Title: Thomas Jefferson: A good president and a good man. Thomas Jefferson after the Revolutionary War

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1 1 LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PATHWAYS THOMAS JEFFERSON LESSON MODULE By Jacob Grafenberg, Alexis Haislet, Katelyn Hollingshead, Meredith Holm, Larissa Jones and Kelly Larson College of Education University of Northern Iowa Cedar Falls IA Title: Thomas Jefferson: A good president and a good man. Thomas Jefferson after the Revolutionary War Theme: American History Historical Period: American Revolution and After, mrev/ Lesson Module Overview: Students will actively learn about Thomas Jefferson and the role he played in American History. They will be using primary resources from the Library of Congress such as images, documents, and articles. While working through this lesson, the students will learn the impact that Thomas Jefferson had on the United States. They will be asked to imagine the experience during this time period and also to relate the information to the present day United States. Grade Range: Intermediate/Middle Level (3 rd 6 th ) TABLE OF CONTENTS LESSON MODULE DAY 1 Title: Selling Monticello 2 LESSON MODULE DAY 2 Title: The Declaration of Independence: A Closer Look 4 LESSON MODULE DAY 3 Title: Runaway Ad 7 LESSON MODULE DAY 4 Title: Thomas Jefferson s Presidency 9 LESSON MODULE DAY 5 Title: The Expedition of the Louisiana Purchase 12 LESSON MODULE DAY 6 Title: Who Helped Create the University of Virginia? 15 APPENDIX I: Images and Graphic Material 18 APPENDIX II: Bibliography and Webliography 34 APPENDIX III: Louisiana Purchase Scavenger Hunt 36

2 2 Lesson Module DAY 1 Title: Selling Monticello Learning Goals: Knowledge Students will recognize Monticello in photographs and on the nickel. Students will identify features of Monticello. Students will describe the significance of Monticello to Jefferson and America. Skills Students will be able to locate Monticello on a map. Students will create a relater sales pitch to hypothetically sell Monticello with historical facts and features. Dispositions Students will appreciate the rich history of Monticello. National Council for the Social Studies Themes: Time, Continuity, & Change: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the past and its legacy. Power, Authority, & Governance: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people create, interact with, and change structures of power, authority, and governance. Civic Ideals & Practices: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals, principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic. Materials Needed Cornerstones of Freedom: Monticello by Norman Richards (Appendix II) Whiteboard Classroom set of computers Sources from Primary Resources (Appendix I) Misc. craft items for projects (optional) Lesson Procedures: Introduction 1. Show students the back of a nickel and ask if they know what it is a picture of.

3 3 Development Culmination Assessment 2. Tell students if they do not know that it is Monticello and if they do not know what it is then they will learn about it in the book Cornerstones of Freedom: Monticello by Norman Richards. 3. After reading the book have students brainstorm a list together (write their answers on the board) of what they learned from the book. 4. Show students where Monticello is on a map. 1. Show students the image of Monticello from the Library of Congress. 2. Let students navigate through (and take notes) on the Explore Monticello website. 3. Have students read the Newspaper article from the Colfax Chronicle. 4. As a class have another class discussion about what students learned from the website and the newspaper article. 1. Make sure students know Monticello is owned by Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation. 2. Put students in pairs or groups of Explain to them they now work for a relater agency and their job is to try and sell Monticello. 4. Students can do further research as needed. 1. Students will show what they know about Monticello by creating a way to sell Monticello to potential buyers. 2. Projects can include but are not limited to Brochure Diorama/ tour Oral presentation/sales pitch 3. Projects must include history of Monticello and its structural features and why it is important to America and American history (for example the amount of land and number of rooms).

4 4 Lesson Module DAY 2 Title: The Declaration of Independence: A Closer Look Learning Goals: Knowledge: Students will define more closely what the Declaration of Independence is. Students will determine the meaning of some of the passages in the Declaration of Independence. Students will familiarize themselves with why our nation wanted a Declaration of Independence. Skills: Students will collaboratively work together in groups to find the meanings behind the Declaration. Students will illustrate their findings with a poster of Great Britain s way of going about life verses the newly independent way of going about life. Dispositions: Students will begin to develop the ability to discover abstract thoughts, presenting higher order thinking skills, and really uncover the meaning behind the Declaration of Independence. National Council for the Social Studies Themes: Time, Continuity, & Change: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the past and its legacy. Power, Authority, & Governance: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people create, interact with, and change structures of power, authority, and governance. Civic Ideals & Practices: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals, principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic. Materials Needed: Primary Source picture The Declaration signing (Appendix I) Primary Source picture A copy of the Declaration of Independence (Appendix I) The book, The Journey of the One and Only Declaration of Independence by Judith St. George Judith (Appendix II) A readable text of the Declaration of Independence (Appendix II) Construction paper Writing paper Markers, crayons, colored pencils

