CURRICULUM FOR STUDENTS WITHOUT A CRIMINAL JUSTICE-RELATED GRADUATE DEGREE. Introduction

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1 CURRICULUM FOR STUDENTS WITHOUT A CRIMINAL JUSTICE-RELATED GRADUATE DEGREE Introduction Students who enter the program without a graduate degree in Criminal Justice (a prerequisite for the Criminal Justice Specialization) or a closely aligned criminal justice discipline) complete a sequence of three criminal justice core KAMs designed to provide a foundational criminal justice knowledge and perspective in the areas of societal development, human behavior, and organizational and social systems. Following the completion of the foundation courses listed below, students complete the online research sequence and the three advanced specialization KAMs (V-VII in criminal justice). Rationale for the Three Core Courses for Criminal Justice Criminal Justice has emerged as a growing professional discipline over the past 35 to 40 years. With the social and political changes that emerged from the 1960s, the criminal justice system was recognized as a primary locus of both resistance and platform of social change in the US. In 1967, the President's Commission on Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice opened the door to a new era of guidance, which led to legislation that provided support for research, education and improvements in the full spectrum of the Criminal Justice System. From that time and during the period that followed, the field of Criminal Justice has grown into a major arena of human service. The recognition of the interrelated aspects of the cognitive areas of Police, Courts, Correctional, and Juvenile Justice services, as well as the perspectives of victimology, race, gender and lifestyle, and cultural issues and the development of these concept within General Systems theory has lead to a explosion of innovation in program planning, evaluation, and research in the Criminal Justice Field. As the Criminal Justice field has matured, there is now a need for graduate level educational programs that educate professionals within the field in the theoretical, and practical application of new and innovative concepts that support positive social change. Also, the field is attracting those from other fields, who wish to pursue a doctoral degree in Criminal Justice. The purpose of this draft is to create a general framework in criminal justice designed for students without a graduate degree in criminal justice or an aligned field to complete their advanced study of Criminal Justice in the pursuit of the Ph.D. Degree in Human Services at Walden University. 1

2 KAM I PRINCIPLES OF SOCIETAL DEVELOPMENT (14 total credit hours) Breadth: SBSF 8110 Theories of Societal Development (5 cr.) HUMN 8120 Current Research in Societal Development: Criminal Justice (5 cr.) Expected Learning Objectives The purpose of the Depth Component is to direct your analysis and explanation of social and cultural change in contemporary situations. For this analysis you are expected to use theoretical and conceptual models discovered in the Breadth Component combined with imperial findings from current research in the cognitive area of the Criminal Justice System that represents your chosen professional or research perspective. You are expected to demonstrate your ability to use both theory and research to critically analyze and explain the phenomenon of change in a specific criminal justice setting that is central to you as a scholar-practitioner. The challenges to the development of a safe, humane and civilized social order, dedicated to the highest ideals of human experience, confront us every day. Social and cultural change in a free society present issues and problems that require informed, intelligent, and skilled research and analytical interventions. As professionals in the Criminal Justice System, you are responsible for a wide range of human services that range from routine dally care to exceptional protection and intervention actions to protect large populations and societal and cultural assets. For the Depth component of this knowledge area, you should focus your study on an issue of social issue or area of personnel and professional interest for change that is central to your professional and research interest for further explanation and analysis. Examples If you are an administrator or student of administrative management, you may be interested in exploring the social and organizational effectiveness based on the inclusion of women and minorities in staff and professional positions in the organization. From a police perspective you may be interested in community policing, broken windows, or special crime and criminal issues. From the perspective of the Court system you may want to consider procedural issues, alternative sentencing structures, or special case features that demonstrate special offender or community needs. As a case worker, counselor, educator, or probation officer you might be 2

