Calculating Grains for School Meals

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Calculating Grains for School Meals"

Transcription

1 Calculating Grains for School Meals California Healthy Kids Resource Center and the California Department of Education, Nutrition Services Division Partner: California Department of Education, Nutrition Services Division Welcome to the Calculating Grains for School Meals online training. This training was developed with funding from the California Department of Education, Nutrition Services Division. We recommend you complete the Determining Whole Grain-Rich Items in School Meals online training and this training before taking the Back to Basics with School Lunch! online training. This training will take approximately thirty minutes to complete. Let's get started! 1

2 Training Objectives After this training you will be able to: 1. Determine how grain products are credited using ounce equivalents for grains. 2. Calculate ounce equivalents for grains from various grain products. 3. Determine the daily and weekly ounce equivalents of grains. 4. Access resources to calculate the grain contribution to the meal pattern. In this training, you will learn to: 1. Determine how grain products are credited using ounce equivalents for grains; 2. Calculate ounce equivalents for grains from various grain products; 3. Determine the daily and weekly ounce equivalents of grains; and 4. Access resources to calculate the grain contribution to the meal pattern. 2

3 A Brief Review of Grains Let s briefly review grains first. Today s diets often fall short of the current recommendations for whole grains. How do whole grains benefit health? Benefits of whole grains include providing vital nutrients, reducing risk of heart disease, preventing constipation, and helping with weight management. Grains are divided into two subgroups, whole grains and refined grains. Whole grains consist of the entire cereal grain seed or kernel. They include all parts of the grain kernel including the bran, endosperm, and germ. Whole grains include more fiber, B vitamins, and trace minerals than many refined grains. Examples of whole grains are brown rice, whole wheat flour, and rolled oats. Grain products made with whole grains include bread, pasta, oatmeal, breakfast cereals, and tortillas. Refined grains are milled, a process that removes the bran and germ and removes dietary fiber, iron, and many B vitamins such as thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and folic acid. Many refined grains are enriched with specific B vitamins and iron, however fiber is not added back. White rice, white bread, and many processed cereal products are examples of refined grain products. 3

4 Grain Requirements Whole grain-rich foods must contain at least 50 percent whole grains. Ounce equivalent standards are used to credit grains To promote the benefits and the consumption of more whole grains, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act required the United States Department of Agriculture (U.S.D.A.) to update school meal nutrition standards to include more whole grains. As a result, schools are required to offer whole grain-rich products for school breakfast and lunch programs. Whole grain-rich products must contain at least 50 percent whole grains. Grain products must be credited based on ounce equivalent standards. Let s do a quick review of identifying whole grain-rich products for school meals, then move on to crediting grains using ounce equivalent standards. 4

5 Whole Grain-Rich Foods in School Meal Programs Whole Grain-Rich Criteria Grains must meet at least one of the following criteria: 1. Lists whole grain as the first ingredient on the ingredient list. 2. Contains 8 grams whole grain per oz eq grain. 3. Includes F.D.A. s approved whole grain health claim or other documentation. How do you recognize a whole grain-rich food for your school meal program planning? First, the item must meet the serving size requirements outlined in the U.S.D.A. Exhibit A chart. The updated Exhibit A chart is included in the Whole Grain Resource for the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs on the Resource Page at the end of this training. To identify a product as whole grain-rich, the item must meet one of the following three criteria: 1. A whole grain is listed first on the ingredient list; 2. The whole grain content per ounce equivalent must be greater to or equal to 8 grams; or 3. The product may include a Food and Drug Administration (F.D.A. ) whole grain health claim on its packaging or other manufacturer documentation. To learn more about each criterion, see the Determining Whole Grain-Rich Items in School Meals online training listed on the Resource Page at the end of this training.

6 Daily and Weekly Minimum Requirements for Grains for School Lunch Required ounce equivalents servings. May include multiple grain offerings to count for the minimum daily grain requirement. Food Components Grades K - 5 Grades 6-8 Grades 9-12 Grains Weekly Range based on a 5-day week. All Whole-Grain Rich 8 to 9 ounce equivalents (oz eq) / week 1 oz eq daily minimum 8 to 10 ounce equivalents (oz eq) / week 1 oz eq daily minimum 10 to 12 ounce equivalents (oz eq) / week 2 oz eq daily minimum Let s look at the school lunch daily and weekly meal pattern requirements for grains for school lunch. The daily minimum requirement for grades kindergarten to grade five and grades six to eight is one ounce equivalent of grains, and two ounce equivalents of grains for grades nine to twelve. The school nutrition program can include multiple grain offerings to count for the minimum daily grain requirement. The weekly minimum requirement, based on a five-day week, includes eight to ten ounce equivalents for grades kindergarten to grade five, nine to ten ounce equivalents for grades six to eight, and ten to twelve ounce equivalents for grades nine to twelve. The U.S.D.A. eliminated the maximum grains requirement and the range is now used as a guide in menu planning to meet the nutrient standards over the week. You may be wondering, what is an ounce equivalent for grains? 6

7 U.S.D.A. Grain Ounce Equivalents An ounce equivalent is a standard unit for grains when calculating the contribution to the meal pattern. The U.S.D.A. Exhibit A chart provides the ounce equivalent information for different types of food products such as breads and cereal products that are commonly used in school meals. You may access the Exhibit A chart handout by selecting the link for information about ounce equivalents for grain products. The chart organizes grain products based upon the categories of grain products and is an essential tool for calculating ounce equivalents for grains. Let s take a closer look at the food items in each group. Group A contains food items that are very dry (with little moisture) such as hard pretzels and croutons. For this group, one ounce equivalent of grain is 0.8 ounces or 22 grams per serving. Many common food items are included in Group B such as bread, flour and corn tortillas, pizza crust, bagels, and graham crackers. For this group, one ounce equivalent for grain is 1 ounce or 28 grams per serving. The food items in Group C include plain cookies, pancakes, and corn muffins. A one ounce equivalent of grain is 2.2 ounces or 34 grams per serving for this group. 7

8 U.S.D.A. Grain Ounce Equivalents Group D contains more processed breakfast or snack items (with more sugar and fat) such as doughnuts, cereal bars, muffins, sweet rolls, and toaster pastries. Typically, as the amount of other ingredients increases, the amount of ounce equivalents of grain decrease. For this group, one ounce equivalent of grain is 2 ounces or 55 grams per serving. More breakfast and snack foods are included in Group E, such as breakfast bars, cookies, doughnuts, French toast, sweet rolls, and toaster pastry. For this group, one ounce equivalent of grain is 2.4 ounces or 69 grams per serving. Food items in Group F include unfrosted cake and coffee cake, and a one ounce equivalent of grain is 2.9 ounces or 82 grams per serving. Group G contains frosted cake and plain brownies. A one ounce equivalent of grain for this group is 4.4 ounces or 125 grams per serving. Group H includes cooked grains such as barley, quinoa, oatmeal, macaroni, pasta, and rice. For this group, one ounce equivalent of grain is 1 ounce dry grain or ½ cup cooked grains. Cold or dry ready-to-eat breakfast cereals are in Group I, and for this final group, a one ounce equivalent of grain is 1 ounce or 1 cup flakes, 1 ¼ cups of puffed cereal, or ¼ cup of granola. 8

9 Identify the Grain Equivalent Groups Match these Food Items 1. Pasta 2. Cornbread 3. Bread Sticks, Hard 4. Tortilla Chips (Whole Corn) 5. Blueberry Muffin 6. Brownie, plain With the Groups Group A Group B Group C Group D Group E Group F Group G Group H Take a minute to review the food items listed on the left. Use the Exhibit A handout to match the groups in the right column with the food items on the left. 9

10 Identify the Grain Equivalent Groups Match these Food Items 1. Pasta (Group H) 2. Cornbread (Group C) 3. Bread Sticks, Hard (Group A) 4. Tortilla Chips (Whole Corn) (Group B) 5. Blueberry Muffin (Group D) 6. Brownie, plain (Group G) Did you get that number 1, the pasta, is in Group H; the cornbread is in Group C; the hard breadsticks are in Group A; and the whole corn tortilla chips are in Group B? The blueberry muffin is in Group D and the plain brownie is in Group G. Identifying food items within each grain group may take a little extra time at first. After a while it will be a piece of Group F, cake! 10

11 Counting Grain Ounce Equivalents Tuesday s Lunch Menu Item Whole Wheat Pasta (1 cup cooked) with Meatballs and Cheese Check Grain Ounce Equivalents 1. In which group does this belong? 2. How many ounce equivalents are offered? Counting ounce equivalents correctly is critical to meeting the daily and weekly grain requirements. Refer to the Exhibit A handout and review it as you check Tuesday s Lunch Menu item. In which grain group does the whole wheat pasta belong? How many ounce equivalents of grain does it equal? 11