5 5 Lesson Procedures: Introduction 1. Split the class into 4 groups (this may vary depending on class size). On an overhead screen or on the white board pull up the two primary source pictures. 2. Have the group s together work on what they think these two pictures are of and their meanings. Have them write it down on one piece of paper. The groups can decide a writer. 3. After giving the groups a couple of minutes, explain to them that a book is going to be read to see if their questions are answered. Proceed to reading the book, The Journey of the One and Only Declaration of Independence by Judith St. George. 4. Once the reading is complete, ask each group to answer these inquiry based questions again on a sheet of paper. What was the Declaration of Independence? Who were some important people involved? Who were the 13 colonies trying to gain independence from? 5. Have the groups share by calling on students who raise their hands. 6. Go back to the pictures put up in the beginning of the lesson and explain them more in detail just in case some students are not following along as well. Explain to them that one picture is an actual copy of part of the Declaration and the other picture is a picture of them signing the document which we celebrate on July 4 th. Development 1. Show the students the readable text of the Declaration explaining to them we are not going to read this whole document because it is very challenging and overwhelming. Explain that they are going to as groups look at parts deeply to try and distinguish a meaning. 2. Tell the students that each group will receive a line from the document where they are to collaborate and come up with a meaning. 3. They will portray their meaning through a poster. One side will be Great Britain s meaning and the other side will be what the independent states received from the Declaration of Independence. 4. Teacher s example could be: For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us Great Britain s side would be that they controlled everyone with swarmed amounts of armed troops everywhere. Independent side would be that now the 13 states have freedom from such a controlling atmosphere. Here they could draw a picture of large amounts of troops and then an American Flag to show freedom.

6 6 5. The 4 groups would be given the following passages from the document Group 1 For imposing Taxes on us without our Consent Group 2 He has plundered our seas, ravaged our coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people Group 3 For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world Group 4 For transporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences 6. The teacher will circulate the room helping out and giving ideas where needed just in case the group is steering the wrong direction. The groups should be working together to try and define a meaning from these passages. 7. Once they have derived a meaning, they will portray it on construction paper with markers, crayons, and or colored pencils. Culmination 1. Once teacher has given ample amount of time or seen that most groups are finishing up, she will proceed to the next part of the lesson. 2. Each group will take turns coming to the front of the room and sharing their passage and their meaning represented on their poster. 3. The teacher will talk about it to the class and help the children understand what the passages mean. 4. The teacher will then answer any questions that still are of concern to the students. Assessment 1. The first assessment was their poster. Based on the book reading, the primary source pictures, and discussion, they were to illustrate a poster with the meaning of a passage from the Declaration of Independence in mind. 2. Their second assessment will take place the next day following the lesson so they will have time to take in all this new information. They will be asked to write 1 important fact they learned, 1 passage they learned the meaning of from the posters, and 1 interesting idea they will take from this lesson.

7 7 LESSON MODULE DAY 3 Title: Runaway Ad Learning Goals: Knowledge Students will understand the term slavery. Students will learn about Thomas Jefferson s perspective on slavery and the role he played. Skills Students will perform in a role play and act out different scenarios provided for them. Students will analyze and create a runaway slave advertisement that people used in the south. Dispositions Students will be able to examine other points of view and form their own opinion about slavery and Thomas Jefferson s role. National Council for the Social Studies Themes: Time, Continuity, & Change: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the past and its legacy. Power, Authority, & Governance: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people create, interact with, and change structures of power, authority, and governance. Civic Ideals & Practices: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals, principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic. Materials Needed: Scenarios Markers/Crayons Pencil Paper Examples of Advertisements (Appendix II) Copy of Effects of Slavery (Cleveland Gazette) (Appendix I) Copy of African American Perspectives by Daniel Goodloe (Appendix II) Lesson Procedures: Introduction 1. To begin our introduction to slavery, we will fill out a KWL chart. (Know, Want to Know, Learned) The class will share their prior knowledge about slavery and also share information that they would like to know during the lesson.

