CP-16.07, Proposal to Establish the Post-Baccalaureate Campus Certificate in Foundations of College Instruction

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1 Academic Program Development 2614 University Hall (MC 103) 601 South Morgan Street Chicago, Illinois March 29, 2016 TO: FROM: RE: Ilene Harris, Chair Senate Committee on Educational Policy Dana Wright, Director of Academic Program Development CP-16.07, Proposal to Establish the Post-Baccalaureate Campus Certificate in Foundations of College Instruction At the SCEP meeting of March 3, 2016, the Proposal to Establish the Post-Baccalaureate Campus Certificate in College Teaching was reviewed. Overall, members of SCEP noted that graduate students would benefit from coursework and organized training in this area of effective college teaching. However, SCEP moved to table the proposal until the proposers could respond to a number of questions/concerns which were forwarded on March 4, Attached you will find the questions/concerns sent to proposers John Coumbe-Lilley and Steve Kragon, as well as their responses and the revised proposal. Please note the certificate has been renamed as the Campus Certificate in Foundations of College Instruction. Finally, as a reminder, the certificate will be administered by the Graduate College, and the Graduate College Executive Committee approved the certificate on February 19, 2016 ATTACHMENT

2 Wright, Dana C From: Sent: To: Cc: Subject: Wright, Dana C Friday, March 04, :59 PM Kragon, Steven; Coumbe-Lilley, John Edward Harris, Ilene B; Corte, Anthony M 3/3/2016 SCEP Meeting Followup John and Steve, I am writing to follow up on yesterday s SCEP meeting and discussion related to the Proposal to Establish the Campus Certificate in College Teaching. There was robust discussion about this proposal. Overall, members of SCEP believe that graduate students would benefit from coursework and organized training in this area of effective college teaching. However, SCEP did have some concerns about this proposal that are summarized below. Action on the proposal has been tabled until it is amended to address the following: 1. There is significant concern that the certificate title implies that a level of teacher certification/credentialing has been achieved. SCEP strongly recommends that you modify the title so that prospective students and future employers of program alumni are not mislead into thinking that the program provides the same level of preparation and expertise as, say, achieving certification in secondary teaching. One suggestion was Campus Certificate in Fundamentals of College Instruction. But you may find alternative labels used by comparable programs at other institutions (e.g., UConn offers a graduate certificate in college instruction). 2. Additional explanation of how the certificate s learning outcomes (identified on page 5 of the proposal) and course learning outcomes for GC 592, 593 and 594 are achieved, particularly in regards to: o How supervision and feedback/assessment is conducted within the practicum (GC 594) o How instruction for the major topics of the seminar (GC 592) result in achieving course learning outcomes. As listed in the CRS record/appendix III, instruction focused on in the major topics appears to be done using lecture formats, on unspecified best practices. Members of SCEP were concerned that lecture-based instruction would generally not be viewed as a best practice in instruction. Also, what will/might be the focus of content for each week? It may be useful to include in the proposal course syllabi in their entirety or cite syllabi content directly. 3. The proposal states that the certificate would be open to qualified non-degree students holding a bachelor s degree. (See page 4). Please clarify how the program defines qualified. For example, would the student have to be currently enrolled as a graduate student and be actively working as a TA? 4. Finally, SCEP requests that the proposal be reviewed by someone in the College of Education for their feedback and that their recommendations be incorporated into the proposal. Two names were suggested Carole Mitchener (Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction) or Maria Varelas (Director, Center for the Advancement of Teaching-Learning Communities and Professor of Curriculum and Instruction). 1

3 When I am back in the office this weekend, I will send the Word version of the proposal and Appendix III reviewed by SCEP. Please make revisions to this iteration, using the Track Changes feature, or other mechanism for emphasizing new and/or revised content. A revised proposal can be sent to me at your convenience, and I will work to see that it is added to a future SCEP agenda for review and action. However, please keep in mind the following dates: The next and last SCEP meeting for the academic year will be held April 6. If you would like the proposal to be added to that agenda, please submit your revisions no later than Thursday, March 24. If you have any questions about SCEP s request, I am sure that Chairperson Ilene Harris and External Education Subcommittee Chairperson Tony Corte would be happy to speak with you. As such I have copied them for ease of routing inquiries via . I am also happy to provide whatever additional assistance I can. Best, Dana Dana C. Wright Director of Academic Program Development UIC Office of Programs and Academic Assessment