12 Grain Ounce Equivalents for a School Meal Item Tuesday s Lunch Menu Item Whole Wheat Pasta (1 cup cooked) with Meatballs and Cheese Check Grain Ounce Equivalents Group H ½ cup pasta = 1 ounce equivalent of grain 1 cup = 2 ounce equivalents of grain The menu item of one cup of whole wheat pasta with Meatballs and Cheese is categorized as Group H. For grains in Group H, one half cup of cooked pasta equals one ounce equivalent, therefore one cup of cooked pasta is equal to two ounce equivalents of grain. 12

13 Wednesday s Lunch Menu Wednesday s Lunch Menu Item Quesadilla with Salsa (28 grams whole wheat tortilla) Green Salad (1-1/2 cups) Fresh Strawberries and Oatmeal Cake (82 grams unfrosted cake) 1% Milk Check Grain Ounce Equivalents 1. Which grain groups are included? 2. How many ounce equivalents of grain for each item? Let s look at the whole menu for Wednesday to get more practice counting ounce equivalents of grain based on the weight of grain in grams. Use the Exhibit A handout again to determine the grain groups and the ounce equivalents of grain in each item. Which grain groups are represented? How many ounce equivalents are there for each item? 13

14 What Did You Count? Wednesday s Lunch Menu Item Quesadilla with Salsa (28 grams whole wheat tortilla) Green Salad (1-1/2 cups) Fresh Strawberries and Oatmeal Cake (82 grams unfrosted cake) 1% Milk Check Grain Ounce Equivalents Whole Wheat Tortilla = Group B Oatmeal Cake = Group F Determine ounce equivalents (oz eq) 28 grams for the Tortilla = 28 grams per oz eq for Group B = 1 oz eq 82 grams for the cake = 82 grams per oz for Group F = 1 oz eq for the Oatmeal Cake For Wednesday s menu the grains include the whole wheat tortilla from Group B and the oatmeal cake from Group F. For Group B, 28 grams is equal to one ounce equivalent and the weight of the whole wheat tortilla is 28 grams; therefore the tortilla contributes 1 ounce equivalent of grain to the menu. Because 82 grams of cake equals the 82 grams for one ounce equivalent for Group F, the oatmeal cake also contributes one ounce equivalent of grains to the lunch meal. 14

15 Other Grain Component Issues Grain-Based Desserts Only two oz eq creditable grainbased desserts allowed at lunch per school week No grain-based desserts allowed at breakfast Although the oatmeal cake is a dessert, it counts toward meeting the grain requirement. However, because it has a higher amount of solid fats and added sugars, the U.S.D.A. reduced the number of whole grain-rich desserts allowed at lunch to a maximum of two ounce equivalents per week. The two ounce equivalents can be broken down to smaller daily amounts. No grain-based desserts are allowed at breakfast, such as cake, cookies, and brownies. 15

16 Contribution to the Meal Pattern: Calculating Ounce Equivalents of Grains The grams of creditable grain are documented by: A standardized recipe. A product formulation statement. So far, we have assumed that the grains are whole grain-rich and we used Exhibit A to calculate the ounce equivalents of grain. School meal programs have the option to credit ounce equivalents for grain products based on the weights listed in Exhibit A or by the grams of creditable grain in each product portion. The grams of creditable grain are documented by a standardized recipe or product formulation statement signed by a manufacturer. 16

17 Non-creditable Grains Do not contribute to meal pattern components. Products must contain less than 0.25 ounce equivalent. You may be wondering what are non-creditable grains. A non-creditable grain is an ingredient such as oat fiber, corn fiber, bran, germ, corn starch, and wheat starch, or potato, legume, and other vegetable flours that do not contribute toward the meal pattern. You may print the Non-creditable Grains handout by selecting the link. If a product contains non-creditable grains these grains must be 0.25 ounce equivalent or less for the product to contribute toward the whole grain-rich grain meal component. A manufacturer may indicate on the label contains less than 2% of the product formula. Let s look at examples of determining ounce equivalents of grain for purchased products. Later we ll cover how to calculate ounce equivalent of grains for recipes. 17

18 Method 1 Use the U.S.D.A. Exhibit A Handout Wheat Bread Ingredient list includes whole wheat flour first. All other grains are enriched or whole grain. Manufacturer documentation states that all grains are creditable and if there are non-creditable grains the amount meets the criteria. Ingredients: Whole wheat flour, enriched wheat flour, sprouted wheat, yeast, nonfat milk, sunflower oil, honey, salt. You may print the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Worksheet for Purchased Products handout by selecting the link. Follow along as we use the food label and the worksheet to determine how to credit a purchased wheat bread. The first step in crediting a product is to determine if the product includes whole grains. This wheat bread meets the whole grain-rich criteria because whole wheat flour is listed first and all other grains are enriched or whole grain and creditable. If the food labeling does not include an ingredients list, manufacturer s documentation can be used to show there are creditable grains. If you are using a product formulation statement, manufacturers must provide documentation on company letterhead and this must be kept on file by the school. To learn more about allowable methods to document whole grain-rich products, please see the online training, Determining Whole Grain-Rich Items for School Meals. If the product is a whole grain-rich product, the next step is to determine the ounce equivalents of grain for a serving of the grain product. 18

19 Method 1: U.S.D.A. Exhibit A Determine the Ounce Equivalents Using Weight of Product in Grams One slice bread weighs 34 grams. Group B 28 grams is the standard weight per ounce equivalent (oz eq). 34 grams / 28 grams = 1.2 oz eq. Round down to nearest ¼ oz eq = 1.0 oz eq. After you have determined that the product is whole grain-rich, next determine the grain contribution to the meal pattern, by calculating the ounce equivalents of grain. Method 1 uses the U.S.D.A. Exhibit A grain chart for food items. Start by determining the grain group using the Exhibit A chart. Note that the manufacturer does not have to document the grams of grain in one serving of the grain product to use the Exhibit A grain chart. In which group is the bread included? Wheat bread is included in Group B. Next, determine the standard weight for one ounce equivalent grain in that group. For Group B the standard weight for one ounce equivalent is 28 grams. To determine the ounce equivalents per serving, divide the weight of the product, in this case 34 grams, by 28 grams, the standard weight of Group B. This equals 1.2 ounce equivalents. If a product is 0.24 ounce equivalents or less it is not creditable. For this calculation, we round down to the nearest quarter ounce equivalent to equal 1 ounce equivalent of grains per serving. 19

20 Method 1: U.S.D.A. Exhibit A-- Determine the Ounce Equivalents Using Weight of Product in Ounces One slice bread weighs 1.2 ounces. Group B 1.0 ounce is the standard weight per ounce equivalent (oz eq). 1.2 ounces / 1.0 ounce = 1.2 oz eq. Round down to nearest ¼ oz eq = 1.0 oz eq. If the weight of one serving of this product is given in ounces, divide the weight of the serving, in this case one slice of bread is 1.2 ounces, by the weight of one ounce equivalent which is 1 ounce for Group B. This equals 1.2 ounce equivalents of grains. Rounding down to the nearest quarter ounce equals 1 ounce equivalent of grain. 20

21 Method 2 Using Manufacturer s Documentation on Credible Grains Manufacturer s documentation of 17 grams creditable grain per slice. Creditable grain standard of 16 grams per ounce equivalent (oz eq). 17 g / 16 g = 1.06 oz eq. Round down to nearest ¼ oz eq = 1 oz eq. Another method to calculate the grain contribution to the meal pattern is based on the grams of creditable grain in a serving. This slice of bread may be credited using the manufacturer s documentation on company letterhead. Sample product formulation statements are provided on the Resource Page following this training. In this example, one slice of bread contains 17 grams of creditable grain according to the manufacturer s documentation. For this calculation, divide the grams of creditable grain (17 grams) by the standard of 16 grams per ounce equivalent. This equals 1.06 ounce equivalents. Round down to the nearest ¼ ounce equivalent, which is 1.0 ounce equivalent of grain per slice. You may be wondering which result to use to credit this bread to the meal pattern. In this example, both methods give the same ounce equivalent grain. If the results are different, you may use the higher amount of ounce equivalents as long as documentation is on file to support your results. 21

22 What is the Grains Contribution to the Meal Pattern for this Pasta? Use the food label and ingredient list to calculate the meal pattern contribution of this pasta. Ingredients: Whole grain wheat, whole grain brown rice, enriched wheat flour, and water. Let s practice with another example using Exhibit A, the food label, and the ingredient list for this whole grain pasta. First, is this is a whole grain-rich product? Next, determine the grain group using the Exhibit A chart and calculate the ounce equivalents of grain using the ½ cup cooked pasta volume. You may refer to the Wisconsin Worksheet for Crediting Purchased Products handout to calculate the grains contribution to the meal pattern for this pasta. 22