3 interested in analyzing the problems of a specific client group with respect to the issues of sentencing options, and retributive or rehabilitative interventions. In addition to these issues, you may want to examine community, demographic, economic, and political issues that provide a societal basis for the broad theoretical and philosophical foundations of the current application of criminal justice procedures in our post modern contemporary society. Your work must demonstrate high scholastic quality, demonstrate a sound knowledge of the theories of social change from the Breadth component and evidence of knowledge of current research findings. Bibliography Agnew, R. & Passas, N. (eds.) (1997). The future of anomie theory. Boston, MA: Northeastern University Press. Akers, R. (1994). Criminological theories: Introduction and evaluation. Los Angeles, CA: Roxbury Publishing. Akers, R. (1998). Social learning and social structure: a general theory of crime and deviance. Boston, MA: Northeastern University Press. Albrecht, H., & Kury, H.(1999). Crime, criminal law reform and corrections in times of social change. Freiburg, GER: Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law. Bandidos: The varieties of Latin American banditry.(1987). New York, NY: Greenwood Press. Brady, E. (Ed.). (2001). Culture and medicine in modern health belief systems. Logan, UT: Utah State University Press. Criminology: a Canadian perspective. (1987), Toronto, CAN: Holt, Rinehart and Winston of Canada. Chaos, criminology, and social justice: The new orderly (dis)order. (1997). Westport, CT: Praeger Chesney-Lind, M., & Shelden, R. (2003). Girls, delinquency, and juvenile justice (contemporary issues in crime and justice series). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. Cole, D. (2000). No equal justice: race and class in the American criminal justice system. New York, NY: The New Press. Criminology and social theory. (2000). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. 3

4 Curran, D., & Renzetti, C. (1994). Theories of crime. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon. Deviant designations: crime, law and deviance in Canada. (1983). Toronto: Butterworths. Dragan, M. (1987). Weberian and Marxist analysis of law: development and functions of law in a capitalist mode of production. Ann Arbor, MI: University Microfilms International. Ellis, L. & Walsh, A. (2000). Criminology: a global perspective. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon. Findlay, M. (1999). The globalisation of crime: understanding transitional relationships in context. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Friedrichs, D. (2001). Law in our lives: An introduction. Los Angeles, CA: Roxbury. Gottfredson, M. R. & Hirschi, T. (1990). A general theory of crime. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Greene, H., & Gabbidon, S. (2000). African American criminological thought. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press. Hagan, J., Gillis, A., & Brownfield, D. (1996). Criminological controversies: A methodological primer. Boulder, CO: Westview Press. Investigating difference: Human and cultural relations in criminal justice (1999). The Criminal Justice Collective. Boston: Allyn & Bacon. Jacoby, J. (2004). Classics of criminology (3rd ed.). Long Grove, IL: Waveland Press, Inc. Kappeler, V., & Potter, G. (2004). Mythology of crime and criminal justice. Long Grove, IL: Waveland Press, Inc. Lanier, M. & Henry, S. (2004). Essential criminology. Boulder, CO: Westview Press. Martin, S., & Jurik, N. (1996). Doing justice, doing gender: Women in law and criminal justice occupations, Vol. 1. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Messerschmidt, J.W. (1997). Crime as structured action: gender, race, class, and crime in the making. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Naffine, N. (1996). Feminism and criminology. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. 4

5 Pakes, F. (2004 ). Comparative criminal justice. Uffculme, Cullompton, Devon,UK: Willan Publishing. Pitch, T. (1995). Limited responsibilities: Social movements & criminal justice. New York, NY: Routledge. Readings in contemporary criminological theory. (1996). Boston, MA: Northeastern University Press. Reiman, J. (2003). The Rich get richer and the poor get prison: Ideology, class, and criminal justice (7th ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon. Smart C. (1995). Law, crime and sexuality: Essays in feminism. London, UK: Sage. The criminology theory reader. (1998). New York, NY: New York University Press. The legacy of anomie theory. (1995). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction. van Wormer, K., & Bartollas, C. (1999). Women and the Criminal Justice System: Gender, Race, and Class. Boston: Allyn & Bacon. Walker, S., & Spohn, C., & DeLone, M. (2002). Color of justice: Race, ethnicity, and crime in America (3 rd ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Way, N., & Chu, J. (2003). Adolescent boys: Exploring diverse cultures of boyhood. New York: New York University Press. Wright, R. A. (1988). 'Victim' and 'resister' conceptualizations of oppression: An assessment through a content analysis of the depiction of women in criminology textbooks. [s.n.]. Zehr, H. & Toews, B. (2004). Critical issues in restorative justice. Monsey, NY: Criminal Justice Press. Application: HUMN 8130 Professional Practice and Societal Development: Criminal Justice (4 cr.) Expected Learning Outcomes The purpose of this component is to provide the opportunity to create, initiate, or implement change, in a concrete situation within the criminal justice system. Upon completion of this assignment, you should have a renewed sense of your ability and role as an agent of constructive social change in this domain and of its larger societal implications. 5

