Roads and Footpaths Infrastructure Asset Management Plan

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1 Roads and Footpaths Infrastructure Asset Management Plan Version 2a November 2012

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3 Prepared By: Rob Damhuis Senior Transport Asset Management Consultant Opus International Consultants (PCA) Ltd Approved for Release By: Chief Executive Officer Shire of Irwin PO Box 21 DONGARA WA 6525 Phone Fax: Time Period of the Plan: Asset Management Plan Review Date: The AMP covers a 10 year period. The AMP is reviewed initially before July 2014, then every 4 years and is due for revision and updating within 2 years of each Shire election. The Shire of Irwin wishes to acknowledge the following contributors: The funding provided by the Department of Local Government and Department of Regional Development and Lands through Royalties for Regions to support this initiative / project; and The Institute of Public Works Engineering Australia for the use of the Asset Management for Small, Rural or Remote Communities Practice Notes and template

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5 - i - TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY... iii 1. INTRODUCTION Background Goals and Objectives of Asset Management Plan Framework Corporate Document Relationships Core and Advanced Asset Management Community Consultation RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN FUTURE DEMAND Demand Forecast Changes in Technology Demand Management Plan New Assets for Growth LEVELS OF SERVICE Legislative Requirements Desired Levels of Service Current Levels of Service Level of Service Performance Monitoring LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT PLAN Asset hierarchy Age profile Present asset condition Routine Maintenance Plan Maintenance plan Standards and specifications Future operations and maintenance expenditures Renewal/Replacement Plan Renewal plan Renewal standards Projected renewal expenditure Creation/Acquisition/Upgrade Plan Selection criteria Standards and specifications Projected upgrade/new assets expenditure Disposal Plan Financial Summary Asset valuations Asset Sustainability Ratios... 25

6 - ii Gap Analysis Expenditure projections for long term financial plan Funding Strategy Valuation Forecasts Key Assumptions made in Financial Forecasts Data confidence ASSET MANAGEMENT PRACTICES Accounting/Financial Systems Accounting and financial systems Accountabilities for financial systems Accounting standards and regulations Capital/maintenance threshold Required changes to accounting financial systems arising from this AM Plan Asset Management Systems Asset management system Asset registers Linkage from asset management to financial system Accountabilities for asset management system and data Required changes to asset management system arising from this AM Plan Information Flow Requirements and Processes PLAN IMPROVEMENT AND MONITORING Performance Measures Improvement Plan Monitoring and Review Procedures Appendix A. Appendix B. Appendix C. Appendix D. Appendix E. Appendix F. Appendix G. Appendix H. Appendix I. Appendix J. Appendix K. Appendix L. ROAD AND PATH VALUATION, UNIT RATES AND LIVES LEVELS OF SERVICE CONDITION INSPECTION METHODOLOGY RENEWAL/REPLACEMENT PRIORITIZATION METHODOLOGY SAFETY AND MAINTENANCE INSPECTION METHODOLOGY PROJECTED 10 YEAR CAPITAL RENEWAL WORKS PROGRAM (DERIVED FROM USEFUL LIFE ROAD AND PATH NETWORK DEMAND RISK MATRIX LEGISLATIVE ENVIRONMENT: ACTS AND REGULATIONS REFERENCES ABBREVIATIONS GLOSSARY Disclaimer Any representation, statement, opinion or advice expressed or implied in this publication is made in good faith and on the basis that Opus, its employees and agents are not liable for any damage or loss whatsoever which may occur as a result of action taken or not taken, as the case may be, in respect of any representation, statement, opinion or advice referred to herein.

7 - iii - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Introduction This Roads and Footpaths Asset Management Plan (AMP) has been compiled to comply with Local Government regulatory requirements including the Integrated Planning and Reporting requirements, and to demonstrate Council s responsible management of assets (and services provided from these assets). This Plan collates current road network asset condition, valuation, income and expenditure data, and compares it with the asset stock s long term funding needs (that are required to provide an agreed and sustainable Level of Service). This Plan investigates whether Council s current level of asset operational, maintenance and renewal funding are sufficient to sustain the assets at a standard that will be acceptable to both asset owners and road users. This plan covers roads and paths, and their components as follows: Roads: Sealed & unsealed surface Road Pavement Earthworks / formation Foot- and cycle paths The Road network comprises: 33.3km of sealed regional distributor roads; 35.4km of sealed local distributor roads; 77.5km of sealed local access roads; 19.9km of unsealed local distributor roads; 258.0km of unsealed local access roads; 9.5km of formed local access roads, and 16.0km of footpath. These infrastructure assets have a combined replacement value of $58,273,000. Sustainability of service delivery (Long term Life Cycle Cost) The projected cost to provide the services covered by this Asset Management Plan includes operations, maintenance, and renewal of existing assets over the 10 year planning period is $1.67 million per annum. Council s estimated available funding for this period is $764,761 per year giving a 10 year funding shortfall of -$909,135 per year as illustrated in the figure below. This indicates that Council has 46% of the projected expenditures needed to provide the services documented in the asset management plan to the current Level of Service. Councils present funding levels are insufficient to continue to provide existing services at current Levels of Service in the medium term without pursuing alternative funding sources. Although this paints a fairly bleak picture, these figures are distorted by poor data confidence levels. These data confidence levels will improve in future revisions of the AMP as the data quality improves. What we will do Council plans to provide road services for the following within the 10 year planning period: Operation, maintenance, renewal and upgrade of roads to meet Levels of Service set by council in annual budgets. Major renewals and upgrades to a number of streets, roads and road side kerbs. What we cannot do Council does not have enough funding to provide all services at the desired Levels of Service or provide new services. The current Levels of Service will be revised, a list of works which cannot be done will be included in future revisions of the AMP. Managing the Risks There are risks associated with providing the service and not being able to complete all identified activities and projects. We have identified major risks as: Lack of confidence in asset register data leading to poor forward works forecasting; and Financial gap between required Level of Service and funding levels We will endeavour to manage these risks within available funding by: Review road asset inventory, include newly acquired assets; and Define appropriate Levels of Service; And pursue alternate funding avenues.

8 - iv - The Next Steps The actions resulting from this asset management plan are: Define the Asset Management roles and responsibilities of Shire staff; Develop and implement a formal staff AM training programme, including induction awareness; Develop Level of Service based on community requirements; Incorporate other road related assets into this AMP; Identify and pursue alternative funding streams; and Review road asset inventory, include newly acquired assets, and revaluate network. Questions you may have What is this plan about? This asset management plan covers the Shire of Irwin Community s road and footpath infrastructure assets. These assets include sealed and unsealed roads, and paths (both footpaths and shared paths) throughout the Council area that enable residents to travel around the Shire to work and for recreation as well as enabling visitors to travel around the Shire. What is an Asset Management Plan? Asset management planning is a comprehensive process to ensure delivery of services from infrastructure is provided in a financially sustainable manner. An asset management plan (AMP) details information about infrastructure assets including actions required to provide an agreed Level of Service in the most cost effective manner. The AMP defines the services to be provided, how the services are provided and what funds are required to provide the services. Why is there a funding shortfall? Most of the Council s transport network was constructed from government grants often provided and accepted without consideration of ongoing operations, maintenance and replacement needs. Data indicates that many of these assets have exceeded their useful life and require replacement, services from the assets are decreasing and maintenance costs are increasing. Councils present funding levels are insufficient to continue to provide existing services at current levels in the medium term. What options do we have? Resolving the funding shortfall involves several steps: Improving asset knowledge so that data accurately records the asset inventory, how assets are performing and when assets are not able to provide the required Levels of Service; Improving our efficiency in operating, maintaining, replacing existing and constructing new assets to optimise life cycle costs; Identifying and managing risks associated with providing services from infrastructure; Making trade-offs between Levels of Service and costs to ensure that the community receives the best return from infrastructure; Identifying assets surplus to needs for disposal to make saving in future operations and maintenance costs; Consulting with the community to ensure that transport services and costs meet community needs and are affordable; Developing partnership with other bodies, where available to provide services; and Seeking additional funding from governments and other bodies to better reflect a whole of government funding approach to infrastructure services. What happens if we don t manage the shortfall? It is likely that council will have to reduce Levels of Service in some areas, unless new sources of revenue are found. For roads, the service level reduction may include: More potholes and road failures; Poorer road condition prior to renewal / upgrade actions; and Lower frequency of grading. What can we do? Council can develop options and priorities for future road services with costs of providing the services, consult with the community to plan future services to match the community services needs with ability to pay for services and maximise benefit to the community for costs to the community. What can you do? Council will be pleased to consider your thoughts on the issues raised in this asset management plan and suggestions on how Council may change or reduce its transport services mix to ensure that the appropriate Level of Service can be provided to the community within available funding.

9 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background This asset management plan has been developed to demonstrate responsive management of assets (and services provided from assets), compliance with regulatory requirements, and to communicate funding needed to provide the required Levels of Service. The asset management plan is to be read with Council s Asset Management Policy, Asset Management Strategy and the following associated planning documents: The Shire of Irwin Plan For The Future 2010/11 to 2014/15; The Shire of Irwin Strategic Plan 2010/11 to 2014/15; and The Shire of Irwin Draft Strategic Community Plan 2012 This infrastructure assets covered by this asset management plan are shown in Table 1-1: Assets covered by this Plan. Asset Category Dimension ** Table 1-1: Assets covered by this Plan Optimised Replacement Cost * Optimised Depreciated Replacement Cost * Annual Depreciation * Accumulated Depreciation* Pavement formation 3,099,446m2 $ 23,868,000 $ 23,868,000 $ 0 $ 0 Pavement structure 2,940,791.m2 $ 22,674,000 $ 13,767,000 $719,000 $ 8,907,000 Pavement surface 1,062,279m2 $ 7,784,000 $ 3,567,000 $ 477,000 $ 4,217,000 Surface water channels 113,466m $ 2,104,000 $ 1,052,000 $ 105,000 $ 1,052,000 Road Assets Total $ 56,431,000 $ 42,254,000 $ 1,286,000 $ 14,176,000 Footpath 31,378m2 $ 1,842,000 $ 1,599,000 $ 25,000 $ 243,000 Footpath Assets Total $ 1,842,000 $ 1,599,000 $ 25,000 $ 243,000 Total $ 58,273,000 $ 43,853,000 $ 1,311,000 $ 14,419,000 * Roads and footpaths asset revaluation June 2012 ** From ROMAN II data base The following assets are not included due to lack of asset register data: Road signage; Traffic calming structures; Road related drainage, i.e. culverts and bridges; Road barriers; and Parking areas. Future revisions of the Road Asset Management Plan will incorporate these assets. 1.2 Goals and Objectives of Asset Management The Council exists to provide services to its community. Some of these services are provided by infrastructure assets. Council has acquired infrastructure assets by purchase, by contract, construction by council staff and by donation of assets constructed by developers and others to meet increased Levels of Service.

10 - 6 - Council s goal in managing infrastructure assets is to meet the required Level of Service in the most cost effective manner for present and future consumers. The goal of this asset management plan is to: Document the services/levels of Service to be provided and the costs of providing the service, Communicate the consequences for Levels of Service and risk, where desired funding is not available, and Provide information to assist decision makers in trading off Levels of Service, costs and risks to provide services in a financially sustainable manner. The key elements of infrastructure asset management are: Taking a whole life cycle approach; Developing cost-effective management strategies for the long term; Providing a defined Level of Service and monitoring performance; Understanding and meeting the demands of growth through demand management and infrastructure investment; Managing risks associated with asset failures; Sustainable use of physical resources; and Continuous improvement in asset management practices. 1 This asset management plan is prepared under the direction of Council s vision, community aspirations and values, objectives and desired outcomes. Council s vision 2 is: A motivated, progressive and friendly community, offering a brilliant blend of opportunity, natural beauty and heritage, with an enviable lifestyle. The community identified the following aspirations and values: Forward thinking and innovative; Honest, open and accountable; Effective leadership; Engaging our community; and Respecting our character and diversity. Table 1.2 on the following page outlines the strategies identified to achieve the Council s objectives and indicates how they are supported by this Road Asset Management Plan. 1 IPWEA, 2006, IIMM Sec 1.1.3, p Shire of Irwin 10+ Year Strategic Community Plan 2012 Draft 14 June 2012

11 - 7 - Economic Table 1-2: Organisation Objectives and how these are addressed in this Plan Objectives Outcomes Strategy A prosperous, diverse and thriving economy. Supports existing industries, facilities, new development and promotes economic growth. Develop an Investment Attraction Prospectus for the Shire. How objectives and outcomes are supported by AMP John F. Kennedy once said, It is not our wealth that built our Roads, but it is our roads that built our wealth. The plan s objective is to ensure that the road network is maintained and developed to ensure economic wellbeing of the Shire. Environmental To respect and understand our natural and built environment, and conserve our heritage. 2.3 Conserve and protect our natural and built environment through land-use management, planning and development strategies. 2.4 Our natural assets and open spaces are accessible and amenable. 2.5 Our Town Centres are attractive, accessible and inviting, whilst maintaining their unique character. 2.6 Physical assets are maintained efficiently and effectively : Investigate regional recycling opportunities : Review and update the Disability Access and Inclusion Plan : Review and update the Shared footpaths and Cycle Network Plan : Continue to provide a high standard of maintenance and presentation in the Town Centres : Maintain road assets and ancillary infrastructure : Develop and implement an Asset Management Plan. Materials recycling opportunities are identified in the AMP. Levels of Service have been developed to ensure maximum recycling is undertaken. The AMP has identified disabled accessibility improvement opportunities in the footpath network. The AMP provides guidance on the Levels of Service for future footpath networks. The AMP ensures that maintenance remains at a constant acceptable level. The AMP ensures that maintenance remains at a constant acceptable level. This AMP has been developed to ensure compliance and a fit-forpurpose, cost-effective network is maintained. Social A friendly, safe and engaged community enjoying a quality lifestyle and a diverse range of services, programs and facilities. 3.1 High quality and well maintained community infrastructure. 3.2 Well utilised, efficient and multi-purpose community resources. 3.3 Increased availability of aged care facilities. 3.8 Maintain our safe community : Develop and implement the Asset Management Plan : Monitor and support the provision of a Community Bus : Investigate future facilities for Seniors Citizens Partner with the Mid West Road Safety Alliance and other road safety organisations. This AMP ensures a fit-for-purpose network that enhances the community lifestyle, and ensures access to Shire facilities. The AMP ensures that road maintenance remains at a constant acceptable level. The AMP assists in guidance with the quality requirements of the future footpath. Although not assisting in partnership with these organisations, the AMP assists in the enhancement of road safety through Road Safety Levels of Service.

12 - 8 - Civic Leadership Objectives Outcomes Strategy A collaborative and forward looking community that is guided by strong leadership 4.1 A well informed and engaged community. 4.2 Effective governance, sound management and prudent financial responsibility. 4.3 A local government that is respected, professional and accountable : Implement and regularly review the Community Engagement Policy : Undertake an Annual Customer Satisfaction Survey : Adopt best practice in order to ensure compliance : Implement the Integrated Planning Framework, including the Long Term Financial Plan, Workforce Plan, Asset Management Plan, Corporate Business Plan and Annual Budget : Ensure adequate training programs for elected members and staff : Adopt best practice processes to achieve a high standard of governance and accountability : Implement risk management standards. How objectives and outcomes are supported by AMP The Levels of Service require monitoring and report back to community to ensure that the community is aware of the network standards and implications of changes to Levels of Service (financial and quality). AMP s promote a consistent approach to project identification, and is best practice in whole-of-life financial planning. This AMP ensures compliance with the Integrated Planning Framework. Elected member & staff training have been identified as an improvement action. AMP s promote a consistent approach to project identification, and is best practice in whole-of-life financial planning. The network risk register has identified a number of network related risks which will feed into the corporate risk register. 1.3 Plan Framework Key elements of the AMP are: Levels of Service specifies the services and Levels of Service to be provided by council; Future demand how this will impact on future service delivery and how this is to be met; Life cycle management how the organisation will manage its existing and future assets to provide the required services; Financial summary what funds are required to provide the required services; Asset management practices how the projects are identified, prioritised and delivered; Monitoring how the AMP will be monitored to ensure it is meeting the organisation s objectives; and Asset management improvement plan.