23 Use the Volume Per Serving to Calculate the Grain Contribution A B C D E Product Name and Servings Size from the Product Label Whole Grain- Rich or Refined? Exhibit A Group Exhibit A 1 oz eq Serving Size (in grams, cups, or ounces) Number of Grain Contributions in one Serving of the Product (A / D = E) Round to the nearest ¼ oz eq Healthy Grain Pasta (1/2 cup cooked or 32 grams dry) Whole Grain- Rich Group H ½ cup cooked or 28 grams dry ½cup / ½cup = 1 oz eq grain 1.0 oz eq grain If you determined all the grain ingredients in the ingredient list can be credited and this is a whole grain-rich product, you are right. In addition, this pasta is in Group H, and one ounce equivalent of grain equals ½ cup of cooked pasta. Divide the cups of cooked pasta in one serving by the serving size of one ounce equivalent of grain in cups. This is ½ cup divided by ½ cup to equal one ounce equivalent of grain. 23

24 Use the Dry Weight in Grams Per Serving to Calculate the Grain Contribution A B C D E Product Name and Servings Size from the Product Label Whole Grain- Rich or Refined? Exhibit A Group Exhibit A 1 oz eq Serving Size (in grams, cups, or ounces) Number of Grain Contributions in one Serving of the Product (A / D = E) Round to the nearest ¼oz eq Healthy Grain Pasta (1/2 cup cooked or 32 grams dry) Whole Grain- Rich Group H ½ cup cooked or 28 grams dry 32 grams / 28 grams = 1.14 oz eq grain 1.0 oz eq grain You can also calculate the ounce equivalents of grain based on grams of dry pasta. From the food label we find that 32 grams of dry pasta is one serving. For Group H, 28 grams or 1 ounce dry is equal to one ounce equivalent of grain. Dividing 32 grams of dry pasta by 28 grams per ounce equivalent of grain equals Rounded down to the nearest ¼ ounce equivalent, this equals 1 ounce equivalent of grain. 24

25 Use the Manufacturer s Documented Amount of Creditable Grain Manufacturer s documentation of creditable grain = 17 grams per ½ cup of cooked pasta. 17 grams per serving / 16 grams per ounce equivalent grain = 1.06 ounce equivalents of grain. Rounded down to the nearest ¼ ounce equivalent = 1.00 ounce equivalent of grain. Another method for determining the creditable grain per portion is to use the manufacturer s documentation for the grams of creditable grain. For this calculation, divide the manufacturer s documented 17 grams of creditable grain by the standard of 16 grams per ounce equivalent. The result equals 1.06 ounce equivalents of grain. Remember to round down to the nearest ¼ ounce equivalent to equal 1 ounce equivalent of grain. There is no need to calculate the contribution to the meal pattern using more than one method. The most important part is to keep on file documentation of how you credited a grain product for your meal pattern. 25

26 Determine the Creditable Grain Amounts in Recipes 1. Convert amount of creditable grains to grams. The number of ounce equivalents of creditable grains can also be calculated using standard recipes. There are two methods that can be used to determine the number of creditable grain servings contained in one portion or serving of a recipe. Either you can use the Exhibit A grain chart with the weight of a portion of the cooked food item and compare to the weight in the correct group or you can calculate based upon 16 grams of creditable grain per serving. You may choose either method, or you may wish to complete both methods to determine which method will give the most crediting. Let s practice using the Blueberry Bread recipe. You may print the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Worksheet for Recipes and Blueberry Bread recipe handouts by selecting the links, and refer to the Exhibit A chart handout. To calculate ounce equivalents of grain for this Blueberry Bread recipe, start by changing the weight of the creditable grain ingredients to grams. If grains are listed in cups or pounds in recipes, a list of commonly used conversions can be found in the U.S.D.A. Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs. You may access this conversion chart by selecting the link. Total the grams of grain in the recipe, then divide by the total number of portions in the recipe. After that, divide the total grams per portion by 16 grams, the standard weight for one serving of grains, and round down to the nearest quarter gram. Let s walk through the Blueberry Bread Recipe to calculate the amount of creditable grains per serving. 26

27 Calculate Creditable Grains in the Blueberry Bread Recipe 1. Convert amount of creditable grains to grams. 3 ½ lb Whole wheat flour + 2 ½ lb enriched white flour = 6 lb 6 lb x grams/lb = 2,271.6 grams per recipe 2. Divide the total grams per recipe by the number of portions in the recipe. 2,271.6 grams per recipe / 96 portions = grams of grain per portion 3. Divide grams per portion by 16 grams the standard weight for one creditable grain serving grams per portion / 16 grams of grain per ounce equivalent = 1.77 ounce equivalents of grain 4. Round down to the nearest ¼ oz eq grain ounce equivalents of grain per serving First, find the ingredients that are creditable grains. This recipe includes whole-grain wheat flour and enriched white flour. This bread is whole grain-rich because the weight of whole wheat flour is more than 50 percent of the weight of all grains in the recipe and the white flour is enriched. Add together the total amount of creditable grains: 3 ½ pounds plus 2 ½ pounds equals 6 pounds of grains. The next step is to determine the number of grams of grain in the recipe. There are grams per pound. 6 pounds times equals 2,721.6 grams per recipe. Next divide the total grams of grain in the recipe by the number of portions. That is 2,721.6 grams divided by 96 portions, to equal grams of grain per portion. How many ounce equivalents of grain is that for crediting purposes? Divide grams by 16 grams per ounce equivalent to equal Then round down to the nearest quarter ounce equivalent to get 1.75 ounce equivalents of grain per portion. What if you cut the pan into 64 servings, how many ounce equivalents of grain would you get per serving? 27

28 Reducing the Number of Servings Increases the Ounce Equivalents of Grain per Serving. 1. Convert amount of creditable grains to grams. 3 ½ lb Whole wheat flour + 2 ½ lb enriched white flour = 6 lb 6 lb x grams/lb = 2,271.6 grams per recipe 2. Divide the total grams per recipe by the number of portions in the recipe. 2,271.6 grams per recipe / 64 portions = grams of grain per portion 3. Divide grams per portion by 16 grams the standard weight for one creditable grain serving grams per portion / 16 grams of grain per ounce equivalent = 2.22 ounce equivalents of grain 4. Round down to the nearest ¼ oz eq grain. 2.0 ounce equivalents of grain per serving The same calculations are completed to convert the amount of creditable grains to grams. First, add together the total amount of creditable grains: 3 ½ pounds plus 2 ½ pounds equals 6 pounds of grains. The next step is determine the number of grams. This equals grams per pound times 6 pounds, or 2,721.6 grams per recipe. This time we are cutting the bread into 64 portions, so that is 2,721.6 grams divided by 64 portions to equal grams of grain per portion. A portion would now be credited by dividing grams by 16 grams per ounce equivalent to equal Rounding down to the nearest ¼ ounce equivalent results in 2 ounce equivalents of grain creditable per portion. Would there be any difference if you used the Exhibit A chart to determine the whole grain contribution? 28

29 Determine the Ounce Equivalents for the Blueberry Bread Recipe using Exhibit A Group D 2.0 ounces is the standard weight per ounce equivalent. One portion of the Blueberry Bread recipe weighs 4.0 ounces. 4.0 ounces/ 2.0 ounce = 2.0 ounce equivalents. Blueberry Bread would be categorized in Group D, because it is a quick bread, more like a muffin than a yeast bread. After preparing the recipe, cut the bread into the portions that will be served such as 64 or 96 servings, then weigh one serving. Keep an accurate scale in your kitchen to use this method of crediting. An ounce equivalent in group D weighs 2 ounces or 55 grams. For the Blueberry Bread recipe, if a portion of bread weighs 4.0 ounces, divide that by 2 ounces per ounce equivalent for Group D to equal 2 ounce equivalents of grain. Either calculation can be used, however be sure to keep the recipe and the documentation for crediting a serving of this product. 29

30 Your Turn Sweet Potato Bread Try calculating the contribution of this Sweet Potato Bread recipe to the school meal pattern using the grams of grain per serving. You may print the recipe handout by selecting the link and use the Worksheet for Grain Recipes for your calculations. What did you get? 30

31 Sweet Potato Bread Contributions Sweet Potato Bread Recipe Flour, whole wheat 11 pounds Flour, all purpose, wheat 9 pounds Total flour 20 pounds 20 pounds x grams/pound = 9,072 grams 9,072 grams / 490 portions = 18.5 grams per portion 18.5 grams per portion / 16 grams per oz eq. grain contribution = 1.16 or 1 oz. eq. grain per portion Round down to the nearest ¼ ounce equivalent = 1.00 ounce equivalent of grain. Calculate the total amount of creditable grains in the recipe and convert it to grams. In this case, 11 pounds of whole wheat flour and 9 pounds of all purpose, enriched white flour total 20 pounds. Multiplying this by grams per pound to determine the total grams of creditable grain results in 9,072 grams. Dividing this by the number of portions for the total recipe, or 9,072 divided by 490 portions, equals 18.5 grams per portion. To determine the ounce equivalents per portion, divide 18.5 grams by 16 grams per ounce equivalent of grain contribution. This equals 1.16 or rounded down by a quarter of an ounce, gives 1 ounce equivalent of grain per portion. You may print the Sweet Potato Bread Answer Sheet handout by selecting the link to compare with your results. 31

