Reading Through History

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1 Reading Through History

2 Primary Documents by Jake Henderson & Robert Marshall 2014 All images are taken from public domain. This includes images taken by employees of various US Government agencies; images published prior to 1923; or images that have otherwise been released to public domain. Please visit our sites at Reading Through History

3 The Emancipation Proclamation One of the most important things Abraham Lincoln did while he was president was issue the Emancipation Proclamation. What did the Proclamation say? Why is it so important? The Emancipation Proclamation was issued on January 1, It was an Executive Order announcing that all slaves in the rebelling states were to be freed. January 1, 1863 By the President of the United States of America: A Proclamation. Whereas, on the twenty-second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, a proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing, among other things, the following, to wit: "That on the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever free; and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to repress such persons, or any of them, in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom. "That the Executive will, on the first day of January aforesaid, by proclamation, designate the States and parts of States, if any, in which the people thereof, respectively, shall then be in rebellion against the United States; and the fact that any State, or the people thereof, shall on that day be, in good faith, represented in the Congress of the United States by members chosen thereto at elections wherein a majority of the qualified voters of such State shall have participated, shall, in the absence of strong countervailing testimony, be deemed conclusive evidence that such State, and the people thereof, are not then in rebellion against the United States." Now, therefore I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-in-Chief, of the Army and Navy of the United States in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and in accordance with my purpose so to do publicly proclaimed for the full period of one hundred days, from the day first above mentioned, order and designate as the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, (except the Parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James Ascension, Assumption, Terrebonne, Lafourche, St. Mary, St. Martin, and Orleans, including the City of New Orleans) Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia, (except the forty-eight counties designated as West Reading Through History Page 1

4 Virginia, and also the counties of Berkley, Accomac, Northampton, Elizabeth City, York, Princess Ann, and Norfolk, including the cities of Norfolk and Portsmouth[)], and which excepted parts, are for the present, left precisely as if this proclamation were not issued. And by virtue of the power, and for the purpose aforesaid, I do order and declare that all persons held as slaves within said designated States, and parts of States, are, and henceforward shall be free; and that the Executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of said persons. And I hereby enjoin upon the people so declared to be free to abstain from all violence, unless in necessary self-defence; and I recommend to them that, in all cases when allowed, they labor faithfully for reasonable wages. And I further declare and make known, that such persons of suitable condition, will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service. And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution, upon military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgment of mankind, and the gracious favor of Almighty God. In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington, this first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty three, and of the Independence of the United States of America the eighty-seventh. By the President: ABRAHAM LINCOLN WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State The Emancipation Proclamation did not free that many slaves at first. There were about 20,000 who were freed as soon as they order took effect. This was a small number compared to the 3.1 million slaves the proclamation actually applied to. Since those slaves lived in states that did not consider themselves to be a part of the United States, it was difficult to enforce the order in those areas. However, the Emancipation Proclamation had a major impact as the war progressed. Words to watch for: emancipation repress sincerely abstain First, the issuance of this Executive Order made slavery the key issue of the war. Prior to the Emancipation Proclamation, the primary goal of the war had always been preserving the Union. From that point forward, though, the focus of the war was abolishing slavery as well as preserving the Union. Additionally, as Union soldiers captured new areas, the slaves in those territories were immediately set free. The Emancipation Proclamation was not entirely popular when first issued. In fact, many thought the President was overstepping his authority. However, most foreign nations applauded the effort. In fact, because of this announcement, no foreign nation would consider recognizing the Confederacy as a legitimate nation. Page 2 Reading Through History

5 Multiple Choice: Select the choice that completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Who was the author of the Emancipation Proclamation? a. William Seward c. Abraham Lincoln b. Thomas Jefferson d. The author is unknown 2. For what audience was the Emancipation Proclamation written? a. The document was written to slaves in the rebelling states. b. The document was written to the leaders of the rebelling states. c. The document was written to the people of the nation as well as the world. d. The document was written to Lincoln s staff and not meant to be seen by others. 3. Which of the following correctly identifies the date that the Emancipation Proclamation was issued? a. January 1, 1863 c. July 4, 1776 b. January 1, 1836 d. July 4, How many slaves were immediately freed by the Emancipation Proclamation? a. No slaves were immediately freed. c. About 20,000 b. About 2,000 d. About 200, Which of the following correctly identifies the main impact of the Emancipation Proclamation? a. All slaves were immediately freed throughout the United States. b. It shifted the focus of the war from preserving the Union to abolishing slavery. c. It brought the Civil War to an almost immediate end. d. Several more states decided to join the Confederacy after it was issued. True/False: Indicate whether the statement is true or false. If the statement is false, write the correct word in the space provided to make the statement true. 6. The Emancipation Proclamation was a law issued by Abraham Lincoln.. 7. The Emancipation Proclamation announced that all slaves in loyal states would be freed.. 8. The Emancipation Proclamation should have applied to approximately 3.1 million slaves.. 9. As Confederate soldiers captured new areas, the slaves in those territories were immediately set free When it was first issued, the Emancipation Proclamation was not entirely popular.. Reading Through History Page 3