8 8 2. I will introduce the definition of slavery. We will look at photographs and books to help explain the time period. (Resources above) 3. Students will be grouped in groups of four or five. They will be given a scenario that they will act out in front of their class. The scenarios will be: *You are a well treated slave that becomes a part of your master s family. You never think about running away because all of your necessities are met. You wonder how your brothers and sisters are doing and hope they have it as good as you do, however, do you go look for them? *You are a poor treated slave. You are whipped and work all day long. You don t know if you will be able to eat and are very afraid of your master. You think about running away, but don t know what to do. *You are Thomas Jefferson. You own a few slaves because you know they are valuable to your land. You have considered ending slavery and think slavery makes people afraid, but you also see the potential in slaves. What should you do? *You are a Caucasian person living in the south. You do not own any slaves and don t plan on owning any. You feel bad for the slaves that work in the field all day long. You know some slaves are trying to escape. Do you open up your home to runaways or keep yourself safe? Development 1. We will begin examining an advertisement by Thomas Jefferson on a runaway slave. Ad/ 2. As a class, we will discuss the language used in the advertisement, what we know about the slave from reading this document, and what we might know about Thomas Jefferson from this document. 3. After reviewing this advertisement, the students will create their own advertisement. The advertisement can be from a slave owner s perspective, a slave s perspective, or a non slave owner who lives in the south. 4. The students will create this activity individually and use resources to gain ideas, as well as using their own creativity. Culmination 1. Share student s advertisements with the class. Share what perspective they were coming from and why they choose that. 2. Post the student s advertisements around the room. Encourage students to look at their peer s posters and how they would feel if they were living back in that time period. 3. There will be a designated book shelf that has several resources regarding slavery and Thomas Jefferson. Students will be able to read documents relating to the content and lesson. Assessment 1. Ask students to write a one page paper on their feelings about slavery. In the paper, they need to include why they believe slavery was a good or bad idea, what they would do if they were living in the south during the slave period, and why they think Thomas Jefferson was or was not an important figure in slavery history.

9 9 LESSON MODULE DAY 4 Title: Thomas Jefferson s Presidency Learning Goals: Knowledge The students will recognize Thomas Jefferson as the third president of the United States. The learner will be able to identify accomplishments of Thomas Jefferson Skills Students will participate in researching information about Thomas Jefferson s Presidency The learner will begin utilizing different types of primary sources such as images, documents, political cartoons, and posters Dispositions Students will develop an opinion on what they believe was Thomas Jefferson s greatest accomplishments were during his years of presidency. National Council for the Social Studies Themes: Time, Continuity, & Change: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the past and its legacy. Power, Authority, & Governance: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people create, interact with, and change structures of power, authority, and governance. Civic Ideals & Practices: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals, principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic. Materials: Student Journals Resources for students to look through about Thomas Jefferson Presidency (Appendix II) Computer Copies of Primary Sources from Lesson Module (Appendix I) with information about the source copied on the back of the document

10 10 Lesson Procedures: Introduction 1. Show the class the primary source document image of Thomas Jefferson. Ask them if they know who the man in the picture is. 2. Depending on the students responses move your conversation into what they know about Jefferson if anything. President from Louis and Clark Expedition Monticello Statute of Virginia Religious Freedom 3. Briefly tell the students about Thomas Jefferson and some of his accomplishments before his presidency. I.e. The Declaration of Independence. Development 1. The students will write a short biography When/Where he was born. When he died What number of president he was for the United States One interesting fact that they found about Thomas Jefferson. 2. Explain to the students that after they find all the above information, they are going to make a timeline of the accomplishments that Jefferson had made during the time of his presidency. 3. Make sure the students are aware that they should only be looking for accomplishments starting in 1801 and ending in The students will find at least three or more accomplishments of Jefferson s and put them in chronological order underneath their biography they have created. 5. Ask the students if they have questions at this point about the assignment. 6. Prepare the students that they will learn about Thomas Jefferson over the next couple of sessions therefore, it is important to understand who he is and what he has done for our country. Culmination 1. Have the students present to the class the one interesting fact that they found about Thomas Jefferson. 2. After all the students have present their interesting fact have the students share one of the accomplishments they found that Thomas Jefferson had Achieved during his presidency 3. Once they complete their discussion ask the students if they had any questions about Jefferson s presidency that they did not find and would like to know more about. Make sure you write these down so you can come back to them in the future. 4.