4 To: Dana Wright, and Members of SCEP From: John Coumbe-Lilley, PhD Steven Kragon, Executive Assistant Dean, Graduate College Reference: Response to SCEP Concerns with the Proposal for the Post-Baccalaureate Campus Certificate in Fundamentals of College Instruction Date: Friday, March 25, 2016 Item one: Change of program title Concern presented, SCEP 3/3/16 1. There is significant concern that the "certificate" title implies that a level of teacher certification/credentialing has been achieved. SCEP strongly recommends that you modify the title so that prospective students and future employers of program alumni are not mislead into thinking that the program provides the same level of preparation and expertise as, say, achieving certification in secondary teaching. One suggestion was "Campus Certificate in Fundamentals of College Instruction". But you may find alternative labels used by comparable programs at other institutions (e.g., UConn offers a graduate certificate in college instruction. Response 1.1 The proposed renaming of the certificate to Certificate in Fundamentals of College Instruction is accepted and the proposal has been modified as such. The operating title of this program should not and does not confer confirmation of certain characteristics provided by some form of external review, education, assessment, or audit, nor should it be assumed accreditation by a specific organization's process of certification has occurred. The proposed title of this program serves to communicate the fact that each individual completing the proposed sequence of courses has done so for the purpose of preparing themselves to teach at an institution of higher education. It does not and should not be assumed that any form of licensure or credential is attached to this program. This is not the intention of this program of study. The committee is reminded that Dr. Coumbe-Lilley was one of the last graduate students to earn the College Teaching Preparation Program Certificate operated by the Teaching and Learning Center that was led by Jim Peirce, PhD, and subsequently shuttered and resources reallocated in the early to middle part of the previous decade. This effort has been reignited by the leadership of Maria Varelas, PhD Director, Center for the Advancement of Teaching-Learning Communities and Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. Dr. Coumbe-Lilley is regularly briefed on Dr. Varelas efforts having recommended his faculty participate in the TLC effort and his longtime colleague Jane Marone, MD, being one of the master teachers working with Dr. Varelas. 1

5 This certificate serves to redefine and replace the effort Dr. Pierce led and formalize and document the efforts of graduate students to enhance their professional skills. Item two: Supervision in GC 594; Learning Outcomes GC 592 Concern presented, SCEP 3/3/16 Additional explanation of how the certificate's learning outcomes (identified on page 5 of the proposal) and course learning outcomes for GC 592, 593 and 594 are achieved, particularly in regards to: 1. How supervision and feedback/assessment is conducted within the practicum GC 594) 2. How instruction for the major topics of the seminar (GC 592) result in achieving course learning outcomes. As listed in the CRS record/appendix III, instruction focused on in the major topics appears to be done using "lecture" formats, on unspecified best practices. Members of SCEP were concerned that lecture-based instruction would generally not be viewed as a best practice in instruction. Also, what will/might be the focus of content for each week? Response 2.1 (GC 594) This course is designed from an action learning perspective which means individuals set goals for themselves; self-evaluate the structure, processes and outcomes achieved by their teaching before they attend class. When they attend class they are grouped and use a debrief process which means they systematically present their experience and the challenges they faced in the week prior to the course. The group listens and then uses an inquiry led approach to help the individual identify their own solutions first before offering theirs. The individual student documents their own solutions and their peers suggestions and prepares for their next week of teaching by crafting a new action plan. This approach is similar to the plan-do-study-act cycle found in quality improvement approaches used in a variety of settings. The individual raises their awareness to their own performance improvement with the assistance of the group overseen and facilitated by the course instructor. If an individual was to observe this class in action they would witness a highly interactive and engaged workshop-like process focused on identifying challenges to teaching and solving problems college educators face. Essentially, this is an organic reflexive approach to learning grounded in the individuals own experience. The syllabus for this course demonstrates the approach applied on a week to week basis. Response 2.2 (GC 592) We agree with the criticism of the committee and we would not offer a best practice class if a didactic approach was the primary method of instruction. The processes for the course are outlined below and borrowed from the course syllabus version 1. 2

6 Teaching methods used in this course Guest Lecturers A number of award winning college teachers will be invited to the present to the class. The speakers will present for about minutes using a systematic format. There will be a ten minute break and then the instructor will facilitate an open floor discussion between the presenter and the students for about 30 minutes. The final phase of the class will be a guided reflection on the session that took place. Speakers will be asked to follow the following inquiry format. 1. What is your field and why do you love it? 2. What made you start teaching? 3. How does your teaching in your field make the world a better place? 4. What was your first semester/year of teaching like? 5. What were the toughest hurdles you faced in your early teaching career? 6. What have been your greatest successes as a college teacher? 7. What are your favorite ways to engage diverse student populations? 8. What have students taught you about teaching? 9. What are three things you recommend prospective college educators do to prepare themselves to teach in higher education? 10. What legacy do you hope to leave through your teaching? Reflection Papers Students will write reflection papers for each class that will be periodically updated based upon what they learn in class and gain through their own experiences. Teaching Philosophy Statement Students will develop a draft of a teaching philosophy statement fairly early in the class and continue to revise the statement throughout the term. The methods used in this course are to bridge the gap between science and practice. The teaching approaches used in this course are designed to increase knowledge retention, transfer and application by using, but not limited to, the following ways of reproducing and producing knowledge and application: Lecture; video/dvd viewing with critical discussion; individual study; individual/group presentation; case study criticism; student led questioning; assigned reading; group project work; role playing; 2-minute short answer responses; class discussion; group discussion etc. Note: Course syllabi for GC 592, 593 and 594 are now included in the appendix of the proposal. 3

