McDaniel College Biennial Review Drug Free Schools and Communities Act

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "McDaniel College 2011-13 Biennial Review Drug Free Schools and Communities Act"

Transcription

1 McDaniel College Biennial Review Drug Free Schools and Communities Act 1

2 Table of Contents Student Biennial Review...3 Descriptions of the Alcohol and Other Drug Program Services...4 Summaries of AOD Program Strengths and Weaknesses...4 AOD Accomplishments The Success List...6 Review of Student Data...9 McDaniel s Efforts to Reduce Drug/Alcohol Abuse...11 Recommendations for Revising AOD Prevention Efforts...16 Procedures for Distributing AOD Policy to Students...18 McDaniel College Alcohol Policy...20 Employee Biennial Review 29 Annual Notice Substance Abuse Policies and Procedures for Employees 29 Employee Substance Drug Testing Policy Review of Employee Data.35 Employee Assistance Program..36 Disciplinary Action Related to Employee Substance Abuse Issues..36 Employee Educational Activities Summary of Employee Program Strengths and Weaknesses 37 Biennial Review Committee.38 Biennial Review Meeting Minutes 38 Distribution Certification

3 Introduction-Student Biennial Review The Division of Student Affairs Leadership Team at McDaniel College prepared the following report to meet the requirements of the1989 amendments to the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act, as articulated in Part 86, the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations. As explained: In order to certify its compliance with the Part 86 Regulations, an IHE (Institutions of Higher Education) must adopt and implement a drug prevention program to prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by all students and employees both on school premises and as part of any of its activities. Creating a program that complies with the Regulations requires an IHE to do the following: (1) Prepare a written policy on alcohol and other drugs; (2) Develop a sound method for distribution of the policy to every student and IHE staff member each year; and (3) Prepare a biennial report on the effectiveness of its alcohol and other drug (AOD) programs and the consistency of policy enforcement The Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations require IHEs to review their AOD programs and policies every two years. The required review has two objectives: (1) to determine the effectiveness of, and to implement any needed changes to, the AOD program; and (2) to ensure that the disciplinary sanctions for violating standards of conduct are enforced consistently. Because the Regulations do not specify what a biennial review should include or how it should be conducted, schools have considerable leeway in determining how to conduct and what to include in their biennial review. In practice, biennial reviews range from 2 to almost 30 pages. The more thorough biennial reviews include (1) descriptions of the AOD program elements; (2) a statement of AOD program goals and a discussion of goal achievement; (3) summaries of AOD program strengths and weaknesses; (4) procedures for distributing AOD policy to students and employees; (5) copies of the policies distributed to students and employees; and (6) recommendations for revising AOD programs. Although IHEs produce a wide variety of acceptable biennial reviews, the most useful reviews point to areas in a program or policy that need improvement or that can continue unchanged (Higher Education Center, 2001). McDaniel College has developed and updated a comprehensive written policy on alcohol and other drugs, as well as successfully distributing this policy to all undergraduate students. This report represents the Biennial Review of Alcohol and Drug Prevention Programs at McDaniel College as required by the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations. In this report, student alcohol and other drug surveys are evaluated, as suggested by the Department of Education, to help measure policy and program effectiveness. In addition, the prevention initiatives the College has implemented to minimize drug and alcohol problems are summarized. 3

4 Descriptions of the Alcohol and Other Drug Program Services McDaniel College s Wellness Center and Counseling Services provides a range of services to assist students with alcohol and drug issues. Students are provided with caring and confidential services, which include assessment, individual counseling, referral to community substance abuse providers, and self- help programs. The Alcohol Awareness and Prevention Committee (AAPC) provide coordination for the alcohol education and prevention efforts at McDaniel College. The Wellness Center Counselor/Alcohol Prevention Coordinator chairs the interdisciplinary team and members represent other departments from within the Division of Student Affairs. Prevention programs are provided campus wide each semester to various student groups including student athletes, fraternities and sororities, first year students, and students living on-campus. All students benefit from marketing campaigns and general wellness outreach programs. Students who violate campus AOD policies are referred to the Associate Dean of Student Affairs through the Student Conduct process and to the Wellness Center, depending on the circumstances of their AOD violation. All student violators will receive education. Students are assigned an AOD assessment, and receive counseling if appropriate, and warranted by the violation. Statement of AOD Program Goals and a Discussion of Goal Achievement The mission of the AOD program at McDaniel College is to create a college environment that promotes student wellness and academic success by providing multidisciplinary efforts to reduce the prevalence of alcohol and other drug problems. The goals of the campus AOD prevention efforts include: To increase students awareness of the risks involved in high-risk drinking and drug use. To provide various AOD education programs to students throughout the academic year. To provide various alcohol-free late night events as an alternative to drinking. To support an overall culture of responsible drinking at the College. To provide student groups an opportunity to assist with or participate in the sponsorship of AOD education events. To expand the focus on environmental strategies as a best practice approach to prevention. Summaries of AOD Program Strengths and Weaknesses Strengths The major strength of McDaniel College s prevention outreach is the collaborations that have occurred between the various departments and personnel on campus. McDaniel College continues to have a strong relationship with the Westminster community. Carroll 4

5 County s Health Department s Substance Abuse Prevention Coordinator and the Coordinator of the Maryland Strategic Prevention Framework grant continue to be key partners in the development and implementation of new AOD education and intervention programming. McDaniel College is a member of the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems. The Maryland Collaborative was created and funded by the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) with the goal of making a significant and measurable difference in excessive drinking and related problems on college campuses in Maryland (Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems, 2013, p. ii). This 5-year initiative involves staff training, best practices, data gathering, technical assistance in environmental strategies and individual intervention protocols. Please visit the Maryland Collaborative website, for more information and to download our the Guide to Best Practices. The licensed mental health professionals in the Wellness Center who provide assessment, brief intervention, and counseling are well trained and experienced. Weaknesses McDaniel College does not have a full-time position dedicated only to alcohol and drug prevention and intervention. However the Alcohol Awareness and Prevention Committee provides significant programmatic support in the area of substance abuse prevention. The last nationally normed campus-wide survey of alcohol use among McDaniel College students was completed in However McDaniel s work with the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems will include provide an opportunity to implement a new normed statewide assessment tool. 5

6 AAPC Committee and Other Prevention Accomplishments - The Success List Alcohol and Drug Awareness training to Resident Assistants regarding high-risk drinking, blood alcohol content, alcohol poisoning, and alcohol abuse prevention among residents. ( ) Peer Mentor Training reviewed on-campus mental health resources, basic helping skills, effective communication, appropriate boundaries, recognizing and referring students in distress, and alcohol abuse prevention. ( ) CHOICES Student Theater Performance during First-Year student orientation addressed multiple student life and health issues including alcohol and drug use, sexual violence, and mental health. Wellness Center staff train and supervise student cast members. ( ) Happy Hour with Mike Green Alcohol prevention program during First-Year student orientation. A brief assessment was handed out to students who attended. The assessment data suggested that students learned something from the program, would recommend the program to a friend, and many reported motivation to alter behavior after attending the event. ( ) The Wellness Center continued to mail BRAD Birthday Cards (signed by the VP/Dean of Students) to all students turning 21, in order to encourage them to celebrate responsibly, and identify the signs of alcohol poisoning. Safe Spring Break Table. The 2-hour event included contests, giveaways, a beer goggle remote control car race, and information on alcohol abuse and sexual behavior. Staff form the Carroll County Health Department provided information on skin damage, and offered students a chance to use their skin/sun damage analyzer. Staff from Department of Campus Safety, Student Affairs Area Coordinators, and the Wellness Center facilitated the event with approximately 75 students stopping to participate. (March 2012) Alcohol Education Class for Level 1 violators of college alcohol and drug policies. Beginning in the spring of 2013, the Wellness Center collaborated with the Alcohol Prevention Coordinator for the Carroll County Health Department to redesign the Alcohol Education class for violators of college alcohol policy. ( ) Tie One On t-shirt event during Spring Fling, annual outdoor event. Students had the opportunity to tie-dye free t-shirts printed with an alcohol abuse prevention message. Once completed, the shirts were hung in the quad to dry, and subsequently displayed a prevention message throughout the event. The goal of this event was to promote a prevention message during an event when historically many students engage in binge drinking behaviors. (2011, 2012) AAPC members and Department of Campus Safety demonstrated SIDNE, the go-cart simulation for impaired and distracted driving, to The Carroll County Health Department and other community members. The demonstration also included the other interactive program modules that were part of SIDNE. (2012) Twisted Thursday House Party : An alcohol awareness program provided a variety of interactive educational games and activities. This was a collaborative event with the various departments in Student Affairs and the Substance Abuse Prevention Coordinator at Carroll County Health Department. (2012) Late Nights at McDaniel was a new late-night programming model beginning in Fall 2013, to offer alternatives on campus for students instead of consuming alcohol. 6

7 o Late night Carnival: AAPC provided an alcohol awareness activity in which students played video games on the Wii console with and without drunk goggles to demonstrate the impairment caused by alcohol. All AAPC committee members assisted in planning and working the event students attended. (9/12/13) o Late Nights at McDaniel AAPC Event: Battle of the Sexes Game Night. Included Jeopardy game that included components of pop culture trivia, alcohol education, and sexual health education. Also included Minute To Win It competitions, some of which included the use of drunk goggles to demonstrate the impairment caused by alcohol consumption. 140 Students attended. (9/19/14) o Late Nights at McDaniel AAPC Event: Party in the Pub. Alcohol-free social event with karaoke, snacks, and trivia game with pop culture and alcohol education components. 216 Students attended. (10/17/13) o Late Nights at McDaniel AAPC Event: SIDNE and Snacks. Facilitated two interactive program modules- the SIDNE go-cart simulation of impaired driving and the drunk goggles. Snacks and music provided. The program was held in the gym. 45 students attended. (11/8/13). o Qualtrics surveys were distributed by to all attendees at AAPC Late Night events. These surveys asked for basic demographics questions such as what class in school, residential vs. commuter status, and length of time at event. Questions about most popular night to drink on campus and what student would have been doing if not at event were included. Students were asked open-ended questions about what they liked most about the event, what could be improved, and suggestions for future events. Specific questions were asked about whether new information was gained from educational components of activities. The results of these assessments suggested an overall positive experience for students, high numbers of first-year students in attendance, and educational value was achieved for some students. AAPC co-sponsored the campus-wide Fall Fest event. The Substance Abuse Prevention Coordinator from the Carroll County Health Department and the Coordinator for the Maryland Strategic Prevention Framework Grant for Underage Drinking both helped staff the event. The Intoxiclock activity and Drunk goggles were used to educate students about the effects of impairment. Mocktails were served. 400 students attended the event. (2012, 2013) Members of AAPC regularly attended meetings of the Maryland Strategic Prevention Framework coalition at the Carroll County Health Department to discuss underage drinking and prevention issues in Carroll County. ( ) In addition to alcohol and drug specific programs, the Wellness Center provided a wide range of wellness programming: : 22, : 26 and Fall 2013: 17 AAPC received a $1000 grant from The Towson University ATOD Prevention Center to help fund alcohol abuse prevention efforts. ( ). The Maryland Strategic Prevention Framework grant (coordinated through Carroll County s Health Department) provided funding for Project Sticker Shock, a community activity designed to raise awareness about selling alcohol to minors. McDaniel students participated in this project in Spring 2013 and are scheduled to participate in spring

8 Every first-year student has completed an online alcohol education program beginning in the summer of There has been a 100% course completion rate. For the first two years, Alcohol Wise was utilized as the online course. In the summer of 2013, the College transitioned to Alcohol EDU. During the freshmen orientation program all students received an alcohol/drug policy presentation conducted by a member of the Division of Student Affairs leadership team. The Office of Residence Life offered both mandated and optional Substance Free Housing opportunities. All first year student residence halls were designated as substance free, applying to any non-traditional age first year students that elected to live on campus as well as student staff who worked in those halls. In response to the increase in college drug policy violations, McDaniel College began sanctioning students to complete Marijuana 101 for first time violators. Marijuana 101 is a 6-lesson course that specifically addressed marijuana use and included the echeckup TO GO brief intervention for marijuana (formerly e-toke). The Marijuana 101 course also included a 30-day Part 2 to measure changes in students attitudes and behavior. The course was individualized for each student and integrated his or her personalized feedback throughout the interactive portions of the course. The Student Outreach Network (SON), is a group of campus administrators from Student Affairs, Academic Affairs, Athletics, Diversity and Multicultural Affairs, Student Academic Success Services, Residence Life, Student Engagement, Campus Wellness, and Campus Safety, met weekly to discuss students that have been referred to group members or otherwise have triggered some form of alert/concern. These cases could range from a recent loss of a family member, a student doing very poorly or frequently skipping attendance in a class, or a student that a faculty member is concerned about because they seem to be under the influence when they attend class. Some of these concerns are directly related to possible alcohol or drug abuse, and the SON group identified an individual or team to reach out to students to connect them with resources. Department of Campus Safety (DoCS) received a $25,000 grant from State Farm to purchase SIDNE, which was used both on and off campus to combat alcohol impaired driving. SIDNE -Simulated Impaired Driving Experience Simulated Impaired Driving Experience, or SIDNE is a battery-powered vehicle that simulates the effects of distraction and impairment from alcohol and other drugs on a motorist s driving skills. Programs are offered on and off campus for students and the community. The SIDNE program began in April of 2012 and in this two-year period a total of nineteen programs was implemented. DoCS officers attend party prevention and controlled party dispersal training at University of Maryland in November 2011 that was provided by The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The training was tied to the RAMM grant that the department was a participant in. RAMM grant provided financial compensation for officer overtime to work with Westminster Police Department in efforts to crack down on underage drinking on high student trafficked areas connected to College property. Safety Bug, an actual vehicle that is set up as a drunk driving simulator was brought to campus in March of Students were able to drive a real car and feel the effects of impaired driving. 8