32 Does This Lunch Menu for Grades 6-8 Meet the Grain Daily and Weekly Minimum Requirements? Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Burrito Beans Cheese, Fresh Salsa, Whole Wheat Tortilla (2 oz) Pears Southwest Salad Chicken Vegetable Stir Fry Brown rice (1 cup) Fruit Cocktail Crustless Egg and Spinach Quiche Green Salad Lender s Cinnamon Raisin Bagel (2.25 oz) Shredded Pork Tacos Tomatoes, Lettuce, Cheese Whole Corn Shells Corn (48 grams) Barbeque Chicken Cilantro Coleslaw Homemade Cornbread (3 ounces - Recipe Provided) Peach Slices Mango Cubes Take 1 1% White Milk (1 c) Non Fat Chocolate Milk (1 c) Take 1 1% White Milk (1 c) Non Fat Chocolate Milk (1 c) Take 1 1% White Milk (1 c) Non-fat Chocolate Milk (1 c) Take 1 Milk Non-fat Chocolate Milk (1 c) Take 1 1% White Milk (1 c) Non-fat Chocolate Milk (1 c) Let s put everything together to calculate the grain contributions to the meal pattern for this middle school lunch menu and check whether it meets the minimum daily and weekly requirements for grains. For this menu assume all grain products are whole grain-rich, however the Cinnamon Raisin Bagel from Lenders and the Cornbread Recipe will require review of the product and recipe information to calculate contributions. 32

33 Review the Daily and Weekly Minimum Requirements for Grains Food Components Grades K - 5 Grades 6-8 Grades 9-12 Grains/Breads Weekly Range based on a 5-day week. All Whole-Grain Rich 8 to 9 ounce equivalents (oz eq) / week 1 oz eq daily minimum 8 to 10 ounce equivalents (oz eq) / week 1 oz eq daily minimum 10 to 12 ounce equivalents (oz eq) / week 2 oz eq daily minimum Let s recheck the daily and weekly minimum requirements for grains for grades six to eight. As you review the menu keep in mind that the grain contribution at lunch is required to provide 1 ounce equivalent of grain each day and a minimum of 8 ounce equivalents of grain for the week. What is the first step to determining whether the minimum grain contributions are met? Start by changing all the grain amounts into ounce equivalents of grains. You may refer to the Wisconsin Worksheet for Purchased Products to calculate and track the grain contribution of all the processed grain items. Also refer to Exhibit A and the Wisconsin Recipe Worksheet. As references to check this menu, you may print the Lender s Cinnamon Raisin Bagel Manufacturer s documentation and Cornbread Recipe handouts by selecting the links. 33

34 Check Your Results A Product Name and Servings Size from the Product Label B Whole Grain- Rich or Refined? C Exhibit A Group D Exhibit A 1 oz eq Serving Size (in grams, cups, or ounces) E Number of Grain Contributions in one Serving of the Product (A / D = E) Round to the nearest ¼ oz eq Whole Wheat Tortilla (1 tortilla = 2 ounces) Whole Grain-Rich Group B 1 ounce = 1 ounce equivalent of grain 2 ounces / 1 ounce per oz eq = 2 oz eq 2.0 oz eq grain Brown Rice (1 cup cooked) Whole Grain-Rich Group H ½ cup cooked = 1 ounce equivalent 1 cup / ½ cup per oz eq = 2 oz eq 2.0 oz eq grain White Whole Wheat Cinnamon Raisin Bagel (1 Bagel = 64 grams) Whole Grain-Rich Group B 28 grams = 1 ounce equivalent of grain 64 grams / 28 grams per oz eq = 2.28 oz eq 2.25 oz eq grain Let s check your results. On Monday, the school serves one 2-ounce whole grainrich tortilla. This is in Group B and the grain contribution to the meal pattern is 2 ounce equivalents, which meets the daily requirement. It is okay to exceed the daily minimum ounce equivalents of grain. On Tuesday, one cup of brown rice is included. Because brown rice is in Group H and ½ cup of cooked brown rice is one ounce equivalent of grain, 2 ounce equivalents of grain are served. On Tuesday, the daily minimum requirement of 1 ounce equivalent of grain is met again for grades six to eight. Wednesday a whole wheat cinnamon raisin bagel is on the menu. The Manufacturer s Documentation shows one bagel is 64 grams and the product is whole grain-rich. Dividing 64 grams by 28 grams per ounce equivalent for Group B equals 2.28 ounce equivalents of grain for Wednesday. This rounds down to 2.25 ounce equivalents and again the minimum ounce equivalent of grain requirement is met. 34

35 Check Your Results for Thursday A Product Name and Servings Size from the Product Label B Whole Grain- Rich or Refined? C Exhibit A Group D Exhibit A 1 oz eq Serving Size (in grams, cups, or ounces) E Number of Grain Contributions in one Serving of the Product (A / D = E) Round to the nearest ¼ oz eq Whole Grain Taco Shells (2 shells = 56 grams) Whole Grain- Rich Group B 28 grams = 1 ounce equivalent of grain 56 grams / 28 grams per oz eq = 2.0 oz eq 2.0 oz eq grain For Thursday, two whole corn taco shells from Group B equal 56 grams and contribute 2 ounce equivalents of grains (56 grams divided by 28 grams equals 2). 35

36 Check Your Results with Cornbread Recipe A Product Name and Servings Size from the Product Label B Whole Grain- Rich or Refined? C Exhibit A Group D Exhibit A 1 oz eq Serving Size (in grams, cups, or ounces) E Number of Grain Contributions in one Serving of the Product (A / D = E) Round to the nearest ¼ oz eq Homemade Cornbread Whole Grain- Rich Group C 16 grams creditable grain per oz eq 3 ounces Cornbread = 2 ½ lbs x = 1,134 grams/50 portions = grams/16 = 1.25 oz eq (Group C) 1.25 oz eq grain On Friday, the cornbread recipe for 50 portions includes 1 ½ pound whole grains from the ½ pound of whole-wheat flour and 1 pound of whole cornmeal. There is also 1 pound enriched flour. Adding these together totals 2 ½ pounds of grain. Multiplied by grams per pound of grain, this equals 1,134 grams for the recipe. Divide the grams of grain by 50 portions to get grams per portion, then divide by 16 grams per ounce equivalent to calculate the number of ounce equivalents of grain. The result is 1.42, which, rounded down to the nearest quarter ounce equivalent, equals 1.25 ounce equivalents per portion. You could also weigh a portion of the cornbread and determine the ounce equivalents of grain based upon Group C of the Exhibit A chart. Then, if the results are different, you could determine which method to keep on file as documentation. Either method can be used. Keeping accurate documentation is essential. 36

37 Weekly Results Monday portions Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday 2 oz Tortilla = 2 1 cup Brown 1 Roll = 2.0 ounce Rice = 2 ounce ounce equivalents of equivalents of equivalents of grain (Group B) grain (Group H) grain (Group B) 2 Shells (56 3 ounces grams) = 2 ounce equivalents of grain (Group B) Cornbread = 2 ½ lbs x = 1,134 grams/50 portions = grams/16 = 1.25 oz eq (Group C) Weekly Total 2 oz eq + 2 oz eq + 2 oz eq + 2 oz eq oz eq = 9.25 oz eq Each day includes one or more ounce equivalents of grain, so all daily minimums are met. Did the menu meet the weekly requirement? This menu met the minimum weekly requirements of 8 ounce equivalents of grain for grades six to eight and was within the recommended range of 8 to 10 ounce equivalents of grain. Would this menu meet the daily and weekly minimum grain requirements for grades nine to twelve? No, the daily minimum for grains for grades nine to twelve is 2 ounce equivalents of grain. Less than 2 ounce equivalents of grain were served on Friday. In addition, 10 to 12 ounce equivalents of grain are recommended weekly for grades nine to twelve. This menu falls short of both the daily and weekly minimum requirements. Increasing the portion size of cornbread served on Friday to 2 ounce equivalents would bring the daily and the weekly amounts up to at least the 10 ounce equivalent minimum. 37

