision making.

3 The courses that form the assessment sequence (Psy 661, 663, 664, and 697) all require students to develop a solid knowledge base in assessing strengths and weaknesses, understanding the importance of context when developing assessment batteries, and linking assessment information to meaningful, empirically-based recommendations and interventions. Specific assessment skills that are developed include assessing cognitive, academic, behavioral, emotional, personality, adaptive and social functioning. Students learn informal methods for gathering information such as error analysis, curriculumbased assessment, interviewing, and conducting observations. The target age range includes birth through adulthood. A large focus of the training is learning to integrate information to get a clear understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of an individual and the context that exists around, and may contribute to these strengths and weaknesses. For all assessment courses, students are required to identify any necessary interventions based on the information from assessment data. Intervention courses (Psy 621, Psy 674, 675, and Coun 620) require students to apply the empirical body of research to academic, behavioral, emotional, and social needs of children and adolescents. In several of these courses, students are required to develop intervention plans for mock cases based on existing research and any relevant contextual issues in the case. Practicum I, Practicum II, and Internship allow students increasing levels of independence in data-based decision making and accountability (see Course Syllabi). During the internal practicum placement students are required to evaluate a minimum of four individuals in the Psychological Services Clinic. The reasons for referral on clinic cases are seldom straightforward, and require students to critically analyze the best assessment tools for gathering information. Additionally clinic cases require students to be thorough in evaluations and in making recommendations for clients. The internal practicum placement often involves considerable supervision for the first few cases. For the external practicum placement and internship students are required to submit portfolio assignments that demonstrate assessment, consultation, and intervention skills. Assessed: The courses listed above (Psy 651, 652, 661, 663, 664, 697, 621, 674, 675, and Coun 620) all require written products to measure competency and understanding of material. The written products include examinations, case studies, comprehensive psychological reports, reflection papers, and various other approaches to assessing knowledge base. The Psychological Assessment I course involves videotaped observations of administrations. Practicum I and Practicum II also involve observations of students work. Within the internal placement, their supervisor in person and/or through the use of audio or videotaping observes students. During the external placement, the university supervisor completes at least one site-visit in which the student is observed engaging in a professional activity. Practicum students are also evaluated by their field supervisor using the Practicum Evaluation Form. This form measures many of the specific objectives of the program that are focused on data-based decision-making. Practicum students are required to complete assessment activities (a minimum of 4 cases), consultation cases (a minimum of 2 cases), counseling cases (a minimum of 2),

4 and two presentations (assessment instrument presentation and intervention presentation) to classmates. Materials submitted during both the internal and external practicum placements are reviewed and maintained as part of the student s portfolio (see School Psychology Program Handbook, pp for a copy of the portfolio log form). Interns are also evaluated on data-based decision making items by their field supervisor (see Intern Evaluation Form) and submit samples of their work to the University for inclusion in the portfolio. Interns are required to complete assessment cases (a minimum of 4), a teacher consultation case, a parent consultation case, an academic intervention case, a behavioral intervention case, individual counseling cases (a minimum of 4), a group therapy, and an inservice presentation. Thesis projects are another measure of data-based decision making and accountability. Students have two formal assessments associated with the thesis project. Students must pass a thesis prospectus examination (see Department of Psychology Graduate Handbook, pp. 7-9). At the thesis prospectus meeting students are evaluated on several facets of their oral and written presentation of the project (Thesis Prospectus Evaluation Forms). Students must also pass a final oral defense of their completed thesis project. Alumni surveys are also used to evaluate students data-based decision making and accountability knowledge and skills (Alumni Survey, questions 6 and 10a). Finally, although the PRAXIS II school psychology specialty exam is not required in the program, most students complete the examination as part of their requirements for licensure or certification. The PRAXIS II scores provide a global assessment of overall training across all NASP domains. These scores are monitored to ensure that graduates of the program are able to meet state and local standards for credentialing in the field. Attained: Data indicate that the program provides adequate training in data-based decision making and accountability. Grades in the courses listed above were satisfactory. A few students made Cs in Assessment I (Psy 661) or Statistics (Psy 651); however, most performed in the A or B range in all courses (see Grade Summary Sheet). Students performing in the C range for Assessment I or Statistics course are able to perform in the A to B range in Assessment II and Advanced Research: Proposal Writing, suggesting mastery over basic skills in assessment and research methods. Practicum students in the academic year logged an average of hours in assessment and hours in research, both of which are measures of data-based decision making activities. Interns in the academic year logged an average of hours in assessment and hours in research (see Intern and Practicum Log Summary). Results of practicum evaluations for the and academic years revealed means scores of: (Column B) assessment skills 4.38 and 4.72 respectively and (Column D) intervention skills 4.47 and 4.48 respectively. Results of intern evaluations for the and academic years revealed (Column B) assessment skills 4.82 and 4.89 respectively and (Column D) intervention skills 4.69 and 4.82 respectively. All students in the 2005 graduating class successfully passed their oral thesis defense.

