Measured Performance of 5-GHz a Wireless LAN Systems

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Measured Performance of 5-GHz a Wireless LAN Systems"

Transcription

1 Measured Performance of 5-GHz a Wireless LAN Systems IEEE a systems take advantage of higher data rates and more frequency spectrum to deliver good range and improved system capacity performance. By James C. Chen, Ph.D. Atheros Communications, Inc. 529 Almanor Ave. Sunnyvale, CA (408) Abstract Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) have come a long way from their humble roots. What started out as a way for vertical industries to transmit data in warehouses and on the factory floor has grown into a cost-effective means for enterprises to network increasingly mobile workers for increased productivity. Last year approximately 7 million WLAN units were sold generating an estimated $1 billion market. While such results seem impressive, WLANs have yet to realize their full potential. Systems built to the IEEE a standard will soon appear in the market to take advantage of higher data rates and more frequency channels for even greater performance. In this paper, we will present, for the first time, measured 5-GHz a performance data. The range performance of 5-GHz a systems is measured in terms of data link rate and throughput. These results will then be used to calculate a system capacity. Here, a provides not only higher end-user speeds but also allows reductions in WLAN deployment costs. Atheros TM and The Air is Cleaner at 5GHz TM are trademarks of Atheros Communications, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Published 08/27/ Atheros Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. 1

2 1 Introduction Many events have conspired to produce the success of Wireless LANs. The advent of the IEEE b standard that achieved nearly Ethernet-equivalent speeds, the creation of the Wireless Ethernet Compatibility Alliance (WECA) as an industry forum that pushed for Wi-Fi TM interoperability amongst equipment vendors, and the decision by major notebook makers to integrate WLANs into mobile PCs for the mass market all played pivotal roles. Such efforts and trends will continue for a and for the future of WLANs. As Table 1 shows, U.S. F.C.C regulatory and IEEE standards bodies have laid a solid foundation for this future. Certain inherent advantages for a are evident in terms of more frequency spectrum, higher data rates, and more advanced modulation techniques. As such, the resulting benefits to a users are very compelling and should be carefully studied and understood a b Standard Approved September 1999 September 1999 July 1997 Available Bandwidth 300MHz 83.5MHz 83.5MHz Unlicensed Frequencies of Operation Number of Non- Overlapping Channels GHz, GHz 4 (Indoor) 4 (Indoor/Outdoor) 4 (Indoor/Outdoor) 6, 9, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, 54 Mbps GHz GHz 3 (Indoor/Outdoor) 3 (Indoor/Outdoor) Data Rate per 1, 2, 5.5, 11 Mbps 1, 2 Mbps Channel Modulation Type OFDM DSSS FHSS, DSSS Table 1. Table of approved IEEE standards. Note that the a standard is just as mature as b. U.S. frequency spectrum regulations and number of non-overlapping channels are listed. Only U.S. F.C.C. regulations and frequencies are shown. This paper seeks to address two of these benefits range and system capacity. We begin by presenting measured a range performance in a typical office environment. Details with regards to the measurement setup and measurement environment are described. Measured data for link rate and throughput performance are presented. These are compared to measured b performance data as well. The measured range data is then used to calculate system capacity. These calculations are based on a published IEEE model and are repeated for both WLAN systems. The results point to the importance of having more non-overlapping channels, which allow a systems to have more system capacity due to less likelihood of interference from neighboring cells. Finally, we conclude with discussion on the benefits of a systems for the end user and IT manager in terms of higher speeds and lower deployment costs a Range Performance Many studies of a range performance have used theoretical link models and radio wave propagation characteristics to support their claims. While theoretical models allow for predictive capability, they nonetheless still do not offer real-world validation. This is especially true in environments where people and multi-path (i.e. a condition in which a transmitted signal reflects off many surfaces before arriving at the receiver) are present. Furthermore, all models depend on the performance of theoretical rather than real radio implementations. This paper will present, for the first time, measured 5-GHz a range performance data collected in a typical, office environment. Details of the measurement setup and resulting measurement results are explained below. Identical tests were repeated for a popular b product as well. The results indicate that a systems have similar range as b systems in a typical office environment but with 2 to 5 times higher data rate and throughput performance Atheros Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. 2

3 2.1 Measurement Setup The measurement environment was Atheros Sunnyvale office in California. This is a 265 foot by 115 foot rectangular facility with conference rooms, closed offices, and walls as well as semi-open cubicle spaces. For the a system, data was sent between two Atheros a PC Card reference designs. One card served as the fixed Access Point (AP) while the other served as a mobile station. Distances of up to 225 feet were measured. The a reference design used the Atheros AR5000 chipset and had an output power of 14dBm to the antenna for both the AP and the mobile station. The PC Card reference design used for the a AP included a reference design external antenna with an average gain of 4dBi. The b system under test comprised an Access Point and PC Card from a leading b manufacturer. This system had an output power of 15dBm to the antenna for both the AP and the mobile station. For both systems, the mobile station was moved to the same 80 random locations, which included open cubicle areas, various closed offices and conference rooms. At each location, the placement of the laptop followed a random orientation in order to be representative of actual use (i.e. users do not manually adjust the orientation of their mobile stations). A random orientation also lessened the advantages for any antenna gain with respect to a particular orientation. The same orientation at each location was used for both a and b systems in order to maintain a uniform comparison between the two systems. At each location, 100 broadcast (i.e. non-acknowledged) packets at each data link rate were sent from the Access Point to the mobile station. This was done in order to obtain statistically meaningful results. The packet size was fixed at 1500 bytes and no fragmentation was used. The mobile station then recorded how many of these packets were received successfully to compute a Packet Error Rate (PER). This measurement technique allowed close monitoring of the physical, link performance of both systems without being subject to performance effects due to variability in software (i.e. rate adaptation) or higher layer protocols and applications (e.g. FTP file transfer using TCP/IP). Again, the same measurement methodology was used for both the a and b systems. After all packet error rate measurements were taken, an optimal rate adaptation algorithm was used to determine the data link rate and throughput performance. This was applied to both a and b systems. Recall that at each of the 80 measurement locations, packets were sent at all data link rates (i.e. 6, 9, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, 54 Mbps for a and 1, 2, 5.5, 11 Mbps for b) and associated PERs were recorded. These PERs were then used to compute an effective MAC throughput for each of the data link rates. This calculation accounted for the MAC and PHY overhead and effect of packet retries. This calculation was based on specifications for inter-frame spacings, slot times, PHY overhead, etc. (An example of this calculation can be found in Appendix A and is summarized in Appendix B.) The best throughput was selected for each location and this process was repeated for all 80 locations. 2.2 Data Link Rate Results For each location, the optimal data link rate is defined as the link rate yielding the highest throughput. This determination was repeated for all 80 locations. This process was applied to both a and b systems to remove the effect of different software rate adaptation algorithms. For the data link rate measurement, a median filter was applied to the data from each of the 80 locations to smooth the data. The purpose was to produce results that provided a fair representation of the overall range performance. The use of the median filter means that at each link rate there are equal numbers of measured ranges that are less than as well as greater than the median values. The a and b median range performances are plotted in Figure 1 below. There are two main conclusions that can be readily drawn from Figure 1: a has similar range compared to b up to 225 feet in a typical office environment. 2. For all distances up to 225 feet in a typical office environment, the data link rates of a are 2 to 5 times better than b Atheros Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. 3