38 Resources for Serving More Whole Grains! United States Department of Agriculture Whole Grain Resource that includes the Exhibit A Chart The Whole Grain Council ChooseMyPlate.gov Check out the Resource Page at the end of the training for more Web sites, training and planning tools, and information to meet the whole grain meal contribution requirements. The resources include the U.S.D.A. Whole Grain Resource Booklet that includes the Exhibit A chart, and links to helpful Web sites such as the Whole Grain Council and ChooseMyPlate.gov for lessons and activities to teach students and families the health benefits of whole grains and how to include them every day. 38

39 Training Objectives Today, you learned to: 1. Determine how grain products are credited using ounce equivalents for grains. 2. Calculate ounce equivalents for grains from various grain products. 3. Determine the daily and weekly ounce equivalents of grains. 4. Access resources to calculate the grain contribution to the meal pattern. Let s review our objectives for this training. Today you learned to: 1. Determine how grain products are credited using ounce equivalents for grains; 2. Calculate ounce equivalents for grains from various grain products; 3. Determine the daily and weekly ounce equivalents of grains; and 4. Access resources to calculate the grain contribution to the meal pattern. 39

40 Congratulations! This training was produced with support from the California Department of Education and the United States Department of Agriculture. Both are equal opportunity providers and employers. Partner: California Department of Education, Nutrition Services Division Congratulations! You have reached the end of the training. You will now have the opportunity to take a quiz to test the knowledge you have acquired in this training. If you receive a passing score, a completion certificate will be ed to you at the address you provided. If you don t receive a passing score, you will have the opportunity to take the test again at any time. Following the quiz, you will be asked to complete an optional brief feedback survey. After you complete the survey, you will be able to access the Resource Page and additional information and trainings about whole grains and school meal pattern requirements. You may take the quiz by selecting the link. Thank you for participating in this training! This training was produced with support from the California Department of Education and the United States Department of Agriculture. Both are equal opportunity providers and employers. 40

School Breakfast Program. Regional Directors Special Nutrition Programs All Regions. State Directors Child Nutrition Programs All States

School Breakfast Program. Regional Directors Special Nutrition Programs All Regions. State Directors Child Nutrition Programs All States USDA --- Jnited States Department Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service 3101 Park Center Drive Alexandria, VA 22302-1500 of DATE: April 26, 2012 MEMO CODE: SP 30-2012 SUBJECT: Grain Requirements for the

More information

Grain Requirements in the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program

Grain Requirements in the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program Grain Requirements in the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program Mary Joan McLarney MS, RD Special Nutrition Programs Nutritionist FNS-USDA-NERO April, 2013 maryjo.mclarney@fns.usda.gov

More information

High Fiber Diet What is fiber? Why does my child need a high fiber diet? How much fiber does my child need?

High Fiber Diet What is fiber? Why does my child need a high fiber diet? How much fiber does my child need? High Fiber Diet What is fiber? Fiber is a type of carbohydrate that our body is not able to break down. Foods that are highest in fiber are fruits, vegetables, and unprocessed grains. Why does my child

More information

Whole Grains. USDA/State Agency Workshop December 2012

Whole Grains. USDA/State Agency Workshop December 2012 Whole Grains USDA/State Agency Workshop December 2012 Nutrition Standards Changes in NSLP and SBP Amended regulations at 7 CFR 210.10 and 220.8, January 26, 2012 Aligned with 2010 Dietary Guidelines for

More information

Slide 1. Slide 2. A Closer Look At Crediting Grains. Why do we credit foods? Ensuring Meals Served To Students Are Reimbursable

Slide 1. Slide 2. A Closer Look At Crediting Grains. Why do we credit foods? Ensuring Meals Served To Students Are Reimbursable Slide 1 A Closer Look At Crediting Grains Ensuring Meals Served To Students Are Reimbursable The objective of this training is to help sponsors of Child Nutrition Programs better understand how to credit

More information

From the Trainer s Tablet: Lessons for Family/Home Child Care Providers Grains and Breads - What is a Serving? OA TS

From the Trainer s Tablet: Lessons for Family/Home Child Care Providers Grains and Breads - What is a Serving? OA TS OA TS National Food Service Management Institute The University of Mississippi Spring 2003 Table of Contents Purpose 3 Objectives 3 Time 3 Definitions 3 Materials 4 Trainer s Tips 5 Icebreaker 5 Activities

More information

Grains in the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs What are the new requirements? 2:00pm Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Grains in the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs What are the new requirements? 2:00pm Wednesday, May 2, 2012 Grains in the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs What are the new requirements? 2:00pm Wednesday, May 2, 2012 Presentation slides, resources, and CEU form available at: www.schoolnutrition.org/webinar

More information

HealthierUS School Challenge Whole Grains Resource

HealthierUS School Challenge Whole Grains Resource HealthierUS School Challenge Whole Grains Resource This resource outlines the HealthierUS School Challenge (HUSSC) whole grains criteria and offers additional background information to help school food

More information

WHOLE GRAINS FOR GOOD HEALTH

WHOLE GRAINS FOR GOOD HEALTH WHOLE GRAINS FOR GOOD HEALTH Section 1: What are Whole Grains? Whole grains are nutritious, delicious, and are included in the WIC program! Whole grains contain the entire grain kernel. That means whole

More information

Lesson 3 - The Grains Group

Lesson 3 - The Grains Group Lesson 3 - The Grains Group Go With Energy! Topic Nutrition Audience 2 nd & 3 rd Grades Suggested Time 45 minutes NJ Core Curriculum Standards 2.1 Wellness By the end of Grade 2, students will know how

More information

21-Day Sample Cycle Menu Child and Adult Care Food Program

21-Day Sample Cycle Menu Child and Adult Care Food Program The abbreviation to the left of each menu item indicates the meal pattern component supplied. The following abbreviations are used: G/B = Grains/Breads; M/MA = Meat/Meat Alternate; F/V = Fruit/Vegetable;

More information

Snack Time: Providing Healthy Snacks in Your After School Program

Snack Time: Providing Healthy Snacks in Your After School Program Snack Time: Providing Healthy Snacks in Your After School Program California After School Resource Center (CASRC) Administered for the California Department of Education (C.D.E.) Hello, welcome to the

More information

Crediting information appears in parentheses after each item on the menu. National Food Service Management Institute The University of Mississippi

Crediting information appears in parentheses after each item on the menu. National Food Service Management Institute The University of Mississippi The cycle menus are designed to show how to achieve dietary variety, to use USDA Recipes for Child Care (available online at www.nfsmi.org), and to follow the recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines

More information

This is an official Page/Publication of the University of Massachusetts Preventive and Behavioral Medicine 55 Lake Avenue North Worcester, MA

This is an official Page/Publication of the University of Massachusetts Preventive and Behavioral Medicine 55 Lake Avenue North Worcester, MA Meets 100% of the RDA Monday 1/2 c oatmeal 1/4 c raisins 1 T ground flax seed 2 oz skim milk 1 slice multigrain bread 2 tsp almond butter 6 oz coffee 1 banana Tuna Sandwich: 1/2 c water packed tuna 1 medium

More information

NEW WHOLE GRAIN DATABASE AND FINDINGS RELATED TO OBESITY

NEW WHOLE GRAIN DATABASE AND FINDINGS RELATED TO OBESITY NEW WHOLE GRAIN DATABASE AND FINDINGS RELATED TO OBESITY Laura Sampson Mary Franz Pauline Koh-Banerjee Simin Lui Donna Spiegelman Walter Willett Eric Rimm Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public

More information

GO FOR WHOLE GRAINS. Introduction. Preparation. Suggested Recipes. Suggested Handouts. Key Concepts

GO FOR WHOLE GRAINS. Introduction. Preparation. Suggested Recipes. Suggested Handouts. Key Concepts GO FOR WHOLE GRAINS Introduction This lesson focuses on the grain food group, emphasizing the role of whole grains in maintaining a healthy diet and preventing disease. Participants will develop their

More information

SUBJECT: Determining Creditability of Breakfast Cereals for Child Nutrition Programs

SUBJECT: Determining Creditability of Breakfast Cereals for Child Nutrition Programs United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service DATE: November 28, 2006 MEMO CODE: TA01-2007 SUBJECT: Determining Creditability of Breakfast Cereals for Child Nutrition Programs 3101

More information

Fill Up with Fiber Presentation Guide

Fill Up with Fiber Presentation Guide Fill Up with Fiber Presentation Guide HANDOUTS SUPPLIES What is a Whole Grain > ½ cup size measuring cup Food Labels > 1 apple or orange Fiber in Foods List > Copies of handouts for participants Fill Up

More information

My Diabetic Meal Plan during Pregnancy

My Diabetic Meal Plan during Pregnancy My Diabetic Meal Plan during Pregnancy When you have diabetes and are pregnant, you need to eat small meals and snacks throughout the day to help control your blood sugar. This also helps you get in enough

More information

Lesson 3 Assessing My Eating Habits

Lesson 3 Assessing My Eating Habits Lesson 3 Assessing My Eating Habits Overview This lesson introduces the federal guidelines for healthy eating. Students assess their eating habits against these guidelines and make suggestions for improvement.