9 Overview of Student Conduct Data Incident Reports generated by the Residence Life and Campus Safety Departments total reported incidents total reported incidents total reported incidents total reported incidents The total number of reports generated decreased by 18%. College Alcohol Policy Violations total violations total violations total violations total violations The number of alcohol policy violations decreased by 44%. Alcohol Poisonings total transports total transports total transports total transports The number of students transported to the hospital for alcohol poisoning decreased by 39%. Illegal Drug Policy Violations total violations total violations total violations total violations The number of illegal drug violations decreased by 45%. Off Campus Violations total reported incidents total reported incidents total reported incidents total reported incidents The number of reported off campus incidents decreased by 26%. Explanations for the decline in drug and alcohol policy violations: Alcohol Wise or Alcohol EDU online education course completed by all new students. Resident assistants and peer mentors reaching out to new students to encourage campus involvement in the Office of Student Engagement programming initiatives. More upper class students are engaged in campus events and organizations so their focus is not excessive substance use. Stronger leadership among student athletes who have clear expectations of expected student-athlete conduct. 9

10 Strengthened Greek community that is more focused on the positive aspects of Greek life involvement. Newly added late-night venues, such as pizza shop, coffeehouse, convenience store, 24- hour creative learning library spaces, expanded event programming and intramural activities. 10

11 McDaniel College s Comprehensive Efforts to Reduce Alcohol and Drug Abuse Associate Dean of Student Affairs Office In fall 2011, McDaniel College began utilizing the National Assessment on Student Adjudication Processes (NASCAP) instrument to assess the effectiveness of the student conduct process, including the impact of the educational sanctions assigned. o The College received a yearly summary report from NASCAP that includes an overview of the assessment data collected during the previous academic year from undergraduate students referred to the Student Conduct Process in response to documented behaviors that may violate a College Policy. At the conclusion of the student conduct process, a student received an summarizing the findings and sanctions assigned as a result of the process. This also included a link to the NASCAP survey that explained the type of questions that will be asked of the student and how the data collected was utilized to improve the educational experience afforded to students through the student conduct process. o The yearly summary report also provided a benchmark analysis of McDaniel data and data gathered from institutions across the country. This final report highlighted suggested areas of improvement for the student conduct process in moving forward. The report analyzed the feedback provided by students in three areas: student learning outcomes; system efficacy; and environmental press. Student learning outcomes referred to an individual student s development, values clarification, and likelihood to change future behavior. System efficacy, or how the student conduct process occurred procedurally. The environmental press component examined the influence community members have on one another; to what extent students held each other accountable; and whether faculty and staff reinforced academic integrity and student conduct policies. o To increase the student response rate of the NASCAP survey, monthly reminder s were sent to all students referred to the student conduct process encouraging them to complete the survey and providing the link. Students received reminder s approximately 3 times. Office of Residence Life All events organized by the Office of Residence Life are strictly alcohol-free. During the academic year there were 334 events (4576 student attendees) that the Residence Life staff organized or brought residents to that were happening on campus in order to get more students exposed to the information/topics and develop connections between the campus community. Following changes to the Residence Life programming model and expectations of event planning/advertising, during the academic year there were 396 events with 7124 student attendees. During Fall 2013, there were 125 events with 5081 student attendees. During the training program that Resident Assistants completed each August, they received information on alcohol and drug resources on campus, how to identify commonly used paraphernalia, campus policies on drugs and alcohol, and 11

12 alcohol/drug impacts on sexual assault. They also participated in role play scenarios where they practiced confronting a wide variety of issues that they may encounter in the residence halls, including a party scene with mock intoxicated students and a sexual assault case. Affinity Housing, a student housing option, where students can applied in groups for clustered housing, with the expectation that each member of the group fulfilled a certain number of community service hours each semester. In these clusters, if any member of the group is under 21, the entire cluster was designated as substance free. Greek Organizations are placed together in clusters, filling a floor or wing of a residence hall. These locations are designated as substance free. Resident Assistants facilitated annual community meetings with their residents to review information about college policies on alcohol and drugs, crime prevention, and the Clery Act. Wellness Center and Counseling Services Facilitated alcohol and drug education sessions in the residence halls, classrooms, and in fraternities and sororities. Served as a media spokesperson for alcohol and drug issues. Implemented social norm and social marketing campaigns utilizing newspapers, radio, and bus advertisements. Informed policy and programming efforts through serving on state, community, and university alcohol and drug coalitions. Coordinated campus-wide, multidisciplinary efforts to reduce the prevalence of alcohol and other drug problems. Educated new students about campus alcohol and drug issues. Offered confidential screening, individual counseling and group therapy for students with needs for substance abuse services. Coordinated Counseling Center services for students with alcohol/drug problems as well as for students who are affected by (current or past) alcohol/substance abuse of parents or friends. Met with clients that identify alcohol or substance abuse as their primary problem. Provided information to students related to Alcoholics Anonymous. Developed the Wellness Center Facebook page. Provided information, public service announcements, upcoming events, psycho-educational information, health and wellness information, and links to outside resources. A variety of topics tailored to current campus issues and concerns were covered, including anxiety, alcohol poisoning, safer sex, prevention of cold and flu, healthy relationships, exam stress and relaxation, helping a friend with sexual assault, ethnicity and race, and encouraging the utilization of campus resources. ( ) Created and disseminated bulletin boards and public awareness announcements related to alcohol and drug prevention. ( ) Provided wellness themed information tables: : 4, : 6 and Fall 2013: 3. Alcohol Awareness Month Programming, October

13 o Light Up the Night Luminaries signified the number of deaths due to drunk driving along with the drunk driving prevention testimony by speaker Miguel Vela. Upwards of 50 students attended the event. Alpha Sigma Tau sorority assisted with the program. o Midterm Massage 36 students received free 10-min. massages. Handouts and tips on stress management and relaxation were available. o A Few Too Many alcohol education program with speaker Dr. Lori Hart. o Late Night Milk and Cookies faculty and staff cookie contest accompanied by a student performance group who provided entertainment. Office of Student Engagement Conducted student organization training addressing use of alcohol at events and the conduct process as it relates to student groups. Sponsored student organizations conducted continuous programs for students to participate in, including weekend trips and programming, outdoor recreation, leadership programs, films, concerts, and community service and arts programs. Student leaders performed skits for parents about alcohol and drug scenarios, and how to have important conversations with their student about substance abuse during the Parent Preview summer orientation program. All programs sponsored by Green Terror Productions (GTP) student programming board are alcohol and drug free. Weekend Blitz programming initiative began in Weekend trips offered twice per month to all undergraduate students to provide alternatives for substance free events. Students signed waivers to participate in all off-campus trips agreeing to abstain from alcohol and drug use while representing the College. Greek Community offered an alcohol education program to the entire community once per semester. All chapters are required to send 80% of their membership to these programs. Greek Community participated in an FIPG Risk Management program in Fall 2013 to understand how to mitigate risk while successfully implementing social events. All chapters are required to have 100% of their membership attend this program. All recognized Greek-lettered organizations are required to show proof of a $1 million dollar liability insurance policy each year to the Office of Student Engagement. Department of Campus Safety (DoCS) Enforced all laws and campus regulations (underage alcohol possession was documented and sanctioned through the student conduct process and students are not criminally cited by campus law enforcement unless circumstances are exceptional. DoCS worked with the Westminster Police Department to ensure students off campus who are cited for alcohol related offenses are documented through the College s student conduct process.) Ensured emergency medical care for students who may be in danger of alcohol poisoning or drug overdosing as members of the Maryland Institute of Emergency Medical Services Systems (MIEMSS), the state s official sanctioning body for EMS 13

14 providers. All DoCS officers were required to be certified as Emergency Medical Responders within one year of employment. Offered programming and talks tailored to many topics of alcohol and drug abuse. Students are made aware that they can request DoCS programming and resident assistants often utilize this resource. Housed SIDNE along with several other prevention programming tools that are available. The Athletic Department, Alcohol Awareness and Prevention Committee, and Residence Life staffs have utilized these resources. Offered various programs for students as part of broader programming events. o SIDNE o Playing Wii with fatal vision goggles o Playing basketball with fatal vision goggles o Simulated sobriety walks (walk the line with fatal vision goggles) at campus carnivals Water pong tournament with standard drink measurement education. The Truth About Drinking Games used the Intoxiclock to show BAC consumption and how quickly one becomes intoxicated by binge drinking. (Intoxiclock is a tool used to dynamically and visually demonstrate how alcohol affects a person s B.A.C. and the rate at which the body metabolizes that alcohol.) 11 pairs of Fatal Vision impairment goggles, plastic goggles that a student wears that simulate different levels of impairment, were available for programming. The levels start as low as.04 and goes to.25+. Fatal Reflection computer software that allowed the user to see what can happen to a person (injury, damage and death) at certain levels of impairment. You Call the Shots banner identified Standard Drink Units (SDU s) that are in popular alcoholic beverages and dispelled common myths about alcohol consumption. The S.U.M. I+ Cup program (Standard Unit of Measure) is an educational tool that consisted of a large and small measuring beaker, stemware, and pitcher designed to allow adults, 21 years of age and older, to pour and measure a volume of liquid and determine the number of standard drink units represented by the liquid for various types of popular alcohol beverages. Conducted alcohol and drug education programming for the campus in residence halls, classrooms for resident assistants, and for fraternities and sororities. Staff served on AAPC and Late Night s campus committees. Served on The Maryland Collaborative to reduce underage drinking and related problems committee. Served on The Carroll County Coalition Against Underage Drinking committee. Participated and served as an active member of Catherine s Cause drunk driving community foundation that brings light to the issue of drunk driving. Provided drug and alcohol education and awareness to community partners such as Silver Oak Academy, the Gerstell School and the local chapter of the Boy s and Girl s Club Ensured the DoCS lobby area is always full of drug and alcohol prevention and awareness literature. 14

15 Delivered drunk and drugged driving prevention messages through the banner sign located at a major campus intersection near a campus entry point. Provided several educational outreach events in high traffic areas such as Decker College Center. Used social media (Facebook and Twitter) to bring awareness and education about alcohol and drugs. Used campus advertising such as display cases and bulletin boards to highlight awareness topics such as National College Alcohol Awareness Week. Distributed literature on move in day to all the incoming freshman about alcohol and drug abuse. Maintained and continued to expand a positive relationship with the Westminster Police Department in programming efforts and in joint patrols on selected high risk weekends (ex. Move In, Homecoming, etc) in the neighborhoods surrounding the campus. 15

16 Recommendations for Revising AOD Prevention Efforts These Recommendations are supported by the empirical research of the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems. Results of the Maryland Collaborative s general student survey of McDaniel students, which is planned for Spring 2014, will help target future AOD prevention efforts on campus. Increase screening for at-risk students including all students seeking both counseling and health services at the Wellness Center, athletic teams, Greek Organization members, all violators of the College alcohol policy, and students receiving academic assistance. The SBIRT model (Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment) will be used coupled with a possible computerized initial screening and face-to-face brief intervention and/or referral to treatment depending on level of risk identified. Develop a clear threshold criterion for directing students to appropriate resources. The return of a group counseling intervention provided by the Alcohol Prevention Coordinator at the Wellness Center. The group would be an open and ongoing with rolling admission. Students violating college alcohol and drug policies could be required to attend a certain number of sessions. Discontinue the use of SASSI (Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory) as a primary assessment tool utilized by the Alcohol Prevention Coordinator at the Wellness Center. Continue the use of AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test) and other SBIRT normed screening tools. Consider formal training for all Wellness Center counselors in BASICS (Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students), a harm reduction approach using motivational interviewing techniques. Explore the effectiveness of Medical Amnesty policies that can encourage students to recognize warning signs of alcohol poisoning and to seek appropriate medical assistance in cases of an alcohol-related emergency. Mandated counseling sessions could be in lieu of a student conduct sanction. Increasing efforts to connect with parents as partners in alcohol prevention efforts. Ideas include parent letters, links to the Maryland Collaborative parent page, workshops at Family Weekend events. The following recommendations from the Maryland Collaborative for next action steps regarding environmental strategies are being considered: o Review of current alcohol policies in student code of conduct to ensure policies are clear and strong, with particular review of provisions for social hosting. o Increase fines associated with violations to college drug and alcohol policies. o Ideally fines should be similar for violating a social host provision either on or off campus. o Capitalize on existing relationships and coordination between McDaniel s Department of Campus Safety and the Westminster Police Department to further explore the local Westminster nuisance code (Disorderly House ordinance) and determine whether amendments can be made to address social host issues for offcampus parties 16