4 Other notable observations are that at the maximum measured distance of 225 feet, a yielded a 6 Mbps rate versus 2 Mbps for b. At the highest b 11 Mbps range (i.e feet) a still operated at a higher data link rate of 18 Mbps. Of course, at closer distances this improvement becomes larger. In actual use, many enterprises are deploying smaller cells with 65 feet radii. This is done in order for each AP to serve a smaller number of users thereby providing each user a higher speed. At 65 feet, Figure 1 shows that a furthers its speed advantage by delivering a 36 Mbps data link rate. Figure 1. Measured median range performance data for 1500 byte data packets indicates that the range of a is similar to b up to 225 feet in a typical office environment. At 225 feet, a systems were measured at 6 Mbps while b systems were at 2 Mbps. 2.3 Throughput Results Data link rates provide an insight into how WLAN systems trade performance for range. However, another important metric is throughput versus range. Throughput is the actual rate of information that can be transmitted accounting for various overheads. Throughput is dependent on several factors: data link rate (54 Mbps, etc.), MAC efficiency, measured packet error rate (PER), and packet size. Other factors such as efficiency of higher layer protocols (e.g. TCP/IP), collisions, and the number of users can also affect throughput but were not considered in this analysis. As previously described in Section 2.1, throughput performance was determined by selecting the best throughput at each location. This process was repeated for all 80 locations. The resulting set of 80 throughput data points was then binned and averaged to smooth the data. This methodology was repeated for both a and 802.1b systems under test and is plotted in Figure 2. There are two main conclusions that can be readily drawn from Figure 2: a has higher throughput than b up to 225 feet in a typical office environment. 2. For all distances up to 225 feet in a typical office environment, the throughput of a systems are 2 to 4.5 times better than b. More specifically, at the maximum measured distance of 225 feet, a yielded a 5.2 Mbps rate versus 1.6 Mbps for b. At more realistic deployment distances of 65 feet, a extends its speed to 21 Mbps versus 5.1 Mbps for b. These throughput results will be used in calculations on system capacity in the subsequent sections Atheros Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. 4

5 Figure 2. Averaged throughput performance data for 1500 byte data packets. The results indicate that a throughputs are always at least a factor of 2 times and up to 4.5 times larger than b systems up to 225 feet a System Capacity Benefits So far the discussion has been limited to measured performance between two nodes, one AP and a mobile station. In a real world WLAN deployment, there are many Access Points, each simultaneously serving many stations within a given area or cell. A more meaningful question that should be asked is, given a deployment of multiple APs, how much throughput does each user receive? To answer this question, we will need to introduce and discuss the issue of system capacity. System capacity refers to the throughput of an entire WLAN system comprised of many cells. Before we can begin a discussion on a system capacity versus that of b, we first need to understand the throughput of a singlecell WLAN network. 3.1 Single Cell Throughput For a single mobile station within a cell, the cell throughput is equivalent to the throughput received by the station. For multiple stations in a cell, the average cell throughput is divided equally among the stations (assuming equal sharing among stations). Based on the measured results of Figure 2 above, throughput of the cell is the highest when the mobile station is closest to the center of the cell, or AP, and lowest when it is farthest away. In between these extremes is an average throughput for the entire cell. This average cell throughput represents an average value that the cell can provide to a mobile station irrespective of its location within the cell. Based upon the measured results of the previous section, the average cell throughput of an a cell with a 225 feet radius in a typical office environment is 9.41 Mbps. This is a 3 times increase over the throughput of an b system (3.13 Mbps) in the same office environment. For a more realistic cell radius of 65 feet (or a cell size of 130 feet), a average cell throughput is 4.5 times that of b Mbps versus 5.1 Mbps. In other words, for an b system to provide the same amount of total throughput as an a system, more than four b APs would have to be deployed (each operating on a unique frequency) in the same area (see Figure 3 below) Atheros Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. 5

6 Figure 3. For a cell radius of 65 feet, more than four b cells would have to be overlaid on top of each other to achieve the same average throughput of a single a cell. This assumes that each b Access Point can operate on a unique frequency. In reality, this can never be accomplished since b systems can only operate on 3 distinct channels as mandated by the U.S. F.C.C regulations for the 2.4-GHz unlicensed band. 3.2 Impact of Co-Channel Interference (CCI) Unfortunately, the deployment scenario described in the previous section is not possible for b systems. The reason is that the fourth b cell would have to operate using one of the previous three channels. The sharing of the same channel between two adjacent cells reduces their average throughput. This effect is referred to as Co- Channel Interference (CCI). Conceptually, it is easy to understand that the key factor in eliminating or reducing CCI is to increase the number of available channels. Figure 4 illustrates this point for an 8-cell system deployed using a and b. The 8 indoor WLAN channels allotted for a by U.S. F.C.C regulations prevent any CCI in this 8-cell system. This is not the case for the 8-cell b system. Each channel has at least one additional CCI cell for an average of 1.67 CCI cells over all 3 frequencies. Figure 4. By virtue of having more channels, a systems will suffer less CCI than b systems. Hence, cell throughput will not be degraded in an a 8-cell system as it will in an 8-cell b system. Numbers inside each hexagon correspond to different channel frequencies. 3.3 System Capacity under CCI One way to evaluate the impact of CCI on average cell throughput is to use a model for system capacity. A system capacity model proposed in 1998 by NEC 1 to the IEEE WLAN standardization group was used. Measured range performance data from Section 2 was inputted into this model to make its results more indicative of actual a 1 Ishii, K. General Discussion of Throughput Capacity, IEEE , April 23, Atheros Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. 6