More information

Become a good grains detective

Become a good grains detective Lesson 3: Become a good grains detective Objectives: Time: Materials: Teach children about the grains food group. Identify what foods are in the grains category. Explain why whole grains are healthier

More information

Getting Started: General Guidelines (based on a 2,000 calorie/day diet) week 3 itinerary: My Plate and the Pyramid. $30 Bookstore Gift Card

Getting Started: General Guidelines (based on a 2,000 calorie/day diet) week 3 itinerary: My Plate and the Pyramid. $30 Bookstore Gift Card week 3 itinerary: My Plate and the Pyramid Getting Started: What types of food should I choose? What is a serving size? How much should I eat? These are questions we all ask and it takes a lot of Nergy

More information

Session 2b: Healthy Whole Grains Kindergarten through Second Grade

Session 2b: Healthy Whole Grains Kindergarten through Second Grade Healthy Ever After: Kids! Torrance Memorial Medical Center and Torrance Unified School District Prepared by Giselle Willeford, RD Revised by Emily Parker, MS, RD Session 2b: Healthy Whole Grains Kindergarten

More information

TRACKS Lesson Plan. Fiber Fill Up On Fiber! Grade: 9-12

TRACKS Lesson Plan. Fiber Fill Up On Fiber! Grade: 9-12 TRACKS Lesson Plan Fiber Fill Up On Fiber! Grade: 9-12 I. Nutrition Education Objective: Goal 1: Students will comprehend concepts consistent with USDA guidance related to eating and physical activity

More information

Health Basics Start with

Health Basics Start with Health Basics Start with GRAINS time 50 minutes overview of Lesson This lesson introduces students to the grains food group. Students will learn the importance of eating whole grains while learning which

More information

Nutrition for Runners

Nutrition for Runners Nutrition for Runners Nutrition is an important part of training A healthy balanced diet can help you feel and perform your best. Both fueling and refueling with high quality foods and beverages is important

More information

Vegetables, Fruits, Whole Grains, and Beans

Vegetables, Fruits, Whole Grains, and Beans Vegetables, Fruits, Session 2 Background Information Tips Goals Background Information Vegetables, Fruit, Why Are Vegetables and Fruits Important? Eating plenty of vegetables and fruits is a very important

More information

February 4, 2015. Dear Valued Customer:

February 4, 2015. Dear Valued Customer: February 4, 2015 Dear Valued Customer: On January 26, 2012, the US Department of Agriculture () Published The Nutrition Standards on the National School Lunch and Breakfast Program in the Federal Register.

More information

Fibe. Fiber and water work together in bowel regulation. Be sure to drink eight to ten (8 ounce) glasses of

Fibe. Fiber and water work together in bowel regulation. Be sure to drink eight to ten (8 ounce) glasses of r Fibe An important part of a healthy diet is eating a variety of fiber-rich foods, including whole-grain breads and cereals, fruits and vegetables, beans and nuts. Fiber is an important part of your diet.

More information

Carbohydrate Counting (Quiz Number: Manatee3032009)

Carbohydrate Counting (Quiz Number: Manatee3032009) Page 1 The goal of Carbohydrate Counting is to make clear to you which foods affect your blood glucose and then to spread these foods evenly throughout the day (or to match insulin peaks and durations).

More information

Title: Build Your Body with Iron Lesson Plan for Interactive Nutrition Education Center. Target Audience: PG, BF, PP, C, I

Title: Build Your Body with Iron Lesson Plan for Interactive Nutrition Education Center. Target Audience: PG, BF, PP, C, I Title: Build Your Body with Iron Lesson Plan for Interactive Nutrition Education Center Target Audience: PG, BF, PP, C, I Objectives: The client will: 1. Identify one or more sources of iron from foods

More information

High School. Sports Nutrition and Performance

High School. Sports Nutrition and Performance High School Sports Nutrition and Performance Project Sponsors USDA Project funded through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) School District of Philadelphia Department of Nutrition Sciences,

More information

Whole Wheat Chocolate Chip Cookies: An Introduction to Whole Grains

Whole Wheat Chocolate Chip Cookies: An Introduction to Whole Grains Objectives: The student will be introduced to whole grains, develop a basic understanding of what makes a whole grain and give examples of two or more whole grains. The student will be introduced to the

More information

-Grains are divided into 2 subgroups: whole grains and refined grains.

-Grains are divided into 2 subgroups: whole grains and refined grains. Nutrition (Pre-3 rd ) was written to educate young people, parents and teachers about where our food comes from. This guide provides nutrition facts, useful definitions, and additional websites for teachers

More information

Bagged Lunch vs. School Lunch

Bagged Lunch vs. School Lunch Bagged Lunch vs. School Lunch Parents: A breakdown of what a typical bagged lunch may cost VS. the cost of school lunch at Olmsted Falls Schools! (Prices are based on average retail costs of lunch ingredients.

More information

Title: Focus on Fiber Lesson Plan for Interactive Nutrition Education Center. Target Audience: PG, BF, PP, Children. Objectives: The client will:

Title: Focus on Fiber Lesson Plan for Interactive Nutrition Education Center. Target Audience: PG, BF, PP, Children. Objectives: The client will: Title: Focus on Fiber Lesson Plan for Interactive Nutrition Education Center Target Audience: PG, BF, PP, Children Objectives: The client will: 1. Identify high fiber foods available from WIC: whole grain

More information

Instructions for 3 Day Diet Analysis for Nutrition 219

Instructions for 3 Day Diet Analysis for Nutrition 219 Name Instructions for 3 Day Diet Analysis for Nutrition 219 1. Keep a record of everything you eat and drink for 3 days. Be specific. Was it white or wheat bread, 1% or 2% milk, 1 cup or 1½ cups, did you

More information

Choosing Foods at Meals and Snacks

Choosing Foods at Meals and Snacks Circular 631 A NUTRITION SERIES People with diabetes must balance foods high in carbohydrates and foods low in carbohydrates. Low-carbohydrate foods include vegetables, meats and nuts, and fats. High-carbohydrate

More information

4000 Calorie Meal Plan

4000 Calorie Meal Plan 4000 Calorie Meal Plan (Increase to 4,500 calories per day: 75 g CHO, 25 g protein, 12 g fat, see page 7 for examples) Each Breakfast selection provides approximately 1046 calories: 12g CHO, 57 g protein,

More information

Annual Menu

Annual Menu WEEK 1 Toasty O's [WG] English Muffin, 2 oz French Toast Stick [WG], 0.87 oz Crispy Rice Bagel, 1-2 oz Vegetable/Fruit Bananas [C] Apricots [A] Applesauce [C] Oranges [C] Fruit Cocktail [A, C] Fruit Cocktail

More information

Ready, Set, Start Counting!

Ready, Set, Start Counting! Ready, Set, Start Counting! Carbohydrate Counting a Tool to Help Manage Your Blood Glucose When you have diabetes, keeping your blood glucose in a healthy range will help you feel your best today and in

More information

The DASH eating plan to control high blood pressure

The DASH eating plan to control high blood pressure The DASH eating plan to control high blood pressure What does DASH stand for? DASH stands for Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (high blood pressure). The DASH eating plan is similar to other healthy

More information

Fiber. What is fiber? Fiber is a part of plant food. There are two types of fiber:

Fiber. What is fiber? Fiber is a part of plant food. There are two types of fiber: Fiber An important part of a healthy diet is eating fiber-rich foods. This handout will explain what fiber is, where it s found, and how to increase the amount of fiber in your diet. What is fiber? Fiber

More information

FIBER IN YOUR DIET WHAT IS FIBER?

FIBER IN YOUR DIET WHAT IS FIBER? FIBER IN YOUR DIET WHAT IS FIBER? Fiber is the portion of plant foods that our bodies cannot absorb or digest. Fiber is found primarily in fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains. There is no fiber

More information

Healthy Foods for my School

Healthy Foods for my School yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, yum, Healthy Foods for my School Nutrition Standards for Saskatchewan Schools Schools are an ideal place

More information

APPENDIX A O N E - W E E K MEAL PLAN

APPENDIX A O N E - W E E K MEAL PLAN This one-week meal plan is based on Canada s Food Guide recommended servings for a senior woman. Senior men should add one Food Guide Serving of grain products a day. (For example, a senior man could add

More information

DIETS AND DIET MODIFICATION LIST. Pudding: Liquids that have been thickened to a pudding consistency. They remain on the spoon in a soft mass.