5 Students in the 2006 graduating class and 2007 graduating class have all passed their thesis prospectus examination. Results of the 2005 alumni survey had a mean score of 4.89 on Item #6 and a mean score of 4.67 on Item #10a. These ratings indicate that students feel well-prepared in areas related to data-based decision making and accountability. Eighty-three percent of the PRAXIS II scores for the 2004 and 2005 graduating class were above the national standard. One hundred percent for both classes scored above the state standard on the exam. 2. Consultation and Collaboration: School psychologists have knowledge of behavioral, mental health, collaborative, and/or other consultation models and methods and of their application to particular situations. School psychologists collaborate effectively with others in planning and decision-making processes at the individual, group, and system levels. Addressed: The program philosophy, goals and objectives (Knowledge Objective 1 and Ability Objectives 9, 11, 16, 18, and 22) clearly demonstrate the importance of consultation and collaboration in the program (School Psychology Program Handbook, pp. 3-6). The training program offers an entire class that is focused on consultation and collaboration (Coun 645). This course includes units on behavioral, mental health, and organizational consultation (see Appendix D11, Course Syllabi). Consultation and collaboration are also important components of other classes. Counseling (Coun 620) and Cognitive Behavioral Interventions (Psy 675) focus on important skills for establishing relationships and providing empirically based recommendations during consultative interactions (Appendix D10 and D5). Courses such as Professional Issues (Psy 673), Family Systems (Psy 678), and Advanced Educational Psychology (Psy 621) further provide foundations for consultation. During the internal practicum placement, students are expected to provide feedback to parents and consult with other professionals (e.g., teachers, psychologists in the community) to ensure that the client s needs are being met. The supervisor often observes feedback sessions and consultation meetings when students first begin working in the Psychological Services Clinic. Consultation is also a key component of external practicum placements and internship (see Course Syllabi). Site visits during practicum and internship also allow for assessment of consultation and intervention skills. Items on the Practicum Evaluation Form and Intern Evaluation Form assess specific aspects of consultation and collaboration. Assessed: The Consultation and Collaboration (Coun 645) course involves completion of two written examinations (mid-term and final exam) as well as a consultation project (see Course Syllabi). The consultation project involves actually forming a consultative relationship with an educator to start establishing basic skills in consultation. Courses such as Psy 675 and Coun 620 use role-playing activities to help establish basic skills in interacting with others such as establishing eye contact, paraphrasing, and other techniques. Practicum and Intern hours logged in consultative activities are recorded throughout their field experiences (see Intern and Practicum Log Forms). Practicum

6 students are required to submit two consultation cases for review in their portfolio. Interns are required to submit a parent consultation case, a teacher consultation case, an academic intervention case (which may be consultative in nature), and a behavioral intervention case (which may be consultative in nature). See Course Syllabi, for specific information about practicum and internship consultation cases. Practicum and Intern Evaluation Forms include an entire section devoted to the consultation and collaboration skills of the student. Alumni surveys also provide information about consultation and collaboration skills (see questions #7 and 10b). Finally, although the PRAXIS II school psychology specialty exam is not required in the program, most students complete the examination as part of their requirements for licensure or certification. The PRAXIS II scores provide a global assessment of overall training across all NASP domains. These scores are monitored to ensure that graduates of the program are able to meet state and local standards for credentialing in the field. Attained: Grades in the Consultation and Collaboration (Coun 645) course have been satisfactory for the past several years. No students have made a score below a B in the course during the last three years. Grades for Psy 621, 673, 675, 678, and Coun 620 have consistently been in the above average range (see Grade Summary Sheet). Practicum students in the academic year logged an average of hours in consultation. Interns in the academic year logged an average of hours in consultation (see Intern and Practicum Log Summary). Samples from practicum and intern portfolios also provide additional documentation that the students are trained in consultation and collaboration. Results of practicum evaluations for the and academic years revealed means scores of: (Column A) professional skills 4.77 and 4.60 respectively and (Column C) consultation skills 4.39 and 4.46 respectively. Results of intern evaluations for the and academic years revealed means scores of: (Column A) professional skills 4.59 and 4.76 respectively, and (Column C) consultation skills 4.70 and 4.73 respectively. Results of the 2005 alumni survey had a mean score of 4.22 on Item #7 and a mean score of 4.33 on Item #10b. These ratings indicate that students feel adequately prepared in areas related to consultation and collaboration. Eighty-three percent of the PRAXIS II scores for the 2004 and 2005 graduating class were above the national standard. One hundred percent for both classes scored above the state standard on the exam. 3. Effective Instruction and Development of Cognitive/Academic Skills school psychologists have knowledge of human learning processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of cognitive and academic skills. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, develop appropriate cognitive and academic goals for students with different abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve these goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions. Such interventions include, but are not limited to, instructional interventions and consultation.