7 and b range performance. There are two mechanisms that model the effect of CCI on system capacity. The Clear Channel Assessment (CCA) mechanism describes the decrease in throughput that results when the Access Point inside a particular cell has to wait until the channel is available for transmission. The second, Hidden Cell mechanism models how transmissions from undetected cells can corrupt transmission, thereby lowering throughput. The system capacity model and measured range data were used to evaluate the system capacity for an 8-cell WLAN system depicted in Figure 4 above. An 8-cell system was chosen because it is representative of deployments in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Figure 5 shows the result of this analysis. For a typical cell radius of 65 feet (cell diameter of 130 feet), an a system provides over 8 times the average cell throughput (and therefore, 8 times the system capacity) of an equivalent b system. For a given number of users, each user on an a network would experience 8 times the throughput of a user on an b network. This increase results from the fact that there was no Co-Channel Interference in the a system due to the availability of 8 channels (802.11a systems have 8 indoor channels versus 3 for b according to U.S. F.C.C. regulations). Figure 5. Average cell throughputs for an 8-cell a system versus an 8-cell b system b systems have Co-Channel Interference and throughput suffers as a result. For a typical cell radius of 65 feet (a diameter of 130 feet), an a system provides 8 times the average cell throughput of an b system. The advantages of having more channels carry over to larger systems as well. In many-cell systems, such as those shown in Figure 6, a will have CCI cells but a fewer number than b. If we use channel 1 as the point of reference, the number of CCI cells at one cell distance, or first ring, away from the center cell is 0 for both a and b systems. If we extend this distance to the second ring, a continues to have no CCI cells, whereas b has 6. For the third ring, a will begin to have 4 CCI cells, but this value is 3 times less than b systems. The presence of additional channels has another benefit in reducing CCI. As shown in Figure 6, the distance between CCI cells is increased, and the likelihood of packets from different cells interfering with one another is therefore reduced Atheros Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. 7

8 802.11a b Figure 6. The number of cells that cause Co-Channel Interference is less for a systems due to the presence of more channels. Figure a system capacity advantages enable IT managers to deploy the same system capacity using fewer APs than an 8-cell b system. Alternatively, IT managers can deploy a higher system capacity using the same number of APs as an 8-cell b system. 3.4 Performance and Cost Implications In the previous section, we demonstrated how a can provide more system capacity than b due to the availability of more channels. This increase allows IT managers to trade off increased performance with lower deployment costs. This is illustrated in Figure 7 above. Total system capacity (average cell throughput multiplied by the number of cells in the system) is plotted versus WLAN deployment areas for both an 8-cell b system and 2001 Atheros Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. 8

9 different a systems with a varying number of cells. For a deployment area of 200,000 ft 2, a 3-cell a and an 8-cell b system provide approximately the same system capacity Mbps and 36.5 Mbps, respectively. However, a can accomplish this with 3 cells spaced 285 feet apart, whereas an b system requires 8 cells spaced 170 feet apart. This allows a systems to be provisioned with less AP infrastructure and lower installation costs. Alternatively, IT managers can also choose to deploy an 8-cell a system to increase system capacity to Mbps for the same 200,000 ft 2 area. In effect, each user now has 4 times more throughput. Figure 7 shows other options that are possible for a systems. 4 Conclusions In this paper, we have presented measured a performance data for range in terms of data link rate and throughput. We have used these measurements with an IEEE model to explain the advantages of more frequency channels on system capacity. To summarize, this paper has produced the following findings: a has similar range compared to b in a typical office environment up to 225 feet a has 2 to 5 times the data link rate of b in a typical office environment up to 225 feet a has 2 to 4.5 times the throughput of b in a typical office environment up to 225 feet a systems have more available non-overlapping channels than b. This allows a systems to have higher system capacity than b systems a has 8 times the system capacity of b for an 8-cell WLAN deployment a system capacity advantages offer choices for IT network managers. They can either provide the same throughput as b at lower AP deployment costs or provide increased throughput for similar AP deployment costs as b Atheros Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. 9

10 Appendix A: Throughput vs. PER Calculation 2001 Atheros Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. 10

11 Appendix B: Throughput vs. Date Rate and PER Summary 2001 Atheros Communications, Inc. All rights reserved. 11

Wi-Fi (IEEE b) and Bluetooth Coexistence Issues and Solutions for the 2.4 GHz ISM Band

Wi-Fi (IEEE b) and Bluetooth Coexistence Issues and Solutions for the 2.4 GHz ISM Band White Paper Wi-Fi (IEEE 802.11b) and Bluetooth Coexistence Issues and Solutions for the 2.4 GHz ISM Band Matthew B. Shoemake, Ph.D. This white paper presents information related to the IEEE 802.11b Wireless

More information

IEEE n advantage

IEEE n advantage Introduction IEEE 802.11n advantage Most current embedded devices that integrate 802.11 WLAN use the legacy 802.11b or 802.11g standards. The data rates offered by these methods have been deemed to be

More information

Wi-Fi and Bluetooth - Interference Issues

Wi-Fi and Bluetooth - Interference Issues Wi-Fi and Bluetooth - Interference Issues January 2002 1 Introduction Because both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth wireless technology share spectrum and will often be located in close physical proximity to one another,

More information

802.11n in the Outdoor Environment

802.11n in the Outdoor Environment POSITION PAPER 802.11n in the Outdoor Environment How Motorola is transforming outdoor mesh networks to leverage full n advantages Municipalities and large enterprise customers are deploying mesh networks

More information

Attenuation (amplitude of the wave loses strength thereby the signal power) Refraction Reflection Shadowing Scattering Diffraction

Attenuation (amplitude of the wave loses strength thereby the signal power) Refraction Reflection Shadowing Scattering Diffraction Wireless Physical Layer Q1. Is it possible to transmit a digital signal, e.g., coded as square wave as used inside a computer, using radio transmission without any loss? Why? It is not possible to transmit

More information

VOICE OVER WI-FI CAPACITY PLANNING

VOICE OVER WI-FI CAPACITY PLANNING VOICE OVER WI-FI CAPACITY PLANNING Version 1.0 Copyright 2003 Table of Contents Introduction...3 Wi-Fi RF Technology Options...3 Spectrum Availability and Non-Overlapping Wi-Fi Channels...4 Limited

More information

Wireless LAN Concepts

Wireless LAN Concepts Wireless LAN Concepts Wireless LAN technology is becoming increasingly popular for a wide variety of applications. After evaluating the technology, most users are convinced of its reliability, satisfied

More information

Site Survey Report MAH

Site Survey Report MAH Site Survey Report MAH Index 1. Introduction...3 1.1 Contact Information... 3 1.2 Scope of Survey and Spectrum... 3 1.3 Validity... 3 2. Report...4 2.1 Coverage... 4 2.1.1 Signal Strength vs. Signal to

More information

Wireless Ethernet LAN (WLAN) General 802.11a/802.11b/802.11g FAQ

Wireless Ethernet LAN (WLAN) General 802.11a/802.11b/802.11g FAQ Wireless Ethernet LAN (WLAN) General 802.11a/802.11b/802.11g FAQ Q: What is a Wireless LAN (WLAN)? Q: What are the benefits of using a WLAN instead of a wired network connection? Q: Are Intel WLAN products

More information

Spring 2014. Final Project Report

Spring 2014. Final Project Report ENSC 427: COMMUNICATIONNETWORKS Spring 2014 Final Project Report Evaluation and Comparison of WiMAX (802.16a) and Wi-Fi (802.11a) http://www.sfu.ca/~tlan/ensc427webpage.html Group #11 Tian Lan tlan@sfu.ca

More information

What is 802.11? Why are standards important?