7 Item three: Admission Non-degree Concern presented, SCEP 3/3/16 The proposal states that the certificate would be open to qualified non-degree students holding a bachelor s degree. (See page 4). Please clarify how the program defines qualified. For example, would the student have to be currently enrolled as a graduate student and be actively working as a TA? Response 3.1 The intent of the proposal is to allow any graduate student who meets the admission requirements to be admitted to the certificate program. The following categories of students are anticipated to be interested in the certificate: Current UIC graduate students in degree programs who will concurrently hold teaching assistantships. This is believed to be the largest category of students who will be interested in the certificate. Graduate students in programs where teaching availability is either limited or nonexistent (e.g. PhD programs in the College of Medicine). There are examples of highly sought recruits who turned down fully-funded offers (research appointments at $29,000 annually) due to the lack of teaching opportunity, as their future employment will require experience in teaching. Postdocs at UIC who would apply as nondegree graduate students. (At least one postdoc sought nondegree admission in order to take GC 593, and offered extensive compliments on the content of the course and how it will aid her career path.) Students and postdocs from other institutions who would apply as nondegree students (for the certificate). All applicants to the certificate will have to submit a Supplemental Application on which they will be required to supply the following information: Past and present teaching experience. Whether the applicant will have an active teaching assistantship or related activity when enrolled in GC 594, Practicum in College Teaching. If the applicant will not have a teaching assistantship while enrolled in this course, they need to submit information explaining what experiences the student will use to complete the practicum course. The applicant is encouraged to consult with the program director prior to submitting the supplemental application. Applicants who have active teaching assistantships will not need any special consideration for admission. Applicants who do not have active teaching assistantships (whether UIC degree-seeking, a postdoc or an applicant external to UIC) will have their Supplemental Application form 4

8 reviewed by the program director to determine if they are admissible. Applicants without an active teaching assistantship will be encouraged to consult with the program director before submitting their application discuss their proposed plan to ensure that their plan is adequate for admission. Item four: College if Education Feedback Concern presented, SCEP 3/3/16 Finally, SCEP requests that the proposal be reviewed by someone in the College of Education for their feedback and that their recommendations be incorporated into the proposal. Two names were suggested Carole Mitchener (Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction) or Maria Varelas (Director, Center for the Advancement of Teaching-Learning Communities and Professor of Curriculum and Instruction). Response 4.1 The proposal was edited and revised as per SCEP suggestions (items 1-3 above) and presented to Maria Varelas (Director, Center for the Advancement of Teaching-Learning Communities and Professor of Curriculum and Instruction) for review. Dr. Varelas shared the proposal with Carole Mitchener (Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction). Dr. Varelas comments follow the pasted below. From: Maria Varelas Sent: Thursday, March 24, :01 PM To: Steve Kragon Subject: Re: GC Certificate Looks good, Steve. I don t have anything to add. Thanks for sharing it with me. Best, Maria. Maria Varelas, PhD Professor of Science Education & Director of the UIC Center for the Advancement of Teaching-Learning Communities Department of Curriculum & Instruction College of Education The University of Illinois at Chicago 3513 ETMSW, MC W. Harrison St. Chicago, IL (312)

9 On Mar 23, 2016, at 4:34 PM, Steve Kragon wrote: Hello Maria, Attached is what I compiled from our phone conversation. Please look it over and let me know if I misrepresented anything, or if there is something you need added. Would it be possible to receive your response tomorrow? Thank you. Steven Kragon Ph: <Review of Proposal for the Certificate in Foundations of College Instruction Dr Varelas.docx> Review of Graduate College Proposal for the Certificate in Foundations of College Instruction (CFCI) by Dr. Maria Varelas (transcribed by Steven Kragon, Graduate College, and verified by Dr. Varela) Course numbering and sequence in which students take courses GC 593 (Foundations) is the core course where the students are exposed to the basics, background, pedagogy and theory. In terms of sequence, it should be most advantageous for students to begin with 593 so that they can draw from and apply what they learned in order to create a more interactive and robust discussion with the guest speakers in GC 592 (Seminar). If the students take 592 first, they won t have the grounding in the subject to get as much out of what the guest speakers present at the seminar, and bring out informed interactions with the guests. The above bullet then brings the issue of the initial course (593) numbered higher than the second course (592), although that is not a major concern. Agrees that practicum (594) should be last. Graduate College Comment: Revised proposal so that GC 593 is the recommended first course. Students will have the order they complete their courses tracked to confirm progress, and profile student registration order preference, the purpose of which is to offer the courses in ways that meet student needs. 6