6 Guided Reading: Fill in the blanks below to create complete sentences. 1. The Emancipation Proclamation was issued by the of the United States of America all persons held as slaves within any State or designated part of a State, the people whereof shall then be in rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward, and forever and the Executive Government of the United States, including the military and naval authority thereof, will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons, and will do no act or acts to such persons The Emancipation Proclamation lists the following states as being in rebellion against the United States: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and. 5. However, the document excludes the forty-eight counties designated as the Executive government of the United States, including the military and naval authorities thereof, will recognize and maintain the of said persons. 7. In the Emancipation Proclamation, President Lincoln encourages all of those who have been freed to abstain from unless necessary for self-defense. 8. President Lincoln also recommends that those who have been freed to labor for reasonable. 9. President Lincoln also states that those who have been freed, if they are in good physical condition, will be received into the of the United States. 10. The Emancipation Proclamation was co-signed by. Vocabulary: Match each word with its correct definition. Consider how the word is used in the lesson. This might help you define each term. Use a dictionary to help if necessary. a. emancipation d. sincere b. repress e. abolish c. abstain 11. the act of being freed 12. genuine or real; earnest 13. to keep under control; restrain 14. to hold oneself back voluntarily 15. to do away with; get rid of Page 4 Reading Through History

7 Reading Comprehension & More: Select the choice that answers the question. 1. Which of the following best identifies the main theme of the Emancipation Proclamation? a. All slaves in states still loyal to the Union are to be freed. b. All slaves in the rebelling states are to be freed. c. Former slaves and free blacks are encouraged to join the military. d. Slaves who have been freed should abstain from violence except in self-defense. 2. Which of the following correctly identifies the tone of the Emancipation Proclamation? a. whimsical; it s lighthearted b. somber and serious c. thoughtful; similar to journal entry d. official; this is a legal document 3. Read the fourth paragraph of the Emancipation Proclamation. Based on the information in this paragraph, how does Lincoln define that a state is not in rebellion? a. A state that has members of Congress representing them are not in rebellion. b. A state that signed an oath of loyalty to the nation will not be in rebellion. c. A state that has met its yearly requirements, paying duties and taxes will not be in rebellion. d. A state that has freed its slaves will be considered a state that is not in rebellion. 4. Several times throughout the Emancipation Proclamation, it states that the only slaves to be freed will be those in rebelling states. Based on this information, which conclusion could best be reached? a. There were still slaves being held in states that had not rebelled. b. There were no slaves in states that had not rebelled. c. The slaves living in states that had not rebelled had no desire to be free. d. Only the rebelling states were experiencing a controversy over slavery. 5. Read the eighth paragraph of the Emancipation Proclamation. Based on the information in this paragraph, which of the following could best be inferred? a. President Lincoln knew that the former slaves would be good soldiers. b. Many feared that there would not be many former slaves in a suitable condition to enlist. c. The Union was in need of soldiers, so they were encouraging everyone who could enlist to do so. d. President Lincoln feared that there would be many former slaves who were not willing to enlist in the military. 6. Read the final paragraph of this lesson. Based on the information in this paragraph, which assumption could best be made about many foreign nations of that era? a. Many foreign nations were not interested in the American Civil War. b. Many foreign nations were opposed to slavery and would not support a nation where slavery was legal. c. Many foreign nations were still actively involved in the slave trade and did not appreciate Abraham Lincoln s strong stance against slavery. d. Many foreign nations were hoping to trade with the Confederacy because of their valuable cotton crops. Reading Through History Page 5

8 Summarize: Answer the following questions in the space provided. Attempt to respond in a complete sentence for each question. Be sure to use correct capitalization and punctuation! 1. Who applauded Lincoln s efforts with the Emancipation Proclamation? 2. What was the primary goal of the Civil War prior to the issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation? 3. When was the Emancipation Proclamation signed? 4. Which part of the nation did the Emancipation Proclamation apply to? 5. Why was the Emancipation Proclamation difficult to enforce? 6. How did some feel about the Emancipation Proclamation when it was first released? Student Response: Please respond to the questions raised below. A thorough response should be a paragraph of at least three to five complete sentences. 7. Why do you suppose Abraham Lincoln released the Emancipation Proclamation? Was he trying to gain support for the war effort? Or did he genuinely believe it was the right thing to do? Explain your answer. Page 6 Reading Through History