11 11 Assessment 1. Once the students have completed the timeline and biography and turned them into the teacher, ask the students to write in their journals about what they have learned. 2. Ask the students to write what number of president Jefferson was and to choose ONE of the accomplishments they found or heard from a classmate that they felt was important to our country and explain why. This will show what information they retained about the research of Jefferson s presidency and what they felt was the most important. 3. Evaluate the journals and timeline to check for students understanding. One important thing to look for is the student s ability to find information and achievements that were only during Jefferson s presidency.

12 12 Lesson Module DAY 5 Title: The Expedition of the Louisiana Purchase Learning Goals: Knowledge Students will understand the impact of the Louisiana Purchase. Students will learn how the purchase was important for the expansion of the west. Students will know how the geography of the United States has changed with the purchase. Skills Students will compare a map of the United States right after the Louisiana Purchase and a map of present day United States. Students will explore sources to complete a scavenger hunt based off of the Louisiana Purchase. Dispositions Students will see the importance of the Louisiana Purchase in the early 1800 s as well as the current day to help them see how the past relates with the present. National Council for the Social Studies Themes: TIME, CONTINUITY, AND CHANGE: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the past and its legacy. INDIVIDUALS, GROUPS, AND INSTITUTIONS: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups, and institutions. PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION, AND CONSUMPTION: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people organize for the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services. Materials Needed: Map of current United States (Appendix I) Map of United States in the early 1800 s (Appendix I) Copy of Louisiana Purchase by Peter and Connie Roop (Appendix II) The Louisiana Purchase (Appendix II) Louisiana Purchase Scavenger Hunt Writing Utensils A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation (Appendix II)

13 13 Lesson Procedures: Introduction 1. I will start off by gaining the students attention by reading a section of the Louisiana Purchase by Peter and Connie Roop. I will see what knowledge they have about the United States in the past, especially about the land that it occupied. 2. I will then group the students into groups of 3 or 4 and give them all the same scenario. 3. I will tell them that they are in the process of buying a new area of land to add to their town, Sheepsville. I will tell them that This land is very important to help your town grow and you need to be careful about what you buy. (This will help them become more knowledgeable about the environment around them) 4. I will have them think individually for a couple minutes on what they feel is important when buying a new land. This will help them grow intellectually as an individual. 5. They will then share their ideas and possible brainstorm briefly for more ideas and create a list of the things that they would want in the new piece of land and make sure they know why they want those things. 6. I will then have the students share what they had on their list to the class. Development 1. I will then tell them that they are going to be taking an expedition through the Louisiana Purchase with a partner. 2. They are going to be looking through a variety of resources and compare maps of the United States to complete a scavenger hunt. 3. They will be given hard copies of the different maps to use as well as the questions to the scavenger hunt. They will not be given a hard copy of the article, but will be given the URL to the website. 4. There is a bonus question at the bottom of the scavenger hunt that, if time permits, they will go out and find their own resource to answer the question. Culmination 1. The student s will then share their answers, having a slight debate if answers are not agreed upon. 2. They will then share what they came up with for the bonus question (if they got to that point) and share how those things are part of our society today. 3. After discussing these things, I asked them what they learned by doing this and go over major points of the lesson. 4. I will post the lists that the students made in the classroom so all of the students can see what is important for our society to grow. Assessment 1. I will have the students write a paragraph explaining why they think the Louisiana Purchase was important for the United States based on what they learned.

14 2. I am not looking for specific things in these paragraphs, but more of a broad explanation showing they learned something. 3. I will also assess the students while they are working. Interaction is very important and I want to make sure that everyone is being involved and cooperating. 14

15 15 LESSON MODULE DAY 6 Title: Who Helped Create the University of Virginia? Learning Goals: Knowledge Students will understand why Thomas Jefferson wanted to build a college in his home state what it meant to him once it became reality. Students will develop an understanding of how the University of Virginia was founded and what work went into Thomas Jefferson creating the college. Students will begin to recognize the buildings that Thomas Jefferson designed for the University of Virginia campus. Skills Students will participate in a virtual tour of the Rotunda, the lawns, and the pavilions through the University of Virginia website. Students will begin exploring various types of primary sources such as images and posters. Dispositions Students will begin to develop an ability to evaluate multiple perspectives, think critically about the past, and grapple with the complexity of historical ideas. National Council for the Social Studies Themes: Time, Continuity, & Change: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the past and its legacy. Power, Authority, & Governa nce: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of how people create, interact with, and change structures of power, authority, and everyday life. Civic Ideals & Practices: Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the ideals, principles, and practices of citizenship in a democratic republic. Materials Needed: Paper Pencils Computer Internet Access Online Encyclopedias Box Bulletin Board