13 Corporate Document Relationships The AMP integrates with many other key Shire documents, some of which were still under development when this document was prepared. The Shire has adopted a corporate asset management framework similar to that detailed within the WA Asset Management Framework and Guidelines. Strategic Community Figure 1-1 details the currently adopted framework and demonstrates the relationship that exists between the Shire s AMP s and its Asset Management Strategy, other informing strategies and operational processes, plans and practices. The key relationships can be summarised as: Asset Management Strategy: The Strategy outlines how the Shire s asset portfolio will support the service needs of the community. Though reliant on a strong Strategic Community Plan, the Strategy should facilitate the provision of prioritised service delivery, thus informing what assets are required by the Shire. Long Term Financial Plan (LTFP): The Shire is currently developing an LTFP in conjunction with this AMP. A LTFP sets out in detail the financial strategy required to meet the Council s long term expenditure needs. The AMP s inform the LTFP about what level of resource is required to provide the agreed service levels. Figure 1-1: The AMP's Corporate Document Relationships (Department of Local Government Asset Management Framework & Guidelines) 1.5 Core and Advanced Asset Management This asset management plan is prepared as a first cut core asset management plan in accordance with the International Infrastructure Management Manual 3. It is prepared to meet minimum legislative and organisational requirements for sustainable service delivery and long term financial planning and reporting. Core asset management is a top down approach where analysis is applied at the system or network level. 1.6 Community Consultation The outcomes of the Community Consultation conducted as part of the development of the Strategic Community Plans have informed this core asset management plan. 3 IPWEA, 2006.

14 RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN At present the Shire has no Risk Management Policy or Plan. As part of this Asset Management Plan, an assessment of risks associated with service delivery from infrastructure assets has been carried out. The identified critical risks that will result in loss or reduction in service from road assets was carried out. These identified risks will be included in the Shire s Risk Management Plan, once developed. The risk assessment process identifies credible risks, the likelihood of the risk event occurring, the consequences should the event occur, develops a risk rating, evaluates the risk and develops a risk treatment plan for nonacceptable risks. Critical risks, being those assessed as Critical - requiring immediate corrective action identified in the Infrastructure Risk Management Plan are summarised in Table 2-1. The full risk analysis is provided in Appendix G. Table 2-1: Critical Risks and Treatment Plans Ref. Service or Asset at Risk What can happen? Possible cause Risk rating Actions Target date due Asset management - Strategic Forward Works Planning / budgeting Asset Management - inventory Asset Management - condition rating and inspections Asset Management - condition rating and inspections Asset management - system Current trained staff leave resulting in lack of focus or understanding of asset management Processes are not put into place to consistently collect performance information. Inventory is not updated leading to poor revaluations and forward works plans. Footpaths become uneven causing trip hazard leading to claim against Council. Council holds no, or poor, condition data of network infrastructure Funding and management decisions made in isolation of AMP Elected members or staff leaving for various reasons. Lack of succession plan Lack of funding, insufficient resources and/or skill levels. Internal staff not competent in ROMAN II or high staff turnover. the Shire has no formalised inspection methodology for safety or condition of its road network Assets become unsafe, and/or are replaced at suboptimum times. Network ineffectually managed, resulting in potential for increased risk as well as sub-optimal whole of life costs. Critical Critical Critical Critical Critical Critical Develop & implement business continuity plan for AM activities Develop & implement processes to allow collection and monitoring of AMP LOS. Develop an asset inventory update procedure Shire develops a formal procedure & methodology for footpath inspection Shire develops a formal procedure & methodology for road inspection Develop & implement elected member and staff training in for AM activities 3rd Quarter 12/13 2nd Quarter 12/13 3rd Quarter 13/14 3rd Quarter 12/13 3rd Quarter 12/13 4th Quarter 12/13

15 FUTURE DEMAND 3.1 Demand Forecast The Shire has identified a range of influences that may affect demand for services that rely on roads and paths for delivery, over the 10 year horizon of this AMP. The following seven influences have been discussed in further detail in Appendix H: Political; Economic; Social; Technology; Legal; Environmental; and Health & Safety. Demand factor trends and impacts on service delivery are summarised in Table 3-1: Demand Factors, Projections and Impact on Services below. Driver Political Economic Social Technology Legal Environmental Health & Safety Demand Change Table 3-1: Demand Factors, Projections and Impact on Services Comment No change in demand expected provided that current Local, State and Federal Government policies remain unchanged. Increase in demand expected with increasing resource sector activities and tourism. Increased heavy vehicle movement on roads is expected to reduce pavement and seal lives and increase demand for sealing unsealed roads. Therefore, an increase in demand on Shire resource capacity is expected. With one of the fastest growing populations in the Mid-West and a significant seasonal population, expect increased demand on the road and path networks. Also, an ageing population will place greater demand on the construction and maintenance of the path network. No change in demand expected due to material, construction or maintenance techniques; no change due to transport mode changes. Increase in management resource demand because of legislative change; possible increase in demand because of litigation changes. Potentially higher whole of life costs due to climate change, no change from sustainability pressures. Increased demand through health and safety requirements for better service levels.

16 Changes in Technology Technology advances are forecast to affect the delivery of services covered by this plan in the following areas detailed in Table 3-2 below. Table 3-2: Effects of changes in Technology Technology Change Effect on Service Delivery Introduction of new machinery. Road seal renewal treatments. Continual improvement to Road design and Pavement Materials. Pavement recycling technology. Reduced costs, improved productivity & OH&S. Increased residual life and lower lifecycle costs. Increased re-sheet/ pavement life. Higher Level of Service being delivered for a similar budget. 3.3 Demand Management Plan Demand for new services will be managed through a combination of managing existing assets, upgrading of existing assets, and providing new assets to meet demand and demand management. Demand management practices include non-asset solutions, insuring against risks and managing failures. Opportunities identified to date for demand management are shown in Table 3-3 which are aligned with the Draft Strategic Community Plan Service Activity Community Engagement Customer Requests Urban and Rural roads Traffic load and volume control Rural unsealed roads Table 3-3: Demand Management Plan Summary Demand Management Plan Engage with the community to identify community needs and expectations of Levels of Service. Analyse customer requests to optimise the use and performance of existing road services and look for non-asset based solutions to meet demand for services. Identify and promote major transport routes with road hierarchy matched to Levels of Service. Improve road and pavement performance through road mass restrictions and targeting areas for reduced traffic volumes. Develop road hierarchy with matched Levels of Service for patrol grading and resheet cycle. 3.4 New Assets for Growth The new assets required to meet growth will be acquired free of cost from land developments and constructed/acquired by Council. The future projections have been based on a combination of future social growth expectation as described in the Future Demand Plan, and the percentage network growth over the past 10 years for the road and path assets. As the historical growth has been fairly high at between 4% and 8%, dependant on the asset class, with the Shire in an active growth phase, the future projections have been based on half the historical growth rates to come more into line with the expected social growth rates. The new contributed and constructed asset values are summarised in Figure 3.1 below.

17 Figure 3-1: New Assets for growth- value 70,000,000 60,000,000 50,000,000 CRC ($) 40,000,000 30,000,000 20,000,000 10,000, CRC Growth Figure 3-2 illustrates the growth in the individual assets by area. Figure 3-2: New Assets for growth- area 30,000,000 25,000,000 Historical growth Predicted growth Network size (m 2 ) 20,000,000 15,000,000 10,000,000 5,000, Footpath Kerb Pavement Surface Acquiring these new assets will commit council to fund ongoing operations and maintenance costs for the period that the service provided from the assets is required. Given the long life cycle of road assets, the impact of this growth (future renewal costs) is only likely to be material after ten years. These future costs are identified and considered in developing forecasts of future operations and maintenance costs.

18 LEVELS OF SERVICE 4.1 Legislative Requirements Council has to meet many legislative requirements including Australian and State legislation and State regulations. Relevant legislation is stated in Appendix H. 4.2 Desired Levels of Service At present, indications of desired Levels of Service are obtained from various sources including residents feedback to Councillors and staff, service requests and correspondence. Council has identified its desired Level of Service KPIs and will quantify the initial desired Levels of Service in Appendix B once a period of monitoring has taken place. Once done, they will form the basis against which Levels of Service will be monitored and performance reported. Table 4-1 below indicates the draft desired Level of Service based on the present visual condition of the road network. The table s footpath Level of Service provides indicative values only which will be updated once the footpath visual condition have been assessed. These assets have been assessed using the condition assessment methodology outlined in Appendix C. Condition Road % length Asset Class Sealed Roads* Table 4-1 Desired Levels of Service for network visual condition Total Network length Condition 1 Good % Preferred Condition 2 Minor % Preferred Condition 3 Medium % Preferred Condition 4 Major % Preferred Condition 5 No Good % Preferred Sealed Regional Distributor Roads 243,767m2 <90% 50-70% <10% <3% <2% Sealed Local Distributor Roads 262,378m2 <50% 40-70% <15% <3% <2% Sealed Local Access Roads 528,808m2 <50% 40-60% <20% <5% <3% Kerbs 113,466m <70% 40-70% <20% <5% <3% Unsealed Roads* Unsealed Local Distributor Roads Unsealed Local Access Roads Footpaths** 159,180m2 <50% 40-70% <15% <3% <2% 1,680,193m2 <50% 30-70% <20% <5% <3% Concrete path 18,718m2 <75% 20-30% <15% <5% <3% Asphalt paths 840m2 <75% 20-30% <15% <5% <3% Block paving 252m2 <75% 20-30% <15% <5% <3% * Levels of Service based on asset present condition. ** Indicative Levels of Service provided for footpaths. 4.3 Current Levels of Service Except for road condition, Council s current Levels of Service have not as yet been assessed. Current visual road condition Level of Service details are contained in Table 5-2 on page 17. The footpath network has not yet been assessed. 4.4 Level of Service Performance Monitoring The Levels of Service will be monitored on a regular basis and reported.

19 LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT PLAN The lifecycle management plan details how Council plans to manage and operate the assets at the agreed Levels of Service (defined in Section 4) while optimising life cycle costs. Although the model presented in Figure 5-1 below is one for the lifecycle of sealed roads pavements, it is equally applicable to most other asset types, including footpaths. This model relates particularly to the maintenance and renewal stages of asset life. In the Do Nothing phase, the asset deteriorates slowly and maintenance is generally not required. In the Maintain phase, activities will need to be performed to minimise continued deterioration. For roads, these would typically include patching and resealing. At some point the deterioration rate increases, with more maintenance interventions being required more regularly. This leads to the Rehabilitate or Renewal phase, in which activities are undertaken to restore the asset to a condition close to that of the original. Figure 5-1: The Sealed Road Pavement Lifecycle (IPWEA, 2006)) The importance of the time for intervention for renewal is paramount. If renewal activities are not undertaken in a timely manner, the condition of the asset will deteriorate rapidly to failure, and the cost of reconstruction, may be many times that of renewal activities. 5.1 Asset hierarchy An asset hierarchy provides a framework for structuring data in an information system to assist in collection of data, reporting information and making decisions. The hierarchy includes the asset class and component used for asset planning and financial reporting and service level hierarchy used for service planning and delivery. Council s service hierarchy is shown in Table 5-1 on the following page.

20 Service Hierarchy Regional Sealed Distributor Roads Sealed Local Distributor Roads Sealed Local Access Roads Unsealed Local Distributor Roads Unsealed Local Distributor Roads Unsealed Local Access Roads Table 5-1: Asset Service Hierarchy Service Level Objective Provide safe, smooth and all weather access [2 lane width, 80km/h design speed, no load limits] Provide safe, smooth and all weather access [2 lane width (for more than 200vpd), 60km/h design speed, no load limits] Provide safe, smooth and all weather access [2 lane width, 60km/h design speed, no load limits] Provide safe, smooth and all weather access [2 lane width (for more than 200vpd), 60km/h design speed, no load limits] Provide safe, smooth and all weather access [2 lane width, 60km/h design speed, no load limits] Provide safe access [2 lane width (for more than 100vpd), 50km/h design speed] 5.2 Age profile The age profile of the assets include in this AM Plan is shown in Figure 5-2. Figure 5-2: Asset Age Profile Network area (m 2 ) Footpath Kerb - CRC Pavement - CRC Surface - CRC Although substantial work has been carried out by the Shire to improve the quality of the age profile data, a number of the dates contained are estimates only and it is considered fairly inaccurate. For accurate full life cycle costing to be carried out, it is a requirement that the data confidence is improved in the future. The age profile will be further worked on and revised in future revisions of the asset management plan. The asset age profile shows that a large portion of the road network is in the middle stage of its lifecycle and maintenance and renewal costs can expect to increase during the life of the AMP.

21 Present asset condition The Shire has recently undertaken a formal road condition inspection of its entire road network in accordance with Appendix C. The results of the condition inspection are recorded in Table 5 2 below. Asset condition information for the footpaths and kerbs is not currently available. Condition % length Condition 1 Good % Table 5-2 Condition assessment Condition 2 Minor % Condition 3 Medium % Condition 4 Major % Condition 5 No Good % Road Asset Class Current Desired Current Desired Current Desired Current Desired Current Desired Sealed Roads Sealed Regional Distributor Roads 100 < <10 0 <3 0 <2 Sealed Local Distributor Roads 3 < <15 0 <3 0 <2 Sealed Local Access Roads 4 < <20 20 <5 8 <3 Kerbs TBC <70 TBC TBC <20 TBC <5 TBC <3 Un-Sealed Roads Unsealed Local Distributor Roads Unsealed Local Access Roads Footpaths 86 < <15 0 <3 0 <2 49 < <20 0 <5 0 <3 Concrete path TBC <75 TBC TBC <15 TBC <5 TBC <3 Asphalt paths TBC <75 TBC TBC <15 TBC <5 TBC <3 Block paving TBC <75 TBC TBC <15 TBC <5 TBC <3 Concrete flagstone TBC 100 TBC 0 TBC 0 TBC 0 TBC 0 Based on the indicative Condition Levels of Service contained in the above table, the Council is providing: o o o A high Level of Service for its sealed Regional Distributors and unsealed Local Distributor networks; A medium Level of Service for its sealed local distributor network and unsealed local access road network; and A basic Level of Service on the sealed local access road network. Considering that these Levels of Service are based on the networks present condition, and this is the first formal condition assessment of the network, further work will be carried out to once the Levels of Service have been finalised and adopted by Council. This further work will entail compiling a forward works program to redress these imbalances, and increase funding to the areas where the Level of Service is deficient. 5.4 Routine Maintenance Plan Routine maintenance is the regular on-going work that is necessary to keep assets operating, including instances where portions of the asset fail and need immediate repair to make the asset operational again Maintenance plan Maintenance refers to works undertaken to address minor defects such as pothole patching, edge break or patching. These treatment works are undertaken to keep Council s Road assets in a safe and operational condition, but not

22 necessarily to improve the overall condition of these assets. Maintenance includes reactive, planned and specific maintenance work activities. Reactive maintenance is unplanned repair work carried out in response to service requests and management/supervisory directions. Assessment and prioritisation of reactive maintenance is undertaken by Council staff using experience and judgement. Reactive maintenance work is estimated at approximately 40% of total maintenance expenditure. Planned maintenance is repair work that is identified and managed through a maintenance management system (MMS). MMS activities include inspection, assessing the condition against failure/breakdown experience, prioritising, scheduling, actioning the work and reporting what was done to develop a maintenance history and improve maintenance and service delivery performance. Planned maintenance work is estimated at approximately 25% of total maintenance expenditure. Cyclic maintenance is replacement of higher value components/ sub components of assets that are undertaken on a regular cycle including repainting of road markings, grading of gravel roads, etc. This work generally falls below the capital/ maintenance threshold. Cyclic maintenance work is estimated at approximately 35% of total maintenance expenditure. Actual past maintenance expenditure is shown in Table 5-3. Table 5-3: Historical Maintenance Expenditure Trends Year Operating Costs Maintenance Total 2008/09 $ 42,463 $ 438,457 $ 480, /10 $ 56,881 $ 480,731 $ 537, /11 $ 50,000 $ 368,417 $ 418, /12 $ 50,000 $ 444,245 $ 494,245 Based on the network current condition, it appears the maintenance expenditure levels are adequate but may need to be reallocated and balanced to meet the Condition Level of Service. It can be assumed that future expenditure levels will be similar to historical expenditure and Table 5-4 illustrates expected planned expenditure levels over the life of this AMP in 2012 dollars. Table 5-4: Planned Operations and Maintenance Expenditure Road Operation & Maintenance - Existing Roads 2012/ /23 $ 482,798 per annum At present assessment and prioritisation of reactive maintenance is undertaken by operational staff using experience and judgement. Although not developed as yet, it is the aim of the Shire to carry out reactive maintenance in accordance with predetermined response Levels of Service Standards and specifications Maintenance work is carried out in accordance with the following Standards and Specifications. Austroads standards and specifications; Australian Standards; Aus spec; Australian Roads and Research Board (ARRB) Sealed Local Roads Manual; and Local policy and specifications.