9 The Gettysburg Address Abraham Lincoln s Gettysburg Address is remembered today as one of the finest speeches ever delivered. What did the Gettysburg Address say? Was it always thought of this way? On November 19, 1863, Abraham Lincoln spoke at a dedication for the Soldiers National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. This event occurred a little more than four months after the Battle of Gettysburg during the Civil War. Lincoln was not the featured speaker at this dedication service. The main speaker was Edward Everett who delivered a speech which lasted more than two hours! Following these lengthy remarks, Lincoln delivered his address as a way of commemorating the actual cemetery. His remarks were very brief, consisting of only ten sentences, but they are remembered today as a masterpiece: Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth. Words to watch for: proposition devotion consecrate resolve Reaction to the speech was mixed. The crowd was quiet afterwards, with only mild applause. Some claim they were hushed into silence, while others argue they were not that impressed. Newspapers across the nation reprinted the President s words, along with their own evaluation. Some referred to the address as silly, shameful, and even ludicrous. While other reporters stated that the speech was a perfect gem and that Lincoln s words were deep in feeling. However, regardless of how his contemporaries felt, there are few today who question the power and effectiveness of Lincoln s words. The speech has been quoted countless times and will surely endure as part of the world culture for generations to come. Reading Through History Page 7

10 Multiple Choice: Select the choice that completes the statement or answers the question. 1. Who delivered the Gettysburg Address? a. Edward Everett c. Thomas Jefferson b. Abraham Lincoln d. Martin Luther King Jr. 2. For what purpose was the Gettysburg Address written? a. It was a letter of apology for those who lost family members at the Battle of Gettysburg. b. It was written to dedicate Shiloh battlefield as a national historical landmark. c. It was written to commemorate the Soldiers National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. d. It was written to open the festivities of an annual Thanksgiving dinner held at Gettysburg. 3. Who was the intended audience of the Gettysburg Address? a. Those who attended the ceremony that day were the intended audience. b. Lincoln knew that people all over the world would read his remarks. c. Lincoln was addressing the future generations of Americans who would read his words. d. Those who had lost family members during the Battle of Gettysburg were the intended audience. 4. Which of the following is the correct date that the Gettysburg Address was delivered? a. November 19, 1776 c. July 4, 1863 b. July 4, 1776 d. November 19, Which of the following best describes the immediate reaction to the Gettysburg Address? a. Everyone instantly knew that they had just heard one of the greatest speeches ever delivered. b. Many people actually booed the speech, because they thought it was so horrible. c. Reactions were mixed, with many people silent, while others mildly applauded. d. The address was only published in newspapers, so there was no immediate reaction. True/False: Indicate whether the statement is true or false. If the statement is false, write the correct word in the space provided to make the statement true. 6. Abraham Lincoln was the featured speaker at the dedication for the Soldiers National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.. 7. The Gettysburg Address is only ten sentences long.. 8. The crowd was loud after Lincoln s speech ended.. 9. Some argue that the audience was not impressed with Lincoln s speech that day The Gettysburg Address has been quoted very few times.. Page 8 Reading Through History

11 Guided Reading: Fill in the blanks below to create complete sentences. 1. The dedication for the Soldiers National Cemetery in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania occurred a little more than four months after the. 2. Edward Everett delivered a speech which lasted more than. 3. In the Gettysburg Address, Lincoln stated that Four score and seven years ago, our fathers brought forth on this continent, Now we are engaged in a great, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. 5. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have it, far above our poor power to add or detract. 6. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never what they did here from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the of devotion we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not from the earth. 10. Some reporters stated that Lincoln s speech was and that Lincoln s words were deep in feeling. Vocabulary: Match each word with its correct definition. Consider how the word is used in the lesson. This might help you define each term. Use a dictionary to help if necessary. a. proposition d. devotion b. consecrate e. resolve c. hallow 11. to honor as holy or sacred 12. a suggestion; something set forth for discussion 13. to dedicate for some purpose 14. to come to a definite and determined decision 15. strong commitment to a cause Reading Through History Page 9