7 Addressed: The program philosophy, goals and objectives (Knowledge Objectives 3 and 5 and Ability Objectives 9, 11, 14, 18, and 20) clearly demonstrate the importance of effective instruction and development of cognitive/academic skills (see School Psychology Program Handbook, pp. 3-6). Theories of human learning and cognition are addressed in several courses: Advanced Educational Psychology (Psy 621), Child and Adolescent Development (Psy 624), and Human Neuropsychology (Psy 548/648). Assessment courses (Psy 661, 663, and 664) also address issues directly related to learning and the assessment of cognitive and academic skills and the development of interventions (see Course Syllabi). Psychological Assessment I provides basic instruction in cognitive assessment and identification of strengths and weaknesses. Psychological Assessment II builds on this foundation to teach students additional cognitive assessment tools (including nonverbal), omnibus and diagnostic achievement measures, informal assessment techniques such as curriculum-based assessment and error analysis, and begins to train students in developing academic interventions based on assessment data. The Preschool Assessment and Intervention (Psy 663) course expands the training in assessment to birth through five, utilizes scaffolding approaches to the assessment of learning, and focuses on developing interventions based on the results. During the internal practicum placement, students are expected to provide feedback to parents and consult with other professionals (e.g., teachers, psychologists in the community) regarding cognitive and academic functioning. The supervisor often observes feedback sessions and consultation meetings when students first begin working in the Psychological Services Clinic. Consultation and intervention are also a key component of external practicum placements and internship (see Course Syllabi). All internships have been completed in the school system, and thus students have considerable opportunity to work with children and adolescents with and without disabilities (see Internship Syllabus, p. 1). Students complete consultation and academic intervention requirements during practicum and internship. Site visits during practicum and internship also allow for assessment of consultation and intervention skills. Items on the Practicum Evaluation Form and Intern Evaluation Form assess specific aspects of intervention and consultation. Assessed: Theories of human learning and cognition are assessed via traditional examinations, written assignments, and student presentations (see Course Syllabi). In assessment courses students are required to administer assessment measures, interpret assessment data and write results up in psychological reports. Psychological Assessment II requires students to integrate cognitive and academic information from multiple tools. It also requires students to develop academic interventions based on assessment data. Preschool Assessment and Intervention (Psy 663) requires students to submit videotapes of administrations of several instruments. The videotapes are used in class to teach students about the nature of assessing cognitive and readiness skills in young children. Practicum and Intern hours logged in intervention and consultative activities are recorded throughout their field experiences (see Intern and Practicum Log Forms). Practicum students are required to submit two consultation cases for review in their portfolio.

8 Interns are required to submit a parent consultation case, a teacher consultation case, and an academic intervention case. See Course Syllabi, for specific information about practicum and internship consultation cases. Practicum and Intern Evaluation Forms include an entire section devoted to consultation and collaboration and an entire section devoted to intervention. Alumni surveys also provide information about consultation and collaboration skills and intervention (see questions #7 and 10b-c). Finally, although the PRAXIS II school psychology specialty exam is not required in the program, most students complete the examination as part of their requirements for licensure or certification. The PRAXIS II scores provide a global assessment of overall training across all NASP domains. These scores are monitored to ensure that graduates of the program are able to meet state and local standards for credentialing in the field. Attained: Grades in Psy 621, 624, and 548/648 have been in the A and B range. No students in the program during the past three years have made below a B in these courses. In the assessment sequence, grades have also primarily been in the A to B range (see Grade Summary Sheet). Practicum average hours logged across areas during were as follows: consultation and intervention 16.19(see Summary of Intern/Practicum Logs). During the academic year, average hours logged across areas for interns were as follows: consultation and intervention Samples from practicum and intern portfolios also provide additional documentation that the students are trained in consultation and collaboration. Results of practicum evaluations for the and academic years revealed mean scores of: (Column C) consultation skills 4.39 and 4.46 respectively and (Column D) intervention skills 4.47 and 4.48 respectively. Results of intern evaluations for the and academic years revealed means scores of: (Column C) consultation skills 4.70 and 4.73 respectively and (Column D) intervention skills 4.69 and 4.82 respectively. Results of the 2005 alumni survey had a mean score of 4.22 on Item #7, a mean score of 4.33 on Item #10b, and a mean score of 4.50 on Item #10c. These ratings indicate that students feel adequately prepared in areas related to consultation and collaboration. Mean rating on Item #10c was 4.50, suggesting that alumni feel confident in their knowledge and skills related to Effective Instruction and Development of Cognitive/Academic Skills. Eighty-three percent of the PRAXIS II scores for the 2004 and 2005 graduating class were above the national standard. One hundred percent for both classes scored above the state standard on the exam. 4. Socialization and Development of Life Skills school psychologists have knowledge of human developmental processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social skills. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, develop appropriate behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social goals for students of varying abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those