What is 802.11? Why are standards important? What is 802.11? The 802.11 standards are a group of evolving specifications defined by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). Commonly referred to as Wi Fi the 802.11 standards define

More information

Performance Analysis of the IEEE 802.11 Wireless LAN Standard 1

Performance Analysis of the IEEE 802.11 Wireless LAN Standard 1 Performance Analysis of the IEEE. Wireless LAN Standard C. Sweet Performance Analysis of the IEEE. Wireless LAN Standard Craig Sweet and Deepinder Sidhu Maryland Center for Telecommunications Research

More information

SmartDiagnostics Application Note Wireless Interference

SmartDiagnostics Application Note Wireless Interference SmartDiagnostics Application Note Wireless Interference Publication Date: May 27, 2015 KCF Technologies, Inc. Background The SmartDiagnostics wireless network is an easy to install, end-to-end machine

More information

Whitepaper. 802.11n The Next Generation in Wireless Technology

Whitepaper. 802.11n The Next Generation in Wireless Technology Whitepaper 802.11n The Next Generation in Wireless Technology Introduction Wireless technology continues to evolve and add value with its inherent characteristics. First came 802.11, then a & b, followed

More information

Wireless LANs vs. Wireless WANs

Wireless LANs vs. Wireless WANs White Paper Wireless LANs vs. Wireless WANs White Paper 2130273 Revision 1.0 Date 2002 November 18 Subject Supported Products Comparing Wireless LANs and Wireless WANs Wireless data cards and modules,

More information

Optimizing Wireless Networks.

Optimizing Wireless Networks. from the makers of inssider Optimizing Wireless Networks. Over the past few years, MetaGeek has created tools to help users optimize their wireless networks. MetaGeek s tools help visualize the physical

More information

Understanding and Optimizing 802.11n

Understanding and Optimizing 802.11n Understanding and Optimizing 802.11n Buffalo Technology July 2011 Brian Verenkoff Director of Marketing and Business Development Introduction: Wireless networks have always been difficult to implement

More information

Bluetooth voice and data performance in 802.11 DS WLAN environment

Bluetooth voice and data performance in 802.11 DS WLAN environment 1 (1) Bluetooth voice and data performance in 802.11 DS WLAN environment Abstract In this document, the impact of a 20dBm 802.11 Direct-Sequence WLAN system on a 0dBm Bluetooth link is studied. A typical

More information

Which antenna for Wi-Fi?

Which antenna for Wi-Fi? Which antenna for Wi-Fi? Introduction Wi-Fi is a brand originally licensed by the Wi-Fi Alliance to describe the underlying technology of wireless local area networks (WLAN) based on the IEEE 802.11 specifications.

More information

Virtual Access Points

Virtual Access Points Virtual Access Points Performance Impacts in an 802.11 environment and Alternative Solutions to overcome the problems By Thenu Kittappa Engineer Author: Thenu Kittappa Page 1 Virtual Access Points... 1

More information

communication over wireless link handling mobile user who changes point of attachment to network

communication over wireless link handling mobile user who changes point of attachment to network Wireless Networks Background: # wireless (mobile) phone subscribers now exceeds # wired phone subscribers! computer nets: laptops, palmtops, PDAs, Internet-enabled phone promise anytime untethered Internet

More information

IEEE 802.11ac in Service Provider Wi-Fi Deployments: Consider More Than Speed

IEEE 802.11ac in Service Provider Wi-Fi Deployments: Consider More Than Speed White Paper IEEE 802.11ac in Service Provider Wi-Fi Deployments: Consider More Than Speed 2015 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public Information. Page 1 of 6 Contents

More information

WI-FI PERFORMANCE BENCHMARK TESTING: Aruba Networks AP-225 and Cisco Aironet 3702i

WI-FI PERFORMANCE BENCHMARK TESTING: Aruba Networks AP-225 and Cisco Aironet 3702i WI-FI PERFORMANCE BENCHMARK TESTING: Networks AP-225 and Cisco Aironet 3702i Conducted at the Proof-of-Concept Lab January 24, 2014 Statement of Test Result Confidence makes every attempt to optimize all

More information

Planning for 802.11ac Adoption with Ekahau Site Survey 6.0

Planning for 802.11ac Adoption with Ekahau Site Survey 6.0 Planning for 802.11ac Adoption with Ekahau Site Survey 6.0 1 P a g e w w w. e k a h a u. c o m / e s s Introduction to 802.11ac The emerging next generation Wi-Fi standard IEEE 802.11ac aims to break the

More information

EKT 331/4 COMMUNICATION NETWORK

EKT 331/4 COMMUNICATION NETWORK UNIVERSITI MALAYSIA PERLIS SCHOOL OF COMPUTER & COMMUNICATIONS ENGINEERING EKT 331/4 COMMUNICATION NETWORK LABORATORY MODULE LAB 5 WIRELESS ACCESS POINT Lab 5 : Wireless Access Point Objectives To learn

More information

Best Practices for High Density Wireless Network Design In Education and Small/Medium Businesses

Best Practices for High Density Wireless Network Design In Education and Small/Medium Businesses Best Practices for High Density Wireless Network Design In Education and Small/Medium Businesses White Paper Table of Contents Executive Summary 3 Introduction 3 Determining Access Point Throughput 4 Establishing

More information

It s not a Cable, It s an Antenna!