17 Finalization of AAPC logo and tagline to be used in publicity and programming materials. Increased collaboration with the Office of Student Engagement, particularly on work with Greek organizations and the newly created Office of Student Engagement position that focuses on late night programming. Increased collaboration with the Athletics Department, including the invitation for a representative to serve on the AAPC committee. Explore collaboration around AOD prevention efforts through the NCAA Choices Grant. Recruitment of several student members to serve on AAPC as well as partnerships with student groups such as WHAM (Wellness and Health Alliance at McDaniel) and Active Minds for the development of more peer education opportunities. Expand the drug education component in the existing alcohol education programming in collaboration with partners at the Carroll County Health Department. During the current 2 year review period, the judicial posture of the District Court in Carroll County has changed with respect to constructive possession and now a minor who is impaired by alcohol and does not have an alcoholic beverage in her or his hand cannot be charged criminally. Further, the local hospital will not release medical records without a warrant (where previously a subpoena was adequate). These two judicial issues limit the effectiveness of law enforcement efforts and are beyond the control of McDaniel College. 17

18 Procedures for Distributing AOD policy to Students McDaniel College has a written alcohol and other drug policy that is widely distributed to students via student handbooks, semester course registration guides, websites and the undergraduate and graduate catalogues. These written policies are in compliance with federal guidelines. Student Handbook Notifications Students were informed of the online location of the Student Handbook in three student wide campus announcements sent on August 28, September 2 and 9, The content of the announcement was as follows: The undergraduate student handbook is now online, in a new searchable format, at Navigation is intuitive with all sections of the handbook accessible through the main navigation menu on the right side of each page. Most navigation links are self-explanatory. Parts of the handbook have been reorganized to make it more user-friendly. Questions may be referred to Liz Towle at x2241 or Peggy Fosdick at x2293. Students were informed of the online location of the Student Handbook in an to the student distribution list. From: etowle Sent Wednesday, August 29, :08 PM TO: FROM: All Students Elizabeth S. Towle, Associate Dean of Student Affairs Welcome back to the Hill. I hope that all of you had a relaxing summer. With the goal of maintaining the warm, friendly, and safe environment that we have here at McDaniel, I want to share some information and updates about the McDaniel College Handbook. The College Handbook is online and can be accessed through the McDaniel College Portal at my.mcdaniel.edu. In the Quick Links box, click the Catalog icon, and choose College Handbook from the Catalog drop down menu. The Handbook contains information about the following topics: 18

19 Student Service Offices with contact information The Honor System The Code of Student Conduct The Student Conduct Process General College Policies Residence Hall Policies It is imperative that a student be familiar with the Handbook as it contains vastly important information to assist a student in his/her daily life on the campus. I also wanted to make you aware of revisions made to specific College Policies included in the Handbook. With guidance from the Department of Education, the College has revised its Policy Against Sexual Assault and Policy Against Discrimination and Harassment. I strongly encourage students to review these policies and make themselves aware of the College expectation for conduct in regard to sexual harassment and assault. The policies include descriptions of harassment and sexual assault as well as the resources available on campus and in the Westminster area to assist an individual who believes that s/he has been harassed and/or assaulted. The procedures for reporting and addressing these types of incidents are also defined. An individual s health and safety are paramount at McDaniel and the aforementioned policies highlight this importance. If any individual has questions about the College Handbook and/or the information provided in the Handbook, please contact Associate Dean Elizabeth Towle at Coming Soon - a direct link to the College Handbook from the Student Portal Quick Links! I wish you much success as you embark on a new academic year. Elizabeth S. Towle Associate Dean of Student Affairs 19

20 McDaniel College Alcohol and Drug Policy See policy information at: Introduction McDaniel College is committed to the welfare of its students and the surrounding community. When individuals misuse alcohol academic performance, health, personal relationships and safety are compromised. McDaniel College neither encourages nor condemns the legal consumption of alcoholic beverages, however, the College recognizes that the majority of undergraduate students are below the legal drinking age. McDaniel College supports the strict enforcement of Maryland s liquor laws. No person may sell, furnish or give alcohol to any person under the age of 21. Consequently, alcohol will be permitted at McDaniel College only in those settings which comply with state and federal law, municipal county ordinances and this policy, and in no way inhibit the full participation of those who choose not to drink alcohol. Campus student organizations must follow the Student Events with Alcohol Policy found in the Student Handbook at 9#Student_Organization_Policy_for_Campus_Events_with_Alcohol College Alcohol Policy McDaniel College entrusts to its students the responsibility of compliance with state, county, and municipal laws concerning the purchase, possession, consumption and transport of alcoholic beverages. It is expected that alcoholic beverages will be used in moderation, at suitable times, and under decorous conditions. Public intoxication is prohibited. Maryland Law in Brief Under Maryland state law, persons 21 years of age can purchase, possess, and consume alcoholic beverages. Any underage individual drinking, purchasing, or possessing alcoholic beverages is subject to a fine. Borrowing or falsifying identification constitutes a crime. Procuring alcoholic beverages for underage persons is also prohibited by law. Policy Violations 20

21 Failure to comply with state, county, or municipal alcoholic beverage laws may result in disciplinary action through the Student Conduct Process and/or legal action through the appropriate district court. McDaniel College imposes the following restrictions regarding alcohol possession and use: 1. Kegs and other multi-liter containers (full or empty) are prohibited anywhere on campus without permission of the Office of Student Affairs. Please Note: If a keg or other multi-liter container is found on the campus it will be confiscated by the Department of Campus Safety. Confiscated items will not be returned to students under any circumstances. Any loss of funds that a student may incur because a multi-liter container has been confiscated by the College is his/her own financial responsibility. 2. Behavior or noise by any person or group which is disturbing others is prohibited. The possession and consumption of alcohol shall not infringe upon the privacy and peace of others. In all situations, the use of alcoholic beverages is considered as aggravating rather than mitigating the situation. Failure to follow the policies and laws could lead to student conduct action or proprietary action and/or civil arrest. Campus Safety and Residence Life staff will confront flagrant policy violations that come to their attention. 3. The total number of persons permitted in residence hall rooms will be restricted in accordance with Maryland State Fire Codes and McDaniel College policy (see Room Capacity in Residence Hall policies section). 4. Students should refrain from using alcoholic beverage containers as ashtrays, decorations or for other uses. 5. Alcoholic beverages may not be sold at any McDaniel College event or function or by any organization using College property without a license. 6. Hard liquor possession by students is prohibited on campus. 7. Consumption of alcoholic beverages must comply with the Locations for the Use of Alcohol. Locations for the Use of Alcohol In addition to state laws, alcoholic beverages on McDaniel College campus will be limited as described below. In general, alcoholic beverages are limited to students personal rooms and to spaces designed for social gatherings, such as the Forum and other facilities in Decker Center. It is not appropriate to consume alcoholic beverages or carry open alcoholic containers outside or in public areas designed for other purposes. Beer bongs are not permitted. 1. Student s Room: Students may, within state law and college policy, consume and possess beer and wine in residence hall rooms. 2. Public Areas: Alcoholic beverages are not permitted in any public areas of the residence halls, defined as all hallways, stairwells, bathrooms, lobbies, lounges, porches, balconies, storage rooms, laundry rooms, elevators, or any other area outside a residential facility. In the Garden Apartments, North Village, and college houses, and Daniel McLea Suites, the individual bedrooms are private space while the common areas of the residence are considered public space. 21

22 3. Residence Halls: Alcoholic beverages are not prohibited anywhere in Rouzer, Whiteford, and Daniel MacLea, and designated substance-free residence halls and houses. 4. Special Occasions: Consumption and possession of alcoholic beverages in specified areas for special occasions is subject to approval by the Director of the Office of Student Engagement. Penalties Minimum Sanctions for College Alcohol Policy Violations Minimum Sanctions for College Alcohol Policy Violations The minimum sanctions for violations of the College Student Alcohol Policy are as follows: First Alcohol Policy Violation 1. Completion of a 2 hour alcohol education class 2. Disciplinary warning 3. Parental Notification 4. $50 fine Second Alcohol Policy Violation 1. Completion of the 3 hour online course 2. Payment of the $35.00 fee for the course 3. Disciplinary probation 4. Parental Notification 5. $65 fine Third Alcohol Policy Violation (or a first violation that is more severe specifically when hospitalization occurs) 1. Disciplinary probation 2. Completion of at least three counseling sessions at the Wellness Center 3. Payment of any fees for substance abuse assessments used during counseling sessions 4. Parental notification 5. $125 fine *Additional sanctions for this level violation could include the following: Referral to off-campus substance abuse treatment Residence hall suspension Weekend suspension Suspension from McDaniel College Student Organization Policy for Campus Events with Alcohol This policy applies to all Student Organizations at McDaniel College planning an event where alcohol is to be served. Beer and wine are the only types of alcohol permitted at any McDaniel College student functions. Student organizations must meet with the Office of Student Engagement staff at least 4 weeks prior to the event in order for the event to be approved. 22

23 Third Party Vendor Guidelines 1) Sodexo Food Service is the only third party vendor allowed to serve alcohol on the campus of McDaniel College. 2) Beer and Wine must be served by Sodexo Food Services as a third party vendor. 3) Bartenders are contracted through Sodexo Food Service for a minimum of 4 hours at $30.00 per hour. 4) A copy of the Vendor s Insurance is available in the Human Resources Office. 5) All sales of alcohol will be conducted by the vendor as cash sales only. 6) Alcohol may not be purchased through student organization funds. 7) Non- alcoholic drinks and food must be available at all events. You must contact Sodexho Food Service first, to discuss the food at the event. If they give up the right to serve food, your group may then bring in your own food from off-campus. 8) The vendor will collect and remove any remaining alcohol from the premises at the end of the event. 9) Security is required at all events. During the approval process with the Office of Student Engagement, contact will be made with Campus Safety to determine the required amount of officers present. 10) Only those of legal drinking age with McDaniel Student ID or valid State Identification will be served alcohol. 11) Upon entering the event, wristbands will be issued to those of legal drinking age by the security personnel at the event. Wristbands must be purchased by the student organization. 12) Alcoholic beverage service must end one hour prior to the close of the event. 13) Anyone who appears to be intoxicated will not be permitted into the function or served alcohol. 14) In addition to Campus Safety there must be on adult in an advisor role to deal with issues that may arise at the event. Office of Student Engagement staff are not considered advisors and will not participate in this capacity. Event Guidelines 1) All groups requesting to sponsor an event where alcohol is to be served must complete the appropriate form and submit it to the Office of Student Engagement at least 30 days prior to the event. The appropriate form is available in the Office of Student Engagement. 2) Functions with alcohol may only be held on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. 3) The timeframe for events are as follows: Thursday until 12:00 a.m., Friday and Saturday until 2:00 a.m. 4) Events may last no longer than four hours in length. 5) The host group(s) cannot financially profit from the sale of alcohol. For recognized Greek-lettered Organizations McDaniel College endorses the Risk Management Policy of the Fraternal Information & Programming Group (FIPG) and chooses this policy as the minimum standard by which all 23

24 McDaniel College fraternities and sororities will have their organizational risk management evaluated. Following FIPG guidelines, Greek Organizations may not host open events with alcohol. Greek organizations must meet with all social event policy guidelines in accordance with their respective governing council and all events must be registered in order to be considered sanctioned. The policy here described is a privilege extended to the campus community. It is hoped that these privileges will serve to facilitate and enhance the student s self-responsibility and his or her understanding of the values, beliefs, and laws of society at large. The privileges extended under this regulation may, however, be withdrawn from individuals or groups found to be in violation of College policy and/or state law. Best Practices for Off-Campus Events for Fraternities and Sororities Any Greek-lettered organization in Good Standing with the College holding a function at a location where consumption of alcoholic beverages is permitted, including sales, shall abide by the following regulations when conducting the function. Additional guidelines from national organizations must also be followed. 1. Alcoholic beverages may not be served or consumed at any social event held in conjunction with an organized drive to recruit students on campus. 2. The person or group(s) holding the event must establish precautionary measures at the function to ensure that alcoholic beverages are not served to persons under the legal drinking age, to persons who appear intoxicated or to persons known to be addicted to intoxicants. 3. At the function, a person (or persons) over the legal drinking age must be designated as the server(s). All alcoholic beverages to be served must be located so that access to them can be had only through the designated server(s). The server(s) may not consume alcoholic beverages. 4. Non-alcoholic beverages must be available at the same place as the alcoholic beverages and featured as prominently as the alcoholic beverages. 5. A sufficient amount of non-salty, non snack food must be available. 6. The only alcoholic beverages that may be possessed or consumed at the function are those alcoholic beverages served at that location, and the alcoholic beverages must be consumed within the designated location. 24