16 16 Primary Resources from the Library of Congress (Appendix I) =browse&recnum=0&title2=university%20of%20virginia,%20pavilion%20iv,%20east% 20Lawn,%20University%20of%20Virginia%20campus,%20Charlottesville,%20VA&displa ytype=1&maxcols=2 Lesson Procedures: Introduction 1. Hook the students by asking them to raise their hair if they are thinking about going to college someday? After students are done raising their hands tell them that we are going to go on a college visit today! 2. Ask them what colleges they would like to go to? Talk with the class how there are many different colleges out there to choose from and we need to go on college visits to know what we want in a school. Go on to ask the students what they think are important items to take into consideration when looking at a college. 3. From there take them on the virtual tour of the Rotunda, lawns, and the pavilions that Thomas Jefferson designed. Development 1. Write on the board the following historical inquiry questions: What were Thomas Jefferson s reasons to build a college in Virginia? What are some of the building and structures that Thomas Jefferson designed to be located on the campus of the University of Virginia? (name more than two) 2. Go over any questions that students might have relating to the questions that are posed to them. 3. Support the student s development and understanding of the any questions that they have proposed. Try and answer them as best as possible using the computer and online encyclopedia without answering the questions that the students are working on. 4. Allow time for the students to use any resources they can think of the help answer the questions that are proposed. Let the students work in small groups no larger than 3 or 4 people in the group. 5. After ample time of searching for answers to the questions bring the class back to a whole group and go over the groups answers they came up with and write down the answers on the chalk board. 6. Once the students have answered the questions to the best of their knowledge expand on the information that is covered including the years that Thomas Jefferson was creating the University and his hopes and dreams. 7. Show past and current pictures of the buildings and gardens that Thomas Jefferson designed when planning the University while talking about the different locations.

17 17 8. Inform the students that planning and under seeing the construction of the University of Virginia was one of the last things that Thomas Jefferson did in the public eye. Culmination 1. Create a space in the classroom with the primary sources in the lesson plan a other pictures of the University of Virginia. Have these posted on a bulletin board. Do not label them. 2. Unveil the board after working through the lesson and encourage the students to look at the pictures during appropriate times of the day and to guess what buildings were designed by Thomas Jefferson based on the information that we learned about today in class. 3. Have a box there that the students can use to put their predictions in when they are done guessing what buildings were designed by Thomas Jefferson. Assessment 1. Ask the student to complete a Check Out Slip where they will write two things that they learned about Thomas Jefferson s involvement in the creating and establishment of the University of Virginia. Also have them write down one question that they have about what they had learned today.

18 18 APPENDIX I IMAGES AND GRAPHIC MATERIAL FROM THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 1. Image: The Colfax chronicle., December 14, 1912, Image 8. Newspaper article on the restoration of Monticello by Congressman Jefferson

19 19 2. Image: Monticello, Virginia. Front of Monticello from right with reflection in pool, horizontal II. Photograph of the front of Monticello.

20 20 3. Image: Part of the original first draft of the Declaration of Independence. The line, We Hold These Truths To Be Self Evident, is showed in this clip of the document. Thomas Jefferson ( )

21 21 4. Image: The Declaration of Independence The actual signing of the Declaration of Independence. 1912

22 22 5. Image: An article from the Cleveland Gazette that talks about the effects of slavery. Written in 1884.

23 23 6. Pamphlets: A collection of the writings of the most eminent southern statesmen of the Revolutionary War period, designed to show that such men as Washington, Jefferson, Henry Clay, etc., abhorred slavery even though many of the South.

24 24 7. Image: Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States. Elected president in Born Born: April 13 (April 2, Old Style), 1743, Shadwell, VirginiaDied: July 4, 1826, Monticello, Virginia.