6 Learning Resources There are no suggested readings for this assignment. Learning resources may include personal experience and observations, conversations with others involved in the change process, as well as some bibliographic references pertaining to the specific events or situations being described and discussed. Wherever relevant and necessary, theoretical and analytical insights may be gained by referring to the literary sources used in the Breadth and Depth components. Demonstration of Competence Complete one of the following: 1. Undertake a project in consultation with your faculty mentor/assessor to plan and implement change, either actual or planned, in a concrete Criminal Justice setting. A detailed description and critical evaluation of the project will be needed to complete this assignment. Examples: Develop a community-based offender intervention program that you are involved in or know of first hand. Implement a Neighborhood Watch initiative to promote citizen police interaction, reduce crime, and improve community cohesion and safety. Enhance a Community Policing effort by local police agencies, families, and church groups to other community groups to build positive relationships and communication between citizens and the police. Create a court intervention program to allow first offenders to receive an appropriate intervention such as detoxification, education, counseling, treatment, victim restitution or community service as an alternative to traditional criminal processing and punishment. Implement change in any other macro- or micro-level public policy issue in the community that impacts upon the criminal justice system, its agents or clients. 2. Describe and evaluate a program of the above type that took place in the recent past, in which you were personally involved or knew about first hand. 3. A major work you have previously completed such as a master s thesis, curriculum design, or professional project may demonstrate your ability to apply the theories, concepts, methods, and research findings that are the focus of this KAM. Such a demonstration of your competence may be submitted, along with a 10-page explanatory essay. This essay should 6

7 a. Explain how the project illustrated the processes of societal change and their theoretical explanations, as well as your mastery of this knowledge base, as well as b. Provide a brief rationale for the project, comment on how the situation might have changed since the project was first undertaken, and describe what to do differently if you were to plan and implement something similar now. Note: The expected length of this assignment is pages and is considered equivalent to 4-quarter credit hours of graduate work in a traditional program. 7

8 Bibliography Advances in criminological theory: volume 2. (1990). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction. Banks, C. (2004). Criminal justice ethics: theory and practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Barelli, J. (1986). On understanding the business of art and antique theft: and exploratory study. Ann Arbor, MI: University Microfilms International. Bumgarner, J. (2004). Profiling and Criminal Justice in America: A Reference Handbook. A B C-CLIO. Constitutive criminology at work: Applications to crime and justice. (1999). Albany, NY: State University of New York Press. Criminology as peace-making. (1991) Bloomington, IN: University of Indiana Press. Day, L. E. (1992). Social control in neighborhood contexts: A multi-level analysis of a multi-level theory of delinquency. [s.n.]. Ethical and social perspectives on situational crime prevention. (2000). Portland, OR: Hart Publishing. Felson M., & Clarke R. (1998). Opportunity makes the thief: Practical theory for crime prevention. London, UK: Research, Development and Statistics Directorate, U.K. Home Office. Geason, S. & Wilson P. (1990). Preventing graffiti and vandalism. Canberra, AUS/Monsey, NY: Australian Institute of Criminology/Criminal Justice Press. Integrating crime prevention strategies: Propensity and opportunity. (1995) Stockholm, SWE: National Council for Crime Prevention. Matthews, R. (Ed.) (1989) Privatizing Criminal Justice, Vol. 5. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Mauer, M., & Chesney-Lind, M. (Eds.). (2003). Invisible Punishment: The Collateral Consequences of Mass Imprisonment. New York, NY: The New Press. Of crime & criminality: The use of theory in everyday life. (2000). Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press. Petersilia, J. (2003). When prisoners come home: Parole and prisoner reentry. Oxford, UK: Oxford University. 8