9 goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions. Such interventions include, but are not limited to, consultation, behavioral assessment/intervention, and counseling. Addressed: The program philosophy, goals and objectives (Knowledge Objectives 3 and 5 and Ability Objectives 2, 3, 9, 10, 11, 19, 21, and 22) clearly demonstrate a training orientation related to socialization and development of life skills (see School Psychology Program Handbook, pp. 3-6). Child and Adolescent Development (Psy 624) and Human Neuropsychology (Psy 548/648) provide students with an understanding of human developmental processes (Appendix D, Course Syllabi). Students learn to assess these processes in courses such as Preschool Assessment and Intervention (Psy 663), Behavioral/Emotional Evaluation of Children and Adolescents (Psy 697) and Advanced Educational Psychology (Psy 621). Interventions focused on cognitive, behavioral, adaptive and social functioning are covered in courses such as Cognitive Behavioral Intervention (Psy 675), Counseling Children (Coun 620), and Consultation (Coun 645). A key component in the Psy 675 class is behavioral assessment, collecting baseline data, developing empirically based interventions, and monitoring/modifying interventions as needed. Internal practicum placements require comprehensive assessments for behavioral/emotional functioning. These placements also allow for behavioral consultation with parents and teachers, and in some situations for providing direct intervention services. External placements also provide opportunities to develop skills in assessing behavioral, emotional, adaptive, and social functioning. During field experiences (practicum and internship) students are required to engage in consultation related to behavioral/emotional issues and provide direct services (individual or group counseling). Assessed: Knowledge of socialization and development of life skills is assessed through traditional examinations, written assignments, and student presentations (Appendix D, Course Syllabi). Mock case studies in courses like Cognitive Behavioral Interventions (Psy 675) require students to develop detailed behavior intervention plans for children and adolescents. In assessment courses students are required to administer assessment instruments, interpret assessment results, integrate and write results up in psychological reports. Videotapes of student interactions with preschool children are used to teach about behavior norms and social engagement in young children. Practicum and Intern students log intervention hours throughout their field experiences (see Intern and Practicum Log Forms). Practicum students are required to submit two consultation cases for review in their portfolio. Interns are required to submit a parent consultation case, a teacher consultation case, and a behavioral intervention case (see Course Syllabi, for specific information about practicum and internship consultation cases). Practicum and Intern Evaluation Forms include an entire section devoted to assessment skills and an entire section devoted to intervention skills. Alumni surveys also provide information about behavioral assessment and intervention skills (see questions #6, 7 and 10d). Finally, although the PRAXIS II school psychology specialty exam is not required in the program, most students complete the examination as part of their requirements for licensure or certification. The PRAXIS II scores provide a global assessment of overall

10 training across all NASP domains. These scores are monitored to ensure that graduates of the program are able to meet state and local standards for credentialing in the field. Attained: Grades in Psy 621, 624, 548/648, 675, 697 and Coun 620 and 645 have been excellent (see Grade Summary Sheet). The majority of students (over 94%) have also made a B or higher in Psy 663 during the past three years. Practicum average hours logged across areas during were as follows: assessment (97.97), consultation and intervention (see Appendix E4, Summary of Intern/Practicum Logs). During the academic year, average hours logged across areas for interns were as follows: assessment (626.87), consultation and intervention Samples from practicum and intern portfolios also provide additional documentation that the students are trained in consultation and collaboration. Results of practicum evaluations for the and academic years revealed mean scores of: (Column B) assessment skills 4.38 and 4.72 respectively, (Column C) consultation skills 4.39 and 4.46 respectively, and (Column D) intervention skills 4.47 and 4.48 respectively. Results of intern evaluations for the and academic years revealed means scores of: (Column B) assessment skills 4.82 and 4.89 respectively, (Column C) consultation skills 4.70 and 4.73 respectively, and (Column D) intervention skills 4.69 and 4.82 respectively. Results of the 2005 alumni survey had a mean score of 4.89 on Item 6, a mean score of 4.22 on Item #7 and a mean score of 4.50 on Item #10d. These ratings indicate that students feel adequately prepared in areas related to consultation and collaboration. Mean rating on Item #10c was 4.50, suggesting that alumni feel confident in their knowledge and skills related to Effective Instruction and Development of Cognitive/Academic Skills. Eighty-three percent of the PRAXIS II scores for the 2004 and 2005 graduating class were above the national standard. One hundred percent for both classes scored above the state standard on the exam. 5. Student Diversity in Development and Learning school psychologists have knowledge of individual differences, abilities, and disabilities and of the potential influence of biological, social, cultural, ethnic, experiential, socioeconomic, genderrelated, and linguistic factors in development and learning. School psychologists demonstrate the sensitivity and skills needed to work with individuals of diverse characteristics and to implement strategies selected and/or adapted based on individual characteristics, strengths, and needs. Addressed: The program philosophy, goals and objectives (Knowledge Objectives 2, 3, 5, 10 and Ability Objectives 1, 2, 5, 12, 14, 16, 19, and 22) clearly demonstrate a training orientation related to working with diverse groups (see School Psychology Program Handbook, pp. 3-6). Most courses integrate diversity issues throughout classroom content (see Course Syllabi). Lectures and discussions in class focus on the role of culture, ethnicity, and social factors in the experiences of individuals. Several classes include specific readings about the experiences of different diverse groups. The assessment

