MICROSOFT CRM 3.0 SMALL BUSINESS EDITION IMPLEMENTING MICROSOFT CRM 3.0 SMALL BUSINESS EDITION

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1 MICROSOFT CRM 3.0 SMALL BUSINESS EDITION IMPLEMENTING MICROSOFT CRM 3.0 SMALL BUSINESS EDITION

2 Last Revision: December 2005 The information contained in this document represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation on the issues discussed as of the date of publication. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information presented after the date of publication. This document is for informational purposes only. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT. Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without limiting the rights under copyright, no part of this document may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise), or for any purpose, without the express written permission of Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights covering subject matter in this document. Except as expressly provided in any written license agreement from Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Great Plains, BizTalk, Microsoft.NET, Excel, Visio, Word, Office, Windows, Visual Basic, C#, C++, Active Directory, SQL Server, ActiveX, ASP.NET, Exchange, Internet Explorer, Powerpoint and Outlook are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation or Great Plains Software, Inc. or their affiliates in the United States and/or other countries. Great Plains Software, Inc. is a subsidiary of Microsoft Corporation. The names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners. The names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

3 Table of Contents Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition 9 Objectives... 9 Introduction... 9 Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition The Microsoft CRM 3.0 Licensing Model Pre-Installation Requirements and Planning Pre-Installation Requirements and Planning Installing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Microsoft CRM Integration with SBS Fax Service Installing the Microsoft CRM 3.0 Client for Outlook Conclusion Quick Interaction: Lessons Learned Chapter 2: Configuring microsoft CRM Small Business Edition 41 Objectives Introduction Using the Configuration Wizard Configuring Microsoft CRM SBE Security Demonstration Creating and Copying Security Roles Conclusion Quick Interaction: Lessons Learned Chapter 3: Customizing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition 75 Objectives Introduction Using Microsoft CRM SBE Customization Tools Demonstration: Form Customization Creating Custom Entities Demonstration: Create a Custom Entity Using Microsoft CRM SBE Workflow Creating a Workflow Rule Demonstration: Activity Creation Actions Sales Processes Demonstration: Adventure Works Cycle Sales Process Conclusion Quick Interaction: Lessons Learned Chapter 4: Using Marketing Automation 103 Objectives Introduction Creating and Managing Marketing Lists Demonstration: Use Advanced Find to Create a List Creating Campaigns Demonstration: Create a Campaign Demonstration: Create a Campaign Launching and Managing Campaigns Demonstration: Managing the Campaign Demonstration: Quick Campaign Conclusion Page i

4 Microsoft CRM Marketing Automation Quick Interaction: Lessons Learned Chapter 5: Using Sales Management 131 Objectives Introduction Managing Leads Managing Opportunities Closing the Sale: The Sales Management Life Cycle Closing the Sale: The Sales Management Life Cycle Demonstration: Sales Management Use Sales Processes and Workflow Rules Conclusion Quick Interaction: Lessons Learned Chapter 6: Using Customer Service 155 Objectives Introduction Managing Cases Demonstration: Case Creation Managing the Knowledge Base Managing the Knowledge Base Demonstration: Create an Article Using Contracts Demonstration: Contract Template Creation Demonstration: Create a Contract Based on an Existing Contract Demonstration: Adding Contract Lines to a Contract Service Scheduling Scheduling Terminology Demonstration Conclusion Conclusion Quick Interaction: Lessons Learned Appendix A: Optional Labs 187 Introduction Lab 2.1 Copying and Creating Roles Lab 3.1: Form Customization Lab 3.2: Create a Custom Entity Lab 3.3 Activity Creation Actions Lab 3.4 Basic Sales Processes Note that when you complete the last task the Opportunity will close with a Status of "Won" Lab 4.1: Create a List Lab 5.1: Microsoft CRM Process Flow Lab 5.2: Manage Opportunities Lab 6.1: Case Resolution Process Appendix B: Lab Solutions 209 Lab 2.1 Copying and Creating Roles Lab 3.1: Form Customization Page ii

5 Table of Contents Lab 3.2: Create a Custom Entity Lab 3.3 Activity Creation Actions Lab 3.4 Basic Sales Processes Lab 4.1: Create a List Lab 5.1: Microsoft CRM Process Flow Lab 5.2: Manage Opportunities Lab 6.1: Case Resolution Process Index 227 Page iii

6 Microsoft CRM Marketing Automation Page iv

7 Introduction INTRODUCTION TO MICROSOFT CRM Training is a vital component of retaining the value of your Microsoft CRM investment. Quality training from industry experts helps to keep you updated on your solution, and develop skills to maximize the value of your solution. Whether choosing e-learning, instructor-led training, or self-paced study using training manuals, there is a type of training that meets your needs. Additionally, validate your training and demonstrate your expertise with one of many Microsoft Business Solutions certification designations. Choose the training or certification type that best enables you to stay ahead of the competition. E-Learning Microsoft Business Solutions offers online training to help you increase your productivity without spending time away from your home or office. elearning allows you to learn at your own pace through flexible access to training, therefore proving beneficial for those lacking the time or budget to travel. elearning is available in the Foundation Library or as an ecourse. Foundation Library The Foundation Library is a fee-based collection of overview tutorials specific to the Microsoft Business Solutions family of products. These tutorials have the following features: Covers a broad range of topics at a high level, and typically does not exceed 60 minutes in length. Provides tips and tricks to show you how to increase productivity and save time. Enables you to learn about the changes in features and functionality of a new version. Allows you to evaluate a new module or product from Microsoft Business Solutions. Foundation Library subscriptions are available for individual purchase or through partner and customer service plans. ecourses ecourses are fee-based online training designed to cover detailed concepts on specific product areas and can allow you to: Gain in-depth technical and business application training through daily on-demand training Learn at your own pace lessons can be stopped and restarted, skipped or repeated Save time and increase your productivity Receive product knowledge comparable to instructor-led training without the need for travel or time away from the office Page 1