9 Petrillo, M,. & DelBagno D. (2001).The new age of police supervision and management: A behavioral concept. [s.n.]. Pogrebin, M. (ed.). (2003). Qualitative approaches to criminal justice: perspectives from the field. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Policing change, changing police: international perspectives. (1996) New York, NY: Garland. Policy and theory in criminal justice: contributions in honour of Leslie T. Wilkins. (1990). Aldershot, UK: Avebury. Skolnick, J., McCoy, C., & Feeley, M. (2004). Criminal Justice (6 th ed.). New York, NY: The Foundation Press. Smith, W. R. (1984). The self-esteem of the incarcerated juvenile: a comparison of prisonization, importation and social control theories. Ann Arbor, MI: University Microfilms International. Sterman, C. & Bryant, M. (eds.) (2004). Criminal justice: retribution vs. restoration. Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press. Stojkovic, S., & Farkas, M.A. (2003). Correctional leadership: a cultural perspective. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thompson Learning. Walker, S. (2000). Sense and Nonsense about Crime and Drugs: A Policy Guide. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. Zaitzow, B., & Thomas,J. (2003). Women in prison: Gender and social control. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers Inc. 9

10 KAM II: PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (14 total credit hours) Breadth: SBSF 8210 Theories of Human Development (5 cr.) Depth: HUMN 8220 Current Research in Human Development: Criminal Justice (5 cr.) Expected Learning Outcomes In the Depth component you will explore a theory, concept, issue, theorist, or perspective about human development as it relates to criminal justice. The scope of human development for this KAM is intended to be sufficiently broad to include theories that inform us about staff and community member behavior as well as criminal behavior. You will locate, summarize, and analyze recent research that has been conducted to further enhance your comprehensive understanding of the topic. Learning Resources Select books and journal articles relevant to the topic you have selected. Include any other sources, such as government reports, legislation, court decisions, etc. to enhance your knowledge of the historical and current background of the topic. Your selected readings should span various disciplines, which may include psychology, sociology, political science, economics, and law, to develop an integrated approach to the human development process. You should include applicable studies and assess their findings. Examples Explore in detail a particular theory or theoretical perspective of human development as it relates to the development of criminal behavior or supports social change in response to crime. For example, choose a writer such as Maslow, Piaget, Skinner, Merton. Durkheim, Sutherland, Samenow, or a particular theory or theoretical perspective, and trace how subsequent researchers and writers have used, developed, enhanced, or contradicted the original ideas. Integrate the theories of development from various dimensions of individual processes (biological, social and cultural, cognitive and moral, or psychological) into a developmental overview of a single stage or phase of life that describes or explains the development of criminal behavior. Two obvious choices are juvenile delinquency and the maturation of adult offenders. Analyze in depth specific developmental tasks and/or psychological crises and how they may be resolved. Give some attention to cultural and biological influences in this process. 10

11 Analyze a critical issue that is central to a particular stage of human development and crime in the community by presenting and analyzing the issue in light of developmental theory and criminological theory. Analyze and evaluate theories of developmental change from the perspective of a single area: biological, sociocultural, cognitive, or psychological in the development of a project to enhance the growth for either staff or offenders in your agency. Evaluate how cultures differ in their view of human development, and criminal behavior, particularly the expectations at various age or developmental levels. Demonstration of Competence 1. Construct an annotated bibliography of at least 15 recent journal articles related to the particular theory, issue, concept, or set of ideas you have selected for your analytical paper. 2. In a paper of about 25 pages that is based on the selected bibliography, write analytically about a particular theory, issue, concept, theorist, or set of ideas relating to human development that you wish to apply to your Criminal Justice professional setting. 3. Your writing should demonstrate the ability to acquire and integrate researchbased knowledge and to think analytically (compare, contrast, synthesize, critique, examine assumptions, evaluate, etc.). You should review the section in the introduction to the curriculum that describes expectations for the Depth section of Knowledge Area Modules. 11

12 Biliography Anderson, R. E., Carter, I. E., & Lowe, G. (1999). Human behavior in the social environment: Asocial systems approach (6th ed.). New York: Aldine De Gruyter. Biology and crime. (1979). Beverly Hills, CA: Sage. Bui, H. (2004). In the Adopted Land: Abused Immigrant Women and the Criminal Justice System (Criminal Justice, Delinquency, and Corrections Series.) (s.n.) Fillieule, R., & et al. (2001). Sociology of delinquency. [s.n.]. Gardner, H. (1999). Intelligence reframed: Multiple intelligences for the 21st century. New York: Basic Books. Gibson, M. (2002). Born to crime: Cesare Lombroso and the origins of biological Criminology. Westport, CT: Praeger. Hall, T. D. (Ed.). (2000). A world-systems reader: New perspectives on gender, urbanism, cultures, indigenous peoples, & ecology. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Hans, A. (2001). Biomedicine and alternative healing systems in America: Issues of class, race, ethnicity, and gender. La Crosse, WI: University of Wisconsin Press. Kelso, J. A. S. (1999). Dynamic patterns: The self-organization of brain and behavior. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Le Blanc, M., & Fréchette, M. (1989) Male criminal activity from childhood through youth: Multilevel and developmental perspectives. New York, NY: Springer- Verlag Publishing. Laub, J., Robert J. (2003) Shared beginnings, divergent lives: Delinquent boys to age 70. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Life-course criminology: Contemporary and classic readings. (2001). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning. Lilly, J., Cullen, F., & Ball, R. (2002). Criminological theory: Context and consequences (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Lamont, M. (Ed.). (1999). The cultural territories of race: Black and white boundaries. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. 12