It s not a Cable, It s an Antenna! It s not a Cable, It s an Antenna! By Keith Blodorn Why would someone want a cable that acts like an antenna? After all, much research and development has gone into improving cable shields precisely to

More information

LoRaWAN. What is it? A technical overview of LoRa and LoRaWAN. Technical Marketing Workgroup 1.0

LoRaWAN. What is it? A technical overview of LoRa and LoRaWAN. Technical Marketing Workgroup 1.0 LoRaWAN What is it? A technical overview of LoRa and LoRaWAN Technical Marketing Workgroup 1.0 November 2015 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION... 3 What is LoRa?... 3 Long Range (LoRa )... 3 2. Where does

More information

Avaya WLAN 9100 External Antennas for use with the WAO-9122 Access Point

Avaya WLAN 9100 External Antennas for use with the WAO-9122 Access Point Avaya WLAN 9100 External Antennas for use with the WAO-9122 Access Point Overview To optimize the overall performance of a WLAN in an outdoor deployment it is important to understand how to maximize coverage

More information

Networks. Master of Science (Computer Science and Engineering), December 2004, 45 pp.,

Networks. Master of Science (Computer Science and Engineering), December 2004, 45 pp., Park, Sangtae, Optimal Access Point Selection and Channel Assignment in IEEE 802.11 Networks. Master of Science (Computer Science and Engineering), December 2004, 45 pp., 9 tables, 17 figures, 29 titles.

More information

Municipal Mesh Network Design

Municipal Mesh Network Design White Paper Municipal Mesh Network Design Author: Maen Artimy 1 Summary This document provides a wireless mesh network design for the downtown area of the Town of Wolfville, Nova Scotia. This design serves

More information

Chapter 7 Low-Speed Wireless Local Area Networks

Chapter 7 Low-Speed Wireless Local Area Networks Wireless# Guide to Wireless Communications 7-1 Chapter 7 Low-Speed Wireless Local Area Networks At a Glance Instructor s Manual Table of Contents Overview Objectives s Quick Quizzes Class Discussion Topics

More information

Interference Identification Guide. Table of Contents

Interference Identification Guide. Table of Contents Interference Identification Guide This document is a guide to help IT professionals optimize the performance of wireless networks by using spectrum analysis tools to identify sources of wireless interference.

More information

Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS) vs. Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) in Broadband Wireless Access (BWA) and Wireless LAN (WLAN)

Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS) vs. Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) in Broadband Wireless Access (BWA) and Wireless LAN (WLAN) FHSS vs. DSSS page 1 of 16 Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS) vs. Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) in Broadband Wireless Access (BWA) and Wireless LAN (WLAN) by Sorin M. SCHWARTZ Scope In 1997

More information

CS263: Wireless Communications and Sensor Networks

CS263: Wireless Communications and Sensor Networks CS263: Wireless Communications and Sensor Networks Matt Welsh Lecture 4: Medium Access Control October 5, 2004 2004 Matt Welsh Harvard University 1 Today's Lecture Medium Access Control Schemes: FDMA TDMA

More information

Omni Antenna vs. Directional Antenna

Omni Antenna vs. Directional Antenna Omni Antenna vs. Directional Antenna Document ID: 82068 Contents Introduction Prerequisites Requirements Components Used Conventions Basic Definitions and Antenna Concepts Indoor Effects Omni Antenna Pros

More information

CWNA: Official Certification Guide Unit 1 Introduction to Wireless LANs

CWNA: Official Certification Guide Unit 1 Introduction to Wireless LANs CWNA: Official Certification Guide Unit 1 Introduction to Wireless LANs Wireless LANs were once considered expensive and slow solutions to certain network connectivity issues. Wireless LAN sales are now

More information

Optimizing a Wireless Ethernet Radio Network

Optimizing a Wireless Ethernet Radio Network Optimizing a Wireless Ethernet Radio Network January 2009 / White paper by Telemetry & Remote SCADA Solutions Make the most of your energy Summary Executive Summary... p 2 Data Specifications Don t Tell

More information

SECTION 2 TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION OF BPL SYSTEMS

SECTION 2 TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION OF BPL SYSTEMS SECTION 2 TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEMS 2.1 INTRODUCTION Access equipment consists of injectors (also known as concentrators), repeaters, and extractors. injectors are tied to the backbone via fiber

More information

Radio Frequency (RF) Survey

Radio Frequency (RF) Survey Municipal Wireless Broadband and the Digital Community Report Radio Frequency (RF) Survey for the City and County of San Francisco July 21, 2006 Preface This document describes Civitium s findings and

More information

High-Density Wi-Fi. Application Note

High-Density Wi-Fi. Application Note High-Density Wi-Fi Application Note Table of Contents Background... 3 Description... 3 Theory of Operation... 3 Application Examples... Tips and Recommendations... 7 2 Background One of the biggest challenges

More information

Lecture 17: 802.11 Wireless Networking"

Lecture 17: 802.11 Wireless Networking Lecture 17: 802.11 Wireless Networking" CSE 222A: Computer Communication Networks Alex C. Snoeren Thanks: Lili Qiu, Nitin Vaidya Lecture 17 Overview" Project discussion Intro to 802.11 WiFi Jigsaw discussion

More information

Guide for Performing a Wireless Site Survey. 2.4 GHz IEEE 802.11g/802.11b/802.15.4

Guide for Performing a Wireless Site Survey. 2.4 GHz IEEE 802.11g/802.11b/802.15.4 Guide for Performing a Wireless Site Survey 2.4 GHz IEEE 802.11g/802.11b/802.15.4 1 Table of Contents Table of Contents 2 Introduction 3 Wireless Characteristics 3 AMX Site Survey Tools 5 Creating a Channel

More information

Troubleshooting Problems Affecting Radio Frequency Communication

Troubleshooting Problems Affecting Radio Frequency Communication Troubleshooting Problems Affecting Radio Frequency Communication Document ID: 8630 Refer to the Cisco Wireless Downloads (registered customers only) page in order to get Cisco Aironet drivers, firmware

More information

WiFi. Is for Wireless Fidelity Or IEEE 802.11 Standard By Greg Goldman. WiFi 1

WiFi. Is for Wireless Fidelity Or IEEE 802.11 Standard By Greg Goldman. WiFi 1 WiFi Is for Wireless Fidelity Or IEEE 802.11 Standard By Greg Goldman WiFi 1 What is the goal of 802.11 standard? To develop a Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) specification for wireless

More information

Cloud-based Wireless LAN for Enterprise, SMB, IT Service Providers and Carriers. Product Highlights. Relay2 Enterprise Access Point RA100 Datasheet

Cloud-based Wireless LAN for Enterprise, SMB, IT Service Providers and Carriers. Product Highlights. Relay2 Enterprise Access Point RA100 Datasheet Cloud-based Wireless LAN for Enterprise, SMB, IT Service Providers and Carriers The Relay2 Smart Access Point (RA100) is an enterprise-class access point designed for deployment in high-density environments