23 Future operations and maintenance expenditures It should be noted that when undertaking the lifecycle modelling, these types of costs are taken into consideration by assuming that, each year, a percentage of these distresses (such as potholes, footpath trips) will be repaired as part of Council s routine maintenance. If these assets are left to deteriorate (i.e. sufficient capital expenditure is not allocated), then the amount of distresses being fixed under routine maintenance will increase and the routine maintenance expenditure required will also increase. Equally, if the condition of these assets improves then the routine maintenance expenditure required will decrease. Future operations and maintenance expenditure is predicted to trend in line with historical expenditure levels and the value of the asset stock as shown in Table 5-5. Note that all costs are shown in 2012 dollar values. Table 5-5: Projected Operations and Maintenance Expenditure Road Operation & Maintenance - Existing Roads Predicted Road Operation & Maintenance - New Roads Total Predicted Operation & Maintenance 2012/13 $ 482,798 $ 12,496 $ 495, /14 $ 482,798 $ 24,991 $ 507, /15 $ 482,798 $ 37,487 $ 520, /16 $ 482,798 $ 49,983 $ 532, /17 $ 482,798 $ 62,478 $ 545, /18 $ 482,798 $ 74,974 $ 557, /19 $ 482,798 $ 87,469 $ 570, /20 $ 482,798 $ 99,965 $ 582, /21 $ 482,798 $ 112,461 $ 595, /22 $ 482,798 $ 124,956 $ 607, /23 $ 482,798 $ 137,452 $ 620,250 Deferred maintenance, i.e. works that are identified for maintenance and unable to be funded are to be included in the risk assessment process in the infrastructure risk management plan. Maintenance is funded from the operating budget and grants where available. This is further discussed in Section Renewal/Replacement Plan Renewal expenditure is major work which does not increase the asset s design capacity but restores, rehabilitates, replaces or renews an existing asset to its original service potential. Work over and above restoring an asset to original service potential is upgrade/expansion or new works expenditure Renewal plan Assets requiring renewal have been identified using the ROMAN II inventory data to project the renewal costs for renewal years using asset condition, acquisition year and the useful life s listed in Appendix A. Renewal will be undertaken using low-cost renewal methods where practical. The aim of low-cost renewals is to restore the service potential or future economic benefits of the asset by renewing the assets at a cost less than replacement cost. A matrix of low-cost renewal option will be developed as an appendix in future revisions of the AMP.

24 Actual past renewal expenditure is shown in Table 5-6 below. Table 5-6: Historical Renewal Expenditure Renewal 2008/09 $ 241, /10 $ 618, /11 $ 670, /12 $ 691, The planned renewal expenditure as expressed in the Capital Works Schedule for the period from 2013 to 2033 is shown in Table 5-7 below. Table 5-7: Planned Renewal Expenditure Planned Renewal 2012/13 $359, /14 $625, /15 $716, /16 $200, /17 $200, /18 $200, /19 $200, /20 $200, /21 $200, /22 $200, /23 $0 The ranking criteria and funding sources used to determine priority of identified renewal proposals is detailed in Appendix D Renewal standards Renewal work is carried out in accordance with the following Standards and Specifications. Austroads standards and specifications; Australian Standards; Aus. spec; Australian Roads and Research Board (ARRB) Sealed Local Roads Manual; and Local policy and specifications Projected renewal expenditure As can be expected, the projected future renewal expenditures are forecast to increase over time as the asset stock ages and reaches the end of its useful life. The lifecycle cost forecast model, developed for this AMP, combines the network condition with its age profile, extending the life of the older roads in good condition, while decreasing the life of the newer roads in a poor condition, thus creating a balanced forward works program and required expenditure forecast. The predicted renewal cost for the new assets has been estimated as a percentage of the new cost. These forecasted costs are summarised in Table 5-8 and Figure 5-3 below and are shown in 2012 dollar values.

25 Table 5-8: Projected Capital Renewal Expenditure Predicted Road Renewal - Existing Roads Predicted Road Renewal - New Roads (to reserve) Total Predicted Renewal 2012/13 $ 673,684 $ 17,436 $ 691, /14 $ 835,513 $ 39,061 $ 874, /15 $ 271,778 $ 46,095 $ 317, /16 $ 709,875 $ 64,467 $ 774, /17 $ 943,295 $ 88,881 $ 1,032, /18 $ 1,555,859 $ 129,150 $ 1,685, /19 $ 2,304,345 $ 188,790 $ 2,493, /20 $ 1,735,423 $ 233,706 $ 1,969, /21 $ 879,377 $ 256,466 $ 1,135, /22 $ 394,388 $ 266,673 $ 661, /23 $ 366,933 $ 276,170 $ 643,103 Figure 5-3: Projected Capital Renewal Expenditure (including growth) 2,500,000 2,000,000 Predicted Expenditure ($) 1,500,000 1,000, , / / / / / / / / / / /23 Footpath Kerb Pavement Surface Growth renewals Comments on graph: Although kerbing has been included in these projection figures, it is likely that the Shire will only replace a portion of the kerbing required. The pavement renewal costs include the prime seal. Growth renewals are included in a separate category. This represents an average renewal expenditure of just under $1 million per annum, excluding a renewal reserve funding of $146,000 per annum for the expected growth. This is substantially higher than the historical expenditure

26 trends have been. As one would expect from an aging network, the majority of the future expenditure is forecast to be spent on the road pavement and road surfacing. The projected capital renewal program is shown in Appendix F. Renewals are funded from capital works programs and grants where available. This is further discussed in Section Deferred renewal, i.e. those assets identified for renewal and not scheduled for renewal in capital works programs are to be included in the risk assessment process in the risk management plan. 5.6 Creation/Acquisition/Upgrade Plan New works are those works that create a new asset that did not previously exist, or works which upgrade or improve an existing asset beyond its existing capacity. They may result from growth, social or environmental needs. Assets may also be acquired at no cost to the Council from land development. These assets from growth are considered in Section 3.4. Actual past new / upgrade expenditure is shown in Table 5-9 below. Table 5-9: Historical Upgrade & New Expenditure Upgrade New / Acquired 2008/09 $ 492, $ 64, /10 $ 560, $ 87, /11 $ 785, $ 414, /12 $ 573, $ 77, The planned expenditure figures shown below in Table 5-10 below have been derived from the Capital Works Schedule for the period from 2013 to Selection criteria Table 5-10: Planned Upgrade/new expenditure Planned Upgrade/new expenditure 2012/13 $1,465, /14 $1,226, /15 $390, /16 $0 2016/17 $0 2017/18 $0 2018/19 $0 2019/20 $0 2020/21 $0 2021/22 $0 2022/23 $0 New assets and upgrade/expansion of existing assets are identified from various sources such as councillor or community requests, proposals identified by strategic plans or partnerships with other organisations. Candidate proposals are inspected to verify need and to develop a preliminary estimate. Verified proposals are then ranked by priority and available funds, and scheduled in future works programmes. The priority ranking criteria is the same as that used for assets requiring renewal. The funding sources are discussed in Section

27 Standards and specifications Standards and specifications for new assets and for upgrade/expansion of existing assets are the same as those for renewal shown in Section Projected upgrade/new assets expenditure Over the past 4 years, the Shire has expanding its network by an average of $763,964 per annum. This represents a network area expansion of ±2-4% per annum, dependant on the asset component. This trend is expected to carry on into the future and is included in the projected upgrade/new asset expenditures which are summarised in Table 5-11 below and are shown in 2012 dollar values. Table 5-11: Projected Capital Upgrade/New Asset Expenditure Predicted Upgrade & New 2012/13 $ 863, /14 $ 886, /15 $ 910, /16 $ 935, /17 $ 960, /18 $ 987, /19 $ 1,013, /20 $ 1,041, /21 $ 1,070, /22 $ 1,099, /23 $ 1,129,678 New assets and services are to be funded from capital works program and grants where available. This is further discussed in Section For the first three years, the theoretically based, predicted average expenditure reported in Table 5-11 above, is lower that the planned expenditure which has been derived from identified, committed projects in the Capital Works Schedule for the period from 2013 to This is to be expected due to the manner in which they have been derived and for the development of the Long Term Financial Plan, these have been amalgamated, showing the planned expenditure for the known horizon, and the average values, beyond. 5.7 Disposal Plan Disposal includes any activity associated with disposal of a decommissioned asset including sale, demolition or relocation. It is unlikely that any constructed sealed road would be disposed of while it is still in service. If a sealed road is deemed underutilised then it is possible that it may revert back to an unsealed road. There are no plans to dispose of any significant lengths of sealed road at this time. It is equally unlikely that any footpaths will be disposed of in the duration of this AMP. In the carrying out of road realignment works existing road pavement materials may be ripped up and left in situ or removed and reused elsewhere. For all practical purposes, the value of salvaged road and footpath materials is of little consequence. 5.8 Financial Summary The financial projections will be improved as more information becomes available on desired Levels of Service and current and projected future asset performance, and the level of data confidence improves.

28 Figure 5-4 summarise the Shire s total expenditure on the assets covered by this AMP for the past four years, and their planned expenditure for the duration of this AMP. Figure 5-4: Four Year Historical Expenditure and Ten Year Planned Expenditure $2,500,000 $2,000,000 Expenditure ($) $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $0 Planned Operation & Maintenance Planned Upgrade & New Historical Renewal Historical New Planned Renewal Historical Maintenance Historical Upgrade This level of renewal expenditure is considered insufficient if the Shire wishes to continue providing a similar Level of Service into the future. Figure 5-5 below outlines the predicted lifecycle costs to maintain the assets are a similar Level of Service. Predicted Lifecycle Expenditure ($) $4,500,000 $4,000,000 $3,500,000 $3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $0 Figure 5-5: Ten Year Total Predicted Expenditure Predicted ops & maint Predicted renewal Predicted Upgrade & New

29 Asset valuations The value of assets recorded in the asset register as at 30 June 2012 covered by this asset management plan is shown below. Assets were last revalued in Current Replacement Cost (2012) $ 58,273,000 Depreciable Amount $ 58,273,000 Depreciated Replacement Cost $ 43,853,000 Annual Depreciation Expense $ 1,311, Asset Sustainability Ratios As part of the Department of Local Government (DLG) Asset Management Framework and Guidelines the Shire will need to report three ratios. The Shire s current (2011/12) ratios for the assets covered in this plan, for the duration of the plan, are shown below and will be monitored and reported annually. Asset Sustainability Ratio (Renewal & replacement expense/depreciation expense) Asset Renewal Funding Ratio (Planned Capital renewal expenditure/ Required Capital renewal expenditure) Asset Consumption Ratio (Depreciated Cost/Current Replacement Cost) Value DLG s target ranges 43.3% 90% - 110% 55.0% 95% -100% 75.3% 50% - 75% The Asset Consumption Ratio is currently within the DLG s target ranges. However, the Asset Renewal Funding Ratio and Asset Sustainability Ratio are well below the recommended ranges. These ratios will be monitored and reported on an annual basis. Based on historical maintenance and renewal expenditure (4 years), Council is currently renewing assets at 57.9% of the rate they are being consumed and increasing its asset stock by an average of 4.33% each year (network area expansion). To provide services in a financially sustainable manner, as a minimum, Council will need to ensure that it is renewing assets at the rate they are being consumed over the medium-long term, and funding the life cycle costs for all new assets and services in its long term financial plan Gap Analysis This section analyses the variance between the predicted full life cycle cost (including operations, maintenance, renewal, upgrade, but excluding new growth), and planned expenditure. This variance indicates the life cycle gap, showing insufficient asset expenditure, or a surplus, showing excessive expenditure. This gap indicates whether further work is required to manage required Levels of Service and funding to eliminate any funding gap. Providing services in a sustainable manner will require matching of predicted asset expenditure to meet agreed Levels of Service with planned capital works programs and available revenue. Long term - Life Cycle Cost Life cycle costs (or whole of life costs) are the average costs that are required to sustain the Levels of Service over the longest asset life. Life cycle costs include operations and maintenance expenditure and asset consumption

30 (depreciation expense). The life cycle cost for the services covered in this asset management plan is $1,793,798 per year (operations and maintenance expenditure plus depreciation expense in year 1). Life cycle costs can be compared to life cycle expenditure to give an indicator of sustainability in service provision. Life cycle expenditure includes operations, maintenance and capital renewal expenditure in year 1. The Life cycle expenditure will vary depending on the timing of asset renewals, and the overall age of the network. The life cycle expenditure at the start of the AMP is $1,049,995 (average planned operations and maintenance expenditure, plus budgeted capital renewal expenditure in year 1). A shortfall between life cycle cost and life cycle expenditure is the life cycle gap. The average life cycle gap for services covered by this asset management plan is approximately -$743,803 per year (-ve = gap, +ve = surplus). The life cycle expenditure is presently approximately 58.5% of life cycle costs, giving a life cycle sustainability index of 0.58%. The life cycle costs and life cycle expenditure comparison highlights any difference between present outlays and the average cost of providing the service over the long term. If the life cycle expenditure is less than that life cycle cost, it is most likely that outlays will need to be increased, project priorities changed, or cuts in services made in the future. Knowing the extent and timing of any required increase in outlays and the service consequences if funding is not available will assist organisations in providing services to their communities in a financially sustainable manner. This is the purpose of the asset management plans and long term financial plan. Medium term 10 year financial planning period This asset management plan identifies the projected operations, maintenance and capital renewal expenditures required to provide an agreed Level of Service to the community over a 10 year period. This provides input into 10 year financial and funding plans aimed at providing the required services in a sustainable manner. These predicted expenditures may be compared to budgeted expenditures in the 10 year period to identify any funding shortfall. In a core asset management plan, as in this AMP, the gap is generally due to increasing asset renewals for ageing assets due to insufficient past renewal expenditure. The average projected operations, maintenance and capital renewal expenditure required over the 10 year planning period is $1,673,896 per year as illustrated in Figure 5-6.

31 Figure 5-6: Predicted Life Cycle Costs Vs Planned Expenditure $3,500,000 Lifecycle Expenditure ($) $3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $0 2012/ / / / / / / / / / /23 Predicted Ops, Maint & Renewal Average Lifecycle Exp - 10 years Planned Ops, Maint & Renewal Figure 5-7: Predicted Life cycle gap Medium Term (10 year) Gap analysis - Lifecycle costs ( Ops, Maint & renewals Lifecycle Expenditure Gap ($) $500,000 $0 -$500,000 -$1,000,000 -$1,500,000 -$2,000,000 -$2,500, / / / / / / / / / / /23 Gap (-ve = shortfall; +ve = excess) The estimated (budget) operations, maintenance and capital renewal funding is $764,761 per year giving a 10 year funding shortfall of -$909,135 per year. This indicates that Council has 46% of the projected expenditures needed to provide the services documented in the asset management plan to the current Level of Service. Gap analysis summary The figures reported in the preceding sections paint a discouraging picture, it is a factor of the age of the network and backlog of renewals and may be distorted due to the inaccurate asset register data, resulting in excessive capital renewal requirements, it is estimated that the funding gap is accurate to within 30%. With further work set to continue with the asset register data (asset age and regular condition assessments), the reprioritisation of maintenance, and once the backlog of renewals is completed, the accuracy of these forecasts will improve. In addition, the Shire will manage the gap by developing this asset management plan to provide guidance on future Levels of Service and resources required to provide these services, review future services, Levels of Service

32 and costs with the community, and explore further funding strategies as discussed in Section This will be revised in future versions of the AMP Expenditure projections for long term financial plan Table 5-11 shows the projected expenditures for the 10 year long term financial plan. Expenditure projections are in current (non-inflated) values. Disposals are shown as net expenditures (revenues are negative). Year Table 5-12: Expenditure Projections for Long Term Financial Plan ($000) Maintenance ($000) Projected Capital Renewal ($000) Capital Upgrade/ New ($000) Disposals ($000) 2012/13 $495,294 $ 691,120 $1,465,000 $ /14 $507,789 $ 874,574 $1,226,783 $ /15 $520,285 $ 317,873 $390,880 $ /16 $532,781 $ 774,343 $935,422 $ /17 $545,276 $ 1,032,176 $960,847 $ /18 $557,772 $ 1,685,009 $987,007 $ /19 $570,267 $ 2,493,136 $1,013,927 $ /20 $582,763 $ 1,969,129 $1,041,630 $ /21 $595,259 $ 1,135,842 $1,070,139 $ /22 $607,754 $ 661,061 $1,099,480 $0.00 Note: All projected expenditures are in 2012 values Funding Strategy The funding strategy is detailed in the organisation s 10 year long term financial plan. Projected expenditure identified in Section is to be funded from future operating and capital budgets, with grant funding. There are several funding sources that are available to the Shire in order to operate, maintain, renew, upgrade and build the road network. These sources are, but are not limited to, the following: Municipal revenue from rates. The City seeks to maximise funding from non-municipal sources in order to help minimise the cost of roads on City rates. Non-municipal funding sources have not historically been able to fully fund the City s road activities and therefore there is always likely going to be a reliance on rate revenue. Roads to Recovery. The Roads to Recovery Program operates uniformly across Australia. Under current arrangements, each council is guaranteed a share of the total available funding. Under simple administrative procedures whereby spending decisions are made locally and reported to the government, money is paid directly from the Australian Government to each council. Financial Assistance Grants. The Financial Assistance Grants are currently provided under the Local Government (Financial Assistance) Act 1995 and have the following components: o a general purpose component which is distributed between the States and Territories according to population (i.e., on a per capita basis), and o an identified local road component which is distributed between the States and Territories according to fixed historical shares.