10 Mode of delivery proposal section 12 Suggest that the word hybrid be deleted from GC 593 and 594, leaving face-to-face and flipped instruction Suggest that the same description be used for GC 592 o It is thought that having student potentially reviewing, for example, video of the guest teaching, or showing a particular point, on video, which would be watched before class, would allow for more fruitful discussions. Graduate College Comment: Suggestions incorporated into the proposal. Effect on other units proposal section 11 Clarify that the courses in the certificate (especially GC 593) are allowable as free electives for graduate degrees, as determined by the Directors of Graduate Studies Graduate College Comment: Suggestion incorporated into the proposal. Budget Think about enrollment and the desired maximum enrollment for each course before a new section should be opened, in relation to budgetary constraints. Graduate College Comment: The desired maximum enrollment for effective teaching for each of the three courses is 25. The Graduate College will monitor demand and plan accordingly, opening a new section if warranted and if within budget. Syllabus GC 592 Appendix I-A With the understanding that any syllabus is not necessarily an exact reflection of what occurs, it is recommended that some of the material described in weeks 9-15 be moved to earlier in the term, before the guest presentations. As one example, the topic/draft of developing a teaching philosophy (listed as week 10) could be moved to before the guests, and then revised later in the term after the guests have presented. Also, some of the reflection papers could be made to be ongoing as the students gain more insight. Graduate College Comment: This suggestion is very good and is incorporated into the proposal. Syllabus GC 594 Appendix I-C Are students observed in class or other teaching environment? Is there an observation in a class the student is actively teaching as a TA, if applicable? How are observations accomplished? If video is used, does the instructor review the whole video, or clips? Is there peer review and self-assessment, with feedback provided? Graduate College Comment: The methods of supervision are responded to above in 2.1. Video clips will be used and peer feedback would be ongoing in class. No classroom visits would take place. 7

11 4.1.2 Statement from Office of Faculty Affairs/Center for the Advancement of Teaching- Learning Communities Renee Taylor, Vice Provost for Faculty Affairs, and Maria Varelas, Director of the Center for the Advancement of Teaching-Learning Communities (TLC) (which is under the OVPFA) confirm that this certificate does not appear to interfere with TLC's current mission and programming. Renee Taylor and Maria Varelas suggest that on p. 13 the language about endorsement of the CFCI by OVPFA be changed to reflect SCEP's need to ensure lack of interference on, instead of endorsement by, the work of relevant units. See Proposal Appendix 3 A Statement from College of Education Carole Mitchener, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the College of Education indicated that this certificate does not appear to interfere with any of the programs that the College of Education offers. See Proposal Appendix 3 B. 8

12 REQUEST FOR A NEW UNIT OF INSTRUCTION: Certificate Definitions and guidelines for creating certificate programs are available at BACKGROUND 1. Name of Institution: University of Illinois at Chicago Department and/or College Sponsor: Graduate College List unit approvals with dates: Graduate College Executive Committee, 2/19/ Title of Proposed Certificate: Certificate in Foundations of College Instruction (CFCI) 3. Contact Person: Steven Kragon Telephone: Fax: Dr. John Coumbe-Lilley Telephone: Fax: Contact Person and Unit to Receive Student Applications: Contacts Dr. John Coumbe-Lilley Steven Kragon Units to Receive Student Applications Graduate and Professional Admissions Office (applicants who are not currently UIC graduate students) Graduate College (applicants who are currently UIC graduate students) Unit that will Evaluate and Decide Admission Graduate College (all applicants) 4. Level and Type of Proposed Certificate Undergraduate Certificate (1-2 years) Undergraduate Certificate (2-4 years) First Professional Certificate X Campus Certificate _X_ Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Post-Master s Certificate IBHE Certificate 5. Requested CIP Code (6-digits) Teacher Education and Professional Development, Specific Levels and Methods, Other 6. Proposed Date for Implementation: Fall 2016 pg. 1