DIETS AND DIET MODIFICATION LIST. Pudding: Liquids that have been thickened to a pudding consistency. They remain on the spoon in a soft mass. DIETS AND DIET MODIFICATION LIST I. LIQUIDS a. Thick Liquids Pudding: Liquids that have been thickened to a pudding consistency. They remain on the spoon in a soft mass. Honey: Liquids that have been thickened

More information

MAKING A GROCERY LIST LESSON 8 OF MONEY FOR FOOD

MAKING A GROCERY LIST LESSON 8 OF MONEY FOR FOOD MAKING A GROCERY LIST LESSON 8 OF MONEY FOR FOOD Learner Objective Participants will prepare a grocery list of foods needed for family meals for at least 3 days, based on planned meals and snacks. Teaching

More information

2013-2014 Annual Menu

2013-2014 Annual Menu WEEK 1 Toasty O's [WG] English Muffin, 2 oz French Toast Stick [WG], 0.87 oz Crispy Rice Bagel, 1-2 oz Vegetable/Fruit Bananas [C] Apricots [A] Applesauce [C] Oranges [C] Fruit Cocktail [A, C] Fruit Cocktail

More information

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION - BREADS

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION - BREADS NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION - BREADS Cracked Wheat Serving Size (28g) 1 oz Servings Per Container 32 slices Calories 60 Calories from fat Total Fat 0g 0% Sodium 150mg 6% Total Carbohydrate 12g 4% Dietary Fiber

More information

Dietary Guidelines For Americans

Dietary Guidelines For Americans Dietary Guidelines For Americans Eat a variety of foods Maintain healthy weight Choose a diet low in fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol Choose a diet plenty of vegetables, fruits, and grain products Use

More information

The Five Food Groups and Nutrition Facts

The Five Food Groups and Nutrition Facts session 4 The Five Food Groups and Nutrition Facts (Note to the presenter: Comments in parentheses are instructions to follow while giving the presentation. Do not read the comments to participants. This

More information

10 Week Nutrition Plan

10 Week Nutrition Plan 10 Week Nutrition Plan Welcome and thank you for your interest in taking the next step to health! We hope you find this eating plan a starting point to making healthier food choices and a tool to reach

More information

From the Fryer. Chocolate Chip Cookie... $.90 Gluten Free Brownie... $ 1.50 Dessert Special... $ priced accordingly

From the Fryer. Chocolate Chip Cookie... $.90 Gluten Free Brownie... $ 1.50 Dessert Special... $ priced accordingly Gluten Free We understand that Celiac disease and gluten intolerance is a serious medical condition and that you need the assurance that those preparing food for you are extremely cautious in the cooking

More information

Gaining Weight for Athletes

Gaining Weight for Athletes Gaining Weight for Athletes Prepared by Jenn Van Ness, ATC June 2008 Gain Weight the Healthy Way To gain one pound, you need to eat approximately 500 more calories a day. Approximately one pound of fat

More information

Save Time and Money at the Grocery Store

Save Time and Money at the Grocery Store Save Time and Money at the Grocery Store Plan a Grocery List Making a list helps you recall items you need and also saves you time. Organize your list according to the layout of the grocery store. For

More information

Carbohydrate Counting for Patients with Diabetes. Lauren Dorman, MS RD CDE Registered Dietitian & Certified Diabetes Educator

Carbohydrate Counting for Patients with Diabetes. Lauren Dorman, MS RD CDE Registered Dietitian & Certified Diabetes Educator Carbohydrate Counting for Patients with Diabetes Lauren Dorman, MS RD CDE Registered Dietitian & Certified Diabetes Educator Program Purpose To increase knowledge of carbohydrate counting skills for nurses

More information

Gluten-Free Nutrition Therapy General Overview

Gluten-Free Nutrition Therapy General Overview Gluten-Free Nutrition Therapy General Overview Your child has a sensitivity to gluten, the protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. Gluten-free nutrition therapy will allow your child s intestine to heal.

More information

Male Active. #phen375.

Male Active. #phen375. Male Active #phen375 www.phen375.com Below you'll find your new meal plans for success. Each of these meal plans have been specifically formatted with the precise number of calories, proteins, and carbohydrates

More information

Instructions for Using the Meal Plan and Daily Food Checklist:

Instructions for Using the Meal Plan and Daily Food Checklist: Instructions for Using the Meal Plan and Daily Food Checklist: 1. Start by selecting your calorie level based on the below chart. For example, if you would like to maintain your body weight, find your

More information

SOLID FATS AND ADDED SUGARS (SoFAS) Know the Limits

SOLID FATS AND ADDED SUGARS (SoFAS) Know the Limits COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, LEXINGTON, KY, 40546 NEP-207B SOLID FATS AND ADDED SUGARS (SoFAS) Know the Limits The U.S. Department of Agriculture s Dietary

More information

4-H Leader Guide. Compiled by: Rusty Hohlt Project Specialist, Texas Grow! Eat! Go!

4-H Leader Guide. Compiled by: Rusty Hohlt Project Specialist, Texas Grow! Eat! Go! 4-H Leader Guide Compiled by: Rusty Hohlt Project Specialist, Texas Grow! Eat! Go! M yplate was developed as an effort to promote healthy eating. The MyPlate icon is easy to understand and it helps to

More information

Breakfast 1 egg, hard boiled 1/2 meat and alternative ½ c. fruit salad ½ c. high fiber cereal (to top salad)

Breakfast 1 egg, hard boiled 1/2 meat and alternative ½ c. fruit salad ½ c. high fiber cereal (to top salad) Monday 1 egg, hard boiled 1/ ½ c. fruit salad ½ c. high fiber cereal (to top salad) ¾ c. low-fat yogurt, plain 1 c. herbal tea ½ c. orange juice Tuna pita: ½ c. canned tuna, packaged in water 1 tsp reduced

More information

Appendix A Food Sources of Vitamins and Minerals

Appendix A Food Sources of Vitamins and Minerals Appendix A Food Sources of Vitamins and Minerals Appendix A 229 Appendix A Food Sources of Vitamins and Minerals Vitamin A (Retinol) Food Amount IU* Liver 3 oz 45,400 Crab 2 cup,680 Egg medium 590 Fats

More information

Eating after a Gastrectomy

Eating after a Gastrectomy Patient Education diet and nutrition It is important to reduce your intake of concentrated sweets following a gastrectomy. Eating after a Gastrectomy This information describes post-gastrectomy diet guidelines.

More information

Nutrition: Get the Facts. Lynn Henderson, MS, RD, LDN

Nutrition: Get the Facts. Lynn Henderson, MS, RD, LDN Nutrition: Get the Facts Lynn Henderson, MS, RD, LDN Macronutirents Carbohydrate Body and brain s fuel source. Protein Helps build and repair muscle tissues. Important in satiety factor. Fat - Provides

More information

Boston Public Health Commission Healthy Food Procurement Guidelines. Standards for Purchased Beverages and Foods

Boston Public Health Commission Healthy Food Procurement Guidelines. Standards for Purchased Beverages and Foods Boston Public Health Commission Healthy Food Procurement Guidelines Standards for Purchased Beverages and Foods Boston Public Health Commission Healthy Food Procurement Guidelines Standards for Purchased

More information

Vegetarian Diet Throughout the Life Cycle: Infancy to Teenager Years

Vegetarian Diet Throughout the Life Cycle: Infancy to Teenager Years Vegetarian Diet Throughout the Life Cycle: Infancy to Teenager Years Before your child or family decides to change to a vegetarian diet, it is important to know that all vegetarian diets are not alike.

More information

Corn Allergy. Cooking Tips to Replace Corn in Recipes

Corn Allergy. Cooking Tips to Replace Corn in Recipes Corn Allergy Your child has been diagnosed with a corn allergy. The only treatment is to avoid all food products that contain corn or a corn derivative as an ingredient. Corn is not considered a major

More information

Whole Grain-Rich Foods Training Participant s Workbook

Whole Grain-Rich Foods Training Participant s Workbook Whole Grain-Rich Foods Training Participant s Workbook PROJECT COORDINATOR Theresa Stretch, MS, RDN, CP-FS Acting Executive Director, Aleshia Hall-Campbell, PhD, MPH Institute of Child Nutrition The University

More information

Carbohydrate counting a pocket guide

Carbohydrate counting a pocket guide counting a pocket guide www.bayerdiabetes.ca Contents Starches 3 Vegetables 4 Fruit/Fruit juices 5 Milk/Yoghurt 5 Fast foods 6 Proteins (meat/meat substitutes) 6 Drinks 6 Sweets/Sugary foods 7 Combination

More information

ro INTROduct ioninint

ro INTROduct ioninint ro INTROduct ioninint Chapter 6: Menu Planning and Sample Menus For some participants, the food they eat at the CACFP adult day care program will be the tastiest and healthiest food they will have all

More information

Mealtime Memo. for Child Care

Mealtime Memo. for Child Care Mealtime Memo National Food Service Management Institute The University of Mississippi for Child Care No. 10, 2008 Teaching Children about the Food Groups: Meat and Meat Alternates This Mealtime Memo focuses

More information

ChildcareNashville.com

ChildcareNashville.com ChildcareNashville.com childcare nashville/cooks academy We started with 12 child care centers... We have grown to 27 Cooks Academy participants and over 90 Childcare Nashville providers. The following

More information

Mealtime Memo. Timesaving Tips for Mealtime

Mealtime Memo. Timesaving Tips for Mealtime Mealtime Memo National Food Service Management Institute The University of Mississippi for Child Care No. 6, 2009 Timesaving Tips for Mealtime Family day care home providers have a busy day. It starts

More information

Eating to feel your best

Eating to feel your best Eating to feel your best Choose healthy foods. Eat foods from these groups every day. Grains Choose whole grain bread and pasta. Vegetables Choose dark green and bright red, yellow, and orange veggies.