11 courses (Psy 661, 663, 664, and 697) focus on the importance of tailoring assessments to the needs of the individual and to the importance of non-discriminatory assessment practices. The Advanced Educational Psychology (Psy 621) course, the Child and Adolescent Development (Psy 624) course, the Professional Issues (Psy 673) course, and the Advanced Child Psychopathology (Psy 674) course all include units or readings related to working with diverse groups. The Advanced Educational Psychology course includes a unit on Individual, Developmental and Group Differences Among Students. Readings for this course focus on the dimensions and challenges associated with multicultural education. The Child and Adolescent Development course integrates readings on diversity into several units. The class focuses on the role of gender and ethnicity in the socialization experiences of children and adolescents. The Professional Issues class requires students to read and reflect on NASP publications such as Culturally Competent Practice. The Advanced Child Psychopathology deals with diversity in every section of the course. While students learn about various disorders and disabilities that are experienced by children and adolescents, the course also covers topics related to diversity in family situations (e.g., homelessness, teenage parents, sexual minority parents ), ethnicity, and sexual orientation (e.g., the experience of gay/lesbian/bisexual youth). Cultural issues are also addressed in other required courses such as Family Systems (Psy 678), Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions (Psy 675), Human Neuropsychology (Psy 548), Counseling Children (Coun 620), and Consultation and Collaboration (Coun 645). Practicum (Psy 686) provides classroom content that is focused on working with diverse groups. Students are required to read about topics such as students with different types of disabilities, working with linguistically diverse populations, and helping immigrant teenagers. Internship offers many students an opportunity to work with more diverse groups. Students often opt for internships in settings such as the Atlanta Public School System or Orleans Parish in Louisiana as a means of increasing their competencies in working with diverse populations. Practicum and Intern Evaluation Forms include specific questions that focus on diversity issues. Assessed: Courses assess knowledge of diversity in development and learning using traditional examinations, written products, and case studies. Courses such as Advanced Child Psychopathology (Psy 674), Cognitive Behavioral Interventions (Psy 675), and Counseling Children (620) require students to examine how different contexts such as ethnicity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and disability status are relevant in individual cases. Practicum and Intern Evaluation Forms include specific questions related to working with diverse groups. Alumni surveys also provide information about consultation and collaboration skills (see questions #5, 9 and 10e). Attained: Grades for students across courses in the curriculum have demonstrated adequate to excellent levels of performance. Since issues related to diversity are integrated throughout the curriculum, data across classes provide the best examination of grade performance by students in relevant classes (Psy 661, 663, 664, 697, 621, 624, 674, 673, 678, 675, and 548 and Coun 620 and 645). Practicum and Intern Evaluations have been very impressive with regard to diversity issues. An analysis of items related to