13 7. Location Offered 1 : On-Campus: X Off-Campus: Region Number(s) or Statewide Online: 8. MISSION, OBJECTIVES AND PRIORITIES 8.1 Describe specific objectives and measurable contributions the certificate will make to the university s mission, paying particular attention to the program s consistency with the university s priorities. Such objectives and contributions may include: It is well established that graduate students and postdocs are usually not properly trained to teach at the college level. Being an expert on a topic, and effectively communicating that expertise to others require different skills. Typically, graduate students are given a teaching orientation in their department, which may be as little as a few hours, and are not adequately exposed to techniques and pedagogy of teaching. Through trial and error, some students develop into effective teachers, while others do not. This causes stress for both the graduate student instructor, their students, and the lead instructor of the course. The courses that make up this certificate provide the background needed in order for the student to develop into an effective teacher, and are meant to meet the following goals. 1. Introducing student engagement approaches consistent with the campus mission 2. Meeting the occupational and student demand for knowledge, skills and competencies for the role of a college educator 3. Serving the undergraduate mission by providing graduate students approaches and tools they can use in the classroom 4. Setting a standard of preparation graduate students may use in future professional contexts, especially for obtaining tenure-track faculty positions 5. Establishing graduate student teaching as a priority on campus 6. Providing practical opportunities that benefit all departments where participating graduate students are teaching In Fall 2013, the Graduate College began offering a course in college teaching, GC 593, Foundations of College Teaching. To date, GC 593 has been offered four times, with an average of 20 students registered. A second course was added in Spring GC 594, Practicum in College Teaching, has been offered once and 11 students completed the course. Every student who takes GC 593 teaches >20 undergraduate students each week This equates to approximately 1,560 undergraduate students impacted on a weekly basis by the graduate teaching assistants who have taken the course. 8.2 Explain how the certificate will meet regional and state needs and priorities. According to the Southern New Hampshire University (2015), graduate certificates such as this one permit candidates an added set of professional skills not found in their regular studies. Limited state revenue and larger pools of younger and older students will require skilled teachers to lead and facilitate multiple courses of various sizes in face-to-face and online formats (Center on Budget and Policy Studies, 2014). This certificate provides the opportunity for graduate 1 Institutions may request approval to offer a program, simultaneously, on- and off-campus, including statewide. However, assessments of program objectives and outcomes should be developed that address all of the locations and modes of delivery for which the institution is seeking approval. Note that oncampus approval extends to the entire region in which the main campus is located. New off-campus programs to be offered outside the institution s region require approval. pg. 2

14 students to learn skills to help them diversify their capabilities, and will enable them to seize opportunities for a career in higher education or in the private sector. UIC appoints about graduate teaching assistants each fall and spring term, and a lesser number in summer. The duties of the teaching assistant vary greatly, from grader to designing and running their own course. They are involved in level courses. A large percentage work under a professor, and typically teach discussion sections one or two times a week, and hold office hours. In some departments (Mathematics and English are two examples), a fair number of teaching assistants run the whole course and are responsible for all activities in the course, including developing the syllabus and structure of the course. Most 100-level courses utilize graduate teaching assistants, either to lead discussion sections in smaller groups from the larger lecture section, or with being responsible for the whole delivery of the course. Frequently assistants also teach level courses. The impact on the undergraduate student body is not inconsequential. Graduates of PhD programs desiring a position within the academy face an increasingly competitive job market. Many graduates will be applying for tenure-track and non-tenure positions at teaching institutions where research is less a priority. In addition, candidates for positions at research universities are increasingly required to show teaching experience. (Some applicants to PhD programs in the UIC College of Medicine have declined fully-funded admission offers because teaching opportunities do not exist for those students.) In spite of these difficulties, many UIC graduates do get placed into tenure-track positions, either at teaching institutions or schools that engage in research, but where it is not a priority. The majority of tenured and tenure-track professors will state that they never received training on how to teach at the college level while in graduate school. The courses under this certificate will provide the necessary background for teaching assistants, and even postdoctoral trainees, to develop into excellent educators. This certificate will enhance a candidate s CV/resume and make them more competitive candidates for the dwindling numbers of university and college faculty positions. Teaching experience has become very important in hiring new professors, and completion of this certificate will provide an advantage in this area. 8.3 Discuss estimated future employment opportunities for completers of this certificate program. Where appropriate, provide documentation by citing data from such sources as employer surveys, current labor market analyses, and future workforce projections. The trends in hiring for college educators indicates tenured positions are decreasing and faculty are expected to increasingly engage in teaching roles (Academe, 2015). Secondly, parttime employment at two and four year institutions often requires an emphasis on specialized teaching (AACU, 2014). The growth of spending on administrative hiring (Campaign for the Future of Higher Education, 2015) and the reduction of full time faculty hiring (New England Center for Investigative Reporting, 2014) requires future faculty to be able to teach effectively and differentiate themselves from the growing labor pool glut of doctoral candidates (NPR.Org, 2015; National Science Foundation, 2015). Additionally, the National Academies Press (2014) strongly recommended diversified training for graduate and post-doctoral candidates. Other public and private institutions like the University Minnesota, University of Missouri, and Vanderbilt University, as well as the Association of American Colleges and Universities, see the benefit of teaching preparation for future faculty. In the case of the University of Minnesota, one of the stated benefits of providing graduate students with pathways to teaching related roles is to pg. 3