25 7. Drinking contests or any other activities which encourage the rapid and/or excessive consumption of alcoholic beverages shall not be permitted. 8. The sponsoring group shall not allow any alcoholic beverages such as kegs or cases of beer to be provided as free awards, prizes or rewards to an individual(s) or group(s). 9. All announcement(s) or advertisement(s), including but not limited to flyer(s), notice(s), poster(s), banner(s), tee-shirt(s) and newspaper and radio announcement(s), concerning the function shall: a. note the availability of non-alcoholic beverages as prominently as the availability of alcoholic beverages, b. note that proper identification is required in order to be served or sold alcoholic beverages, c. not make reference to the amount of alcoholic beverages, as, for example, the number of kegs of beer, available at the event, nor to any form of drinking contest, d. not portray drinking as a solution to personal or academic problems or as necessary to social, sexual, or academic success. Promotion of alcoholic beverage brands at the activity must not encourage any form of alcohol abuse nor place emphasis on quantity and frequency of use. 10. As appropriate, the sponsoring group should contact the local police jurisdiction about events where alcohol will be served. The local police department will determine if a uniformed member of, or a substitute approved by the police department, must be present during the function. In such cases, the police expense must be paid by the sponsoring group. Zero-Tolerance Drug Policy As noted in the Code of Student Conduct number 8, the College does not tolerate the possession, use, sale, or distribution of controlled substances (drugs). When staff become aware of the presence of drugs on campus, they are required to notify the Westminster Police Department. Law enforcement authorities follow legal police procedures in investigating such matters, including searches. Penalties Minimum Sanctions for College Illegal Drug Policy Violations Minimum Sanctions for College Illegal Drug Policy Violations The minimum sanctions for violations of the College Drug Policy are as follows: 25

26 First Drug Policy Violation 1. Completion of a 3 hour online illegal substance course, including payment for the course 2. Disciplinary Probation 3. Parental Notification 4. $150 fine Second Drug Policy Violation 1. Removal from Residence for the current semester and one additional semester 2. Extension of Disciplinary Probation 3. Parental Notification 4. $300 fine Option: If the student agrees to substantial off campus counseling, the conduct officer may allow the student to continue living in the residence halls as long as further violations do not occur. *Additional sanctions for this level violation could include the following: Referral to off-campus substance abuse treatment Weekend suspension Suspension from McDaniel College Third Drug Policy Violation (or a first violation that is more severe specifically involving the sale or distribution of illegal drugs) 1. Suspension or Expulsion from the College Alcohol Education Sanctions Overview Alcohol Education Level I: 2-hour Know the Facts alcohol education class taught by prevention specialist and instructor Kelley Rainey. Ms. Rainey taught 10 classes. 83 students were referred to Level I, and 79 students completed the sanction. Alcohol Education Level II: 3-hour Under the Influence on-line course covered multiple topics related to alcohol abuse and prevention. 17 students were referred to Level II, and all 14 students completed the sanction. Alcohol Education Level III: 3 counseling sessions incorporated the Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory (SASSI) and the Alcohol Use Disorders Test (AUDIT) assessments with BASICS brief intervention. 19 total students were referred to Level III, 17 completed the sanction. The 2 students who did not complete the sessions were referred at the end of the semester Alcohol Education Level I: 2-hour Know the Facts alcohol education class taught by prevention specialist and instructor Kelley Rainey. 63 students were referred to Level I, and 61 students completed the sanction. (One student who did not complete the class graduated and one took a leave before the class happened again.) 26

27 Alcohol Education Level II: 3-hour Under the Influence on-line course covered multiple topics related to alcohol abuse and prevention. 13 students were referred to Level II, and 12 students completed the sanction. Alcohol Education Level III: 3 counseling sessions incorporated the Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory (SASSI) and the Alcohol Use Disorders Test (AUDIT) assessments with BASICS brief intervention. 14 total students completed Level III. Fall 2013 Alcohol Education Level I: 2-hour Know the Facts alcohol education class taught by prevention specialist from the Carroll County MD Health Department. 34 students were referred to Level I, and all 34 students completed the sanction. Alcohol Education Level II: 3-hour Alcohol Edu for Sanctions on-line course covered multiple topics related to substance abuse and prevention. 3 students were referred to Level II and all 3 completed the sanction. Alcohol Education Level III: 3 counseling sessions incorporated the Substance Abuse Subtle Screening Inventory (SASSI) and the Alcohol Use Disorders Test (AUDIT) assessments with BASICS brief intervention. 4 total students completed Level III. Health Risks Associated with the Use of Illicit Drugs and the Abuse of Alcohol Alcohol can pose both short-term and long-term health risks. As a sedating, or depressant drug, alcohol slows functioning of the brain and central nervous system. In the short-tem, how alcohol affects a person is dependent on how much and how quickly he/she consumes it. The gender, size, and other factors in the drinker impact how quickly alcohol is absorbed and eliminated from the body, as well. Even one or two drinks can impair one s reasoning. As more and more alcohol is absorbed by the body, impaired speech, loss of coordination, impaired sexual functioning, dysphoria, and loss of inhibitions are exhibited. Alcohol use, particularly binge-drinking or high-risk use, can lead to serious short-term health consequences. These include falls, injuries, car crashes, fights, participation in risky behaviors, sexual assault, unwanted pregnancy, transmission of sexually transmitted diseases, suicidal thinking or behavior, and injury or death from alcohol poisoning. Consuming a large amount of alcohol in a short period of time (such as playing drinking games, taking shots of liquor, engaging in power hours, etc.) can lead to the fatal result of alcohol poisoning. Taking other medications while drinking alcohol can also be fatal. More regular, or chronic, alcohol use can lead to alcohol dependence and other long-term problems. Frequent, prolonged use can result in liver disease, ulcers, high cholesterol, heart disease, cognitive deficits, high blood pressure, damage to the pancreas, sexual and fertility problems, and increased risk of breast cancer and other cancers. Other drugs also cause serious health problems for a user. Marijuana is a hallucinogen that contains the same toxic and carcinogenic compounds found in cigarette smoke. It can also lead to deficits in memory and other cognitive skills, as well as reproductive problems. Abusing prescription drugs, or taking prescription medications that are not prescribed to you (such as Adderall, Ritalin, Xanax, Valium, Oxycontin, etc.) can also lead to increased heart rate and blood pressure, organ damage, addiction, heart attack, overdose, and death. Cocaine and other similar stimulants are highly addictive and can lead to seizures, cardiac arrest, and stroke. 27

28 For More Information Students may seek free, confidential alcohol and drug screening and consultation at the Wellness Center in Winslow Center. Students can meet with a counselor to discuss their alcohol or drug use and obtain referrals to local substance abuse treatment programs, as well as other helpful resources. There are several of these treatment programs, as well as self-help groups, in the Westminster area. For a comprehensive list, please contact the Wellness Center at

29 Introduction-Biennial Review for Employees The Department of Human Resources at McDaniel College prepared the following report to meet the requirements of the1989 amendments to the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act, as articulated in Part 86, the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations. McDaniel College has developed and updated a comprehensive written policy on employee drug and alcohol abuse. Annual Notice for Substance Abuse Policies and Procedures for Employees The following notice is supplied to employees upon hire during new employee orientation, at the start of each semester via from the Provost to the faculty/staff list serve and available at any time on the Human Resources Portal Page. McDaniel College is committed to making a good faith effort on a continuing basis to maintain a drug-free campus and workplace. Consistent with federal policy related to the College s eligibility to disburse federal aid to our students, McDaniel College provides a drug-free workplace, including a drug-free awareness program that provides information to employees regarding the prevention of drug and alcohol abuse, a notice distributed annually to our employees of prohibited unlawful activities and the College s planned actions against any employee who violates these prohibitions, and a policy of notifying the Department of Education and taking appropriate action when it the institution learns of an employee s conviction under any criminal drug statute. McDaniel College prohibits the unlawful possession, use or distribution of drugs and alcohol by students and employees on the College s property, or as part of the College s activities. Students and employees who violate College policies, or local, state and federal laws related to possession, use or distribution of illicit drugs or alcohol face potential sanctions up to and including expulsion (for students), termination of employment (for employees), and referral for prosecution by local, state or federal authorities. The use of illicit drugs and alcohol is accompanied by health risks. Research shows an association between drug use and traffic crash deaths, lost productivity and poorer academic performance. Illicit drug use also contributes to HIV-transmission rates and puts children at risk for abuse and neglect. McDaniel College makes available drug and alcohol counseling, treatment, and rehabilitation programs for students (through the department of student health and wellness) and employees (through the College s employee assistance program or EAP). With regard to contracted employees, the College expects agencies policies to meet or exceed those of McDaniel College related to maintenance of a drug-free workplace. McDaniel College reserves the right to take action as appropriate to ensure compliance with its workplace policies and procedures. Policies Pertaining to McDaniel College Employees: Drug-Free Workplace and Substance Abuse Testing Policy The College is committed to maintaining a safe work place free from alcohol and drug abuse. For this reason, the College prohibits its employees from possessing, 29

30 using, distributing and/or working under the influence of alcohol or other intoxicant or illegal or prescription drug, other than one lawfully prescribed by a physician and taken in accordance with that prescription. This policy covers all employees of the College including student employees. The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession or use of a controlled substance (usually referred to as illegal drugs listed under the federal Controlled Substance Act) is prohibited on College property and is cause for employee discipline up to and including termination from employment. For purposes of this policy, Substance Abuse shall include reporting for duty, possessing, distributing or being on duty after having used, abused or ingested alcohol and/or illegal drugs (e.g., marijuana, cocaine, crack, narcotics, PCP, hallucinogens, or other controlled substances), lawful drugs and/or medications taken without a valid prescription or not in accordance with the prescription for that drug or medication. When an employee s official duties to the College include entertainment of distinguished guests where alcoholic beverage service is included, employees shall abide by the spirit of the College s alcohol policy, which states: McDaniel College entrusts to its [employees] the responsibility of compliance with state, county, and municipal laws concerning the purchase, possession, consumption and transport of alcoholic beverages. It is expected that alcoholic beverages will be used in moderation, at suitable times, and under decorous conditions. Public intoxication is prohibited. For purposes of this policy, whenever an applicant or employee tests positive, he or she will be considered as using, abusing or ingesting the prescribed substances in violation of this policy. Possession shall include possession in lockers, clothing, other property or vehicles parked or located on the College premises. In compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, and as a condition of employment with the College, all persons employed by the College are required: a. To abide by the prohibitions stated above; and b. To notify the Director of Human Resources of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring on College property no later than five days after such conviction. c. Any employee whose use of controlled substances away from the College can reasonably be established to be the cause of poor attendance or performance problems is to be counseled to seek rehabilitation from available College or community resources. d. When notice of a criminal drug statute conviction of an employee for a violation occurring on College property is received, the Director of Human Resources will coordinate compliance with the reporting requirements of the Drug-Free Workplace Act of e. An employee convicted of the criminal drug statues occurring on College property is subject, within 30 days of notice of such conviction, to disciplinary action up to and including termination, and/or the employee will be required to complete a drug rehabilitation program. A substance abuse test shall be considered positive if it reveals the presence of illegal drugs, lawful drugs and/or medications taken without a valid prescription or not in accordance with the prescription, or the presence of alcohol in a degree which, in the College s opinion, would impair the individual s ability to effectively perform his or her job or otherwise present a safety risk to the individual or others. Employees who test positive will typically be subject to immediate termination. Any employee refusing to be tested upon request shall also be subject to immediate termination, regardless of the employee s tenure with the College. Any employee who unreasonably delays taking a test, provides false or incomplete information in connection with the test or otherwise refuses to cooperate in taking the test will be considered as having refused to be tested and will be subject to immediate termination. 30