33 Both components of the grants are untied in the hands of local government, allowing councils to spend the grants according to local priorities. Rural Regional Road Group (RRRG) Grants. The RRG operates two grant funding programmes, one for improvement projects and one for rehabilitation. Improvement grants are available, on a two-thirds (grant)/one-third (Council) basis, for either upgrade projects (i.e. road widening) or new projects (new roads). Rehabilitation grants operate on the same basis for road renewal projects (resurfacing or reconstruction). Commodity Route Supplementary Funding The Commodity Routes Supplementary Fund Program forms part of a number of programs administered by the State Road Funds to the Local Government Advisory Committee under a five year agreement Grants up to $0.25m per project are available on a two-thirds (grant)/one-third (Council) basis. Commodity routes are defined as routes where there is a significant high priority transport associated with the transport of a commodity such as grain, timber, agricultural lime, iron ore, etc. Blackspot Funding. The Black Spot Program is part of the commitment to reduce crashes on Australian roads. Road crashes are a major cost to Australians every year. Black Spot projects target those road locations where crashes are occurring. By funding measures such as traffic signals and roundabouts at dangerous locations, the program reduces the risk of crashes. Black spot programs are typically small scale localised upgrade projects. Regional Bicycle Network (RBN) Through the Regional Bicycle Network (RBN) the State Government provides funding assistance for cycling infrastructure and the development of bike plans in regional centres. $750,000 is available to regional local government authorities through the Regional Bicycle Network (RBN) Local Government Grants Program. Developer contributions. The Shire negotiates with property developers in order to receive contributions for the future provision of significant public infrastructure that is necessitated because of development. This includes funding for the provision of new and upgraded roads. Developer funded infrastructure. In some instances where new or upgraded public infrastructure in existing road reserves is necessitated because of development, it is fully funded and constructed by developers.

34 Figure 5-8 shows the historical grants received by the Shire over the past four years. Figure 5-8: Historical Transport Funding Sources % total road and path expend 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% 2008/ / / /12 Municipal Funds FAGS - Roads Component Regional Road Group Grants State Direct Grant Roads to Recovery Blackspot Grants Other Grants Country Pathways Developers Contributions This equates to 26% - 67% of the Shire s expenditure on transport assets during these years. It is in the interest of the Shire to maximise the external funding opportunities, and the Shire will be actively pursuing these grants. Figure 5-9 below illustrates the planned funding sources for the next 3 years, after which Shire funds are planned for unless additional funding sources can be found. A Level of Service KPI has been created to monitor funding sources in the future. Figure 5-9: Planned funding sources Planned Road & Path Income (all) 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0% Roads - Rates income Regional Road Group Grants Roads - CLGF Path - Rates income Bikewise Valuation Forecasts Asset values are forecast to increase as additional assets are added to the asset stock from construction and acquisition by Council and from assets constructed by land developers and others and donated to Council. Figure 5-10 shows the predicted replacement cost asset values and depreciation expense values over the planning period in 2012 dollar values.

35 Figure 5-10: Projected Asset Values Predicted Depreciated Replacement Cost 70,000, ,000, ,000, ,000, ,000, ,000, ,000, Deprec Repl Cost Annual Depr The depreciated replacement cost (current replacement cost less accumulated depreciation) will vary over the forecast period depending on the rates of addition of new assets, disposal of old assets and consumption and renewal of existing assets Key Assumptions made in Financial Forecasts This section details the key assumptions made in presenting the information contained in this asset management plan and in preparing forecasts of required operating and capital expenditure and asset values, depreciation expense and carrying amount estimates. It is presented to enable readers to gain an understanding of the levels of confidence in the data behind the financial forecasts. Key assumptions made in this asset management plan are: No road signage; traffic calming structures; road related drainage, i.e. culverts and bridges; road barriers or parking area asset details have been included; The asset register contained in ROMAN II is accurate; The current Levels of Service will remain constant over the life of this AMP; The budget and expenditure details are accurate as given, and expenditure will continue on the previous four years historical trends; The road and path assets will grow at a similar rate to the upgrades and addition of new assets. i.e. at an average of 2,9%, and in line with anticipated population growth; The current network deficiency is accurately reported as given; The Operational budget includes depot maintenance, street lighting, ROMAN II fees, roadwise expenses, sale of assets, and the admin allocation; The Road Maintenance budget consists of road maintenance, gravel pit rehabilitation, road closures, and traffic management fees; Network valuations are a true representation, and that unit rates and asset lives are reflective of real cost and asset lives; The treatment and maintenance costs are based on Council s current schedule of rates and may not directly compare to Councils internal service provision actual costs; and All predicted financial figures are based on 2012 rates and are not adjusted by the inflation rate for the particular year of works.

36 Data confidence Table 5-13 below summarises the confidence levels of financial data obtained for this AMP. Table 5-13: Financial Data levels of confidence Asset Confidence Rating Category Operations Maintenance Renewals Upgrades New/ Acquisitions Expenditure D B B B B Forecast Exp D C D D D Lifecycle Exp - - C C D Table 5-14 below summarises the confidence levels of information contained in the ROMAN II data obtained for this AMP. Table 5-14: Data levels of confidence Confidence Rating Asset Category Quality overall / completeness Year acquired / Age Useful life Condition Sealed roads B C C+ B Unsealed roads B C C+ C Kerbs / Surface B D C+ D Water Channels Footpaths B B B N/A Table 5-14 below outlines the data confidence limits used in this AMP. Confidence A B C D E Highly Reliable < 2% uncertainty Table 5-15: Levels of Confidence Definitions Description Data based on sound records, procedure, investigations and analysis which is properly documented and recognised as the best method of assessment Reliable ± 2-10% uncertainty Data based on sound records, procedures, investigations, and analysis which is properly documented but has minor shortcomings for example the data is old, some documentation is missing and reliance is placed on unconfirmed reports or some extrapolation. Reasonably Reliable ± % uncertainty Data based on sound records, procedures, investigations, and analysis which is properly documented but has minor shortcomings for example the data is old or incomplete, some documentation is missing and reliance is placed on unconfirmed reports or significant extrapolation. Uncertain ± 25 50% uncertainty Data based on uncertain records, procedures, investigations and analysis which is incomplete or unsupported, or extrapolation from a limited sample for which grade A or B data is available. Very Uncertain > 50% uncertainty Data based on unconfirmed verbal reports and/or cursory inspection and analysis

37 ASSET MANAGEMENT PRACTICES 6.1 Accounting/Financial Systems Accounting and financial systems Council uses the Synergy Soft Account software as their financial management system Accountabilities for financial systems The Senior Finance Officer is responsible for the accounting and financial systems. The CEO is required to undertake reviews of the Financial Management Systems at least every 4 years Accounting standards and regulations The Shire works under Australian Accounting Standards, State Legislation/Regulations and Directives issued by the Local Government Department. All systems are in accordance with the Local Government Financial Management Regs 1996, and Reg 5.(2)(c) Capital/maintenance threshold Council s capital threshold policy specifies that all road expenditure that is expensed and capitalised against the asset Required changes to accounting financial systems arising from this AM Plan The changes to the accounting and financial systems have been identified and are reported in Section Asset Management Systems Asset management system At present the Shire doesn t have a dedicated asset management system. ROMAN II is used to store roads and footpath inventory data. The road supervisor prioritises the maintenance and capital requirements for future years based on knowledge and experience of the network Asset registers ROMAN II contains details of the road asset register, including dates the asset was acquired, Renewal Life, Renewal costs, and useful life. As the Shire has carried out improvements to the data during the preparation of this AMP, the confidence level of the data is reasonable. Asset audits will be required to ensure that all assets have been captured Linkage from asset management to financial system Linkage from the asset management system to the financial system is a manual process Accountabilities for asset management system and data The Works Manager is responsible for the asset management systems and associated data Required changes to asset management system arising from this AM Plan Changes to the asset management systems identified in this asset management plans are reported in Section Information Flow Requirements and Processes The key information flows into this asset management plan are: Council strategic and operational plans; Service requests from the community; Network assets information, i.e. The asset register data on size, age, value, remaining life of the network; The unit rates for categories of work/materials;

38 Current Levels of Service, expenditures, service deficiencies and service risks; Projections of various factors affecting future demand for services and new assets acquired by Council; Correlations between maintenance and renewal; Data on new assets acquired by council Future capital works programs; and Financial asset values. The key information flows from this asset management plan are: The projected Works Program and trends; The resulting budget and long term financial plan expenditure projections; and Financial sustainability indicators. These will impact the Long Term Financial Plan, Strategic Longer-Term Plan, annual budget and departmental business plans and budgets. Figure 6-1: 2009 Construction of roundabout

39 PLAN IMPROVEMENT AND MONITORING 7.1 Performance Measures The effectiveness of the asset management plan can be measured in the following ways: The degree to which the required cashflows identified in this asset management plan are incorporated into the organisation s long term financial plan and Community/Strategic Planning processes and documents; and The degree to which 1-5 year detailed works programs, budgets, business plans and organisational structures take into account the global works program trends provided by the asset management plan. 7.2 Improvement Plan The asset management improvement plan generated from this asset management plan is shown in Table 7-1. Table 7-1: Improvement Plan Action Number Action Prerequisite Action Priority (High = 1-2 year, Medium = 2 4 years, Low =3-6 years Service Focus 1 Expand transport asset management plan (roads, kerbs & footpaths) to include signs, parking areas, bridges and culverts, barriers, traffic calming measures. I.e. create Transport Asset Management Plan Nil High 2 Develop a hierarchy for all assets, identifying parent/child relationships, and linked to Levels of Service. 1 High 3 Develop a process for community engagement on Levels of Service. Nil Medium 4 Revise current development conditions to include the provision of electronic asconstructed asset information and whole-of-life cost analysis. Nil Medium 5 Develop Level of Service based on road performance criteria / road needs & affordability, rather than anniversary treatments. 1,2,3 Medium 6 Investigate the feasibility of implementing a maintenance management system, including the capture & categorisation of customer requests. Nil Medium 7 Develop a simple business case proforma and associated process, for new capital projects. The proforma should provide a project brief, project description, operational, maintenance and renewal impacts (whole-of-life) and potential income sources. Nil High Skills 8 Develop a formal staff AM training programme, including induction awareness. 24,25 High 9 Develop a formal Councillor AM training programme. 24 High 10 Develop a business continuity plan for AM activities. 24,25 High

40 Action Number Action Prerequisite Action Priority (High = 1-2 year, Medium = 2 4 years, Low =3-6 years Knowledge Develop a diagram that defines the organisation s asset management documentation structure and include in the AM Strategy Configure the Shire s corporate financial system to record asset expenditure at the individual asset level. Nil High 7 High 13 Carry out 5% audit on assets wrt. date acquired, dimensions, structure, condition 1 Medium 14 Develop Councils Data Collection Manuals to ensure repeatability and on going improvement of condition data collection and modelling processes Nil Medium 15 Develop an asset inventory updating procedure to ensure ongoing integrity. 15 High 16 Develop safety and maintenance inspection programmes and methodologies for road and footpath related assets. 15 High 17 Implement safety and maintenance inspection programme for roads and footpaths. 16 High 18 Develop & implement the condition inspection programme for roads and footpaths. 15 Medium Review 19 Develop a corporate risk register to allow aggregation of identified risks. Nil High 20 Develop staff AM performance measures and link KPIs to individual job descriptions. 8 High 21 Governance Review and amend Shire Policy template to allow Policies to acknowledge other key Policies. 22 Develop a Workforce Management Plan and link to AM Strategy. Nil High 23 Develop a framework for reporting AM outcomes to Council and customers. Nil Medium 24 Define the AM roles and responsibilities of Shire staff. 8 High 25 Define the asset financial responsibilities of Shire staff. 8 High 26 Develop a Shire population & demographic model for infrastructure planning purposes. Nil Low Nil High 7.3 Monitoring and Review Procedures This asset management plan will be reviewed during annual budget preparation and amended to recognise any material changes in Levels of Service and/or resources available to provide those services as a result of the budget decision process. Scheduled revisions will take place every 4 years and is due for revision and updating within 2 years of each Shire election.