12 Reading Comprehension & More: Select the choice that answers the question. 1. Which of the following correctly identifies the major theme of the Gettysburg Address? a. We should end the fighting as quickly as possible; too many deaths have occurred already. b. The founders of this nation had a really good idea, but it does not seem to be working out very well in reality. c. We have met here today to dedicate this ground, but it has already been dedicated by the men who fought and died here. d. We should continue the struggle in order to keep the country together. Then the deaths that happened here will have meant something. 2. Which of the following sentences best supports the main theme of the Gettysburg Address? a. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. b. But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. c. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. d....the great task remaining before us--that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion Which of the following correctly identifies the tone of the Gettysburg Address? a. scholarly, with attention towards intellectual debate b. good-natured and fun; a light-hearted address c. somber and serious; respectful in nature d. mysterious; he was speaking in riddles 4. In the fifth sentence of the Gettysburg Address, Lincoln states It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. To what is he referring? a. He is saying that they should continue the war effort. b. He is saying they should dedicate a portion of the battlefield as a resting place for those who died there. c. He is saying that the war should be ended and the nation be dissolved. d. He is saying they should honor the memory of those who died by never stepping foot on the battlefield again. 5. Read the second sentence of the Gettysburg Address. Based on the information in this sentence, which of the following evaluations can best be made? a. Lincoln does not believe that the nation will survive much longer. b. The Civil War was still being fought at the time of this address. c. Lincoln was not a strong supporter of the Civil War and wanted to bring it to an end. d. The Civil War had just recently come to an end, and everyone was grateful for it we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain... Based on the other statements made by Lincoln in the Gettysburg Address, what does he mean by this statement? a. He is going to make certain that the deaths at the Battle of Gettysburg were not meaningless. b. He wants to make sure that another battle like Gettysburg never happens again. c. He hopes that those who died at Gettysburg will always be remembered. d. He thinks the war has gone on too long and wants to bring it to a speedy conclusion. Page 10 Reading Through History

13 Summarize: Answer the following questions in the space provided. Attempt to respond in a complete sentence for each question. Be sure to use correct capitalization and punctuation! 1. Who was Abraham Lincoln attempting to honor with the Gettysburg Address? 2. Some newspapers did not like Lincoln s speech. What did those newspapers say about it? 3. According to Lincoln s words in the Gettysburg Address, when did our fathers bring forth a new nation? 4. Where was Lincoln when he delivered the Gettysburg Address? 5. Why was the Soldiers National Cemetery being dedicated? (What had happened there?) 6. According to Lincoln s words in the Gettysburg Address, how were all men created? Student Response: Please respond to the questions raised below. A thorough response should be a paragraph of at least three to five complete sentences. 7. Why do you suppose Lincoln s Gettysburg Address is so well remembered today? Reading Through History Page 11

14 Answer Key: Emancipation Proclamation: Multiple Choice: 1) C 2) C 3) A 4) C 5) B True/False: 6) F Executive Order 7) F rebelling 8) T 9) F Union 10) T Guided Reading: 1) President 2) Free 3) Repress 4) Virginia 5) West Virginia 6) Freedom 7) Violence 8) Wages 9) Armed service 10) William H. Seward Vocabulary Check: 11) A 12) D 13) B 14) C 15) E Reading Comprehension & More: 1) B 2) D 3) A 4) A 5) C 6) B Summarize: 1) Foreign nations applauded Lincoln s efforts. 2) The primary goal of the war prior to the Emancipation Proclamation was preserving the union. 3) The Emancipation Proclamation was signed on January 1, ) The Emancipation Proclamation only applied to the states in rebellion. 5) The Emancipation Proclamation was difficult to enforce because the states it applied to did not consider themselves a part of the United States. 6) Some felt that the President was overstepping his authority. Student Response: 7) Student answers will vary. Page 12 Reading Through History

15 Gettysburg Address: Multiple Choice: 1) B 2) C 3) A 4) D 5) C True/False: 6) F Edward Everett 7) T 8) F quiet 9) T 10) F countless Guided Reading: 1) Battle of Gettysburg 2) Two hours 3) A new nation 4) Civil War 5) Consecrated 6) Forget 7) Last full measure 8) Vain 9) Perish 10) A perfect gem Vocabulary Check: 1) C 2) A 3) B 4) E 5) D Reading Comprehension & More: 1) D 2) D 3) C 4) B 5) B 6) A Summarize: 1) Lincoln was attempting to honor those who had died during the Battle of Gettysburg. 2) The newspapers that did not like Lincoln s speech said it was silly, shameful, and ludicrous. 3) According to Lincoln s words, our fathers brought forth a new nation four score and seven years ago. 4) Lincoln was in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania when he delivered the address. (Soldiers National Cemetery might also be an acceptable answer). 5) The cemetery was being dedicated there, because the Battle of Gettysburg had been fought there. 6) According to the words in the Gettysburg Address, all men are created equal. Student Response: 7) Student answers will vary. Reading Through History Page 13

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