12 working with diverse groups reveals no scores below 4 for both practicum students and interns. Results of the 2005 alumni survey had a mean score of 5.00 on Item 5, a mean score of 4.67 on Item #9 and a mean score of 4.67 on Item #10e. These ratings indicate that students feel well-prepared for working with diverse groups. 6. School and Systems Organization, Policy Development, and Climate school psychologists have knowledge of general education, special education, and other educational and related services. They understand schools and other settings as systems. School psychologists work with individuals and groups to facilitate policies and practices that create and maintain safe, supportive, and effective learning environments for children and others. Addressed: As noted in the School Psychology Program Handbook (Appendix A1, p. 3) two important goals for students in the training program are to have a basic background in both psychology and education designed to provide a general theoretical and applied orientation in order to function effectively as a psychologist in an educational setting and gain an understanding of the educational system including the organization hierarchy, channels of communication, and how to accomplish goals within the educational system. Knowledge (#8) and Ability (#11, 16, 18, 20, 21, and 22) objectives reiterate the importance of these skills for students in the program. Professional Issues (Psy 673) and Advanced Educational Psychology (Psy 621) provide the most significant training regarding school organization, policy and climate. The Professional Issues class requires students to shadow school psychologists in the field in part, to help them understand the role of the psychologist in an educational context. Information about special education is integrated into several courses (Psy 673, 674, 661, 663, 664, 624, and 548/648). Students learn how to facilitate safe and supportive learning environments through readings in Professional Issues (Psy 673), Practicum (Psy 686), Child and Adolescent Development (Psy 624) and Cognitive Behavioral Interventions (Psy 675). Field experiences (external practicum and internship) require students to develop an understanding of the culture of the system they work in and to learn relevant policies and procedures for the school system. Assessed: Knowledge of this domain is assessed in classes through the administration of examinations, mock case studies, and written products (see Course Syllabi). Practicum and Intern Evaluation Forms include specific questions related to working in the school system. The evaluation domains of professional skills and responsibilities evaluate components of working in a school setting. Alumni surveys also provide information on School and Systems Organization, Policy Development, and Climate (see questions #5, 9 and 10f). Attained: Grades for students across courses in the curriculum have demonstrated adequate to excellent levels of performance. See Appendix C5 for information on grade performance in Psy 661, 663, 664, 621, 624, 674, 673, 675, and Coun 645. Results of practicum evaluations for the and academic years revealed means scores of: (Column A) professional skills 4.77 and 4.60 respectively and (Column E)

13 professional responsibilities 4.56 and 4.67 respectively. Results of intern evaluations for the and academic years revealed means scores of: (Column A) professional skills 4.59 and 4.76 respectively and (Column E) professional responsibilities 4.90 and 5 respectively. Results of the 2005 alumni survey had a mean score of 4.33 on Item #10f. 7. Prevention, Crisis Intervention, and Mental Health school psychologists have knowledge of human development and psychopathology and of associated biological, cultural, and social influences on human behavior. School psychologists provide or contribute to prevention and intervention programs that promote the mental health and physical well-being of students. Addressed: The program philosophy, goals and objectives (Goal 5 and Ability Objectives 9 and 22) identify the importance of the school psychologist in prevention, crisis intervention and mental health. This domain is addressed in the content of several different courses (see Course Syllabi). Students learn about human development in Child and Adolescent Development (Psy 624) and Human Neuropsychology (Psy 548/568). Advanced Child Psychopathology (Psy 674) focuses on psychological disorders in children and adolescents. The course includes information about biological and environmental (social/cultural) factors that influence the development and manifestation of psychological disorders. The course also covers social issues (e.g., teenage pregnancy, homelessness, ) that have the potential to significantly impact the lives of children and adolescents. Professional Issues (Psy 673) introduces the role of the psychologist in prevention and crisis intervention. This role is later reiterated in Cognitive Behavioral Interventions, where students use models from the book Best practices in school crisis prevention and intervention to address a variety of mock crisis situations. Counseling Children (Coun 620) also provides training in dealing with crisis situations such as suicidality in children. Practicum and internship offer many opportunities to apply prevention, crisis intervention, and mental health knowledge. Many of the direct services provided by interns include dealing with a crisis situation. Assessed: Knowledge of this domain is assessed in classes through the administration of examinations, mock case studies, and written products (see Course Syllabi). Students in Cognitive Behavioral Interventions are required to complete ten crisis intervention reflection papers. Practicum and Intern Evaluation Forms include a section on intervention. Practicum and Intern hours log intervention experiences throughout field experiences (see Intern and Practicum Log Forms). Practicum students and Interns are required to submit documentation of counseling interventions. Many of these interventions start with a referral for a crisis situation. (See Course Syllabi, for specific information about practicum and internship counseling cases). Practicum and Intern Evaluation Forms include an entire section devoted to the intervention skills of the student. Alumni surveys also provide information regarding Prevention, crisis intervention, and mental health (see question 10g). Finally, although the PRAXIS II school psychology specialty exam is not required in the program, most students complete the examination as part of their requirements for licensure or certification. The PRAXIS II scores provide a global assessment of overall training across all NASP domains. These