41 Appendix A. ROAD AND PATH VALUATION, UNIT RATES AND LIVES Network and 2012 Valuation Asset Category Dimension ** Optimised Replacement Cost * Optimised Depreciated Replacement Cost * Annual Depreciation * Accumulated Depreciation* Pavement formation 3,099,446m2 $ 23,868,000 $ 23,868,000 $ 0 $ 0 Pavement structure 2,940,791.m2 $ 22,674,000 $ 13,767,000 $719,000 $ 8,907,000 Pavement surface 1,062,279m2 $ 7,784,000 $ 3,567,000 $ 477,000 $ 4,217,000 Surface water channels 113,466m $ 2,104,000 $ 1,052,000 $ 105,000 $ 1,052,000 Road Assets Total $ 56,431,000 $ 42,254,000 $ 1,286,000 $ 14,176,000 Footpath 31,378m2 $ 1,842,000 $ 1,599,000 $ 25,000 $ 243,000 Footpath Assets Total $ 1,842,000 $ 1,599,000 $ 25,000 $ 243,000 Unit Rates Total $ 58,273,000 $ 43,853,000 $ 1,311,000 $ 14,419,000 Table 7-2: Network Statistics and 2012 CRC The Shire currently operates a standard corporate set of road replacement unit rates which have been used in determining the 2012 asset valuation. These rates are shown in the table below. Road Type / Construction Unit Cost ($/m2) Roads Distributor Road Pavements $12.00 Roads Access Road Pavements $11.40 Roads Unknown Class Road Pavements N/A Roads-Asphalt seal $30.00 Roads-Chip seal $4.44 Roads-Other surfacing $12.00 Roads - Unsealed $11.56 Roads-Kerbs(incl. Backfill) $30.00 Path - Brick Paving $40.00 Path - Cement Concrete $46.00 Path - Concrete Slabs $40.00 Path - Asphalt $31.00 Path - Bituminous seal $14.00 Path - Unknown $30.00 Table 7-3: Asset Construction Unit Rates

42 Asset Useful Lives Table 7-4 details the road construction lives which have been used in determining the 2012 asset valuation and have been applied in this AMP. In particular, they have been used in conjunction with the lifecycle costing. Road Construction Roads Distributor Road Pavements 50 Basic Service Level (Years) Roads Access Road Pavements 50 Roads Unknown Class Road Pavements N/A Roads-Asphalt seal 25 Roads-Chip seal 16 Roads-Other surfacing 10 Roads - Unsealed 12 Roads-Kerbs(incl. Backfill) 20 Path - Brick Paving 40 Path - Cement Concrete 50 Path - Concrete Slabs 30 Path - Asphalt 35 Path - Bituminous seal 30 Path - Unknown 30 Table 7-4: Asset Lives/Service Level

43 Appendix B. LEVELS OF SERVICE Key Performance Measure Level of Service Objective COMMUNITY LEVELS OF SERVICE Performance Measure Process Quality Responsiveness Customer service requests (CSR) response roads & footpaths Function Safety Service improvement Forward Works Budget spend Access is available at all times Sealed road network condition is maintained at a technically optimal threshold Unsealed road network is functionally fit for purpose Path network is functionally fit for purpose Provide safe suitable roads and footpaths, free from hazards TECHNICAL LEVELS OF SERVICE Funding Operations Complaints roads & footpaths All works identified are completed in time, budget & quality roads & footpaths % Road closures to due unplanned works Network condition assessment Width and connectivity is optimal for use visual assessment during safety inspections Width and connectivity is optimal for use Disability Discrimination Act and Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport audits. Desired Level of Service 95% of all CSRs completed on time less than 5 complaints each month Within 2% of budget Greater than 98% each month Desired LOS Condition is not the be exceeded by more than 5% for condition 4 and 5 in any given year Functional deficiency rating to show no more that 2% of asset stock at unacceptable thresholds Functional deficiency rating to show no more that 2% of asset stock at unacceptable thresholds Current Level of Service TBC TBC TBC TBC TBC TBC TBC Number of injury accidents. Less than 5 per annum TBC Responsiveness Incident response 95% responses on time TBC Environmental CSR s relating to environment Less than 2/ month TBC Maximized external funding for all renewal and upgrade projects Servicing and management Road Operations Budget spend Accessibility: Provide all weather access to trunk collector and dwelling access road % of gross annual asset renewal and upgrade expenditure Annual condition and defects inspection Road Operations Budget Duration and frequency of unsealed road being impassable 40% TBC Defects are reducing Within 2% of budget (savings excluded) Less than 4 hours when road is impassable per year at no more than 2 locations TBC TBC TBC

44 Achieved desired Level of Service Forward Works Budget spend Cost effectiveness: Provide services in cost-effective manner Annual network assessment Road Operations Budget Maintenance cost $/km 5% network improvement per annum Within 2% of budget (savings excluded) Trunk roads $4,000/km Collectors $2,000/km Dwelling access $1,000/km Property access $500/km Innovation % spend on new technology TBC Safety: construction services Safety: Provide clear safety signage Total Recordable Injury Frequency Rate (TIFR) Annual defect & condition survey Not >14hrs/million Less than 5% of signs with defects. TBC TBC TBC TBC TBC Maintenance Maintenance Renewals Upgrade/New Forward Works Budget spend Grading of entire gravel road network Repair sealed road hazards and defects Resheeting of gravel roads Resurfacing of sealed roads Forward Works Budget spend Road Renewal Budget spend Major works rehabs & upgrades Major works rehabs & upgrades completed to quality, time & budget Forward Works Budget spend Path network complies with legislation Road Maintenance Budget Average maintenance grading frequency (times per year) Reactive vs maintenance %age Road Maintenance Budget %age of length of Condition 4 & 5 resheeted per year %age of length ideally requiring reseal - resealed per year Road Renewal Budget Road Renewal Budget %age of road category length upgraded per year %age of works (Time, quality & budget) Budget % of path assets identified for upgrade Disability Discrimination Act and Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport audits. Within 2% of budget (savings excluded) Bus routes 3/yr Collectors 4/yr Dwelling access 1/yr Reactive Planned 20% 80% TBC TBC TBC TBC > 95% TBC > 75% TBC Within 2% of budget (savings excluded) Within 2% of budget (savings excluded) TBC TBC 1-3% TBC > 95% TBC Within 2% of budget (savings excluded) Upgraded within 3 years of identification TBC TBC

45 Appendix C. CONDITION INSPECTION METHODOLOGY Condition inspections are designed to assess the overall physical state of an item in order to determine its likely remaining life and hence approximate time for replacement. Most authorities undertake road and footpath surveys on a regular basis for reasons shown below: Identify deficiencies in the network. Trending condition of network at a point in time and future for prediction of future works programmes, type and time to preserve the asset. Compare performance of different treatments/methods. Prioritise works order. Trend Performance Indicators comparisons/improvements some of which will be linked to safety. Determine current value of asset. Rational approach to show need for funding which could be based on user cost savings, comfort, safety, structural integrity of structure, other environmental issues such as noise, air pollution. Footpath Network Timing The Shire will undertake a footpath visual condition assessment on a three yearly basis. All the footpath data will be collected in one survey. Visual Condition Rating Current footpath condition data is the foundation to enabling the Shire to achieve and maintain its Level of Service and the many quality outputs from the ROMAN II system. The Visual Condition Rating measures the percentage of footpaths rated as being between 1 and 5 condition scale as described below in Table 7-5 using the following condition criteria: Deformation & potholes: related to localised failures causing trip hazards; Crossfall / drainage: Insufficient - leading to water ponding; Width: Is it safely passable, for use as dual or single use (cycle path vs footpath), traffic volume; Low / High edge: erosion or vegetation build-up adjacent to the footpath creating a trip / slip hazard; and Safety issues: visibility, proximity to busy road, hand rails, etc. Health & Safety These surveys would be undertaken by a 2 person operation utilising a small all-terrain vehicle on footpaths away from heavily populated areas; and walked surveys in areas of high pedestrian usage.

46 Road Network Network Performance The Shire has established six performance measurements for monitoring the quality of its road network being: Performance Measurement Visual Condition Rating of roads and kerbs - measuring the percentage of roads rated as being between 1 and 5 on the condition scale. Roughness, Rutting and Texture Assessment - The roughness, rutting and texture assessment will be undertaking using the Laser Profilometer Method as it is rapid, repeatable, and objective means of rating road conditions within a network. In the event that only roughness is rated, a roughometer will be utilised to determine the NAASRA. Road roughness - assessed by the average NAASRA level on distributor roads (yet to be determined). Rutting And Texture Assessment assessed within safety limits (yet to be determined). Pavement strength in microns deflected (Falling Weight Deflectometer); Frequency 50% road visual condition assessment on a rolling two yearly basis. 5 yearly or other basis as agreed with Council. Ad Hoc basis Skid resistance (British Pendulum Method) Ad Hoc basis These performance measures will help to inform Council as to whether the network is of the expected condition, whether the users are able to readily use it and whether it adds to the overall town site aesthetic appeal. Visual Condition Rating All assets will be rated according to Table 7-5 with the date validated and recorded in the ROMAN II database. Table 7-5 Condition Assessment Condition No. Condition Description Condition 1 Good Condition Good Asset provides the services and performs completely in accordance with its specifications and has no damage or evidence of wear and tear. Condition 2 Condition 3 Condition 4 Condition 5 Minor deterioration Minor Medium deterioration Medium Major deterioration Major Unserviceable No Good Some minor wear and tear is evident but is not negatively impacting the services and performance of the asset. The asset is still delivering services and performing to its specifications, however its operation requires regular maintenance or repairs. Considerable expenditure is required to bring the asset back to a condition where it is able to provide services and performance in accordance with its specifications. Asset is damaged beyond repair and is incapable of providing the services or performance for which it was originally designed. The visual condition assessment is undertaken using the Roman pavement performance criteria for the sealed and unsealed road network, kerbs and paths.

47 The resultant snapshot will be reported in Table 7-6, and compared to previous assessment results. Road Asset Class Condition % length Condition 1 Good % Current Desired Table 7-6 Condition Assessment Results Condition 2 Minor % Current Desired Condition 3 Medium % Current Desired Condition 4 Major % Current Desired Condition 5 No Good % Current Desired Sealed Roads Sealed Regional Distributor Roads 100 < <10 0 <3 0 <2 Sealed Local Distributor Roads 3 < <15 0 <3 0 <2 Sealed Local Access Roads 4 < <20 20 <5 8 <3 Kerbs TBC <70 TBC TBC <20 TBC <5 TBC <3 Un-Sealed Roads Unsealed Local Distributor Roads Unsealed Local Access Roads Footpaths 86 < <15 0 <3 0 <2 49 < <20 0 <5 0 <3 Concrete path TBC <75 TBC TBC <15 TBC <5 TBC <3 Asphalt paths TBC <75 TBC TBC <15 TBC <5 TBC <3 Block paving TBC <75 TBC TBC <15 TBC <5 TBC <3 Concrete flagstone TBC 100 TBC 0 TBC 0 TBC 0 TBC 0 Health & Safety These surveys would be undertaken as a driven survey and for Health and Safety reasons would be a 2 person operation. Network Data Audit The Shire currently has an existing of inventory, intersection and various point item data in ROMAN II. A Network Data Audit will be undertaken every five years on all new assets to validate the road and footpath links to ensure data confidence. The existing inventory data will be assessed during the audit and changes made during the survey. All data will be collected on standard ROMAN II data collection sheets which will be used as hard-copy back-up or reference and used for auditing purposes. The information to be collected includes: Inventory data; Condition data; Intersection data; and Point item data. All field data will be entered into the ROMAN II system and checked using ROMAN II data validation functions. Because of the data validation, additional field inspections may be required to confirm or correct missing or invalid data, and amendments will be made in ROMAN II. All new streets not registered in ROMAN II will be recorded.

48 Appendix D. RENEWAL/REPLACEMENT PRIORITIZATION METHODOLOGY Renewal expenditure is major work which does not increase the asset s design capacity but restores, rehabilitates, replaces or renews an existing asset to its original service potential. Work over and above restoring an asset to original service potential is upgrade/expansion or new works expenditure. Sealed Roads Renewal Plan Renewals of sealed roads are funded primarily through the Regional Roads Fund and are therefore prioritised using the Wheatbelt North Regional Road Group s Local Road Project Funding Multi Criteria Assessment (MCA) model which calculates scores for local road projects on Roads of Regional Significance (RRS). Scoring assigns priority to Regional Distributor Roads and preservation projects are favoured over new construction / improvements. The scoring process compares existing and proposed road standards relative to the RRG designated or traffic warrant road standard for the project. Lower standard sections are assigned priority. Horizontal and vertical alignment, drainage, safety and environmental management improvements are all taken into account under separate scoring categories. Work which is critical to overall project completion is recognised, as are projects which are subject to external funding contributions and projects which will reduce future maintenance requirements. Finally, impact on regional development is also assessed and scored. The MCA model scores fifteen separate categories as listed in Table 7-7. Further details of the workings of the MCA model are contained in the Wheatbelt North Regional Road Group s Local Road Project Funding Multi Criteria Assessment Model User Manual Document RRG/WBN/002/006. Table 7-7: MCA Scoring Categories Item Maximum Score % of Total 1. Road & Project Categorisation 1.1 RRS Category (A, B, or C) % 1.2 Preservation/New Construction % Sub-Total % 2. Traffic Data 2.1 Average Daily Traffic % 2.2 Equivalent Standard Axles % 2.3 School Bus Route 5 2.9% 2.4 Road Train Route 5 2.9% Sub-Total % 3. Treatment Details 3.1 Road Type Description No Score* Existing Road Standard % 3.3 Proposed Road Standard % 3.4 Horizontal and Vertical Alignment 5 2.9% 3.5 Drainage 2 1.2% 3.6 Treatment Safety Devices % 3.7 Environmental Management 2 1.2% Sub-Total % 4. General Details 4.1 Five Year Programme 2 1.2% 4.2 Ongoing Project 2 1.2% 4.3 Ongoing Maintenance 3 1.8% 4.4 Regional Development 3 1.8% Sub-Total % TOTAL % * Existing and proposed road standards are measured against Regional Road Group Road Type Description MCA submissions are completed, submitted and evaluated to the Regional Roads Fund.

49 If approved for RRG funding, the project gets funded partially by the grant, with the balance being covered in the Shire s budget. In the event that the project is only partially funded due to RRG fund constraints, the scope of works is revised, and resubmitted for approval. The project will get grant funding if the scoring is too low for funding approval and will then form part of the Shire s Service Deficiency List. Unsealed Roads Renewal Plan The ranking criteria used to determine priority of identified renewal proposals is detailed in Table 7-8. Table 7-8: Renewal Priority Ranking Criteria Unsealed Roads Criteria Weighting Functional Significance / Road Usage (Bus route) 25% Safety 20% Customer/Community requests 10% Condition gravel thickness 15% Width Deficiency 20% Life Cycle cost 10% Total 100% Renewal will be undertaken using low-cost renewal methods where practical. The aim of low-cost renewals is to restore the service potential or future economic benefits of the asset by renewing the assets at a cost less than replacement cost. A matrix of low-cost renewal option will be developed in future revisions of the AMP. Renewal standards Renewal work is carried out in accordance with the following Standards and Specifications. Austroads standards and specifications; Australian Standards; Aus spec; and Australian Roads and Research Board (ARRB) Sealed Local Roads Manual; and Local Shire policies and standards.

50 Appendix E. SAFETY AND MAINTENANCE INSPECTION METHODOLOGY At present the Shire carried out regular ad hoc safety inspections of its road and footpath network although no formalised process exists for the identification of safety and maintenance defects on the Shire s road and path network. This has been listed as an improvement action and will be developed in the future.

51 Appendix F. PROJECTED 10 YEAR CAPITAL RENEWAL WORKS PROGRAM (DERIVED FROM USEFUL LIFE) Asset ID Sub Category Asset Name Description Description From To Area Kerb BARTLETT PLACE SLK 0.00 SLK $6, Kerb BARTLETT PLACE SLK 0.00 SLK $6, Kerb BATTY HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK $ Kerb BATTY HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK $ Kerb BRADY STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb BRADY STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb BYGRAVE DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $6, Kerb BYGRAVE DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $6, Kerb CARNARVON STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $15, Kerb CARNARVON STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $15, Kerb CARROL STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb CARROL STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb COUSINS STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $6, Kerb COUSINS STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $6, Kerb DAWSON AVENUE SLK 0.00 SLK $5, Kerb DAWSON AVENUE SLK 0.00 SLK $5, Kerb DENT COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb DENT COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb DUVAL STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $19, Kerb DUVAL STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $19, Kerb FLANAGAN WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $12, Kerb FLANAGAN WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $12, Kerb GALLAGHER WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $12, Kerb GALLAGHER WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $12, Kerb GEORGETTE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb GEORGETTE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb HEALY STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb HEALY STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb HENDY STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $5, Kerb HENDY STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $5, Kerb LECAILLE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb LECAILLE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb LEITCH STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb LEITCH STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb MARTIN STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb MARTIN STREET SLK 0.11 SLK $3, Kerb MARTIN STREET SLK 0.11 SLK $3, Kerb MCINTYRE COVE SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb MCINTYRE COVE SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb OCEAN DRIVE SLK 1.30 SLK $27, Kerb OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $14, Kerb OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $14, Kerb OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.51 SLK $2, Kerb OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.62 SLK $2, Kerb OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.70 SLK $2, Kerb OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.62 SLK $2, Kerb OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.70 SLK $2, Kerb OCEAN DRIVE SLK 1.30 SLK $ Kerb OSBORNE WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $7, Kerb OSBORNE WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $7,500.00