13 Minty, B., & Ashcroft, C. (1987). Child care and adult crime. Manchester, England: Manchester University Press. Moen, P., Dempster-McClain, D., & Walker, H. A. (Eds.). (1999). A nation divided: Diversity, inequality, and community in American society. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. Norlin, J. M., & Chess, W. A. (1997). Human behavior and the social environment: Social systems theory (3rd ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon. Oyama, S. (2000). Evolution's eye: A systems view of the biology-culture divide. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. Paternoster, R., & Bachman, R. (2001). Explaining criminals and crime. Los Angeles, CA: Roxbury. Pillemer, K., Moen, P., Wethington, E. & Glasgow, N. (Eds.). (2000). Social integration in the second half of life. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press. Prigogine, I. (1984). Order out of chaos: Man's new dialogue with nature. Toronto; New York: Bantam Books. Shannon, L., McKim, J., Curry, J. & Haffner, L. (1988). Criminal career continuity: Its social context. New York, NY: Human Sciences Press, Inc. The new and the old criminology. (1978). New York: Praeger. Thelen, E. (1996). Development of cognition and action. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Thornberry, Terence P., (Ed.), (1997). Developmental theories of crime and delinquency. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers. Walsh, A., & et al. (2002). Biosocial criminology: Introduction and integration. (s.n.) Walters, G. (2002) Criminal belief systems: An integrated-interactive theory of lifestyles. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers/Greenwood Publishing Group, Inc. 13

14 Application: HUMN 8230 Professional Practice and Human Development: Criminal Justice (4 cr.) Expected Learning Outcomes In the Application component, you have the opportunity to integrate theory with practice by making concrete what you have been learning in the previous two KAM components. You should demonstrate and apply the knowledge that you gained from the Breadth and Depth sections of this KAM. Demonstration of Competence You are required to complete and submit a paper/project for this section of the KAM. Specifically, design a criminal justice program for a particular community group, or a developmental program for a criminal justice organizational staff using one or more theories or models of criminal behavior that include human development variables. 1. Your project should include an identification and critical assessment of the theories and research that you have been drawing upon from Breadth and Depth Components. Be sure to identify the name the theory that you are using and evaluate its applicability to the situation you are discussing. 2. You are encouraged to develop an action-oriented project involving a particular problem or issue relating to aspects of human development in the areas you have examined or touched upon in Breadth and Depth. 14

15 Bibliogaphy Alexander, C., Walton, K., Orme-Johnson, D., Goodman, R. & Nathaniel, P. (2003). Transcendental meditation in criminal rehabilitation and crime prevention. Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press Inc. Bernfeld, G., Farrington, D., & Leschied, A. (2001). Offender rehabilitation in practice. New York, NY: John Wiley Bertolino, B., & Schultheis, G. (2002). The therapist s notebook for families. Binghamton, NY: Haworth Clinical Practice Press. Chesney-Lind, M., & Pasko, L. (2004). Girls, women and crime: Selected readings. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Connor, D. (2003). Aggression and antisocial behavior in children and adolescents: Research and treatment. New York, NY: Guilford Press. Cullen, M., & Bradley, M. (2001). Inside/Out: Continuing to cage your rage. Lanham, MD: American Correctional Association. Fagan, T., & Ax, R. (2003). Correctional mental health handbook. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. DiGiulio, R.(2001). Educate, Medicate, or Litigate? What Teachers, Parents, and Administrators Must Do about Student Behavior. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, Inc. Evans, C. (1998). Casebook of Forensic Detection: How Science Solved 100 of the World's Most Baffling Crimes. New York: John Wiley & Sons. Greenwald, R. (2003). Trauma and juvenile delinquency: Theory, research and interventions. Binghamton, NY: Haworth Maltreatment & Trauma Press. Glick, B., & Sturgeon, W. (2001). Recess is over: A handbook for managing youthful offenders in adult systems. Lanham, MD: American Correctional Association. Grisso, T., & Schwartz, R., (Eds.), (2000). Youth on trial: A developmental perspective on juvenile justice. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. Hendriks-Jansen, H. (1996). Catching ourselves in the act: Situated activity, interactive emergence, evolution, and human thought. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Howell, J. (2003). Preventing and reducing juvenile delinquency: A comprehensive framework. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. 15