14 scores are monitored to ensure that graduates of the program are able to meet state and local standards for credentialing in the field. Attained: Grades for students across courses listed above have been in the A to B range. No students have made below a B in these courses during the past three years. See Grade Summary Log information on grade performance in Psy, 624, 548/648, 674, 675, and Coun 620. Average hours practicum students logged across during for intervention was 16.19, while interns during the same year logged on average intervention hours. Results of practicum evaluations for the and academic years revealed means scores for (Column D) intervention skills of 4.47 and 4.48 respectively. Results of intern evaluations for the and academic years revealed means scores for (Column D) intervention skills of 4.69 and 4.82 respectively. Samples from practicum and intern portfolios also provide additional documentation that the students are trained in consultation and collaboration. Results of the 2005 alumni survey had a mean score of 4.67 on Item #10g. Eighty-three percent of the PRAXIS II scores for the 2004 and 2005 graduating class were above the national standard (F7). One hundred percent for both classes scored above the state standard on the exam. 8. Home/School/Community Collaboration school psychologists have knowledge of family systems, including family strengths and influences on student development, learning, and behavior, and methods to involve families in education and service delivery. School psychologists work effectively with families, educators, and others in the community to promote and provide comprehensive services to children and families. Addressed: The program philosophy, goals and objectives (Goal 5 and Ability Objectives 11, 14, and 16) focus on home/school/community collaboration. Although, home school collaboration is emphasized in several courses (e.g., Psy 663, 674, 675), an entire course is devoted to working with families (See Course Syllabi). The Family Systems (Psy 678) course provides training in working with families. Internal practicum placements require students to consult with families regarding academic and behavioral issues. External practicum placements and internship have specific assignments related to parent consultation. Assessed: Evaluation in classes related to home/school/community collaboration involve examinations, written products, and mock cases. Internal placements for practicum often involve observation of student feedback sessions with parents. External practicum placements and internship require students to log the amount of time they spend engaged in consultative activities (see Intern and Practicum Log Forms). Practicum students are required to submit two consultation cases for review in their portfolio. Interns are required to submit a parent consultation case. They also submit a behavioral and an academic intervention case (which may involve consultation with parents). See Course Syllabi, for specific information about practicum and internship consultation cases. Practicum and Intern Evaluation Forms include an entire section devoted to consultation

15 skills. Alumni surveys also provide information about consultation and collaboration skills (see question 10h). Attained: Grades for the Family Systems class have been exceptional during the past three years. Over eighty-five percent of students have made an A in the course. Grades in other courses that focus on home/school/community collaboration (e.g., Psy 663, 674, and 675) have been average to above average. Practicum students in the academic year logged an average of hours in consultation. Interns in the academic year logged an average of hours in consultation (see Intern and Practicum Log Summary). Samples from practicum and intern portfolios also provide additional documentation that the students are trained in consultation and collaboration. Results of practicum evaluations for the and academic years revealed mean scores of: (Column A) professional skills 4.77 and 4.60 respectively and (Column C) consultation skills 4.39 and 4.46 respectively. Results of intern evaluations for the and academic years revealed means scores of: (Column A) professional skills 4.59 and 4.76 respectively, and (Column C) consultation skills 4.70 and 4.73 respectively. Results of the 2005 alumni survey had a mean score of 4.50 on Item #10h. 9. Research and Program Evaluation school psychologists have knowledge of research, statistics, and evaluation methods. School psychologists evaluate research, translate research into practice, and understand research design and statistics in sufficient depth to plan and conduct investigations and program evaluations for improvement of services. Addressed: Program goal #2 for students to have sufficient academic training to interpret and apply psychological and educational research in a critical manner and Ability Objective #17 for students to demonstrate application of knowledge of test theory, psychometric principles, and statistics in decision-making such that student assessment is appropriate and linked to intervention focus on the application of research methods to the practice of school psychology (see School Psychology Program Handbook). The program includes two specific courses that focus on research and program evaluation: Advanced Research Methods (Psy 651) and Advanced Research: Proposal Writing (Psy 652). These sequenced courses provide a foundation for understanding statistics, research methods, bodies of research literature, and program evaluation (see Course Syllabi). The program also includes a thesis project, which is detailed in the Department of Psychology Graduate Handbook. Practicum students and interns log hours engaged in research activities during their field experience. Assessed: Evaluation in Psy 651 and Psy 652 involves examinations and labs using SPSS for Windows. The thesis prospectus examination occurs during the spring of the first year. Procedures for the prospectus examination can be found in the Department of Psychology Graduate Handbook (pp. 7-9). Three thesis committee members independently complete the rating forms for the prospectus meeting (see Thesis Prospectus Evaluation Forms). The prospectus examination and the oral defense of the