15 build a pool of capable teaching faculty for the Twin-Cities region. We estimate the evidence for completing this certificate will differentiate program graduates in the employment market, especially those vying for full-time faculty positions in Illinois. 9. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 9.1 Provide a brief narrative description of the certificate program, including a list of its central academic objectives. Explain how the curriculum is structured to meet the certificate s stated objectives. Provide a complete catalog description for the proposed certificate, including: Curriculum Structure: The Graduate College offers the Post-Baccalaureate Campus Certificate in Foundations of College Instruction (CFCI). The curriculum is structured to lead students through a three phase learning sequence. GC 593, Foundations of College Teaching, is designed to raise student awareness to the roles, responsibilities, practices and possibilities of college teaching. GC 592, Seminar in College Teaching, is a best practices seminar where experienced instructors in various fields present their philosophy of teaching and their applications to the college classroom. The final course is GC 594, Practicum in College Teaching, and prepares students to construct, implement and evaluate courses, and allows them to practice these skills. Together, these courses work progressively to expose students to the role college teachers play, the requirements they must meet, and opportunities they may have. The sequence helps students develop skills and competencies in a sequenced manner building on previous experience. The recommended pathway to certificate completion is outlined above, however, students may take the courses out of sequence as befits their preferences and studying schedule, although it is recommended that GC 594 (practicum) be taken after GC 593. Applicant Pool: The intent of the certificate is to allow any graduate student who meets the admission requirements to be admitted to the certificate program. The admission requirements are an earned baccalaureate (or international equivalent to a U.S. baccalaureate) from an accredited institution, and the supplemental application where the applicant will provide evidence of their teaching experience at the college level (e.g. currently a teaching assistant), and how they will fulfill the practicum course requirements if they do not expect to have active teaching availability. There are a few categories of students that are anticipated to be interested in the certificate: Current UIC graduate students in degree programs who will concurrently hold teaching assistantships. This is believed to be the largest category of students who will be interested in the program. Graduate students in programs where teaching availability is either limited or nonexistent (e.g. PhD programs in the College of Medicine). There are examples where highly sought recruits turned down fully-funded offers (research appointments at $29,000 annually) due to the lack of teaching opportunity, since their future employment requires experience in teaching. Postdocs at UIC who would apply as nondegree graduate students. (At least one postdoc applied for nondegree admission in order to take GC 593, and offered comments on how it will aid her career path.) Students and postdocs from other institutions who would apply to the certificate as nondegree students. pg. 4

16 All applicants to the certificate will have to submit a Supplemental Application on which they will be required to supply the following information: Past and present teaching experience. Whether the applicant will have an active teaching assistantship or related activity when enrolled in GC 594, Practicum in College Teaching. If the applicant will not have a teaching assistantship when registered for this course, they should submit information explaining what experiences the student will use to complete the practicum course. The applicant is encouraged to consult with the program director prior to submitting the supplemental application if not holding an active teaching assistantship. Students who have active teaching assistantships will not need any special consideration for admission. Students who do not have active teaching assistantships (whether degree seeking at UIC, a postdoc, or an applicant external to UIC) will have their proposed plan for the practicum course reviewed by the program director to determine suitability for admission to the certificate. (Complete information on what the necessary practicum teaching interactions, breadth and depth, will be posted to the certificate website.). Catalog Description The requirements of Campus Certificates do not appear in the Graduate Catalog. The following equivalent information will be posted to the Graduate College website. Campus Certificate in Foundations of College Instruction (CFCI) Mailing Address: Certificate in Foundations of College Instruction Graduate College (MC 192) 601 S Morgan Street, 606 UH Chicago, IL Telephone: Website: [to be created] Contact: Steven Kragon The Graduate College offers a Post-Baccalaureate Campus Certificate in Foundations of College Instruction (CFCI) to graduate students in all disciplines at UIC, as well as non-degree graduate students who have earned a baccalaureate degree, or the international equivalent of a U. S. baccalaureate, from an accredited institution. This 9 credit hour graduate certificate consists of a series of courses that provide foundational information and help develop the competencies necessary to teach effectively in higher education. The courses are known for translating theoryand evidence-based approaches into practice. Graduate students and postdoctoral candidates are prepared to become excellent college teaching professionals. Postdoctoral candidates may be interested in this program as it will help them develop a skill set not customarily acquired in their academic training. This additional skill set is anticipated to make them more attractive candidates for positions in both higher education and research-focused organizations. pg. 5