52 Description Description Asset ID Sub Category Asset Name Area From To 507 Kerb PEARSE ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $12, Kerb PEARSE ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $12, Kerb PEARSE ROAD SLK 0.40 SLK $11, Kerb PEARSE ROAD SLK 0.40 SLK $11, Kerb PETERWANGY PLACE SLK 0.00 SLK $6, Kerb PETERWANGY PLACE SLK 0.00 SLK $6, Kerb REEVE TERRACE SLK 0.00 SLK $7, Kerb REEVE TERRACE SLK 0.00 SLK $7, Kerb RESERVE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb RESERVE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb RUSS STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $8, Kerb RUSS STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $8, Kerb SAMUEL STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb SAMUEL STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb SCOTT ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $6, Kerb SCOTT ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $6, Kerb SMITH STREET SLK 0.09 SLK $8, Kerb SMITH STREET SLK 0.09 SLK $8, Kerb SMITH STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb SMITH STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb ST DOMINICS ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $5, Kerb ST DOMINICS ROAD SLK 0.19 SLK $3, Kerb ST DOMINICS ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $ Kerb SUNDEW AVENUE SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb SUNDEW AVENUE SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb WHELAN STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb WHELAN STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb WHELAN STREET SLK 0.13 SLK $3, Kerb WHELAN STREET SLK 0.13 SLK $3, Kerb WILLIAM STREET SLK 0.13 SLK $4, Kerb WILLIAM STREET SLK 0.13 SLK $4, Kerb WILLIAM STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb WILLIAM STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, _P Pavement FRANCISCO ROAD SLK 0.55 SLK $28, _S Surface DAWSON AVENUE SLK 0.00 SLK $8, _S Surface DAWSON AVENUE SLK 0.10 SLK $6, _S Surface KENNEDY HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK $5, _S Surface PETERWANGY PLACE SLK 0.00 SLK $17, _S Surface PORTEUS HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK $3, _S Surface PORTEUS HEIGHTS SLK 0.12 SLK $1, _S Surface POST OFFICE LANE SLK 0.00 SLK $5, _S Surface REEVE TERRACE SLK 0.09 SLK $15, _S Surface REEVE TERRACE SLK 0.00 SLK $7, _S Surface RUSS STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $24, _S Surface VINCENT STREET SLK 0.34 SLK $9, _S Surface WHELAN STREET SLK 0.13 SLK $15, _S Surface WHELAN STREET SLK 0.20 SLK $10, Kerb ARMSTRONG STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb ARMSTRONG STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb CAVE WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $3,900.00

53 Description Description Asset ID Sub Category Asset Name Area From To 695 Kerb CAVE WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb CHURCH STREET SLK 0.11 SLK $ Kerb GEORGE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb GEORGE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb GEORGE STREET SLK 0.13 SLK $3, Kerb GEORGE STREET SLK 0.13 SLK $3, Kerb MARTIN STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK SLK $ Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK SLK $ Kerb OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.79 SLK $4, Kerb OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.79 SLK $4, Kerb PICKERING DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $12, Kerb PICKERING DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $12, Kerb POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 2.55 SLK $1, Kerb POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 3.50 SLK $ Kerb WALTON STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $5, Kerb WHITE TOPS ROAD SLK 0.02 SLK $ _P Pavement BURMA ROAD SLK SLK $340, _S Surface ARMSTRONG STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $12, _S Surface BRENNAND ROAD SLK 1.06 SLK $4, _S Surface CLARKSON STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $9, _S Surface MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.40 SLK $28, _S Surface MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.29 SLK $17, _S Surface MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.07 SLK $16, _S Surface MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.58 SLK $13, _S Surface MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.00 SLK $8, _S Surface MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.27 SLK $3, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 1.70 SLK $28, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 0.75 SLK $27, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 3.26 SLK $26, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 2.26 SLK $26, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 2.77 SLK $26, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 1.05 SLK $25, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 2.00 SLK $22, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 1.32 SLK $19, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 3.64 SLK $15, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 3.51 SLK $14, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 1.52 SLK $12, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 3.05 SLK $12, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 2.55 SLK $11, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 3.16 SLK $11, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $9, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 2.70 SLK $6, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 2.67 SLK $2, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 0.08 SLK $1, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 3.50 SLK $1, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 2.25 SLK $ _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 0.07 SLK $ _P Pavement STEELE ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $124, _S Surface BLENHEIM ROAD SLK 0.34 SLK $27,661.20

54 Description Description Asset ID Sub Category Asset Name Area From To 213_S Surface BLENHEIM ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $5, _S Surface BLENHEIM ROAD SLK 0.19 SLK $4, _S Surface CANNY WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $4, _S Surface GREY CLOSE SLK 0.00 SLK $3, _S Surface HOPE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $2, _S Surface HOPE STREET SLK 0.08 SLK $2, _S Surface NAIRN COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $1, _S Surface NORTH SHORE DRIVE SLK 1.04 SLK $5, _S Surface NORTH SHORE DRIVE SLK 1.00 SLK $3, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.33 SLK $5, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $4, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.22 SLK $3, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.13 SLK $2, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.50 SLK $ _S Surface PLESTER STREET SLK 0.08 SLK $7, _S Surface PLESTER STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $2, _S Surface POOLE VIEW SLK 0.00 SLK $3, _S Surface ROWLAND STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $2, _S Surface ST DOMINICS ROAD SLK 1.70 SLK $15, _S Surface ST DOMINICS ROAD SLK 2.20 SLK $15, _S Surface SUNSET COVE SLK 0.00 SLK $7, _S Surface SUNSET COVE SLK 0.10 SLK $6, _S Surface SUNSET COVE SLK 0.18 SLK $6, Kerb BRADY STREET SLK 0.10 SLK $1, Kerb BRADY STREET SLK 0.10 SLK $1, _P Pavement WATER SUPPLY ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $123, _P Pavement YARDARINO ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $32, _S Surface BRADY STREET SLK 0.16 SLK $10, _S Surface COLES WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $14, _S Surface COUSINS STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $7, _S Surface COUSINS STREET SLK 0.15 SLK $7, _S Surface COUSINS STREET SLK 0.08 SLK $6, _S Surface EMILY WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $5, _S Surface HENDY STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $9, _S Surface HENDY STREET SLK 0.11 SLK $7, _S Surface IRWIN CRESCENT SLK 0.00 SLK $15, _S Surface KAILIS DRIVE SLK 4.11 SLK $221, _S Surface KAILIS DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $111, _S Surface KAILIS DRIVE SLK 3.26 SLK $29, _S Surface MCNABO COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $1, _S Surface PEARSE ROAD SLK 0.17 SLK $20, _S Surface PEARSE ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $8, _S Surface PEARSE ROAD SLK 0.09 SLK $7, _S Surface PEARSE ROAD SLK 0.39 SLK $ _S Surface RIVER GUM WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $7, _S Surface SUNDEW AVENUE SLK 0.00 SLK $8, _S Surface TUART GLEN SLK 0.00 SLK $6, _S Surface TULLOCH DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $24, _S Surface TULLOCH DRIVE SLK 0.90 SLK $ _S Surface UNNAMED ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $7,200.00

55 Asset ID Sub Category Asset Name Description Description From To Area _S Surface WHELAN STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $11, Kerb POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 2.25 SLK $ Kerb POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 2.25 SLK $ _P Pavement ARMSTRONG STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $36, _P Pavement CAVE WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $11, _P Pavement STOCK ROUTE ROAD SLK 0.22 SLK $43, _P Pavement STOCK ROUTE ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $10, _P Pavement TABLETOP ROAD SLK 4.56 SLK $328, _P Pavement TABLETOP ROAD SLK SLK $252, _P Pavement TABLETOP ROAD SLK 3.80 SLK $37, _P Pavement WALTON STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $8, _P Pavement WALTON STREET SLK 0.09 SLK $8, _S Surface ACACIA ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $7, _S Surface BATTY HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK $1, _S Surface BYGRAVE DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $5, _S Surface BYGRAVE DRIVE SLK 0.16 SLK $2, _S Surface DELMAGE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $10, _S Surface DELMAGE STREET SLK 0.12 SLK $5, _S Surface DELMAGE STREET SLK 0.18 SLK $1, _S Surface HUNT - WALDECK STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $81, _S Surface LEITCH STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $9, _S Surface MCCARLEY WALK SLK 0.00 SLK $1, _S Surface NORRISH DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $2, _S Surface NORRISH DRIVE SLK 0.08 SLK $1, _S Surface NORRISH DRIVE SLK 0.12 SLK $1, _S Surface PEARSE ROAD SLK 0.51 SLK $15, _S Surface PEARSE ROAD SLK 0.68 SLK $9, _S Surface PEARSE ROAD SLK 0.40 SLK $4, _S Surface PEARSE ROAD SLK 0.46 SLK $4, _S Surface PEARSE ROAD SLK 0.45 SLK $ _S Surface QUANDONG ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $16, _S Surface RESERVE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, _S Surface SAMUEL STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $9, _S Surface SHEOAK WAY SLK 0.04 SLK $1, _S Surface SHEOAK WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb PAYNE CRESCENT SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb PAYNE CRESCENT SLK 0.00 SLK $3, _P Pavement BEAGLE ROAD SLK 0.50 SLK $13, _P Pavement BOOKARA EAST ROAD SLK 1.30 SLK $333, _P Pavement BOOKARA EAST ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $56, _P Pavement HAMERSLEY ROAD SLK 0.20 SLK $98, _P Pavement HAMERSLEY ROAD SLK 0.14 SLK $2, _P Pavement MELALEUCA ROAD SLK 2.10 SLK $15, _P Pavement TABLETOP ROAD SLK SLK $280, _S Surface ACACIA ROAD SLK 0.77 SLK $29, _S Surface ACACIA ROAD SLK 0.25 SLK $16, _S Surface ALLANOOKA SPRINGS SLK 4.63 SLK $365,607.36

56 Asset ID Sub Category Asset Name ROAD Description From Description To Area _S Surface ALLANOOKA SPRINGS SLK 0.62 SLK $129, ROAD 98_S Surface ALLANOOKA SPRINGS SLK 0.00 SLK $20, ROAD 338_S Surface BAILEY STREET SLK 0.18 SLK $11, _S Surface BAILEY STREET SLK 0.13 SLK $1, _S Surface BLENHEIM ROAD SLK 1.23 SLK $15, _S Surface BLENHEIM ROAD SLK 1.70 SLK $10, _S Surface DOWNES WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $13, _S Surface DOWNES WAY SLK 0.22 SLK $8, _S Surface DOWNES WAY SLK 0.14 SLK $7, _S Surface FRANCIS ROAD SLK 0.15 SLK $9, _S Surface FRANCIS ROAD SLK 0.05 SLK $3, _S Surface FRANCIS ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $1, _S Surface FRANCIS ROAD SLK 0.44 SLK $1, _S Surface GOLF COURSE ROAD SLK 0.39 SLK $14, _S Surface GOLF COURSE ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $12, _S Surface GOLF COURSE ROAD SLK 0.38 SLK $ _S Surface HONEY MYRTLE CLOSE SLK 0.00 SLK $9, _S Surface PICKERING DRIVE SLK 0.14 SLK $18, _S Surface PICKERING DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $12, _S Surface PICKERING DRIVE SLK 0.35 SLK $6, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 0.20 SLK $9, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 0.38 SLK $5, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 0.10 SLK $3, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 0.48 SLK $2, _S Surface WHITE TOPS ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb BARRETT COVE SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb BARRETT COVE SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb BLENHEIM ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $36, Kerb BURGES STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $7, Kerb BURGES STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $7, Kerb CANNY WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb CANNY WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb CLEMENTINA ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $9, Kerb CLEMENTINA ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $9, Kerb CORAL COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb CORAL COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb DELMAGE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $6, Kerb DELMAGE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $6, Kerb HAMPTON STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $15, Kerb HOPE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb HOPE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb HUNT - WALDECK STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $13, Kerb HUNT - WALDECK SLK 0.00 SLK $13, STREET 407 Kerb HUNT - WALDECK SLK 1.18 SLK $4, STREET 406 Kerb HUNT - WALDECK SLK 1.18 SLK $4,200.00

57 Asset ID Sub Category Asset Name STREET 393 Kerb HUNT - WALDECK STREET 392 Kerb HUNT - WALDECK STREET 390 Kerb HUNT - WALDECK STREET 395 Kerb HUNT - WALDECK STREET 399 Kerb HUNT - WALDECK STREET 398 Kerb HUNT - WALDECK STREET 401 Kerb HUNT - WALDECK STREET 385 Kerb HUNT - WALDECK STREET Description From Description To Area SLK 0.70 SLK $3, SLK 0.70 SLK $3, SLK 0.59 SLK $3, SLK 0.83 SLK $3, SLK 0.94 SLK $2, SLK 0.94 SLK $2, SLK 1.01 SLK $1, SLK 0.56 SLK $ Kerb HUNT - WALDECK SLK 0.56 SLK $ STREET 743 Kerb KENNEDY HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb KENNEDY HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb MORISSEY PLACE SLK 0.00 SLK $5, Kerb MORISSEY PLACE SLK 0.00 SLK $5, Kerb NAIRN COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb NAIRN COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb NORTH SHORE DRIVE SLK 0.83 SLK $5, Kerb NORTH SHORE DRIVE SLK 0.83 SLK $5, Kerb OCEAN DRIVE SLK 2.61 SLK $ Kerb PARKER STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb PARKER STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb PLESTER STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $9, Kerb PLESTER STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $9, Kerb PORTEUS HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb PORTEUS HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb RICHARDSON ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $10, Kerb RICHARDSON ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $10, Kerb ROWLAND STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb ROWLAND STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb SEA RIPPLE AVENUE SLK 0.29 SLK $ Kerb SEA RIPPLE AVENUE SLK 0.29 SLK $ Kerb SEAHORSE LOOP SLK 0.31 SLK $7, Kerb SEAHORSE LOOP SLK 0.31 SLK $7, Kerb THURKLE SQUARE SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb THURKLE SQUARE SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb TURTON HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK 0.35 #N/A $10, Kerb TURTON HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK 0.35 #N/A $10, _P Pavement BOOKARA EAST ROAD SLK 8.90 SLK $83, _P Pavement CASUARINAS ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $372, _P Pavement DAWSON LANE SLK 0.00 SLK $20, _P Pavement ELLERY ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $98, _P Pavement FANE ROAD SLK 0.22 SLK $93, _P Pavement HUNT - WALDECK STREET SLK 0.70 SLK $11,497.20

58 Description Description Asset ID Sub Category Asset Name Area From To 192_P Pavement ST DOMINICS ROAD SLK 0.30 SLK $61, _P Pavement WYE FARM ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $243, _S Surface ALLANOOKA SPRINGS SLK SLK $320, ROAD 103_S Surface ALLANOOKA SPRINGS ROAD SLK SLK $243, _S Surface ALLANOOKA SPRINGS SLK SLK $3, ROAD 289_S Surface CAVE WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $4, _S Surface CHURCH STREET SLK 0.09 SLK $1, _S Surface DEE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $21, _S Surface DENT COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $4, _S Surface GEORGE STREET SLK 0.62 SLK $17, _S Surface GEORGE STREET SLK 0.25 SLK $16, _S Surface GEORGE STREET SLK 0.44 SLK $15, _S Surface HAMPTON STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $27, _S Surface HAMPTON STREET SLK 0.35 SLK $11, _S Surface HAMPTON STREET SLK 0.30 SLK $4, _S Surface HAMPTON STREET SLK 0.48 SLK $4, _S Surface IRONBARK WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $9, _S Surface IRONBARK WAY SLK 0.34 SLK $4, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 2.20 SLK $37, _S Surface POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 1.65 SLK $4, _S Surface PYE ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $123, _S Surface RIDLEY STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $15, _S Surface SCOTT ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $17, _S Surface SEA RIPPLE AVENUE SLK 0.00 SLK $7, _S Surface SEA RIPPLE AVENUE SLK 0.08 SLK $7, _S Surface SEA VIEW COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $20, _S Surface SEAHORSE LOOP SLK 0.00 SLK $27, _S Surface SMITH STREET SLK 0.27 SLK $8, _S Surface SMITH STREET SLK 0.09 SLK $7, _S Surface SMITH STREET SLK 0.18 SLK $7, _S Surface WHITE TOPS ROAD SLK 0.36 SLK $4, Kerb DOMINICAN CLOSE SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb DOMINICAN CLOSE SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb IRWIN CRESCENT SLK 0.00 SLK $5, Kerb MITCHELL HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK 0.21 #N/A $6, Kerb MITCHELL HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK 0.21 #N/A $6, Kerb PRIORY COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb PRIORY COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $1, _P Pavement BURMA ROAD SLK 0.16 SLK $470, _P Pavement BURMA ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $7, _P Pavement CASUARINAS ROAD SLK 8.50 SLK $236, _P Pavement SKIPPER ROAD SLK 0.04 SLK $138, _P Pavement YANDANOOKA ROAD SLK 2.82 SLK $237, _P Pavement YANDANOOKA ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $139, _S Surface BRADY STREET SLK 0.29 SLK $16, _S Surface CHURCH STREET SLK 0.49 SLK $38, _S Surface CHURCH STREET SLK 0.15 SLK $10,608.00