31 Policies Pertaining to McDaniel College Students: Zero Tolerance Drug Policy The College does not tolerate the possession, use, sale, or distribution of controlled substances (drugs). When staff become aware of the presence of drugs on campus, they are required to notify the Westminster Police Department. Law enforcement authorities follow legal police procedures in investigating such matters, including searches. College Alcohol Policy McDaniel College entrusts to its students the responsibility of compliance with state, county, and municipal laws concerning the purchase, possession, consumption and transport of alcoholic beverages. It is expected that alcoholic beverages will be used in moderation, at suitable times, and under decorous conditions. Public intoxication is prohibited. Maryland Law in Brief Under Maryland state law, persons 21 years of age can purchase, possess, and consume alcoholic beverages. Any underage individual drinking, purchasing, or possessing alcoholic beverages is subject to a fine. Borrowing or falsifying identification constitutes a crime. Procuring alcoholic beverages for underage persons is also prohibited by law. Policy Violations Failure to comply with state, county, or municipal alcoholic beverage laws may result in disciplinary action through the Student Conduct Process and/or legal action through the appropriate district court. McDaniel College is committed to maintaining a drug-free environment. The Federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 require that the College notify students and employees of College policies and sanctions, legal sanctions, health risks and community rehabilitation services associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol. Students may seek further information and assistance at the Wellness Center, or the Office of Student Affairs. Every two years, McDaniel College will review its drug free workplace policy to determine its effectiveness, implement any needed changes, and ensure that the student conduct sanctions described below are consistently enforced. The report includes review of the number of drug and alcohol-related violations and fatalities that occur on campus or as part of the College s activities, and that are reported to campus officials; and the number and type of sanctions that were imposed by the College as a result of drug and alcohol-related violations and fatalities on campus or as part of any of the College s activities. The most recent Drug Free Schools and Communities Act Biennial Review Report is available on the My McDaniel Portal on the Office of Student Affairs page. Standards of Conduct The College s prohibit the possession, use, sale or distribution of controlled substances (drugs). In addition, the Code of Student Conduct prohibit violations of published rules governing College residence halls, traffic and any other regulations that may be enacted or published, and violations of municipal, state or federal laws [and] unauthorized possession of kegs or other multi-liter containers anywhere on campus or violation of alcohol policy. The College Alcohol Policy states that under Maryland state law, persons 21 years of age can purchase, possess, and consume alcoholic beverages. Any underage individual drinking, purchasing, or possessing alcoholic beverage is subject to fine or imprisonment. Borrowing or falsifying identification constitutes a crime. Procuring alcoholic beverages for underage persons is also prohibited by law. Failure to comply with state, county, or municipal alcoholic beverage laws may result in referral to the Student Conduct Process and/or legal action through the appropriate civil authority. In addition to state laws, alcoholic beverages on campus are limited. Alcoholic beverages are not permitted in any public areas of the campus, nor is any alcoholic beverage permitted in the public areas of residence 31

32 halls or in Rouzer, Whiteford, or Daniel McLea Halls or any housing designated as substance free. Hard liquor is prohibited on campus. Refer to the College Alcohol Policy for more details. College Sanctions for Violation Sanctions are imposed appropriate to instances of student misconduct, ranging from warning to expulsion. College policy requires that any illicit drugs found on campus be turned over to local law enforcement authorities, likely resulting in legal action. Minimum sanctions for possession of illegal drugs range from a $150 fine, parental notification, disciplinary probation to expulsion. Minimum sanctions for violations of the College alcohol policy include fines, mandatory alcohol education, disciplinary probation, and suspension from the college. Legal Sanctions of Unlawful Possession, Use, or Distribution of Illicit Drugs and Alcohol Possession and/or distribution of controlled substances and illegal drugs can subject a student to fines that exceed $25,000 and prison terms of as many as 20 years, depending on the type of drug and the circumstances of the criminal act or acts involved. Maryland State law provides for fines of up to $1,000, again depending on the circumstances, when alcoholic beverages are provided to underage students by individuals over 21 years old. Health Risks Associated with the use of Illicit Drugs and Abuse of Alcohol Alcohol can pose both short-term and long-term health risks. As a sedating, or depressant drug, alcohol slows functioning of the brain and central nervous system. In the short-tem, how alcohol affects a person is dependent on how much and how quickly he/she consumes it. The gender, size, and other factors in the drinker impact how quickly alcohol is absorbed and eliminated from the body, as well. Even one or two drinks can impair one s reasoning. As more and more alcohol is absorbed by the body, impaired speech, loss of coordination, impaired sexual functioning, dysphoria, and loss of inhibitions are exhibited. Alcohol use, particularly binge-drinking or high-risk use, can lead to serious short-term health consequences. These include falls, injuries, car crashes, fights, participation in risky behaviors, sexual assault, unwanted pregnancy, transmission of sexually transmitted diseases, suicidal thinking or behavior, and injury or death from alcohol poisoning. Consuming a large amount of alcohol in a short period of time (such as playing drinking games, taking shots of liquor, engaging in power hours, etc.) can lead to the fatal result of alcohol poisoning. Taking other medications while drinking alcohol can also be fatal. More regular, or chronic, alcohol use can lead to alcohol dependence and other long-term problems. Frequent, prolonged use can result in liver disease, ulcers, high cholesterol, heart disease, cognitive deficits, high blood pressure, damage to the pancreas, sexual and fertility problems, and increased risk of breast cancer and other cancers. Other drugs also cause serious health problems for a user. Marijuana is a hallucinogen that contains the same toxic and carcinogenic compounds found in cigarette smoke. It can also lead to deficits in memory and other cognitive skills, as well as reproductive problems. Abusing prescription drugs, or taking prescription medications that are not prescribed to you (such as Adderall, Ritalin, Xanax, Valium, Oxycontin, etc.) can also lead to increased heart rate and blood pressure, organ damage, addiction, heart attack, overdose, and death. Cocaine and other similar stimulants are highly addictive and can lead to seizures, cardiac arrest, and stroke. Drug and Alcohol Assessment and Treatment for Students Students may seek free, confidential alcohol and drug screening and consultation at the Wellness Center in Winslow Center. Students can meet with a counselor to discuss their alcohol or drug use and obtain referrals to local substance abuse treatment programs, as well as other helpful resources. There are several of these treatment programs, as well as self-help groups, in the Westminster area. For a comprehensive list, please contact the Wellness Center at

33 Drug and Alcohol Assessment and Treatment for Employees Employees may seek free, confidential alcohol and drug screening and consultation services through our Employee Assistance Program, Business Health Services. Business Health Services can be contacted directly at , 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. After an assessment, Business Health Services will refer the employee to an appropriate level of care as needed. This may include outpatient, detoxification, intensive outpatient or inpatient services and other self-help groups. Financial Aid Penalties for Drug Convictions Federal financial aid regulations specify that eligibility for federal aid be suspended for students who are convicted under federal or state laws for the sale or possession of illegal drugs if the offense(s) occurred during a period of enrollment for which the student was receiving federal financial aid under Title IV (grants, loans, and/or work-study). Students who are convicted after they apply for aid must notify the McDaniel College financial aid office no later than five days after the conviction. Additional information about federal aid policies may be obtained through the Federal Student Aid Information Center at FED-AID or online at Screen Shots of Annual Substance Abuse Policy Notification for all Employees and all Students Communicated via on 2/24/2014 to all faculty/staff and student list serve: 33

34 Communicated via on 8/27/2014 to all faculty/staff and student list serve: Employee Drug Testing Policy McDaniel College partners with Carroll Occupational Health to provide certified drug testing for employees. The College is committed to maintaining a safe work place free from alcohol and drug abuse. For this reason, the College prohibits its employees from possessing, using, distributing and/or working under the influence of alcohol or other intoxicant or illegal or prescription drug, other than one lawfully prescribed by a physician and taken in accordance with that prescription. This policy covers all employees of the College, including student employees. The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession or use of a controlled substance (usually referred to as illegal drugs listed under the federal Controlled Substance Act) is prohibited on College property and is cause for employee discipline up to and including termination from employment. For purposes of this policy, Substance Abuse shall include reporting for duty, possessing, distributing or being on duty after having used, abused or ingested alcohol and/or illegal drugs (e.g., marijuana, cocaine, crack, narcotics, PCP, hallucinogens, or other controlled substances), lawful drugs and/or medications taken without a valid prescription or not in accordance with the prescription for that drug or medication. For purposes of this policy, whenever an applicant or employee tests positive, he or she will be considered as using, abusing or ingesting the prescribed substances in violation of this policy. Possession shall include possession in lockers, clothing, other property or vehicles parked or located on the College premises. 34

35 In compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, and as a condition of employment with the College, all persons employed by the College are required: a. To abide by the prohibition contained in item 1, above; and b. To notify the Director of Human Resources of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring on College property no later than five days after such conviction. Any employee whose use of controlled substances away from the College can reasonably be established to be the cause of poor attendance or performance problems is to be counseled to seek rehabilitation from available College or community resources. When notice of a criminal drug statute conviction of an employee for a violation occurring on College property is received, the Director of Human Resources will coordinate compliance with the reporting requirements of the Drug-Free Workplace Act of An employee convicted of the criminal drug statues occurring on College property is subject, within 30 days of notice of such conviction, to disciplinary action up to and including termination, and/or the employee will be required to complete a drug rehabilitation program. The Office of Human Resources shall maintain and periodically publish available College and community resources for drug abuse assistance or rehabilitation programs. In addition, the Office of Human Resources shall provide employees with information about the dangers of drug abuse in the workplace. Employees are subject to the following testing: * Random Testing: All Campus Safety and Steam Plant/HVAC employees are subject to random substance abuse testing, and will be selected in a manner as determined by the College. * Suspicion Testing: All employees may also be required to undergo substance abuse testing, if in the sole opinion of the College, the employee s behavior, work performance or other factors warrant such testing. Post Accident/Injury Testing: The College may require a substance abuse test for any employee incurring an on-the-job injury requiring medical attention and/or treatment. Employees damaging property by accident or carelessness may also be subject to testing. Substance Abuse Testing Procedure All testing will be conducted pursuant to the requirements of applicable law. In particular, the College will generally follow these procedures: Reporting for Test: The applicant and/or employee will be directed to report immediately (within 1/2 hour) to the designated testing facility and/or a medical clinic. Transportation will be provided for the employee by the College, and the employee will remain on-the-clock during the testing procedure. Conduct of the Test: A medical professional or other appropriate person will conduct the test in accordance with all applicable standards and/or regulations. Test Results: In the event of a positive result, the applicant and/or employee will be given (1) a copy of the results, (2) a copy of this Policy, (3) written notice of the College s intention to terminate, and, (4) the following notice: 35

36 Verification of test results -- (1) A person who is required to submit to job related testing may request independent testing of the same urine or blood sample for verification of the test results by a laboratory that: (i) Holds a permit under Maryland law; or (ii) If located outside of the State, is certified or otherwise approved for use under Maryland law. Positive Test Results A substance abuse test shall be considered positive if it reveals the presence of illegal drugs, lawful drugs and/or medications taken without a valid prescription or not in accordance with the prescription, or the presence of alcohol in a degree which, in the College s opinion, would impair the individual s ability to effectively perform his or her job or otherwise present a safety risk to the individual or others. For Any Employee With Less Than Five Years Service: Any employee who receives a positive test result who has been with the College for less than five years or works in Campus Safety or HVAC will be subject to immediate termination. For Any Employee With Five or More Years Service: Any employee who receives a positive test result who has been with the College for more than five years who does not work in Campus Safety or HVAC will also be subject to immediate termination. The College may, however, suspend this action upon a review of the case by the division vice president and the Director of Human Resources, with a decision to require the employee to enroll in a substance abuse treatment program approved by the College. Treatment must be paid for by the employee or the employee s health insurance coverage. The employee will not be allowed to return to work until he or she successfully completes the treatment program. If the employee fails to complete the treatment program, he or she will be subject to immediate termination. In the event the employee fails a subsequent substance test, he or she will be subject to immediate termination without any further treatment opportunity. Refusal to Take a Requested Test Any employee refusing to be tested upon request shall also be subject to immediate termination, regardless of the employee s tenure with the College. Any employee who unreasonably delays taking a test, provides false or incomplete information in connection with the test or otherwise refuses to cooperate in taking the test will be considered as having refused to be tested and will be subject to immediate termination. Random and For-Cause Employee Substance Screening Data The following chart describes the number of random and for cause testing during conducted by Carroll Occupational Health Services. Covered Dates Random Drug Screenings Post- Accident Drug Screenings For Cause Drug Screenings Positive Test Results 1/1/ /31/ /1/ /31/ /1/ /31/ Employee Assistance Program McDaniel College collaborates with Business Health Services (BHS) to provide up to six counseling sessions to employees at no cost. Counseling can be for a variety of issues including but not limited to mental health issues, stress, management consultations, marital challenges and substance abuse. Care 36