17 The curriculum of this campus certificate consists of three 3-credit courses. GC 593, Foundations of College Teaching is the first course in the sequence, as it provides theory and pedagogy used in the other courses, GC 592, Seminar in College Teaching and GC 594, Practicum in College Teaching. Most students will be able to complete the program in 3 semesters. The purpose of the certificate is to provide students with opportunities to develop knowledge and skills useful in their current and future careers as college/adult-learning teaching professionals. The intended learning outcomes of the certificate are to: 1. Define learning objectives, outcomes and the teaching, learning and assessment processes to achieve them. 2. Relate appropriate learning theories, models and frameworks to specific learning objectives and outcomes. 3. Recognize the minimum requirements for implementing a quality college course (College Education Quality, 2015). 4. Explain the roles and responsibilities of a college teacher. 5. Construct a college course that uses evidence-based practices principles to instruct, teach and assess learning. 6. Demonstrate ability to instruct in both face-to-face and online formats. 7. Demonstrate ability to integrate technology into teaching, learning and assessment. 8. Demonstrate educational approaches to help individuals and groups learn independently and interdependently. 9. Demonstrate reflective practice to improve teaching, learning and assessment. 10. Demonstrate an ability to engage diverse student populations. Program Admission Baccalaureate degree (or the international equivalent) from an accredited college or university Graduate UIC application (for applicants not currently UIC graduate students) or Request to Change/Add a Graduate Program Form (current UIC graduate students) Supplemental application that requires the following information (the applicant is encouraged to consult with the program director prior to submitting the supplemental application if not currently teaching at the college level): o Past and present teaching experience o Whether the applicant will have an active teaching assistantship or related activity when enrolled in GC 594, Practicum in College Teaching. If the applicant will not have a teaching assistantship during this course, they should submit documentation to the program director explaining what experiences the student will use to complete the practicum portion of the course. International students only: o ibt (internet-based TOEFL): 80, with subscores of Reading 19, Listening 17, Speaking 20, and Writing 21, Or o IELTS 6.5, with subscores of 6.0 for all subscores, Or o PTE Academic 54, with subscores of Listening 47, Writing 56, Reading 51, and Speaking 53, Or o TOEFL PBT: 550 pg. 6

18 Current UIC graduate students should declare their intent to complete the certificate no later than after the completion of one of the certificate s classes. Current graduate students use the Request to Change/Add (a 2 nd ) Graduate Programs form and submit the supplemental application (see above) directly to the Graduate College. Non-UIC students and postdoctoral applicants should complete the on-line admission application and upload their proof of degree, supplemental application, and application fee payment to the Office of Graduate and Professional Admissions. Policies Program admission: The certificate will operate with the usual and customary policies and procedures of the University of Illinois at Chicago. Academic Policies: The certificate will be granted upon satisfactory completion of all related courses. A student has passed satisfactorily when they have achieved a grade B or higher in GC 593 and GC 594, and passed GC 592 with an S grade. Transfer Credit: This is at the discretion of the Graduate College. Any transfer credit must be at the graduate level. Credit: Credits may be used as electives to any graduate degree program based on the determination of the candidates home department accepting the credits for the purposes of degree completion. Typically, the Director of Graduate Studies in the student s academic program makes the decision. Course Requirements: GC 593 Foundations of College Teaching Relates evidence based best practices for teaching at institutions of higher education and provides a professional preparation program for aspiring college instructors. (3 hours) GC 592 Seminar in College Teaching This course will discuss a range of topics pertinent to the future of teaching, learning, and assessment in college education. (3 hours) GC 594 Practicum in College Teaching Provides opportunities for qualified individuals to gain teaching experience, document practice and grow professionally in a supervised program fostering reflection, self-evaluation, assessment, and material revision. (3 hours) 9.2 Describe the strategies to be incorporated into the proposed certificate to promote student learning. The learning strategies aim to model best practices in the following ways: 1. Focus on student engagement through participation in individual and group activities in an inclusive and warm climate that promotes self-reflection, self-confidence and skill building. 2. Students will be presented with a series of challenges and problems to solve through the development of individually- and group-developed solutions. 3. High impact practices (Kuh, 2008) will be introduced and students will be encouraged to incorporate these practices into their teaching approach. pg. 7

19 4. Students will be exposed through readings, guest speakers; on-campus scholar visits and video presentations to a range of award winning and master college educators. 5. Students will complete a teaching practicum which leads them to reflect, synthesize and refine their teaching in real time. GC 593, Foundations in College Teaching The purpose of this course is to provide graduate students with the knowledge, skills and capabilities to proficiently instruct classes up to the 300/400 level of undergraduate education. Primary Learning Outcomes: At the end of this course students should be able to: 1. Apply best practices to designing, delivering and evaluating a college course 2. Teach confidently in a diverse college setting 3. Develop a teaching portfolio 4. Align teaching practice with the mission of the department Content: 1. Working at College - Policies, Procedures and Expectations for Instructors 2. Preparing to teach - Recognize knowledge, skills and competencies of a college teacher 3. Learning Management System: Blackboard Tutorial - Demonstrate capability to use basic functions in Blackboard 4. The science of learning - Explain how learning happens in their classroom 5. Course design - Design a course, unit and a lesson plan 6. Learner centered learning (LCL) - Identify LCL best practices; design a lesson plan 7. Engaging students - Demonstrate use of student engagement techniques 8. Diversity issues in teaching - Relate teaching best practices; design a lesson plan 9. Teaching critical thinking - Construct a critical thought activity; design a lesson plan 10. Motivation in the classroom - Relate motivational principles to teaching; design a lesson plan 11. Assessing student learning - Evaluate student learning 12. Teaching approaches: Lab/discussion - Identify teaching best practices; design a lesson plan 13. Teaching approaches: small group/lecture - Identify teaching best practices; design a lesson plan 14. Evaluating teaching - Recognize methods of teaching evaluation 15. Introduction to online teaching - Experience differences between F2F and online learning 16. Teaching portfolio - Present a teaching portfolio for hiring/promotion purposes Course Learning Outcome Assessment Methods: 1. Reflective assignments 2. Peer/Supervisor teaching evaluation 3. Completion and presentation of a teaching portfolio pg. 8