59 Description Description Asset ID Sub Category Asset Name Area From To 33_S Surface CHURCH STREET SLK 0.28 SLK $5, _S Surface CHURCH STREET SLK 0.35 SLK $5, _S Surface CHURCH STREET SLK 0.42 SLK $5, _S Surface CHURCH STREET SLK 0.11 SLK $3, _S Surface CHURCH STREET SLK 0.96 SLK $3, _S Surface HEPBURN STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $1, _S Surface HEPBURN STREET SLK 0.06 SLK $1, _S Surface HOSKEN STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $10, _S Surface MILO ROAD SLK 1.10 SLK $118, _S Surface MILO ROAD SLK 0.47 SLK $19, _S Surface MILO ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $7, _S Surface MOORE STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $6, _S Surface NORTH SHORE DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $39, _S Surface NORTH SHORE DRIVE SLK 0.19 SLK $31, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 1.30 SLK $19, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.97 SLK $11, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 1.85 SLK $11, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.79 SLK $5, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.51 SLK $2, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.74 SLK $1, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.62 SLK $1, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.70 SLK $1, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.67 SLK $1, _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.59 SLK $ _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 0.95 SLK $ _S Surface OCEAN DRIVE SLK 2.18 SLK $ _S Surface SEVEN MILE ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $62, _S Surface SING WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $1, _S Surface ST DOMINICS ROAD SLK 0.06 SLK $9, _S Surface ST DOMINICS ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $4, _S Surface THURKLE SQUARE SLK 0.00 SLK $4, _S Surface WILLIAM STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $11, Kerb ARMSTRONG STREET SLK 0.09 SLK $9, Kerb ARMSTRONG STREET SLK 0.09 SLK $9, Kerb BAILEY STREET SLK 0.15 SLK $11, Kerb BAILEY STREET SLK 0.15 SLK $11, Kerb BAILEY STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb BAILEY STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb BRADY STREET SLK 0.29 SLK $2, Kerb BRADY STREET SLK 0.29 SLK $2, Kerb BUNGARU ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb BUNGARU ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb BUNGARU ROAD SLK 0.16 SLK $2, Kerb BUNGARU ROAD SLK 0.16 SLK $2, Kerb CHURCH STREET SLK 1.00 SLK $1, Kerb CHURCH STREET SLK 1.00 SLK $1, Kerb COLES WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb COLES WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb CRIDDLE ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb CRIDDLE ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $4,800.00

60 Description Description Asset ID Sub Category Asset Name Area From To 472 Kerb DODD STREET SLK 0.39 SLK $ Kerb DODD STREET SLK 0.39 SLK $ Kerb DOWNES WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $9, Kerb DOWNES WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $9, Kerb FLANAGAN WAY SLK 0.40 SLK $3, Kerb FLANAGAN WAY SLK 0.40 SLK $3, Kerb FLETCHER STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb FLETCHER STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb GEORGE STREET SLK 0.35 SLK $14, Kerb GEORGE STREET SLK 0.35 SLK $14, Kerb GEORGE STREET SLK 0.28 SLK $2, Kerb GEORGE STREET SLK 0.28 SLK $2, Kerb GILLAM DRIVE SLK 0.28 SLK $1, Kerb GILLAM DRIVE SLK 0.28 SLK $1, Kerb HEPBURN STREET SLK 0.12 SLK $4, Kerb HEPBURN STREET SLK 0.12 SLK $4, Kerb HEPBURN STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb HEPBURN STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb HERBERT STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb HERBERT STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb HOSKEN STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb HOSKEN STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb HOSKEN STREET SLK 0.13 SLK $3, Kerb HOSKEN STREET SLK 0.13 SLK $3, Kerb HUNT - WALDECK SLK 1.05 SLK $3, STREET 381 Kerb HUNT - WALDECK STREET 382 Kerb HUNT - WALDECK STREET 387 Kerb HUNT - WALDECK STREET 388 Kerb HUNT - WALDECK STREET SLK 0.45 SLK $3, SLK 0.45 SLK $3, SLK 0.58 SLK $ SLK 0.58 SLK $ Kerb MCCARLEY WALK SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb MCCARLEY WALK SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb MCNABO COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb MCNABO COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.55 SLK $3, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.55 SLK $3, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.16 SLK $3, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.16 SLK $3, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.45 SLK $2, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.45 SLK $2, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.12 SLK $1, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.12 SLK $1, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.52 SLK $ Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.52 SLK $ Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.26 SLK $ Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.26 SLK $ Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK SLK $87.00

61 Description Description Asset ID Sub Category Asset Name Area From To 182 Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK SLK $ Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK 1.50 SLK $ Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK SLK $ Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK SLK $ Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK SLK $ Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK 1.50 SLK $ Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK SLK $ Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK SLK $ Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK SLK $ Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK SLK $ Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK SLK $ Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK 1.50 #N/A $ Kerb MT ADAMS ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK 1.50 #N/A $ Kerb NORRISH DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb NORRISH DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb NORTH SHORE DRIVE SLK 0.34 SLK $12, Kerb NORTH SHORE DRIVE SLK 0.34 SLK $12, Kerb NORTH SHORE DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $10, Kerb NORTH SHORE DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $10, Kerb PHILBEY ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb PHILBEY ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 3.51 SLK $8, Kerb POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 0.61 SLK $7, Kerb POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 0.10 SLK $3, Kerb POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 0.53 SLK 0.61 #N/A $2, Kerb POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 0.53 SLK 0.61 #N/A $2, Kerb POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 2.55 SLK $1, Kerb POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 3.50 SLK $ Kerb PORTEUS HEIGHTS SLK 0.12 SLK $1, Kerb PORTEUS HEIGHTS SLK 0.12 SLK $1, Kerb SHORT STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb SHORT STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb SING WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb SING WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb UNNAMED ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK 0.10 #N/A $3, Kerb UNNAMED ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK 0.10 #N/A $3, Kerb VINCENT STREET SLK 0.34 SLK $9, Kerb VINCENT STREET SLK 0.34 SLK $9, Kerb VINCENT STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb VINCENT STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb WHITE TOPS ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $ Kerb WHITE TOPS ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $ _P Pavement MILO ROAD SLK SLK $221, _S Surface CARROL STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $4, _S Surface CORAL COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $24, _S Surface DUVAL STREET SLK 0.23 SLK $13, _S Surface DUVAL STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $4, _S Surface DUVAL STREET SLK 0.15 SLK $2, _S Surface GALLAGHER WAY SLK 0.00 SLK $13, _S Surface ILLYARRIE ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $8, _S Surface MCINTYRE COVE SLK 0.00 SLK $4, _S Surface SEA RIPPLE AVENUE SLK 0.16 SLK $15,

62 Description Description Asset ID Sub Category Asset Name Area From To 344_S Surface SEA RIPPLE AVENUE SLK 0.23 SLK $13, _S Surface SEAHORSE LOOP SLK 0.31 SLK $60, _S Surface SHEOAK WAY SLK 0.31 SLK $6, _S Surface SHEOAK WAY SLK 0.11 SLK $5, _S Surface SPRINGFIELD DRIVE SLK 0.20 SLK $30, _S Surface SPRINGFIELD DRIVE SLK 1.15 SLK $28, _S Surface SPRINGFIELD DRIVE SLK 0.00 SLK $6, _S Surface SWAN VIEW SLK 0.00 SLK $27, _S Surface TURTON HTS ACCESS SLK 0.00 SLK $18, Kerb CHURCH STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb CHURCH STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $2, Kerb CHURCH STREET SLK 0.09 SLK $ Kerb CHURCH STREET SLK 0.09 SLK $ Kerb DODD STREET SLK 0.14 SLK $7, Kerb DODD STREET SLK 0.14 SLK $7, Kerb DODD STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb DODD STREET SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.29 SLK $4, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.29 SLK $4, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.07 SLK $1, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.07 SLK $1, Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.27 SLK $ Kerb MORETON TERRACE SLK 0.27 SLK $ Kerb POINT LEANDER DRIVE SLK 0.20 SLK $2, Kerb SWAN VIEW SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb SWAN VIEW SLK 0.00 SLK $4, Kerb TURTON HTS ACCESS SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb TURTON HTS ACCESS SLK 0.00 SLK $3, Kerb WHITE TOPS ROAD SLK 0.36 SLK $ Kerb WHITE TOPS ROAD SLK 0.36 SLK $ _P Pavement BURMA ROAD SLK 9.70 SLK $152, _P Pavement BURMA ROAD SLK SLK $8, _S Surface BRENNAND ROAD SLK 1.20 SLK $20, _S Surface BRENNAND ROAD SLK 1.19 SLK $ _S Surface DOMINICAN CLOSE SLK 0.00 SLK $9, _S Surface FRANCISCO ROAD SLK 0.30 SLK $4, _S Surface FRANCISCO ROAD SLK 0.43 SLK $3, _S Surface HAMERSLEY ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $4, _S Surface HIDDEN VALLEY CLOSE SLK 0.00 SLK $19, _S Surface MELALEUCA ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $33, _S Surface MELALEUCA ROAD SLK 1.25 SLK $19, _S Surface MELALEUCA ROAD SLK 1.98 SLK $3, _S Surface MILO ROAD SLK 0.30 SLK $4, _S Surface MITCHELL HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK $37, _S Surface PRIORY COURT SLK 0.00 SLK $11, Kerb GREY CLOSE SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb GREY CLOSE SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb MARINA HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb MARINA HEIGHTS SLK 0.00 SLK $1, Kerb MARINA HEIGHTS SLK 0.06 SLK $900.00

63 Description Description Asset ID Sub Category Asset Name Area From To 1134 Kerb MARINA HEIGHTS SLK 0.06 SLK $ Kerb MARINA HEIGHTS SLK 0.05 SLK $ Kerb MARINA HEIGHTS SLK 0.05 SLK $ Kerb NORTH SHORE DRIVE SLK 1.00 SLK $3, Kerb NORTH SHORE DRIVE SLK 1.00 SLK $3, Kerb POOLE VIEW SLK 0.00 SLK 0.05 #N/A $1, Kerb POOLE VIEW SLK 0.00 SLK 0.05 #N/A $1, Kerb SUNSET COVE SLK 0.00 SLK $5, Kerb SUNSET COVE SLK 0.00 SLK 0.19 #N/A $5, _S Surface BEAGLE ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $13, _S Surface FANE ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $5, _S Surface MILO ROAD SLK 4.90 SLK $262, _S Surface MT HORNER WEST ROAD 68_S Surface MT HORNER WEST ROAD 66_S Surface MT HORNER WEST ROAD SLK 0.00 SLK $12, SLK 0.86 SLK $7, SLK 0.46 SLK $1, _S Surface POWDER BARK LOOP SLK 0.00 SLK $16, _S Surface RICHARDSON ROAD SLK 0.43 SLK $13, _S Surface SHEOAK WAY SLK 0.54 SLK $4,262.40

64 Appendix G. RISK MATRIX An assessment of risks associated with service delivery from the road and path network has identified risks to the Shire. The risk assessment process identifies credible risks, the likelihood of the risk event occurring, the consequences should the event occur, develops a risk rating, evaluates the risk and develops a risk treatment plan for non-acceptable risks. Risk Context The risk analysis has been undertaken to be compliant with AS In-lieu of a corporate risk policy and objectives, the following statement defines what an acceptable level of risk is with regards to road assets. Through risk management, the Shire aims to: Protect the quality of the road and path network; Protect users of the road and path network; Protect the Shire s road and path assets and public image; Reduce the Shire s exposure to risk; and Promote effective financial and asset management practices. This will be achieved through: Identifying, decreasing the likelihood, and mitigating the consequences of risk, within the constraints of sensible objectives and practices; Applying risk based practices to the management of the road network and associated decision making; Maintaining safe and reliable plant, equipment and infrastructure; Preparing appropriate contingencies; Reviewing the risk profile of the road and path network at appropriate intervals and when circumstances dictate; Maintaining an up to date road and path asset management plan. Risk Criteria The following tables detail the likelihood and consequence levels and scale which has been applied to the risk analysis. The combined values for each are then identified on the risk matrix to determine a risk value between low and extreme.

65 LIKELIHOOD (LK.) TABLE 5. Almost Certain The event is expected to occur > once per year Event has more than a 75% chance of occurring Will occur within the next 6 months 4. Likely The event will probably occur once per year Event has 50-74% chance of occurring Will occur within 18 months 3. Possible Risk event could occur at some time Event has 25-49% chance of occurring Will occur within 30 months 2. Unlikely Risk event is unlikely to occur Event has less than 25% chance of occurring May occur within 5 years 1. Rare Event may only occur in exceptional circumstances Not likely to occur within next 5 years CONSEQUENCE (CON.) TABLE 5.Catastrophic Financial impact > $3 million Very high Member sensitivity Irreparable damage to ARRB s image and reputation Cessation of business due to Agreement non-compliance 4. Major Financial impact $500K - $3m Significant Member sensitivity, damage to reputation Financial impact on business or strategic objectives 3.Moderate Financial impact $50K - $500K Moderate Participant sensitivity, damage to reputation Moderate impact on business and strategic objectives 2. Minor Financial impact < $50K Minimal damage to image and reputation Minimal impact on business and strategic objectives 1. Insignificant Consequences are dealt with by routine operations 5- Almost Certain Likely LIKELIHOOD 3 Possible Unlikely Rare Insignificant 2 Minor 3 Moderate 4 Major 5 - Catastrophic CONSEQUENCE 9 10 Critical Risk Must implement control measures. 7 8 High Risk Must complete control evaluation. 5 6 Medium Risk Management of responsibility. 2-4 Low Risk Monitor. Examination of controls is not specifically required.

66 Transport Infrastructure Risk Register Date: 20 July 2012 Carried out by Rob Damhuis RISK IDENTIFICATION RISK ANALYSIS RISK TREATMENT PLAN Ref. Service or Asset at Risk Risk What can happen? When can it occur? Possible cause Existing controls Is risk credi ble? Likelih ood Consequences Risk rating Is risk accep table? Action required Actions Responsi bility Resources Budget Date due 1 Asset management - Strategic Asset Management - staff retention Current trained staff leave resulting in lack of focus or understanding of asset management Anytime in the future Elected members or staff leaving for various reasons. Lack of succession plan None Yes Likely Severe Critical No Immediate corrective action Develop & implement business continuity plan for AM activities CEO Int & Ext $15, rd Quarter 12/13 2 Forward Works Planning / budgeting Service level performance information is not collected. Processes are not put into place to consistently collect performance information. Anytime now Lack of funding, insufficient resources and/or skill levels. None Yes Almost certain Major Critical No Immediate corrective action Develop & implement processes to allow collection and monitoring of AMP LOS. CEO internal Nil 2nd Quarter 12/13 3 Asset Management - inventory Asset Management - inventory Inventory is not updated leading to poor revaluations and forward works plans. Anytime in the future Internal staff not competent in ROMAN II or high staff turnover. None Yes Likely Major Critical No Immediate corrective action Develop an asset inventory update procedure CEO Int & Ext $25, rd Quarter 13/14 4 Asset Management - condition rating and inspections Footpath Network Footpaths become uneven causing trip hazard leading to claim against Council. Anytime now the Shire has no formalised inspection methodology for safety or condition of its road network Adhoc inspection s & customer requests Yes Likely Severe Critical No Immediate corrective action Shire develops a formal procedure & methodology for footpath inspection CEO Int & Ext $18, rd Quarter 12/13 5 Asset Management - condition rating and inspections Poor asset condition information Council holds no, or poor, condition data of network infrastructure Anytime now Assets become unsafe, and/or are replaced at suboptimum times. Adhoc inspection s Yes Likely Major Critical No Immediate corrective action Shire develops a formal procedure & methodology for road inspection CEO Int & Ext $45, rd Quarter 12/13 6 Asset management - system AMP is not supported by Council Funding and management decisions made in isolation of AMP Anytime in the future Network ineffectually managed, resulting in potential for increased risk as well as sub-optimal whole of life costs. Production of AMP Yes Likely Severe Critical No Immediate corrective action Develop & implement elected member and staff training in for AM activities CEO Int & Ext $25, th Quarter 12/13