16 Latessa, E. (1999). Strategic Solutions: The International Community Corrections Association examines substance abuse. Lanham, MD: American Correctional Association. Masters, R. (2003). Counseling criminal justice offenders (2 nd ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. McCord, J., Widom, C., Crowell, Nancy A., (Eds.). (2001). Juvenile crime, juvenile justice. Panel on juvenile crime: prevention, treatment, and control. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. Milkman, H. (2004). Criminal conduct and substance abuse treatment for adolescents: Pathways to self-discovery and change. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Myers, L., & Jackson, D. (2002) Reality therapy and choice theory. Lanham, MD: American Correctional Association. Pogrebin, M. (2004). About criminals: A view of the offender s world. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Samenow, S. (2004). (revised and edited). Inside the Criminal Mind. New York: Crown Publishing Group. Sharp, B. (2000). Changing criminal thinking: A treatment program. Lanham, MD: American Correctional Association. Urquhart, J., & Cullen, M. (2004). Cage your rage for women. Lanham, MD: American Correctional Association. Yochelson,S. & Samenow, S. (1995). Criminal personality: The change process, Vol. 2. New York: Jason Aronson Publishers. 16

17 KAM III PRINCIPLES OF ORGANIZATIONAL AND SOCIAL SYSTEMS (14 total credit hours) Breadth: SBSF 8310 Theories of Organizational and Social Systems (5 cr.) Depth: HUMN 8320 Current Research in Organizational and Social Systems: Criminal Justice (5 cr.) Learning Objectives Unlike the Breadth component, where you were required to demonstrate your critical assessment of systems theory, the emphasis in the Depth component is an analysis of socially constructed reality, using systems theory and concepts. This component is designed to help you develop intellectual and analytical abilities to examine the Criminal Justice field and your profession and/or organization with its problems and challenges through systems perspective. The inquiries in the Breadth component have familiarized you with some of the basic assumptions in systems theories or systems analysis as applied to society as a whole or to some of its parts or subsystems, such as institutions, organizations, and professions. For example, one of these assumptions is that all social systems, including organizations or professions, are dynamic in nature and have a symbiotic relationship with the environment in which they exist. This notion of dynamic interdependence is also assumed in analyzing structures and processes within a single subsystem (organization or profession). To the extent that everything within a subsystem is assumed to be connected with everything else within it, if one element fails or falters, the whole system (or subsystem) fails or falters. Of course, the Criminal Justice System is not strictly systemic in character, and its subsystems are not as regular as natural and mechanical systems (e.g., the planetary system, a human body, or an automobile) are assumed to be. Nevertheless, systems analogies have provided social and behavioral scientists with a powerful heuristic device, along with a utopian vision of the future that assumes, perhaps somewhat naively, that the messy world could be made to run more orderly with proper planning. To successfully complete this component of KAM III, you must demonstrate systems logic and its theory and concepts to analyze the structures, process, problems, and prospects in the Criminal Justice System or your organization and the subsystem to which it belongs, e.g. Police, Courts, or Corrections, to arrive at some tentative conclusions as to the functioning and maintenance of the system. 17