More information

Healthy Snacking for a Healthy Lifestyle

Healthy Snacking for a Healthy Lifestyle Healthy Snacking for a Healthy Lifestyle Getting Started 1. Review lesson plan before each session. 2. Copy handouts: a. Healthy Snacking questions b. Healthy Snacking for a Healthy Lifestyle c. Recipes

More information

Ready, Set, Start Counting!

Ready, Set, Start Counting! Ready, Set, Start Counting! Carbohydrate Counting a Tool to Help Manage Your Blood Glucose When you have diabetes, keeping your blood glucose in a healthy range can help you feel your best today and in

More information

Color the Tray with Vegetable Subgroups

Color the Tray with Vegetable Subgroups Color the Tray with Vegetable Subgroups The California Healthy Kids Resource Center and the California Department of Education, Nutrition Services Division Partner: California Department of Education,

More information

Nutrition: General Guidelines for Infants to Toddlers

Nutrition: General Guidelines for Infants to Toddlers Nutrition: General Guidelines for Infants to Toddlers Beginning at 12 months of age: - Between 12 15 months of age, babies will master drinking from a cup and feeding himself/herself with fingers and a

More information

Shaklee 180 nutrition guides

Shaklee 180 nutrition guides Shaklee 180 nutrition guides As America s #1 Natural Nutrition Company, it s important to us that you lose weight the healthy way. Take a look at these nutritional guides based on your Shaklee 180 kit

More information

Registered Trade Mark

Registered Trade Mark 2008 High Energy, High Protein, Low Fiber Guidelines Registered Trade Mark High Energy, High Protein, Low Fibre Guidelines Eating well, even though you may not feel hungry, is an important part of taking

More information

Supporting School Food Guidelines. information for parents and caregivers

Supporting School Food Guidelines. information for parents and caregivers Supporting School Food Guidelines information for parents and caregivers HEALTHY STUDENTS HEALTHY SCHOOLS 2008 3 Healthy choices available in our schools This brochure provides parents and caregivers with

More information

MEN'S FITNESS FAT TO FIT CHALLENGE CALORIE MEAL PLAN WEEK 4

MEN'S FITNESS FAT TO FIT CHALLENGE CALORIE MEAL PLAN WEEK 4 Day 1 1/2 cup granola 180 36 6 2.5 6 oz low fat vanilla yogurt 140 25 7 1.5 1 cup strawberries, sliced 57.1 13.7 1.2 0.5 TOTAL 377.1 74.7 14.2 4.5 1 cup green grapes 110 29 1.2 0.3 1 oz pistachio nuts

More information

Diabetes Eating Healthy

Diabetes Eating Healthy How do I manage my diabetes? Diabetes Eating Healthy It is important to control diabetes by living a healthy lifestyle. This includes: eating healthy remaining active watching your weight taking medication

More information

Welcome to the Breakfast in the Classroom Nutrition Information Page.

Welcome to the Breakfast in the Classroom Nutrition Information Page. Salem Public Schools Food & Nutrition Services Department Welcome to the Breakfast in the Classroom Nutrition Information Page. There exists no safe level of inadequate nutrition for healthy, growing children.

More information

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY BREAKFAST

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY BREAKFAST CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER/FAMILY CHILD CARE WEEK 1 DATES: December 29 - January 2, 2015 Diced Peaches Grape Juice Banana Slices Orange Slices Pineapple Juice English Muffin Whole Wheat Waffles Rice Krispies

More information

The Glycemic Index of Foods

The Glycemic Index of Foods What is the Glycemic Index (GI)? It is a method used to classify carbohydrate containing foods, according to the effect that they may have on blood sugar levels. It is claimed that the higher the GI number,

More information

Managing Constipation with a High Fibre Diet

Managing Constipation with a High Fibre Diet Managing Constipation with a High Fibre Diet What is constipation? Hard bowel movements (stools) that are difficult to pass May cause discomfort, abdominal pain or bloating What can cause constipation?

More information

MEAL PLANNING FOR MECHANICAL SOFT DIET

MEAL PLANNING FOR MECHANICAL SOFT DIET MEAL PLANNING FOR MECHANICAL SOFT DIET Definition of Terms Calories Protein Blenderized Pureed Units of energy. A nutrient used by your body for growth and repair. The best sources are milk, meats, fish,

More information

HEALTHY RECOMMENDATIONS AND PORTION CONTROL FACTSHEET

HEALTHY RECOMMENDATIONS AND PORTION CONTROL FACTSHEET HEALTHY RECOMMENDATIONS AND PORTION CONTROL FACTSHEET Dining Services Portion control can be a major obstacle, especially for college students with on-campus meal plans. As you can see on the table below,

More information

Second Grade Nutrition Lesson Plan Page 1 of 7

Second Grade Nutrition Lesson Plan Page 1 of 7 Second Grade Nutrition Lesson Plan Page 1 of 7 Dear Educator, As you know, a balanced diet is critical for optimal growth and development of children. While food is a necessary and delicious part of life,

More information

Tips for Shopping Wisely at the Grocery Store

Tips for Shopping Wisely at the Grocery Store Tips for Shopping Wisely at the Grocery Store For successful planning, be sure to keep in mind: u The maximum amount you can spend on food. u The five basic food groups. Plan Ahead Start With A Meal Plan

More information

Eating well with Diabetes. Information to help you make healthy food choices with diabetes

Eating well with Diabetes. Information to help you make healthy food choices with diabetes Eating well with Diabetes Information to help you make healthy food choices with diabetes Table of contents Page How do I eat well to help manage my diabetes?... The food groups... Serving sizes... What

More information

Meal Planning for a Mushy Soft Diet After Nissen Fundoplication

Meal Planning for a Mushy Soft Diet After Nissen Fundoplication Meal Planning for a Mushy Soft Diet After Nissen Fundoplication Name: Date: Dietitian: Telephone: Questions? CALL YOUR DIETITIAN! Patient Food and Nutrition Services University of Michigan Hospital 1500

More information

AMWAY FOOD EXCHANGE GUIDE. Know the exchanges of your favorite AMWAY foods to keep healthy eating in check!

AMWAY FOOD EXCHANGE GUIDE. Know the exchanges of your favorite AMWAY foods to keep healthy eating in check! AMWAY FOOD EXCHANGE GUIDE Know the exchanges of your favorite AMWAY foods to keep healthy eating in check! Food Exchange Facts Food exchanges can help you eat consistent amounts of macronutrients, such

More information

Glycemic Index (GI) Food Chart

Glycemic Index (GI) Food Chart Glycemic Index (GI) Food Chart Below you'll find the Glycemic Index (GI) of most common foods. As stated in my original video, your goal should be to eat low and medium GI foods, while staying away from

More information

Few foods can claim to play such a prominent part of the staple diet in so

Few foods can claim to play such a prominent part of the staple diet in so Whole Grain Vs Whole Wheat Vs Whole Meal Vs Granary Refined Bread? Which is best? What to choose? By Ike Muoma Bsc (Hon) Few foods can claim to play such a prominent part of the staple diet in so many

More information

Take Control Nutrition Tools for Diabetes. 50/50 plate Portions Servings

Take Control Nutrition Tools for Diabetes. 50/50 plate Portions Servings Take Control Nutrition Tools for Diabetes 50/50 plate Portions Servings Eat more Vegetables Especially non starchy vegetables Choosing Foods to manage blood glucose Select a variety of colors and types

More information

Carbohydrate Counting for Pediatric Patients With Type 1 Diabetes. Review Date 4/08 K-0591

Carbohydrate Counting for Pediatric Patients With Type 1 Diabetes. Review Date 4/08 K-0591 Carbohydrate Counting for Pediatric Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Review Date 4/08 K-0591 Program Purpose To increase knowledge of carbohydrate counting and insulin management skills for those caring for

More information