37 for substance abuse may include assessment, referral and treatment. Recommendations for treatment vary by pervasiveness of issue. The following chart describes the number of employees who sought services through the Business HS employee assistance program. The far left column represent employees who accessed services with a presenting problem related to substance abuse. Plan Year Number of Employees Accessing Services with BHS 1/1/ /31/ /1/ /31/ /1/ /31/ Disciplinary Action Related to Employee Substance Abuse Issues Number of Employees Accessing Substance Abuse Services The College reserves the right to summarily warn, reprimand, suspend, or terminate employees without notice should severity of circumstances warrant. Such circumstances include, but are not limited to, the following: Insubordination, including any concerted or deliberate slowdown or delay or interference with one's own productivity or the work of others Working under the influence of, testing positive for, or participating in the illegal sale, purchase, use or possession of drugs, alcoholic beverages, other controlled substances or possession of weapons on campus Unauthorized disclosure of legally protected information Theft or dishonesty including gambling, excessive waste, abuse, unauthorized use of or removal of College property from campus, or falsification of records and fraud Abuse, assault or attack (including horseplay, malicious mischief, threatening language and sexual harassment) upon persons or property whether on or off campus Other behavior which is potentially dangerous or harmful to persons or property and detrimental to work, including failure to adhere to safety rules and regulations Unprofessional conduct or other failure of appropriate behavior either during or outside working hours which is of such a nature that it destroys good will or otherwise causes jeopardy or serious discredit to the College Disciplinary Action Taken Related to Substance Abuse Issues Dates Warnings Written Probation Termination Warning 1/1/ /31/ /1/ /31/ /1/ /31/ Educational Activities In response to several employees expressing a desire to develop programming dedicated to wellness, McDaniel College created a Wellness Committee in The committee is a diverse, employee-centered community committed to empowering employees to take action to improve their overall health and well-being. Through flexible programming and community building the 37

38 committee provides access to activities, training, and education that support wellness. They had their first Wellness Fair on October 16, 2013 offering education on topics including alcohol and substance abuse, smoking cessation and stress and depression. This event was open to all employees and all students. The event was repeated on October 1, Strengths of Employee Programming Comprehensive policy and procedure in effect Random drug testing program in place since 2009 for safety sensitive positions Development of Wellness Committee Weaknesses for Employee Programming Deliver training targeted to supervisors in recognizing signs and symptoms of alcohol and drug abuse affecting the workplace (Scheduled for November 5, 2014) Ineffective policy distribution (Corrected in Spring 2014) Lack of assessment methods for pervasiveness of employee substance abuse (Evaluating self-help assessments to be available on HR Portal page) Lack of full time Training Professional to support ongoing educational opportunities (Creation of Wellness Committee to provide additional support) Biennial Review Committee The Biennial Review Committee is a cross section of employees selected to adequately evaluate the effectiveness of both the student and employee drug and alcohol abuse prevention program. Members include: Elizabeth Towle, Associate Dean of Student Affairs; Christine Workman, Director of Student Engagement; Jenni Glennon, Director of Human Resources; Amanda Blankenship, Employee and Benefits Manager. The committee is charged with the following areas of responsibility: Meet annually to evaluate the drug and alcohol prevention programs for employees and students Analyze student and employee incident data Analyze programming and treatments options available to students and employees Make recommendations to Vice President of Student Affairs, Vice President of Administration and Provost for program improvements as needed Evaluate the delivery methods for the student and employee drug and alcohol policies to ensure that all students receive the information upon initial enrollment and that all new employees receive the information upon hire Evaluate any policy changes that relate to drug and alcohol use to ensure compliance with DFSCA Review final DFSCA report on a biennial basis for submission and approval by the President Biennial Review Committee Meeting Minutes The Committee met on October 17, In attendance were the Elizabeth Towle, Associate Dean of Student Affairs; Christine Workman, Director of Student Engagement; Jenni Glennon, Director of Human Resources; and Amanda Blankenship, Employee and Benefits Manager. The agenda was reviewed by the Chair of the Committee, Jenni Glennon. 38

39 Purpose of the Group: The meeting began with a review of the purpose of the group. Jenni explained that this group will be the repository for the annual Drug Free Schools Campus Act (DFSCA) Biennial Review. Christine advised that for the student required information, she and Liz would be the contributors. Jenni agreed that to be the contributor for the required employee information. Christine and Liz will continuously monitor trends with the student data. Jenni and Amanda will continuously monitor trends with the employee data. The group agreed to review information annually in February and on an as needed basis if trends warranted. Student and Employee Data: All agreed that the student data is trending in a positive direction towards a lower number of incidents. Christine stated that they have recently partnered with the Maryland Collaborative to Reduce College Drinking and Related Problems. This new partnership has enabled Student Affairs to receive a comprehensive assessment of substance abuse prevention programming and statistical data specifically for McDaniel and comparative data for regional institutions. There have been positive results as indicated in the DFSCA report. With regards to the employee data, Jenni mentioned that McDaniel has been compliant with the Random Drug Screening Programming and that no positive tests have been received. There have not been any employees who have been in the disciplinary process to due to alcohol or substance abuse. A need was identified to ensure that supervisors are educated in the appropriate signs of substance abuse. Accordingly, a training sponsored by the EAP provider, BHS, has been scheduled for supervisors on November 5, Programming and Treatment Analysis: Christine stated that due to the new partnership aforementioned, there has been an increase in quality programming offered to students. Amanda stated that in addition to services offered to employees through our EAP, an effort has been made through the Wellness Committee to educate employees on substance and alcohol abuse. The first Wellness Fair was on October 16, Recently, the Wellness Committee sponsored a fair on October 1, 2014 and did include information on substance and alcohol abuse. Liz advised that it would be possible to make the student online training, AlcoholEDU to employees. Jenni agreed this would be a great training to make available for those who were interested. Liz suggested to research a brief self-evaluation tool to make available to employees to help them determine if they may need to access services through the EAP. Delivery Method For Drug and Alcohol Policies: Liz advised that currently all students receive a personalized at the beginning of each semester alerting them to the Student Handbook, Clery Report and the drug and alcohol policies. Additionally, these policies are available for review at any time on the student portal page. Jenni stated that each employee receives a hard copy of the drug and alcohol policy upon hire and acknowledges the receipt in writing. Additionally, at the beginning of each semester, the Provost also sends an to all employees reminding them of policies as well. At this time, these methods appear to be effective. Ongoing Compliance: Each member will continue to monitor local, state, federal and industry standards for any needed changes and ongoing improvement. Respectfully Submitted, Jenni Glennon, Director of Human Resources 39

40 40

COASTAL CAROLINA UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICY

COASTAL CAROLINA UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICY COASTAL CAROLINA UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICY I. Introduction Coastal Carolina University recognizes its responsibility for understanding how alcohol and other drug problems can present grave consequences

More information

Kennesaw State University Drug and Alcohol Policy

Kennesaw State University Drug and Alcohol Policy Kennesaw State University Drug and Alcohol Policy I. Introduction National statistics reveal that the leading causes of death among the 18-23 year-old population are alcohol-related accidents, alcohol-related

More information

Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program Cowley College Drug and Alcohol Task Force December 4, 2014

Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program Cowley College Drug and Alcohol Task Force December 4, 2014 Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program Cowley College Drug and Alcohol Task Force December 4, 2014 The Cowley College Drug and Alcohol Task Force ( Task Force ) met on October 29, 2014 in order to begin

More information

UCLA STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY

UCLA STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY UCLA STUDENT ALCOHOL POLICY Issuing Officer: Vice Chancellor Janina Montero Responsible Dept: Student Affairs Effective Date: August 7, 2007 Supersedes: UCLA Student Alcohol Policy, dated 8/11/04 I. INTRODUCTION

More information

University of Missouri Saint Louis Alcohol and Other Drugs Biennial Review

University of Missouri Saint Louis Alcohol and Other Drugs Biennial Review University of Missouri Saint Louis Alcohol and Other Drugs Biennial Review Introduction The Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (EDGAR Part 86) require that, as a condition of receiving funds or

More information

Community Development and Substance Abuse Programs

Community Development and Substance Abuse Programs Summary Statement MIT has developed a comprehensive prevention program consistent with the Institute s priorities regarding alcohol and other drugs, which includes reducing the rates of dangerous drinking

More information

Alcohol and Drug-Free Work Place Policy

Alcohol and Drug-Free Work Place Policy Alcohol and Drug-Free Work Place Policy Cleary University, in compliance with Public Law 101-226 (Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act), presents the standards listed below to the entire University community:

More information

1. University functions at which use of alcohol is approved.

1. University functions at which use of alcohol is approved. University of Michigan-Flint Alcohol and Other Drugs (AOD) Policy 2013-2014 Introduction The University of Michigan-Flint, is committed to providing a safe, healthy learning community for all its members.

More information

Technical Career Institutes

Technical Career Institutes Technical Career Institutes 2011-2013 Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program Biennial Review Technical Career Institutes Biennial Review of TCI s Alcohol and Other Drug Programs Ð 2011-2013 The Drug Free

More information

Alcohol & Other Drug Policy

Alcohol & Other Drug Policy For more information, contact the Student Leadership and Involvement Center (909) 335-5103 Alcohol & Other Drug Policy For further information, contact Student Life at 909-748-8053 University of Redlands

More information

ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUGS POLICY

ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUGS POLICY ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUGS POLICY Introduction The University of Rochester Alcohol and Other Drug Policy has been adopted to help students comply with federal, state and local laws regulating the possession,

More information

Clayton State University Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Campus Regulations Biennial Review

Clayton State University Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Campus Regulations Biennial Review Clayton State University Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Campus Regulations Biennial Review Conducted December, 2012 Alcohol and other Drug Education and Prevention Team/Review Committee Ms. Alicia

More information

Biennial Review of the Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program of Wesleyan University

Biennial Review of the Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program of Wesleyan University Biennial Review of the Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program of Wesleyan University For the period of September 1, 1998 to August 31, 2000 As required by the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act Compiled

More information

ALCOHOL POLICY FOR GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL STUDENT EVENTS

ALCOHOL POLICY FOR GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL STUDENT EVENTS ALCOHOL POLICY FOR GRADUATE AND PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL STUDENT EVENTS POLICY STATEMENT Yeshiva University is committed to creating and maintaining an environment that is free of alcohol abuse. The University

More information

1 of 7 8/15/2005 4:40 PM. home > student handbook > codes & policies

1 of 7 8/15/2005 4:40 PM. home > student handbook > codes & policies 1 of 7 8/15/2005 4:40 PM home > student handbook > codes & policies 2 of 7 8/15/2005 4:40 PM Values and Moral Standards at FSU Mission Statement General Statement Of Philosophy On Student Conduct And Discipline

More information

Elegance International School of Professional Makeup Biennial Review Report on Alcohol/Drugs Programs and Policies

Elegance International School of Professional Makeup Biennial Review Report on Alcohol/Drugs Programs and Policies Elegance International School of Professional Makeup Biennial Review Report on Alcohol/Drugs Programs and Policies 2011-12 / 2012-13 January, 2014 Biennial Review Report on Alcohol and other Drugs Programs

More information

BIENNIAL REPORT. Complying with the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations 2012. Prepared by:

BIENNIAL REPORT. Complying with the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations 2012. Prepared by: BIENNIAL REPORT Complying with the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations 2012 Prepared by: The Academic Support Center and The Office of Public Safety Five Towns College 305 North Service Road Dix

More information

2011 Biennial Review of Montgomery College Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program

2011 Biennial Review of Montgomery College Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program 2011 Biennial Review of Montgomery College Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program Introduction The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Amendment Act of 1989 (the "Act") required institutions of higher education

More information

DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY

DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY Pace University seeks to promote individual wellness in as many ways as possible. Accordingly, in summary, the Policy prohibits the unlawful use, possession, sale, distribution,

More information

Schreiner University Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Prevention Program Annual Report July 2012 For Academic Year, June 2011 through May 2012

Schreiner University Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Prevention Program Annual Report July 2012 For Academic Year, June 2011 through May 2012 Schreiner University Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Prevention Program Annual Report July 2012 For Academic Year, June 2011 through May 2012 Table of contents Purpose Program Inventory, a Description of

More information

Community College of Denver Drug-Free Schools and Campus Regulations. Biennial Review Report

Community College of Denver Drug-Free Schools and Campus Regulations. Biennial Review Report Community College of Denver Drug-Free Schools and Campus Regulations Biennial Review Report September 2014 This report prepared by: Meloni Rudolph, Dean of Student Life, Rhonda Pylican, Director Human

More information

Policy in student handbook about possession and use of controlled substances and drugs

Policy in student handbook about possession and use of controlled substances and drugs In order to be in compliance with the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act, the Kansas City Art Institute (KCAI) has engaged in a biennial review of its programs and policies related to alcohol and other

More information

Biennial Review of the Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program of Wesleyan University

Biennial Review of the Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program of Wesleyan University Biennial Review of the Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program of Wesleyan University For the period of September 1, 2000 to August 31, 2002 As required by the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act of 1989

More information

Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Program Framework

Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Program Framework Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Program Framework groups: athletic teams, fraternities, res hall communities (mezzo) individual (micro) campus-wide (macro) Person in Environment Approach to AOD Prevention