18 Demonstration of Competence Complete all three of the following assignments: 1. Compile a bibliography of systems-oriented literature relevant to the Criminal Justice System and /or your organization. This bibliography must have at least 15 sources and should be drawn primarily from recent (within the last 5 years) articles in professional journals. 2. After reading the sources, provide a brief summary of each work and a brief critical analysis of each reading. Consult the reference section of a library and review relevant abstracts (e.g., Sociological Abstracts, ERIC, NCJRS, etc.), indexes (Social Science Index, etc.), encyclopedias, and specialized dictionaries, as well as the Indiana University Library. Arrange the bibliography in alphabetical order by author. 3.Use the research reflected in your bibliography in one of the following projects: a. Write an analytic paper applying systems theories to a problem or issue in your profession. The paper must demonstrate an ability to understand recent research on social systems and an ability to use research outcomes to analyze problems and issues in the application of Systems Theory to the Criminal Justice System. b. Individualized Project. You may choose to carry out an individualized and selfdesigned project. This assignment must demonstrate a broad command of systems theory literature. The project should be designed in consultation with your faculty assessor. Note: When preparing your learning agreement, remember that the Depth component ought to demonstrate intellectual inquiry equivalent to that expected in a traditional 4 quarter credit doctoral seminar. 18

19 Bibliography Ackoff, R. L. (1999). Ackoff's best: His classic writings on management. New York: John Wiley & Sons. Aldrich, H. (2001). Organizations evolving (2nd ed.). (2001). Beverly Hills, CA: Sage. Bailey, K. D. (1994). Sociology and the new systems theory: Toward a theoretical synthesis. Albany, NY: SUNY Press. Bales, R. F. (2001). Social interaction systems: Theory and measurement. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers. Banathy, B. H. (2001). Guided evolution of society: A systems view (contemporary systems thinking). New York: Plenum. Bates, F. L., (1997). Sociopolitical ecology: Human systems and ecological fields. New York: Plenum Press. Bausch, K. C. (2001). The emerging consensus in social systems theory. New York: Plenum. Buckley, W. (1998). Society--a complex adaptive system: Essays in social theory. Williston, VT: Gordon & Breach Science Publications. Bertalanffy, L. (1972). General system theory: Foundations, development, applications. London: Allen Lane. Bertalanffy, L. (1975). Perspectives on general system theory: Scientific-philosophical studies. New York: G. Braziller. Checkland, P. (1999). Systems thinking, systems practice: Includes a 30-year retrospective. New York: John Wiley & Sons. Cilliers, P. (1998). Complexity and postmodernism: Understanding complex systems. New York: Routledge. DeSwaan, A. (2001). Human societies: An introduction. Oxford, UK: Polity Press. Elliott, A. (Ed.). (2001). Profiles in contemporary social theory. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage. Etzioni, A. (1997). Modern organizations. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Fararo, T. J. (2001). Social action systems: a study in theoretical sociology. New York: Praeger. 19

20 Gruber, J., (Ed). (2001). Risky behavior among youths: An economic analysis. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. Hanson, B. G. (1995). General systems theory beginning with wholes: An introduction to general systems theory. Washington, DC: Taylor & Francis Publishers. Jervis, R. (2998). System effects: Complexity in political and social life. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Kim, D. H. (1999). Introduction to systems thinking. Williston, VT: Pegasus Communications. Kluver, J. (2000). The dynamics and evolution of social systems: New foundations of a mathematical sociology. Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers. Laszlo, E. (1996). The systems view of the world: A Holistic vision for our time. Cresskill, NJ : Hampton Press. Miller, J. G. (2001). Living systems. Boulder, CO: University Press of Colorado. Moore, M. (1995). Creating public value: Strategic management in government. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. Oshry, B. (1995/1996). Seeing systems: Unlocking the mysteries of organizational life. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers. Ott, J. S. (1997). Classic readings in organizational behavior. New York: Harcourt Brace. Parra-Luna, F. (Ed.). (2000). The performance of social systems: Perspectives and problems. New York: Plenum. Parsons, T., Shils, E. A., & Smelser, N. J. (2001). Toward a general theory of action: Theoretical foundations for the social sciences. NewYork: Transactional Publishers. Rasch, W., & Wolfe, C. (Eds.). (2000). Observing complexity: Systems theory and postmodernity. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press. Richardson, G. P. (1999). Feedback thought in social science and systems theory. Williston, VT: Pegasus Communications. Richmond, B. (2000). The "thinking" in systems thinking: Seven essential skills. Williston, VT: Pegasus Communications. 20

Curriculum Vitae 31 August 2004. CHRISTOPHER R. WILLIAMS, Ph.D. Email: cwilliam@westga.edu EDUCATION SUMMARY

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