67 RISK IDENTIFICATION RISK ANALYSIS RISK TREATMENT PLAN Ref. Service or Asset at Risk Risk What can happen? When can it occur? Possible cause Existing controls Is risk credi ble? Likelih ood Consequences Risk rating Is risk accep table? Action required Actions Responsi bility Resources Budget Date due 7 Levels of Service Poor maintenance management Maintenance items are corrected adhoc Anytime now Maintenance items are not corrected in a timely fashion, critical infrastructure not functional. Adhoc inspection s Yes Possible Moderate High No High Priorityaction required soon Develop a road safety and maintenance defect framework, including inspection and treatment tactics. Trial & revise. CEO Int & Ext $30, nd Quarter 12/13 8 Levels of Service Poor maintenance management Maintenance items are corrected adhoc Anytime now Maintenance is carried out reactively rather than at a planned optimum time. Yes Likely Moderate High No High Priorityaction required soon Develop a road safety and maintenance defect framework, including inspection and treatment tactics. Trial & revise. CEO Int & Ext $30, nd Quarter 12/13 9 unsealed road network unsealed road network the road deteriorates and is below acceptable/safe standards Anytime in the future the Shire has no formalised inspection methodology for safety or condition of its road network reactive maintenan ce Yes Possible Moderate High No High Priorityaction required soon Develop a road safety and maintenance defect framework, including inspection and treatment tactics. Trial & revise. CEO Int & Ext $30, nd Quarter 12/13 10 Asset Management - condition rating and inspections The Shire has no formalised road inspection and maintenance programme. A lack of a formal inspection programme results in reactive maintenance and no clear intervention times and limits. Anytime now No formal process or methodology is adopted. Reactive maintenan ce. Yes Possible Moderate High No High Priorityaction required soon Develop a road safety and maintenance defect framework, including inspection and treatment tactics. Trial & revise. CEO Int & Ext as previous as previous

68 RISK IDENTIFICATION RISK ANALYSIS RISK TREATMENT PLAN Ref. Service or Asset at Risk Risk What can happen? When can it occur? Possible cause Existing controls Is risk credi ble? Likelih ood Consequences Risk rating Is risk accep table? Action required Actions Responsi bility Resources Budget Date due 11 Sealed road network Sealed road network the road network is unavailable Anytime in the future the Shire has no formalised inspection methodology for safety or condition of its road network reactive maintenan ce Yes Possible Major High No High Priorityaction required soon Develop a road safety and maintenance defect framework, including inspection and treatment tactics. Trial & revise. CEO Int & Ext as previous as previous 12 Sealed road network Sealed road network the road deteriorates and is below acceptable/safe standards Anytime in the future the Shire has no formalised inspection methodology for safety or condition of its road network reactive maintenan ce Yes Possible Moderate High No High Priorityaction required soon Develop a road safety and maintenance defect framework, including inspection and treatment tactics. Trial & revise. CEO Int & Ext as previous as previous 13 Asset Management - condition rating and inspections Asset Management - condition rating and inspections condition rating and inspections not carried out repeatably Anytime now No inspection document in place None Yes Almost certain Moderate High No High Priorityaction required soon Develop data collection manual CEO Int & Ext $8, st Quarter 12/13 14 Asset management - Strategic The Shire does not hold a demographic demand model for consistent corporate use. Lack of a single model results in inconsistent demand forecasting and inconsistencies across corporate documents and planning. Anytime in the future AM Plans and other corporate documents use different demographic data. ABS statistics. Yes Likely Moderate High No High Priorityaction required soon Develop demographic model for Shire after 2011 census data released. CEO Int & Ext $25, st Quarter 12/13 15 unsealed road network unsealed road network road demand exceeds the current design of the road Anytime in the future roads are not designed to cope with existing traffic conditions None Yes Possible Moderate High No High Priorityaction required soon Develop or use standard road design standards which incorporate future demand requirements. CEO Internal Nil 2nd Quarter 12/13

69 RISK IDENTIFICATION RISK ANALYSIS RISK TREATMENT PLAN Ref. Service or Asset at Risk Risk What can happen? When can it occur? Possible cause Existing controls Is risk credi ble? Likelih ood Consequences Risk rating Is risk accep table? Action required Actions Responsi bility Resources Budget Date due 16 Sealed road network Sealed road network road demand exceeds the current design of the road Anytime in the future Roads are not designed to cope with anticipated traffic growth None Yes Unlikely Severe High No High Priorityaction required soon Develop or use standard road design standards which incorporate future demand requirements. CEO Internal Nil 2nd Quarter 12/13 17 Levels of Service Levels of Service LOS not acceptable to community Anytime now The Shire has not workshopped the LOS with stakeholders. Customer requests determine LOS Yes Possible Major High No High Priorityaction required soon Develop process for community engagement on LOS CEO Internal $25, rd Quarter 12/13 18 Asset management - system Road AMP does not link to town streetscape plan. Road AMP does not consider the requirements of a wider town streetscape strategy. Anytime now No finalised streetscape plan. None Yes Almost certain Minor High No High Priorityaction required soon Develop road network design requirements in support of townscape planning, tourism strategies, etc. CEO Int & Ext $25, nd Quarter 14/15 19 Forward Works Planning / budgeting Transport assets Assets associated with road and footpath do not receive adequate funding Anytime in the future The Transport AMP excludes associated assets i.e. signs, calming measures etc. Future budgets anticipate that associated assets are included in the road and footpath budget. Suncategory budgeting takes place. Yes Unlikely Severe High No High Priorityaction required soon Revise asset management plan to include roads, kerbs and footpaths and all other road related assets. CEO Int & Ext $8,000 per AMP 1st Quarter 12/13 20 Levels of Service Customer are dis-satisfied Community feels uninformed or feel they are not getting value for money. Anytime in the future Community feels un-informed or feel they are not getting value for money. None Yes Unlikely Moderate High No High Priorityaction required soon Implement traffic monitoring measures to track actual traffic growth. CEO external $25, nd Quarter 12/13 21 Financial reporting Road operation & maintenance activities are not captured in the corporate financial system by asset and activity. Maintenance and operation expenditure is not accurately captured. Anytime in the future Corporate financial system not configured to capture costs in this way, process for reporting works doesn t exist. Single operation and maintenan ce budgets. Yes Possible Moderate High No High Priorityaction required soon Review corporate financial system, develop standard asset operation and maintenance activities. Implement. CEO Internal Nil 2nd Quarter 12/13

70 RISK IDENTIFICATION RISK ANALYSIS RISK TREATMENT PLAN Ref. Service or Asset at Risk Risk What can happen? When can it occur? Possible cause Existing controls Is risk credi ble? Likelih ood Consequences Risk rating Is risk accep table? Action required Actions Responsi bility Resources Budget Date due 22 Sealed road network Sealed road network the road network does not link to strategic locations Anytime now strategic locations around the shire develop over time but the road network does not grow to deal with this development None Yes Possible Major High No High Priorityaction required soon Shire already identified in Strategic Community Plan - develop Community and Economic Development Plan. CEO Int & Ext Nil 23 Levels of Service Service levels have not been workshopped with Council or adopted. Service levels are not adopted. Anytime now Failure to communicate with Council appropriately. None Yes Possible Severe High No High Priorityaction required soon Workshop LOS & AMP with Council CEO Int & Ext $20, st Quarter 12/13 24 unsealed road network unsealed road network the road network is unavailable due to poor drainage maintenance Anytime in the future the Shire has no formalised inspection methodology for safety or condition of its road network reactive maintenan ce Yes Possible Moderate High No High Priorityaction required soon Develop a road safety and maintenance defect framework, including inspection and treatment tactics. Trial & revise. CEO Int & Ext Included in Risk 7 2nd Quarter 12/13 25 Asset management - Strategic Multiple systems lead to data duplication and system redundancies Multiple systems lead to data duplication and system redundancies Anytime now Multiple systems requiring similar data with entry by multiple actions None Yes Possible Major High No High Priorityaction required soon Review corporate asset management systems, ensuring that the minimum duplication of data entry is achieved. CEO Internal Nil 2nd Quarter 12/13 26 Levels of Service Levels of Service Current LOS unsustainable Anytime now Customer demands exceed affordability None Yes Unlikely Major High No High Priorityaction required soon Workshop LOS & AMP with Council CEO Int & Ext Included in Risk 24 2nd Quarter 12/ Financial reporting Asset management - Strategic Network valuation is inaccurate Asset Management - System A lack of process results in an inaccurate valuation & poor whole of life costs asset management system breakdowns due to lack of focus by staff Anytime in the future Anytime now Whole of life cost analysis is inaccurate. Staff doesn t understand the goals of asset management leading to breakdown of system Experience d consultant s undertakin g valuation Yes Possible Major High No None Yes Possible Severe High No High Priorityaction required soon High Priorityaction required soon Ensure that experienced consultants undertaking valuation in future Include asset management KPI's in staff job descriptions CEO Internal Nil CEO Int & Ext Included in Risk 6 2nd Quarter 12/13 4th Quarter 12/13

71 SHIRE OF DANDARAGAN Appendix H. ROAD AND PATH NETWORK DEMAND This AMP considers a 10 year planning horizon and therefore the factors that may influence the potential demand of road and path infrastructure must be recognised over this time. The following section provides commentary on different factors that may be subject to change and that in turn, may affect the demand for services that rely on these networks. In undertaking this analysis of possible demand, selected Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) information has been used to develop first cut demand projections, as well as Shire documentation and knowledge. The projections will require future revision as the Shire s road and path network knowledge improves. Political Economic Policy Change Local government policy change, as well as state government service reallocation, can often affect the demand for community services. These services then often require infrastructure to support them. Aside from Local Government policy change, demand can be affected by both State and Federal policies. Whilst a number of policies could potentially affect demand, it is thought that those concerning infrastructure funding would potentially have the greatest impact on the Council. For example, a cut in funding would place more pressure on municipal revenue to fund the infrastructure projects. This could result in lower service levels being delivered to stakeholders. Conversely, increases in funding can also have a distinct effect. For example, many grants are often tied into the creation of new assets, or upgrading of existing ones. Where this situation occurs, the Shire will need to fully understand the whole of life cost implications of grant funding. Given that the Shire is not aware of any intended changes to policy that may affect demand, and that major increases in development levels are not expected, it is concluded that policy driven demand will remain unchanged. Demand Change: No change Local Economic Change Anecdotal evidence suggests that the local economy has remained steady for a long period of time. Mining is the biggest industry sector in terms of Gross Value Added (GVA) to the economy. However, the majority of the population within the Shire are employed in the more traditional industries of agriculture and fishing. Tourism is also a significant industry for the Shire. Predicted growth in the tourism and resource industries in the region will see increased demand for new infrastructure and greater wear on existing infrastructure as the population expands. This will likely lead to higher costs to Council as asset lives will be reduced. With the mining boom reportedly set to peak in around 2015, it is expected that the local economy will slow. It is anticipated that the housing industry will continue grow as traditional FIFO workers settle in Irwin due to wage makeup changes.

72 SHIRE OF DANDARAGAN Social As things currently stand, it is predicted that there will be an increase in infrastructure demand from economic sources, principally tourism and mining. Demand Change: Likely increase in demand Shire Financial Capacity Recent studies on WA Local Government suggest that many are not financially sustainable. Subsequent recent changes to the WA Local Government Act are now driving Councils towards measuring and achieving long term financial sustainability. It should be noted that at present it is unclear as to how financially sustainable the Shire of Irwin is. However with an increasing population and foreseeable economic development the outlook appears positive. Therefore, a possible increase in demand could be reasonably expected due to increased Shire financial capacity. Demand Change: Possible increase Shire Resource Capacity In recent years many sectors of the WA economy have felt the squeeze from a highly competitive labour market. This has been exasperated by a strong resource sector, as well as an ageing population. The local government market is certainly not immune to this and over recent years, has certainly had to seriously consider its recruitment and retention practices in order to maintain sufficient staffing levels. With predictions of an increasing population and higher tourist numbers, a key concern is whether the Shire will be able to maintain the provision of its assets and services to the same service level into the future if its resourcing level continues to be further restrained. Further consideration is clearly needed by the Shire to ensure that it can resource the long term management of its assets and services. Demand Change: Likely increase in demand Population Total population figures were sourced from the ABS Regional Population Growth dataset (3218.0), table 5, for the Shire of Irwin local government area. Figure 7-1 contains estimated resident populations from between 2001 and 2011 Ref10.

73 SHIRE OF DANDARAGAN Figure 7-1: ABS Estimated Shire Population Shire Population Change Total Population Year The figures from the ABS show that between 2001 and 2011 the Shire experienced an increase in population by approximately 709 people (23.2%). This represents an average annual rate of population increase of 2.0% over the past ten years. However, in the last five years, the population has grown by an average of 3.3% per year. This makes the Shire one of the fastest growing local governments in the Mid-West Ref13. A noticeable trend in the Mid-West region is the movement of the population from inland shires to the coast, with the Shire of Irwin being one of the key settlement areas Ref13. Population forecasts by Western Australia Tomorrow (February 2012) predict a population of up to 5,300 (Band C) by The population is likely to be concentrated in the Dongara/Port Denison town site, where currently 90% of the Shire s population reside Ref14. Also of note is that the Shire experiences a significant seasonal population, particularly during the summer months, when non-residents reside in the region for a period of time. This seasonal population has been estimated at 25% of the estimated residential population and should be accounted for when considering asset lives Ref14. The statistical data suggests that over the life of this AMP, that significant population change will occur within the Shire of Irwin. Therefore, it is expected that due to an increase in population there will be an effect on infrastructure demand due to population change. Demand Change: Likely increase in demand

74 SHIRE OF DANDARAGAN Demographic Change Figure 8.2 below details the Shire s predicted population age distribution in 2010, as sourced from the ABS National Regional Profile dataset (Table ) Ref Figure 7-2: Shire Population Age Distribution 2010 Shire Population Age Distribution Number Some of the key trends evident in this figure include: The majority of the population is aged (45.4%) A significant decrease in number occurs in the age bracket People aged 65 and above account for approximately 16.5% of the population With an increase in the number of retirees moving to the area and the increase in life expectancy, the median age of the population in the Shire has seen a steady rise from 37 years in 1996, 38 years in 2001 and 42 years in 2006 Ref8. This ageing population is expected to increase the Shire s need for appropriate facilities and infrastructure to cater for this age demographic. This may necessitate significant upgrade or development of infrastructure, as well as possible greater maintenance requirements. With possible future changes in the economic character of the Shire, particularly in regards to the increasing influence of the resource industry, the demographics of the area may shift to include more people in the younger age demographic Ref12. This will require the Shire to provide additional facilities and infrastructure to cater to this demand. Overall, demand is likely to increase with an increasing and ageing population. Demand Change: Likely increase in demand Age Range

75 SHIRE OF DANDARAGAN Tourism Growth The Tourism Forecasting Committee is an independent body charged with providing present and future activity forecasts. Tourism Research Australia also publishes the Forecast publication twice a year with contains forecasts for the next 10 years. Figure 7-3 details the actual and forecasted total number of visitor nights between 2000 and These figures exclude visitors staying in Perth. Between 2011 and 2020, total visitor nights are forecast to grow by 9.26% in total. This represents an increase of 1,820,000 extra visitor nights over this time Ref15. 30,000,000 Figure 7-3: Past &Forecasted WA (non-perth) Annual Visitor Nights Tourism Change 25,000,000 Visitor Nights 20,000,000 15,000,000 10,000,000 Domestic Visitors Inbound Visitors 5,000, Year The Shire is characterised by superb natural and historical assets that provide a strong sense of place and attachment to the inland and marine environment. Tourists and visitors are attracted to the natural environment the sandy beaches, nature trails, wildflowers with higher numbers occurring in the spring and summer months. It is reasonable to expect tourism demand to grow at a rate above that forecasted for the State. With sensible strategic investment into key tourist assets, as well as in assets that contribute to overall town site aesthetics (e.g. well maintained roads), the Shire could see tourism growth figures higher than the expected state average of 9.26% by However, any future tourism growth will be strongly linked to both governmental and private industry investment within the Shire Overall, with predictions of increased tourism, this will result in higher utilisation of infrastructure. This in turn would mean Council will incur higher costs for asset replacement. Demand Change: Likely increase in demand Recreation Change In general, the local communities appear to be satisfied with the sport and recreation facilities available. However, to encourage sport and recreation participation and people s engagement in the community there is a requirement to continually improve and upgrade the existing facilities, as well as access to them.

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