More information

What every student should know about. Alcohol & Other Drug Use

What every student should know about. Alcohol & Other Drug Use What every student should know about Alcohol & Other Drug Use 2015 16 Princeton University Alcohol and Drug Policies Alcohol Policy Students at Princeton University are responsible for knowing and abiding

More information

EASTERN OREGON UNIVERSITY 2010 2012 Biennial Review Drug and Alcohol Programs and Policies

EASTERN OREGON UNIVERSITY 2010 2012 Biennial Review Drug and Alcohol Programs and Policies GENERAL POLICIES EASTERN OREGON UNIVERSITY 2010 2012 Biennial Review Drug and Alcohol Programs and Policies Author: Dr. Thacher Carter, Counseling and Psychological Services Eastern Oregon University s

More information

Biennial Report of Alcohol and Other Drug Programs

Biennial Report of Alcohol and Other Drug Programs Biennial Report of Alcohol and Other Drug Programs Prepared by Community Development 1/1/2014 Table of Contents Introduction... 2 Purpose... 2 Policies... 3 University Policy... 3 Housing and Residence

More information

Musicians Institute College of Contemporary Music Biennial Review Report on Alcohol/Drugs Programs and Policies

Musicians Institute College of Contemporary Music Biennial Review Report on Alcohol/Drugs Programs and Policies Musicians Institute College of Contemporary Music Biennial Review Report on Alcohol/Drugs Programs and Policies 2011-12 / 2012-13 January, 2014 Biennial Review Report on Alcohol and other Drugs Programs

More information

North-West College Glendale Career College Nevada Career Institute 2013-2015 Biennial Review of Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program

North-West College Glendale Career College Nevada Career Institute 2013-2015 Biennial Review of Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program The Drug Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (34 CFR Part 86) of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act (DFSCA) require an institution of higher education (IHE), such as North-West College (NWC),

More information

DRUG-FREE SCHOOLS AND CAMPUSES REGULATIONS EDGAR Part 86 (Education Department General Administrative Regulations) BIENNIAL REVIEW REPORT 2012-2014

DRUG-FREE SCHOOLS AND CAMPUSES REGULATIONS EDGAR Part 86 (Education Department General Administrative Regulations) BIENNIAL REVIEW REPORT 2012-2014 DRUG-FREE SCHOOLS AND CAMPUSES REGULATIONS EDGAR Part 86 (Education Department General Administrative Regulations) INTRODUCTION BIENNIAL REVIEW REPORT 2012-2014 Montgomery County Community College is in

More information

Alcohol and Drug Issues Contact: Mark Allen, Ph.D., Dean of Students

Alcohol and Drug Issues Contact: Mark Allen, Ph.D., Dean of Students Alcohol and Drug Issues Contact: Mark Allen, Ph.D., Dean of Students Drug-Free Schools and Communities Public Law 101-226 University regulations have consistently supported and recognized the concerns

More information

Indian Hills Community College

Indian Hills Community College Indian Hills Community College 2011-2013 Drug and Alcohol Prevention Program Biennial Review Page 1 of 10 Indian Hills Community College Biennial Review of IHCC s Alcohol and Other Drug Programs 2011-2013

More information

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR THE USE OF ALCOHOL AT STUDENT EVENTS PHILOSOPHY

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR THE USE OF ALCOHOL AT STUDENT EVENTS PHILOSOPHY CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR THE USE OF ALCOHOL AT STUDENT EVENTS PHILOSOPHY Caltech is committed to providing its students, faculty and staff with an environment that promotes

More information

Alcohol and other Drug Prevention Certification Signed by Chief Executive Officer

Alcohol and other Drug Prevention Certification Signed by Chief Executive Officer Drug-Free Schools and Colleges [EDGAR Part 86] Illinois Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Other Drug, and Violence Prevention Suggested Biennial Review Format & Contents July 2014 Cover Page University/College

More information

University of Louisiana System

University of Louisiana System Policy Number: S-II.XXVI.-1 University of Louisiana System Title: ALCOHOL AND ILLEGAL CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Effective Date: Fall Session, 2000 Cancellation: None Chapter: Students Policies and Procedures

More information

St. Cloud State University Alcohol and Other Drug Compliance Program. This program supports the mission of St. Cloud State University by:

St. Cloud State University Alcohol and Other Drug Compliance Program. This program supports the mission of St. Cloud State University by: St. Cloud State University Alcohol and Other Drug Compliance Program I. Philosophy This program supports the mission of St. Cloud State University by: Enhancing Learning and Service: St. Cloud State University

More information

UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICIES

UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICIES UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICIES 404-185 Rev 8/14 High-risk drinking and illicit drug use increases the risk of negative health consequences and undermines the University s goals of academic success

More information

A l c o h o l a n d O t h e r D r u g P r e v e n t i o n P r o g r a m s o n C o l l e g e C a m p u s e s i n I l l i n o i s

A l c o h o l a n d O t h e r D r u g P r e v e n t i o n P r o g r a m s o n C o l l e g e C a m p u s e s i n I l l i n o i s 2011 A l c o h o l a n d O t h e r D r u g P r e v e n t i o n P r o g r a m s o n C o l l e g e C a m p u s e s i n I l l i n o i s I n s t i t u t i o n a l C o m p r e h e n s i v e A l c o h o l a

More information

Policy Statement on Drugs and Alcohol

Policy Statement on Drugs and Alcohol Policy Statement on Drugs and Alcohol The Drug and Alcohol Policies established at MWCC are intended to address student or employee misuse of alcohol and other drugs on campus, thereby creating a safer

More information

University of Louisiana at Lafayette STUDENT ALCOHOL & DRUG POLICY

University of Louisiana at Lafayette STUDENT ALCOHOL & DRUG POLICY University of Louisiana at Lafayette STUDENT ALCOHOL & DRUG POLICY In 1990, an Alcohol/Drug Policy was approved for UL Lafayette. This policy is in compliance with the federal Drug Free Schools and Communities

More information

STATEMENT OF POLICY ON SOCIAL HOST RESPONSIBILITY

STATEMENT OF POLICY ON SOCIAL HOST RESPONSIBILITY STATEMENT OF POLICY ON SOCIAL HOST RESPONSIBILITY The University of the South supports practices that emphasize a host s responsibility to plan social gatherings in a way that provides a safe setting for

More information

OCPS Tech Centers Orlando Campus. Annual Security Report

OCPS Tech Centers Orlando Campus. Annual Security Report OCPS Tech Centers Orlando Campus Annual Security Report 2015 2016 1. Current campus policies regarding procedures for students and others to report criminal actions or other emergencies occurring on campus.

More information

Programming with Alcohol Policy for Student Groups Wittenberg University

Programming with Alcohol Policy for Student Groups Wittenberg University Philosophy Programming with Alcohol Policy for Student Groups Wittenberg University Wittenberg University s Student Code of Conduct and Ethics affords student groups the privilege of hosting events with

More information

2015-2016 Greek Risk Management Document

2015-2016 Greek Risk Management Document 2015-2016 Greek Risk Management Document On Campus Social Functions/Events Registration of Social Functions/Events: What is a Social Function/Event? Any on or off campus gathering of multiple people at

More information

DRUG PREVENTION PROGRAM

DRUG PREVENTION PROGRAM DRUG PREVENTION PROGRAM This is to inform you of the requirements of the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 Public Law 101-226 and what our schools require of the Staff and the Students.

More information

Social Greek Risk Management Policy and Social Event Registration Procedures

Social Greek Risk Management Policy and Social Event Registration Procedures Social Greek Risk Management Policy and Social Event Registration Procedures For the National Pan-Hellenic Council, Interfraternity Council, and Panhellenic Council at the University of West Georgia To

More information

Drinking and Driving

Drinking and Driving 244 East 58 th Street, 4th Floor New York, NY 10022 212-269-7797 212-269-7510 Fax www.ncadd.org NCADD POLICY STATEMENT Drinking and Driving Preamble A significant percentage of drinking drivers are suffering

More information

McKendree University. Office of Greek Life. Risk Management Policy

McKendree University. Office of Greek Life. Risk Management Policy McKendree University Office of Greek Life Risk Management Policy I. General Policies ALCOHOL AND DRUGS A. The possession, sale, use or consumption of ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES, while on chapter premises or during

More information

ALCOHOL AND DRUGS ON CAMPUS

ALCOHOL AND DRUGS ON CAMPUS ALCOHOL AND DRUGS ON CAMPUS Beloit College is a private, coeducational, residential institution of higher education committed to providing a sound liberal arts education that promotes life-long learning

More information

2012 2014 Biennial Review of Alcohol & Other Drug Programs And Policies

2012 2014 Biennial Review of Alcohol & Other Drug Programs And Policies 2012 2014 Biennial Review of Alcohol & Other Drug Programs And Policies 1 Table of Contents Executive Summary... 4 Purpose... 5 Alcohol and Other Drug Policy, Procedures and Programs... 6 1. Michigan Tech

More information

Policies and Procedures

Policies and Procedures Page 1 of 7 Policies and Procedures Policy Governing Use of Alcohol and Other Drugs 1 Introduction: The College of Environmental Science and Forestry is committed to providing a safe and healthy environment

More information

Wellesley College Alcohol and Other Drug Policy

Wellesley College Alcohol and Other Drug Policy Wellesley College Alcohol and Other Drug Policy Statement of Purpose Wellesley College is committed to providing an environment of well-being, learning, and accountability for its members. To this end,

More information

SACRED HEART UNIVERSITY STUDENT ORGANIZATION EVENTS INVOLVING ALCOHOL

SACRED HEART UNIVERSITY STUDENT ORGANIZATION EVENTS INVOLVING ALCOHOL SACRED HEART UNIVERSITY STUDENT ORGANIZATION EVENTS INVOLVING ALCOHOL For all social events involving alcohol (i.e., socials, semi-formals, formals), the event must be submitted through the event registration

More information

Utica College Annual Notice Regarding Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Policies

Utica College Annual Notice Regarding Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Policies Utica College Annual Notice Regarding Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Policies Utica College is required by federal law to provide the following notice to all students and employees. This notice is being

More information

Biennial Review of Hiwassee College s

Biennial Review of Hiwassee College s Biennial Review of Hiwassee College s Alcohol and Other Drug Programs 2012-2014 HIWASSEE COLLEGE Biennial Review of Hiwassee College s Alcohol and Other Drug Programs 2012-2014 The Drug Free Schools and

More information

IT S GOOD TO BE B.A.D.

IT S GOOD TO BE B.A.D. IT S GOOD TO BE B.A.D. LATE NIGHT ALCOHOL ALTERNATIVE PROGRAMMING JANELLE DENSBERGER COORDINATOR OF STUDENT ACTIVITIES ALEXANDRA CHAPMAN BILLIKENS AFTER DARK INTERN Overview of Presentation Theory of Prevention

More information

CAMPUS ACTIVITES BOARD CHAIR

CAMPUS ACTIVITES BOARD CHAIR EXECUTIVE TEAM The CAB Executive Team consists of the CAB Chair and the four Vice Chairs. The main responsibility of the Executive Team is to oversee the general operations of the organization and to manage

More information

Alcohol and Drug Education and Prevention Programming at Seven Private Institutions

Alcohol and Drug Education and Prevention Programming at Seven Private Institutions STUDENT AFFAIRS LEADERSHIP COUNCIL Alcohol and Drug Education and Prevention Programming at Seven Private Institutions Custom Research Brief June 24, 2011 TABLE OF CONTENTS RESEARCH ASSOCIATE Lady Adjepong

More information

POLICIES OF COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY POLICY

POLICIES OF COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY POLICY POLICIES OF COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY POLICY Policy Title: Effective Date: 1/1/1990 Revised, effective [date] Policy Owner(s): Vice President for Student Affairs Vice President for University

More information

PELLISSIPPI STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE. Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act. Alcohol and Other Drugs. Biennial Review

PELLISSIPPI STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE. Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act. Alcohol and Other Drugs. Biennial Review PELLISSIPPI STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act Alcohol and Other Drugs Biennial Review 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 Academic Years 1 Contents INTRODUCTION... 3 ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUGS

More information

EASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY INTERFRATERNITY AND PANHELLENIC COUNCILS GUIDELINES FOR FRATERNITY AND SORORITY USE OF ALCOHOL

EASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY INTERFRATERNITY AND PANHELLENIC COUNCILS GUIDELINES FOR FRATERNITY AND SORORITY USE OF ALCOHOL Page 1 of 6 EASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY INTERFRATERNITY AND PANHELLENIC COUNCILS For these Recognized Student Organizations Eastern Illinois University is fully aware of the significant contribution fraternities

More information

ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, AND OTHER DRUG USE POLICY (ATOD) June 2013

ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, AND OTHER DRUG USE POLICY (ATOD) June 2013 ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, AND OTHER DRUG USE POLICY (ATOD) June 2013 To help prevent the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees and to provide and maintain

More information

Biennial Review Report of the University of South Alabama s. Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program AY 2012-2013 - AY 2013-2014

Biennial Review Report of the University of South Alabama s. Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program AY 2012-2013 - AY 2013-2014 Biennial Review Report of the University of South Alabama s Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program AY 2012-2013 - AY 2013-2014 Biennial Review Committee Membership Dr. Andrea Agnew, Assistant Dean of

More information

PELLISSIPPI STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE. Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act. Alcohol and Other Drugs. Biennial Review

PELLISSIPPI STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE. Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act. Alcohol and Other Drugs. Biennial Review PELLISSIPPI STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Act Alcohol and Other Drugs Biennial Review 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 Academic Years 1 Contents INTRODUCTION... 3 ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUGS

More information

Florida Atlantic University Fraternity and Sorority Life. Risk Management Policy & Planning Guide for Registered Events where Alcohol is Present

Florida Atlantic University Fraternity and Sorority Life. Risk Management Policy & Planning Guide for Registered Events where Alcohol is Present Florida Atlantic University Fraternity and Sorority Life Risk Management Policy & Planning Guide for Registered Events where Alcohol is Present 1 Table of Contents Risk Management Philosophy Statement...Pg.