More information

WatchGuard AP Deployment Guide. WatchGuard AP. Deployment Guide AP100, AP200

WatchGuard AP Deployment Guide. WatchGuard AP. Deployment Guide AP100, AP200 WatchGuard AP Deployment Guide WatchGuard AP Deployment Guide AP100, AP200 About this Guide The WatchGuard AP Deployment Guide is a guide for deployment of a WatchGuard AP device with an XTM device. For

More information

Wireless Network Policy

Wireless Network Policy Wireless Network Policy Purpose Guide the deployment and integrity of wireless networking on the Kettering University campus to ensure reliable, compatible, and secure operation Protect the security of

More information

Crestron Best Practices for Installation and Setup of Crestron RF Products Reference Guide

Crestron Best Practices for Installation and Setup of Crestron RF Products Reference Guide Crestron Best Practices for Installation and Setup of Crestron RF Products Reference Guide The specific patents that cover Crestron products are listed at patents.crestron.com. Crestron, the Crestron logo,

More information

CWNA Instructor Led Course Outline

CWNA Instructor Led Course Outline CWNA Instructor Led Course Outline Enterprise Wi-Fi Administration, Outline v7.0 Introduction The Enterprise Wireless LAN Administration 7.1 course (which prepares students for the CWNA-106 exam), whether

More information

Antenna Deployment Technical Brief

Antenna Deployment Technical Brief ProCurve Networking Antenna Deployment Technical Brief Introduction... 2 Antenna types... 2 Omni directional antennas... 2 Directional antennas... 2 Diversity antennas... 3 High gain directional antennas...

More information

Express Forwarding : A Distributed QoS MAC Protocol for Wireless Mesh

Express Forwarding : A Distributed QoS MAC Protocol for Wireless Mesh Express Forwarding : A Distributed QoS MAC Protocol for Wireless Mesh, Ph.D. benveniste@ieee.org Mesh 2008, Cap Esterel, France 1 Abstract Abundant hidden node collisions and correlated channel access

More information

TL-WN620G User Guide 108M Wireless USB Adapter

TL-WN620G User Guide 108M Wireless USB Adapter TL-WN620G User Guide 108M Wireless USB Adapter Rev: 1.0.2 1910010034 COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS Specifications are subject to change without notice. is a registered trademark of TP-LINK TECHNOLOGIES CO., LTD.

More information

Understanding Range for RF Devices

Understanding Range for RF Devices Understanding Range for RF Devices October 2012 White Paper Understanding how environmental factors can affect range is one of the key aspects to deploying a radio frequency (RF) solution. This paper will

More information

Expert Reference Series of White Papers. Wireless Bandwidth Not Necessarily as Advertised 1-800-COURSES. www.globalknowledge.com

Expert Reference Series of White Papers. Wireless Bandwidth Not Necessarily as Advertised 1-800-COURSES. www.globalknowledge.com Expert Reference Series of White Papers Wireless Bandwidth Not Necessarily as Advertised 1-800-COURSES www.globalknowledge.com Wireless Bandwidth Not Necessarily as Advertised Ted Rohling, Global Knowledge

More information

White Paper. D-Link International Tel: (65) 6774 6233, Fax: (65) 6774 6322. E-mail: info@dlink.com.sg; Web: http://www.dlink-intl.

White Paper. D-Link International Tel: (65) 6774 6233, Fax: (65) 6774 6322. E-mail: info@dlink.com.sg; Web: http://www.dlink-intl. Introduction to Voice over Wireless LAN (VoWLAN) White Paper D-Link International Tel: (65) 6774 6233, Fax: (65) 6774 6322. Introduction Voice over Wireless LAN (VoWLAN) is a technology involving the use

More information

Indoor Path Loss. Contents. Application Note. XST-AN005a-Indoor June Link Margin...2. Indoor Communications...4. Situational Analysis...

Indoor Path Loss. Contents. Application Note. XST-AN005a-Indoor June Link Margin...2. Indoor Communications...4. Situational Analysis... Indoor Path Loss Contents Link Margin...2 Indoor Communications...4 Situational Analysis...5 Conclusion...6 Application Note XST-AN005a-Indoor June 2012 Website: Email: www.digi.com rf-experts@digi.com

More information

Wharf T&T Limited Report of Wireless LAN Technology Trial Version: 1.0 Date: 26 Jan 2004. Wharf T&T Limited. Version: 1.0 Date: 26 January 2004

Wharf T&T Limited Report of Wireless LAN Technology Trial Version: 1.0 Date: 26 Jan 2004. Wharf T&T Limited. Version: 1.0 Date: 26 January 2004 Wharf T&T Limited Version: 1.0 Date: 26 January 2004 This document is the property of Wharf T&T Limited who owns the copyright therein. Without the written consent of Wharf T&T Limited given by contract

More information

TL-WN310G 54M Wireless CardBus Adapter

TL-WN310G 54M Wireless CardBus Adapter 54M Wireless CardBus Adapter Rev: 1.0.1 1910010042 COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS Specifications are subject to change without notice. is a registered trademark of TP-LINK TECHNOLOGIES CO., LTD. Other brands and

More information

Best Practices for Deploying Wireless LANs

Best Practices for Deploying Wireless LANs Best Practices for Deploying Wireless LANs An overview of special considerations in WLAN implementations As wireless LANs (WLANs) continue to grow in popularity, particularly in enterprise networks, the

More information

Best Practices for Wireless Site Design

Best Practices for Wireless Site Design Best Practices for Wireless Site Design A Technology Whitepaper Table of ContentS Are Site Surveys Really Required? 1 AirMagnet Approach to Wireless Site Design 1 Phase I: Preparation Phase 1 Phase II:

More information

TECHNICAL NOTE. GoFree WIFI-1 web interface settings. Revision Comment Author Date 0.0a First release James Zhang 10/09/2012

TECHNICAL NOTE. GoFree WIFI-1 web interface settings. Revision Comment Author Date 0.0a First release James Zhang 10/09/2012 TECHNICAL NOTE GoFree WIFI-1 web interface settings Revision Comment Author Date 0.0a First release James Zhang 10/09/2012 1/14 Web interface settings under admin mode Figure 1: web interface admin log

More information

IEEE 802.11n Enterprise Class Wireless LAN?