25 25 8. Image: The Thomas Jefferson Papers Series 1. General Correspondence Thomas Jefferson, March 4, 1801, Draft of First Inauguration

26 26 9. Image: Diagram of the United States Before the Louisiana Purchase, 1784

27 Image: The Area That Was Gained With the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 (2011) Resource:

28 Image: The Present Day United States of America, 2006

29 Image: A picture of the whole lawn and Rotunda of the University of Virginia

30 Image: A picture of the Rotunda at the heart of the University of Virginia, designed by Thomas Jefferson

31 Image: Picture of the Rotunda from the front on view on the University of Virginia.

32 Image: Image of one of the gardens on the University of Virginia s campus designed by Thomas Jefferson.

33 Drawings: Building plans for the construction of the Rotunda and the pavilion on the camps of the University of Virginia.

34 34 Bibliography of Children s Literature APPENDIX II BIBLIOGRAPHY AND WEBLIGRAPHY OF RESOURCES FOR STUDENTS AND TEACHERS Bibliography Roop, Peter, and Connie Roop. The Louisiana Purchase. New York: Aladdin, Print George, Judith St. (2005). The Journey of the One and Only Declaration of Independence. New York: Philomel. Richards, N. (1995). Cornerstones of freedom: Monticello. Chicago, IL: Children's Press. Monticello today (2011). In Monticello explorer. Retrieved July 15, 2011, from =&lid=166 The Declaration of Independence: The Want, Will, and Hopes of the People "A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: U.S. Congressional Documents and Debates, " Treasury Department. Web. <http://memory.loc.gov/cgibin/ampage?collid=llsp&filename=034/llsp034.db&recnum=327>. "LOUISIANA: EUROPEAN EXPLORATIONS AND THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE." Library of Congress, Pp Web. <http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/maps/lapurchase/lapurchase.pdf>. "Ohiohistory.org / The African American Experience in Ohio, " Under Construction. Web. 17 July <http://dbs.ohiohistory.org/africanam/page1.cfm?itemid=14410>. American Memory / African American Perspectives: Pamphlets from the Daniel A.P.Murray Collection, Web. 17 July Webliography of Supporting Online Resources for Students Go West Across America With Lewis and Clark This is an interactive game that takes you on the adventure of the Louisiana area with Lewis and Clark. The students will be asked to make decisions that will help them make life choices. Library of Congress: Timeline of Thomas Jefferson: Timeline that outlines many accomplishments throughout Thomas Jefferson s life. The events that are posted range from

35 35 University of Virginia Kids and Families A website designed for children based on the colors of the University of Virginia. In the website it includes a child friendly version history of the college. Monticello This is a fun interactive website students can use to learn more about Monticello. There is so much information and students can explore the house and plantations. The details offer a lot. =&lid=166 Webliography of Supporting Online Resources for Teachers The Lewis and Clark Expedition This website had a lot of links to lessons that teachers can use about the Louisiana Purchase. These lessons range from Thomas Jefferson s process on signing the treaty to Lewis and Clark s expedition. clark/index.html Monticello Lesson Plan "Lesson Plans from Monticello: Runaway Ad Using Primary Documents." Welcome to Monticello Classroom! Web. 18 July <http://classroom.monticello.org/teachers/lessons/lesson/228/runaway Ad Using Primary Documents/>. The The Library of Congress: The African American Experience in Ohio An article from the Cleveland Gazette that talks about the effects of slavery. Written in The Library of Congress: African American Perspectives: Pamphlets from the Daniel A.P. Murray Collection, A collection of the writings of the most eminent southern statesmen of the Revolutionary War period, designed to show that such men as Washington, Jefferson, Henry Clay, etc., abhorred slavery even though many of them were slave owners. Designed as an antislavery statement to the people of the South.

36 36 APPENDIX III LOUISIANA PURCHASE SCAVENGER HUNT (LESSON 5) 1. How many present day states make up the area that was gained in the Louisiana Purchase? 2. Name at least 3 of them. a. b. c. 3. What was the treaty called that gave the Louisiana area to France? 4. Who was the Emperor of France in the beginning of the treaty to buy the Louisiana area? 5. Name 2 reasons France wanted to sell the Louisiana area to the United States. a. b. 6. How much did the United States buy the Louisiana area for? 7. How much is this per acre? 8. What was the digest that Thomas Jefferson made called? 9. What did it have in it? 10. In what year did the Louisiana area become part of the United States? 11. Who was the president of the United States when they purchased the Louisiana area?

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