More information

TEXAS SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY S STATEMENT ON DRUG FREE SCHOOLS AND CAMPUS STUDENT ANNUAL NOTIFICATION

TEXAS SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY S STATEMENT ON DRUG FREE SCHOOLS AND CAMPUS STUDENT ANNUAL NOTIFICATION TEXAS SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY S STATEMENT ON DRUG FREE SCHOOLS AND CAMPUS STUDENT ANNUAL NOTIFICATION Texas Southern University adheres to and complies with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments

More information

FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL POLICY

FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL POLICY FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL POLICY GENERAL REQUIREMENTS: A. This policy shall govern the possession, service, sale, consumption and distribution of alcohol at all Florida International University

More information

ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICY

ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICY ALCOHOL AND DRUG POLICY SOWELA is committed to providing a drug free environment for students, visitors, and employees. SOWELA prohibits unlawful possession, use, or sale of any alcoholic beverage or controlled

More information

Source: Minnesota Student Survey, Key Trends Through 2007, Minnesota Departments of Corrections, Education, Health, Human Services and Public Safety.

Source: Minnesota Student Survey, Key Trends Through 2007, Minnesota Departments of Corrections, Education, Health, Human Services and Public Safety. Underage Drinking in Minnesota The Consequences of Drinking Outweigh the Experience. What s the Big Deal? Underage alcohol use is a big deal and directly related to criminal behavior and serious social

More information

Drug-Free Workplace. Policy Statement. Reason for the Policy. Policy V. 7.2.1

Drug-Free Workplace. Policy Statement. Reason for the Policy. Policy V. 7.2.1 Policy V. 7.2.1 Responsible Official: Vice President for Human Resources, Diversity, and Multicultural Affairs Effective Date: October 26, 2009 Drug-Free Workplace Policy Statement The University of Vermont

More information

Colorado State University Fraternity & Sorority Joint Policy on Risk Management

Colorado State University Fraternity & Sorority Joint Policy on Risk Management Preface Colorado State University Fraternity & Sorority Joint Policy on Risk Management (Governing all Chapters of the Interfraternity Council, Multicultural Greek council, National Pan-Hellenic Council,

More information

Alcohol Policy. Policy/Procedure. Philosophy

Alcohol Policy. Policy/Procedure. Philosophy Alcohol Policy Policy/Procedure Philosophy As members of an academic community, students can expect an atmosphere that supports personal growth and learning. However, because we are also members of a residential

More information

2014 Biennial Review. Prepared by: Center for Health and Wellness Promotion Student Affairs University of San Diego

2014 Biennial Review. Prepared by: Center for Health and Wellness Promotion Student Affairs University of San Diego 2014 Biennial Review Prepared by: Center for Health and Wellness Promotion Student Affairs University of San Diego Table of Contents I. Statement of Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) Program Goals and a Discussion

More information

4.4 ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

4.4 ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Approving Authority: President Original Approval Date: July 29, 1994 Date of Most Recent Review/Revision: July 2007 Office of Accountability: Vice-President: Finance & Administration Administrative Responsibility:

More information

TARLETON UNIVERSITY SYSTEM CENTER CENTRAL TEXAS

TARLETON UNIVERSITY SYSTEM CENTER CENTRAL TEXAS TARLETON UNIVERSITY SYSTEM CENTER CENTRAL TEXAS Killeen, Texas Dr. Garry Ross, Executive Director Room 101, Tarleton University System Center Central Texas (254) 519-5447 Tarleton University System Center

More information

University Alcohol Policy

University Alcohol Policy Administrative Regulation 6:4 Responsible Office: Exectutive Vice President for Finance and Administration / Vice President for Student Affairs Date Effective: 6/19/2015 Supersedes Version: 8/14/2012 University

More information

Complying with the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (DFSCR) By H.S. Albert Jung, Intern, SUNY Office of General Counsel, 1 July 22, 2015

Complying with the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (DFSCR) By H.S. Albert Jung, Intern, SUNY Office of General Counsel, 1 July 22, 2015 Complying with the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses Regulations (DFSCR) By H.S. Albert Jung, ntern, SUNY Office of General Counsel, 1 July 22, 2015 DFSCR requires that colleges (1) distribute a written notice

More information

College Policy on Drugs & Alcohol

College Policy on Drugs & Alcohol College Policy on Drugs & Alcohol Introduction and Table of Contents The Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments require the Institute of Technology to

More information

BYOB: Hosting Safe Social Events

BYOB: Hosting Safe Social Events BYOB: Hosting Safe Social Events USING THIS GUIDE This guide has been designed to assist chapters in planning and implementing safe Bring Your Own Beverage (BYOB) social events. When using this guide to

More information

STUDENT GUIDE. RWU Alcohol Policies and Guidelines. Students Under 21 2010-2011. Sponsored by the Alcohol and Other Drug Task Force

STUDENT GUIDE. RWU Alcohol Policies and Guidelines. Students Under 21 2010-2011. Sponsored by the Alcohol and Other Drug Task Force RWU Alcohol Policies and Guidelines Students Under 21 2010-2011 Sponsored by the Alcohol and Other Drug Task Force STUDENT GUIDE Top things to remember when you are under 21: South Campus is DRY. All alcohol,

More information

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND POLICY ON EMPLOYEE ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG ABUSE

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND POLICY ON EMPLOYEE ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG ABUSE VI-8.00(A) UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND POLICY ON EMPLOYEE ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG ABUSE (Approved by the President September 9, 1992; technical changes November 2009; technical changes September 2014.) The University

More information

Biennial Review of Drug and Alcohol Policies and Programs. June 2012-14

Biennial Review of Drug and Alcohol Policies and Programs. June 2012-14 Biennial Review of Drug and Alcohol Policies and Programs June 2012-14 Prepared by: Richard J. Ferraro, Ph.D., Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs Hal Irvin, Ph.D., Associate Vice President for

More information

Source/Reference: Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989

Source/Reference: Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 Page 1 of 7 Revision Responsibility: Responsible Executive Officer: Executive Director of Human Resources Vice President for Business Affairs Source/Reference: Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 Drug-Free

More information

Position Title Responsibilities Related Graduate Programs

Position Title Responsibilities Related Graduate Programs Department Counseling Center 439-4841 Position Title Responsibilities Related Graduate Programs Alcohol and Drug Must understand and abide by all center policies. Provides educational and prevention oriented

More information

I. STUDENT SUPPORT/WELLNESS PROGRAMS MISSION STATEMENT

I. STUDENT SUPPORT/WELLNESS PROGRAMS MISSION STATEMENT BIENNIAL REVIEW Drug-Free Schools and Campuses FY13 (Fall 2012-Spring 2013) FY14 (Fall 2013-Spring 2014) Dakota State University 820 North Washington Avenue. Madison, SD 57042 Prepared by Nicole Bowen,

More information

University Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program Information

University Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program Information University Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program Information As a caring community, The University of Scranton is committed to the implementation of a program that is designed to prevent the unlawful

More information

MICHIGAN JEWISH INSTITUTE Policy and Procedure Manual

MICHIGAN JEWISH INSTITUTE Policy and Procedure Manual Effective Date: June 2003 Page No. 1 of 12 GENERAL PURPOSE: This policy is intended to provide a process and procedure that will increase awareness of campus safety and security issues and to communicate

More information

Truett-McConnell College. Annual Campus Safety and Security Report 2013

Truett-McConnell College. Annual Campus Safety and Security Report 2013 Truett-McConnell College Annual Campus Safety and Security Report 2013 Message from the Public Safety Coordinator This Annual Campus Safety and Security Report is designed to provide you with important

More information

Alcohol. Policies. on campus and in the workplace

Alcohol. Policies. on campus and in the workplace Alcohol and Drug Policies on campus and in the workplace September 2014 The University of Kansas Alcohol and Drug Policies The consumption of alcoholic liquor on the campus of the University of Kansas

More information

Social Event Management Procedures (SEMP)

Social Event Management Procedures (SEMP) Social Event Management Procedures (SEMP) Purpose Social Event Management Procedures (SEMP) reflects Dartmouth College s commitment to provide the safest possible social atmosphere for members of the College

More information

Northern New Mexico College HUMAN RESOURCES POLICY

Northern New Mexico College HUMAN RESOURCES POLICY Northern New Mexico College HUMAN RESOURCES POLICY Subject: Substance Abuse File Reference: 3.3 Date Approved By Board of Regents: Replaces Policy Approved On: Purpose: September 21, 1990 Policy: Procedures:

More information

University of Central Missouri Interfraternity and Panhellenic Councils Risk Management Policy Revised: Fall 2012. I. Preface

University of Central Missouri Interfraternity and Panhellenic Councils Risk Management Policy Revised: Fall 2012. I. Preface University of Central Missouri Interfraternity and Panhellenic Councils Risk Management Policy Revised: Fall 2012 I. Preface A. Mission Statement of the University of Central Missouri (UCM) Fraternity

More information

Past, Present and Future

Past, Present and Future Newsletter May 2008 BNCCC Volume 1, Issue 1 Bloomington Normal Community Campus Committee, (309) 827-6026 Mission Statement To reduce high risk drinking and its consequences among Bloomington- Normal students.

More information

BCIT LIQUOR CONSUMPTION ON BCIT CAMPUS POLICY. Effective Date: 88-12-13. Amended: 96-06-25 02-01-29 03-07-03 03-11-03 04-09-13

BCIT LIQUOR CONSUMPTION ON BCIT CAMPUS POLICY. Effective Date: 88-12-13. Amended: 96-06-25 02-01-29 03-07-03 03-11-03 04-09-13 BCIT LIQUOR CONSUMPTION ON BCIT CAMPUS POLICY Category: General Administration Policy Number: 7504 Effective Date: 88-12-13 Related Policies: Approved By: Board of Governors Maintained By: Executive Director,

More information

The Community Alcohol Personality Survey

The Community Alcohol Personality Survey The Community Alcohol Personality Survey Learn how to establish the size and shape of alcohol problems in your community and where to focus your efforts for the most impact. www.faceproject.org Toll Free

More information

Campus Crime Awareness

Campus Crime Awareness 1 of 5 2/24/2009 9:22 AM Campus Crime Awareness Title II of the Student Right to Know and Campus Security Act, know as the Campus Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990, requires that colleges

More information

6C2R-6.012 Alcohol Policy. The University alcohol policy shall be as follows: FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL POLICY

6C2R-6.012 Alcohol Policy. The University alcohol policy shall be as follows: FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL POLICY 6C2R-6.012 Alcohol Policy. The University alcohol policy shall be as follows: FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY ALCOHOL POLICY Introduction The Florida State University affirms the guiding ethical principle of

More information

Omega Delta National Fraternity, Inc. Risk Management Policy 2015 v1.2

Omega Delta National Fraternity, Inc. Risk Management Policy 2015 v1.2 OMEGA DELTA NATIONAL FRATERNITY, INC. Omega Delta National Fraternity, Inc. Risk Management Policy 2015 v1.2 TABLE OF CONTENTS ALCOHOL AND DRUGS POLICY ANTI HAZING POLICY SEXUAL ABUSE AND HARASSMENT POLICY

More information

University of Illinois at Chicago Student Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Violence Interim Policy

University of Illinois at Chicago Student Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Violence Interim Policy University of Illinois at Chicago Student Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Violence Interim Policy Introduction The University of Illinois at Chicago is committed to creating a safe and secure community for

More information

DECISIONS DECISIONS DECISIONS

DECISIONS DECISIONS DECISIONS DECISIONS DECISIONS DECISIONS CONSEQUENCES CONSEQUENCES CONSEQUENCES 80 Vandenburgh Avenue Troy, New York 1210-6096 OUR COMMITMENT Hudson Valley Community College is committed to an environment that fosters

More information