16 thesis allow the student to demonstrate an understanding of a body of research, to explain and interpret research results, and to discuss implications of findings for society. Students are expected to demonstrate competence in explaining the intricacies of their research projects and the relevance of the project for the established literature. Both oral and written skills are evaluated as part of the prospectus examination and final defense of the thesis project (see Thesis Prospectus Evaluation Form). Practicum and Intern hours related to research activity are logged throughout their field experiences (see Intern and Practicum Log Forms). Alumni surveys also provide information about consultation and collaboration skills (see question 10i). Finally, although the PRAXIS II school psychology specialty exam is not required in the program, most students complete the examination as part of their requirements for licensure or certification. The PRAXIS II scores provide a global assessment of overall training across all NASP domains. These scores are monitored to ensure that graduates of the program are able to meet state and local standards for credentialing in the field. Attained: Over 92% of students obtain A or B grades in the first research methods course (Psy 651). Historically, at least one student in a cohort will struggle with the course. During the and all students were able to successfully pass their thesis prospectus meeting (Note: two attempts for passing the prospectus are allowed although most students pass on the first attempt). All of these same students also were able to successfully defend their thesis project and graduated on time. Practicum students logged an average of hours for research, while interns logged an average of hours for research. Results of the 2005 alumni survey had a mean score of 4.67 on Item #10i. Eighty-three percent of the PRAXIS II scores for the 2004 and 2005 graduating class were above the national standard (F7). One hundred percent for both classes scored above the state standard on the exam. 10. School Psychology Practice and Development school psychologists have knowledge of the history and foundations of their profession; of various service models and methods; of public policy development applicable to services to children and families; and of ethical, professional, and legal standards. School psychologists practice in ways that are consistent with applicable standards, are involved in their profession, and have the knowledge and skills needed to acquire career-long professional development. Addressed: Program goals and objectives (Knowledge Objectives 4 and 8 and Ability Objective 15) stress the importance of professional issues in school psychology (see School Psychology Program Handbook). Although school psychology practice and development are addressed throughout the program, the Professional Issues (Psy 673) course provides the most comprehensive coverage of this domain. This course is designed to teach students about the roles and functions of school psychologists, relevant legal and ethical standards that govern the field, and about how policy is developed within the educational system (see Course Syllabi). Students learn additional information about such as legal and ethical issues in other courses (e.g., Psy 621, 661, 663, 664, 674, 675). Practicum and internship are designed to reinforce training in professional issues. Knowledge and skills in these areas are monitored by supervisor evaluations.

17 Assessed: The professional issues class (Psy 673) includes examinations, critical issues reports, shadowing experiences, and in-class discussions (see Course Syllabi). Students completing their external practicum placement are required to obtain a copy of all relevant rules and regulations for their agency during the first two weeks of class (see syllabus, p.4). Practicum and intern evaluations include an entire section that is specific to professional responsibilities. Alumni surveys also address training in professional behaviors (see Items #8 and 10j). Attained: During the past three years, students have performed exceptionally well in the Professional Issues class. One hundred percent of the students have made As in this class. Results of practicum evaluations for the and academic years revealed means scores of: (Column A) professional skills 4.77 and 4.60 respectively and (Column E) professional responsibilities 4.56 and 4.67 respectively. Results of intern evaluations for the and academic years revealed means scores of: (Column A) professional skills 4.59 and 4.76 respectively and (Column E) professional responsibilities 4.90 and 5 respectively. Results of the 2005 alumni survey had a mean score of 4.17 on Item #8 and a mean score of 4.83 on #10j. Eighty-three percent of the PRAXIS II scores for the 2004 and 2005 graduating class were above the national standard. One hundred percent for both classes scored above the state standard on the exam. 11. Information Technology school psychologists have knowledge of information sources and technology relevant to their work. School psychologists access, evaluate, and utilize information sources and technology in ways that safeguard or enhance the quality of services. Addressed: The program has one specific ability objective related to information technology. The objective states that the student will demonstrate the ability to apply modern technology in the field of school psychology (see School Psychology Program Handbook, p. 6). Information technology skills in the program that are emphasized include use of Microsoft Office programs (e.g., Word, Excel, Power Point), and internet searches, computer scoring for assessment instruments, use of WebCT for discussion boards and assignment submissions, and statistical analysis using SPSS for Windows. All classes that include written products require students to use a computer for word processing. Psychological Assessment II (Psy 664) and Behavioral/Emotional Evaluation of Children and Adolescents (Psy 697) require proficiency in computer scoring when software is available in the department (see Course Syllabi). These skills are also expected for the internal practicum placement. Select courses (e.g., Psy 674, 697) require students to use WebCT for , discussion boards, and submission of written assignments. The research methods sequence (Psy 651 and 652) require students to purchase the most recent SPSS package for Windows that is available to students. Students are expected to analyze statistical data related to class assignments and the thesis project.

18 Assessed: Information technology is often assessed in subtle ways, such as requirements related to word processing of all written products or requirements of Power Point presentations. In courses that have specific information technology criteria, such as those that use WebCT for course maintenance, dropboxes for assignments close at a specified time. Students that are unable to use the WebCT program would be unable to succeed in these courses. Computer scoring for assessment classes or clinic cases is closely monitored to ensure accuracy of information for psychological reports. For the research methods sequence, students can be assessed through examinations and lab activities related to use of SPSS for data analysis. The thesis project also allows an opportunity to assess students ability to analyze data using a computer program. Alumni surveys also address training in professional behaviors (see Item 10k). Attained: Grades in courses that require knowledge of information technology (Psy 651, 652, 664, 674, 697) have been acceptable. Results of the 2005 alumni survey had a mean score of 4.33 on #10k.

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