IEEE 802.11n Enterprise Class Wireless LAN? Introduction Over the last decade Wi-Fi has advanced from a technology offering a maximum 2Mbps over-theair data rate, to 11Mbps and now to 54Mbps. The technology has been improved to include additions

More information

Interference Measurements on Performance Degradation between Colocated IEEE 802.11g/n and IEEE 802.15.4 Networks

Interference Measurements on Performance Degradation between Colocated IEEE 802.11g/n and IEEE 802.15.4 Networks Interference Measurements on Performance Degradation between Colocated IEEE 802.11g/n and IEEE 802.15.4 Networks Marina Petrova, Lili Wu, Petri Mähönen and Janne Riihijärvi Department of Wireless Networks,

More information

802.11n Wireless Technology Overview

802.11n Wireless Technology Overview 802.11n Wireless Technology Overview Deploying the Next Generation of High Performance Wireless Introduction In less than a decade, wireless LANs have evolved from an interesting idea to an indispensable

More information

Version Date Author Changes - 6/24/2005 D. Liff Initial draft and release 1.0 11/18/2005 K. Adkins Minor spelling and format changes 1.

Version Date Author Changes - 6/24/2005 D. Liff Initial draft and release 1.0 11/18/2005 K. Adkins Minor spelling and format changes 1. 1 Version Date Author Changes - 6/24/2005 D. Liff Initial draft and release 1.0 11/18/2005 K. Adkins Minor spelling and format changes 1.1 08/19/2008 D. Liff Added 802.11.n information 1.2 11/09/2010 J.

More information

Wiereless LAN 802.11

Wiereless LAN 802.11 Tomasz Kurzawa Wiereless LAN 802.11 Introduction The 802.11 Architecture Channels and Associations The 802.11 MAC Protocol The 802.11 Frame Introduction Wireless LANs are most important access networks

More information

Wi-Fi Why Now? Exploring New Wireless Technologies for Industrial Applications

Wi-Fi Why Now? Exploring New Wireless Technologies for Industrial Applications Wi-Fi Why Now? Exploring New Wireless Technologies for Industrial Applications Patrick McCurdy Product Marketing Manager Phoenix Contact Inc. pmccurdy@phoenixcon.com Ira Sharp Product Specialist Phoenix

More information

IEEE 802.11. André Stranne Lund University June 2003

IEEE 802.11. André Stranne Lund University June 2003 IEEE 802.11 André Stranne Lund University June 2003 IEEE 802 Background IEEE Computer Society Local Network Standards Committee Project 802 (IEEE sequence number for standards projects) First meeting 1980

More information

Technology for WiFi/Bluetooth and WiMAX Coexistence

Technology for WiFi/Bluetooth and WiMAX Coexistence Technology for WiFi/Bluetooth and WiMAX Coexistence Taiji Kondo Hiroshi Fujita Makoto Yoshida Tamio Saito (Manuscript received April 6, 2009) Mobile Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access () is

More information

The ArubaOS Spectrum Analyzer Module

The ArubaOS Spectrum Analyzer Module Tech Brief Enterprise The ArubaOS Spectrum Analyzer Module The ArubaOS Spectrum Analyzer Module Tech Brief Table of Contents Introduction... 2 Visibility into the non-802.11 Spectrum... 2 Features... 3

More information

On the Design and Capacity Planning of a Wireless Local Area Network

On the Design and Capacity Planning of a Wireless Local Area Network On the Design and Capacity Planning of a Wireless Local Area Network Ricardo C. Rodrigues, Geraldo R. Mateus, Antonio A. E Loureiro Department of Computer Science Federal University of Minas Gerais Caixa

More information

Tranzeo s EnRoute500 Performance Analysis and Prediction

Tranzeo s EnRoute500 Performance Analysis and Prediction Tranzeo s EnRoute500 Performance Analysis and Prediction Introduction Tranzeo has developed the EnRoute500 product family to provide an optimum balance between price and performance for wireless broadband

More information

Wireless LAN Networking White Paper

Wireless LAN Networking White Paper Wireless LAN Networking White Paper Introduction Wireless technology has helped to simplify networking by enabling multiple computer users to simultaneously share resources in a home or business without

More information

Demystifying Wireless for Real-World Measurement Applications

Demystifying Wireless for Real-World Measurement Applications Proceedings of the IMAC-XXVIII February 1 4, 2010, Jacksonville, Florida USA 2010 Society for Experimental Mechanics Inc. Demystifying Wireless for Real-World Measurement Applications Kurt Veggeberg, Business,

More information

Troubleshooting Range: Understanding the Cell Size. Jerome Henry, Senior Member, IEEE, Cisco Systems

Troubleshooting Range: Understanding the Cell Size. Jerome Henry, Senior Member, IEEE, Cisco Systems Troubleshooting Range: Understanding the Cell Size Jerome Henry, Senior Member, IEEE, TME @ Cisco Systems How Large is My Cell? Long ago, vendors used to be able to provide this Most don t provide cell

More information

... neither PCF nor CA used in practice

... neither PCF nor CA used in practice IEEE 802.11 MAC CSMA/CA with exponential backoff almost like CSMA/CD drop CD CSMA with explicit ACK frame added optional feature: CA (collision avoidance) Two modes for MAC operation: Distributed coordination

More information

Introduction to Wide-Area WiFi. AfNOG 2009 Wireless Tutorials Cairo

Introduction to Wide-Area WiFi. AfNOG 2009 Wireless Tutorials Cairo Introduction to Wide-Area WiFi AfNOG 2009 Wireless Tutorials Cairo Wireless networking protocols The 802.11 family of radio protocols are commonly referred to as WiFi. 802.11a supports up to 54 Mbps using

More information

EPL 657 Wireless Networks

EPL 657 Wireless Networks EPL 657 Wireless Networks Some fundamentals: Multiplexing / Multiple Access / Duplex Infrastructure vs Infrastructureless Panayiotis Kolios Recall: The big picture... Modulations: some basics 2 Multiplexing

More information

2.4GHz 802.11n Outdoor CPE Model:WLAN-LCCPE28-1

2.4GHz 802.11n Outdoor CPE Model:WLAN-LCCPE28-1 2.4GHz 802.11n Outdoor CPE Model:WLAN-LCCPE28-1 Features IP55 Rated Enclosure IEEE 802.11b/g/n Compliant Low Power Consumption Access Point, Client, PxP Modes Selectable Bandwidth Settings: 20/40MHz Applications

More information

CHAPTER 1 1 INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER 1 1 INTRODUCTION CHAPTER 1 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Wireless Networks Background 1.1.1 Evolution of Wireless Networks Figure 1.1 shows a general view of the evolution of wireless networks. It is well known that the first successful

More information

Protection Ripple in ERP 802.11 WLANs White Paper

Protection Ripple in ERP 802.11 WLANs White Paper Protection Ripple in ERP 802.11 WLANs White Paper June 2004 Planet3 Wireless, Inc. Devin Akin, CTO Devin@cwnp.com Copyright 2004 The CWNP Program www.cwnp.com Page 1 Understanding Use of 802.11g Protection

More information

HIPAA Security Considerations for Broadband Fixed Wireless Access Systems White Paper

HIPAA Security Considerations for Broadband Fixed Wireless Access Systems White Paper HIPAA Security Considerations for Broadband Fixed Wireless Access Systems White Paper Rev 1.0 HIPAA Security Considerations for Broadband Fixed Wireless Access Systems This white paper will investigate

More information

This KnowledgeShare document addresses the main types of wireless networking today based on the IEEE 802.11 standard.