20 GC 592, Seminar in College Teaching Course Learning Outcomes: 1. Discuss the roles and responsibilities of a college educator. 2. Comprehend the range of complementary methods of teaching in Arts and Humanities, Behavioral and Social Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics, and Physical Sciences, and Life Sciences. 3. Consider alternative approaches to course planning and preparation. 4. Recognize the impact of technology on teaching, learning, and assessment. 5. Relate the range of student engagement techniques to diverse student populations. 6. Use the knowledge to make a professional development plan. Course Learning Outcome Assessment Methods: 45% in-class participation 55% weekly reflection papers This course extends the appreciation and insight of the role of a college educator based on the experiences of invited presenters from the field and emerging trends affecting the role, expectations, and delivery of college education. Guest speakers - A number of award winning college teachers will be invited to the present to the class. The speakers will present for about minutes using a systematic format. There will be a ten minute break and then the instructor will facilitate an open floor discussion between the presenter and the students for about 30 minutes. The final phase of the class will be a guided reflection on the session that took place. Speakers will be asked to follow the following inquiry format. 1. What is your field and why do you love it? 2. What made you start teaching? 3. How does your teaching in your field make the world a better place? 4. What was your first semester/year of teaching like? 5. What were the toughest hurdles you faced in your early teaching career? 6. What have been your greatest successes as a college teacher? 7. What are your favorite ways to engage diverse student populations? 8. What have students taught you about teaching? 9. What are three things you recommend prospective college educators do to prepare themselves to teach in higher education? 10. What legacy do you hope to leave through your teaching? The methods used in this course are to bridge the gap between science and practice. The teaching approaches used in this course are designed to increase knowledge retention, transfer and application by using but not limited to the following ways of reproducing and producing knowledge and application: Lecture; video/dvd viewing with critical discussion; individual study; individual/group presentation; case study criticism; student led questioning; assigned reading; group project work; role playing; 2-minute short answer responses; class discussion; group discussion etc. GC 594, Practicum in College Teaching This course is designed from an action learning perspective which means individuals set goals for themselves; self-evaluate the structure, processes and outcomes achieved by pg. 9

21 their teaching before they attend class. When they attend class they are grouped and use a debrief process which means they systematically present their experience and the challenges they faced in the week prior to the course. The group listens and then uses an inquiry led approach to help the individual identify their own solutions first before offering theirs. The individual student documents their own solutions and their peers suggestions and prepares for their next week of teaching by crafting a new action plan. This approach is similar to the plan-do-study-act cycle found in quality improvement approaches used in a variety of settings. The individual raises their awareness to their own performance improvement with the assistance of the group overseen and facilitated by the course instructor. If an individual was to observe this class in action they would witness a highly interactive and engaged workshop like process focused on identifying challenges to teaching and solving problems college educators face. Essentially this is an organic reflexive approach to learning grounded in the individuals own experience. The syllabus for this course demonstrates the approach applied on a week to week basis. Course Learning Outcomes: 1. Develop, design, and delivery of a college course. 2. Reflect on appropriate strategies to help students learn effectively. 3. Evaluate their own teaching effectiveness and creatively revise their approaches for improvement. 4. Document their development as college teacher - scholar through preparation of a welldesigned teaching portfolio. Course Learning Outcome Assessment Methods: 30% Teaching portfolio 50% Demonstrated teaching effectiveness 20% Teaching reflection The purpose of the course is to provide a supervised field-based practical experience that progresses from the College of Foundations Course (GC593), i.e. from theory and content learning to application, analysis, evaluation and creation of an effective teaching approach to undergraduate education. Relationship of this course to similar courses offered by other academic units: This course extends from GC593 by providing an applied experience to students who have taken GC593. Major Topics: 1: Course Orientation. Defining college teaching roles and effectiveness 2: Self-assessment & teaching portfolio review 3: Outcomes-led teaching 4: Motivating your students 5: Video analysis and feedback 6: Control-creativity paradox 7: Office hours and tutorials 8: Matching teaching methods with learning outcomes 9: Making the lecture a learning experience 10: Video analysis and feedback 11: Leading effective discussions & questioning techniques for discussion and assessment 12: Learning in groups pg. 10