This KnowledgeShare document addresses the main types of wireless networking today based on the IEEE 802.11 standard. Wireless Networking Q&A Increased use of laptop computers within the enterprise, and increase in worker mobility have fuelled the demand for wireless networks. Up until recently, wireless technology was

More information

From its inception in 1980, the IEEE 802

From its inception in 1980, the IEEE 802 IEEE 802.11 continues to expand. It s time to look at what this alphabet soup of a standard is all about. William Stallings IEEE 802.11: Wireless LANs from a to n From its inception in 1980, the IEEE 802

More information

The WiMAX 802.16e Advantage

The WiMAX 802.16e Advantage The WiMAX 802.16e Advantage An analysis of WiFi 802.11 a/b/g/n and WiMAX 802.16e technologies for license-exempt, outdoor broadband wireless applications. White Paper 2 Objective WiMAX and WiFi are technologies

More information

Chapter 2 Configuring Your Wireless Network and Security Settings

Chapter 2 Configuring Your Wireless Network and Security Settings Chapter 2 Configuring Your Wireless Network and Security Settings This chapter describes how to configure the wireless features of your DG834N RangeMax TM NEXT Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router. For a wireless

More information

Medical Device Connectivity

Medical Device Connectivity Medical Device Connectivity Most medical device manufacturers are implementing 802.11x wireless connectivity. This white paper will identify requirements and provide information to help ensure a successful

More information

WHITE PAPER. WEP Cloaking for Legacy Encryption Protection

WHITE PAPER. WEP Cloaking for Legacy Encryption Protection WHITE PAPER WEP Cloaking for Legacy TM Encryption Protection Introduction Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is the encryption protocol defined in the original IEEE 802.11 standard for Wireless Local Area

More information

Packet Queueing Delay in Wireless Networks with Multiple Base Stations and Cellular Frequency Reuse

Packet Queueing Delay in Wireless Networks with Multiple Base Stations and Cellular Frequency Reuse Packet Queueing Delay in Wireless Networks with Multiple Base Stations and Cellular Frequency Reuse Abstract - Cellular frequency reuse is known to be an efficient method to allow many wireless telephone

More information

Planning a Wireless Network

Planning a Wireless Network ProCurve Networking by HP Planning a Wireless Network Introduction... 2 Conducting a Site Survey... 2 User survey... 2 The workspace... 2 Obstacles to signal strength... 2 Security considerations... 2

More information

Intelligent Channel Bonding in 802.11n WLANs

Intelligent Channel Bonding in 802.11n WLANs Intelligent Channel Bonding in 82.n WLANs Lara Deek, Eduard Garcia-Villegas, Elizabeth Belding, Sung-Ju Lee, Kevin Almeroth UC Santa Barbara, UPC-BarcelonaTECH, Narus Inc. laradeek@cs.ucsb.edu, eduardg@entel.upc.edu,

More information

LTE in Unlicensed Spectrum: European Regulation and Co-existence Considerations

LTE in Unlicensed Spectrum: European Regulation and Co-existence Considerations 3GPP workshop on LTE in unlicensed spectrum Sophia Antipolis, France, June 13, 2014 RWS-140002 LTE in Unlicensed Spectrum: European Regulation and Co-existence Considerations Sari Nielsen & Antti Toskala

More information

LTE, WLAN, BLUETOOTHB

LTE, WLAN, BLUETOOTHB LTE, WLAN, BLUETOOTHB AND Aditya K. Jagannatham FUTURE Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur Commonwealth of Learning Vancouver 4G LTE LTE (Long Term Evolution) is the 4G wireless cellular standard developed

More information

Datasheet. High-Performance airmax Bridge. Models: NBE M5-19, NBE-M5-16. Uniform Beamwidth Maximizes Noise Immunity. Innovative Mechanical Design

Datasheet. High-Performance airmax Bridge. Models: NBE M5-19, NBE-M5-16. Uniform Beamwidth Maximizes Noise Immunity. Innovative Mechanical Design High-Performance airmax Bridge Models: NBE M5-19, NBE-M5-16 Uniform Beamwidth Maximizes Noise Immunity Innovative Mechanical Design High-Speed Processor for Superior Performance Overview Application Examples

More information

The cost and performance benefits of 80 GHz links compared to short-haul 18-38 GHz licensed frequency band products

The cost and performance benefits of 80 GHz links compared to short-haul 18-38 GHz licensed frequency band products The cost and performance benefits of 80 GHz links compared to short-haul 18-38 GHz licensed frequency band products Page 1 of 9 Introduction As service providers and private network operators seek cost

More information

EPI-3601S Wireless LAN PCI adapter Version 1.2 EPI-3601S. Wireless LAN PCI Adapter. (802.11g & 802.11b up to 108 Mbps) User Manual. Version: 1.

EPI-3601S Wireless LAN PCI adapter Version 1.2 EPI-3601S. Wireless LAN PCI Adapter. (802.11g & 802.11b up to 108 Mbps) User Manual. Version: 1. EPI-3601S Wireless LAN PCI Adapter (802.11g & 802.11b up to 108 Mbps) User Manual Version: 1.2 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION...3 2 FEATURES...3 3 PACKAGE CONTENTS...4 4 SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS...5 5 INSTALLATION...5

More information

Industrial Communication. WiFi in the 5 GHz Band

Industrial Communication. WiFi in the 5 GHz Band Industrial Communication Whitepaper WiFi in the 5 GHz Band Contents Introduction... 3 IEEE Standards... 3 ETSI Standards... 4 European Harmonization... 4 Dynamic Frequency Selection... 4 Transmission Power

More information

The influence of Wi-Fi on the operation of Bluetooth based wireless sensor networks in the Internet of Things

The influence of Wi-Fi on the operation of Bluetooth based wireless sensor networks in the Internet of Things Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Mathematics & Computer Science The influence of Wi-Fi on the operation of Bluetooth based wireless sensor networks in the Internet of Things Jermain C. Horsman B.Sc.

More information