8 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Gain beneficial training when preparing for Microsoft Business Solutions certification exams Instructor-Led Training With instructor-led training, you can gain a solid foundation or refresh your knowledge in Microsoft Business Solutions products and processes while learning from an expert in an interactive environment. With courses on a variety of topics, you can: Follow demonstrations and attend presentations Receive hands-on product experience Participate in classroom activities and discussions with other attendees Gain beneficial training when preparing for Microsoft Business Solutions certification exams Courseware Courseware can be ordered for the purpose of self-paced study. These materials are comparable to Courseware used with instructor-led training, and enable you to: Learn at your own pace, in your own time. Refer to an abundance of tips, tricks, and insights Learn in a self-study format when preparing for Microsoft Business Solutions certification exams For selected training manuals there are training Extensions which cover country specific features in the product. These training Extensions are separate training manuals designed to teach local functionality within a given country. Please notice that training Extensions are used in conjunction with the courseware, not as stand-alone training manuals. If an Extension is available for this course, you will find it in your training material. Certifications The Microsoft Business Solutions certification program recognizes an individual's expertise in working with a Microsoft Business Solutions product. The following certification options are available for individuals as part of the Microsoft Business Solutions certification program. Page 2

9 Introduction Microsoft Business Solutions Certified Professional The Microsoft Business Solutions Certified Professional credential is intended for professionals who have demonstrated proficiency with at least one series of a Microsoft Business Solutions product. In order to become a Microsoft Business Solutions Certified Professional, candidates are required to pass one Microsoft Business Solutions certification exam. Microsoft Business Solutions Certified Master Microsoft Business Solutions Certified Professionals are eligible to work toward one or more Microsoft Business Solutions Certified Master credentials. Master level certifications are Microsoft Business Solutions premier certifications. They are an accumulation of exams that satisfy a set of predefined requirements. Each master level certification track contains a core group of required exams and variety of elective exams, in which a specified number needs to be taken to achieve certification. Together with the core exams, elective exams provide a valid and reliable measure of proficiency and expertise on a specific Microsoft Business Solutions product. When an individual achieves a Master level certification, he or she has demonstrated an extensive knowledge base on a Microsoft Business Solutions product, much more than what is needed to achieve a Professional level certification. Microsoft Business Solutions training can help you develop the skills you need to do your job. However, Microsoft Business Solutions does not expect or intend a course to be the sole preparation method for passing an exam. To help prepare for a certification exam, Microsoft Business Solutions highly recommends the use of the preparation guides available for each exam. Preparation guides contain valuable information about a specific exam, including: The target audience Skills being measured Time & pass requirements Question types and topics Preparation tools, such as recommended training supplemental learning resources additional recommended skills Page 3

10 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Microsoft Business Solutions Training Courseware Elements Within the Microsoft Business Solutions Training Courseware are a number of sections or elements. Each chapter includes the following elements: Objectives Each chapter begins with stating the learning objectives specifically for that chapter. Learning objectives are important because they inform of what needs to be done to successfully complete the chapter. Introduction An introduction sets the stage for the learning to take place and prepares you with key statements of the chapter. Topics Chapters are split up into topic areas, usually according to the learning objectives for the chapter. This is especially beneficial in large chapters so that the knowledge and skills to be learned are split up into more manageable units. Test your Knowledge Test your knowledge section consists of review questions for each chapter or topic and are designed to help reinforce learning concepts. Questions can be short answer, true/false, multiple-choice, fill-in-the-blank, or any other type. Answers to the questions are also provided. Conclusion The conclusion wraps up the chapter by highlighting the important parts of the chapter as well as providing a transition to the next chapter. The conclusion also offers an opportunity to refresh earlier learning. Labs Labs test your skills with the learning concepts presented and learned during a topic or chapter. Labs begin with a scenario paragraph, which describes the business problem to be solved and also sets the stage for the exercise. Solutions to the labs are provided. Many labs may also be offered at different levels to accommodate the variety of skills and expertise of each student: Challenge Yourself! Challenge Yourself! labs are the most challenging. These exercises are designed for the experienced student who requires little instruction to complete the required task. This level of exercise states the business problem to be solved and describes the tasks the learner needs to complete. Page 4

11 Introduction About This Course Need a Little Help? Need a Little Help? exercises are designed to challenge students, while providing some assistance. These exercises do not provide step-by-step instructions; however, they provide the user with helpful hints and more information to complete the lab. We suggest you try the "Challenge Yourself!" labs first, and if you need help completing the task, look to the information in the "Need a Little Help?" labs. Quick Interaction: Lessons Learned At the end of each chapter within the Microsoft Business Solutions Training Courseware, you will find a Quick Interaction: Lessons Learned page. This interaction is designed to provide you with a moment to reflect on the material you have learned. By outlining three key points from the chapter, you are maximizing knowledge retention, and providing yourself with an excellent resource for reviewing key points after class. This section provides you with a brief description of: The course Audience Suggested prerequisites Course objectives Student materials Related certification exams Description This one day instructor-led course explores Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition from an implementer's perspective. The course is intended to provide an overview of application in its entirety and covers both implementer and end-user topics. The course includes implementation topics on Microsoft CRM Installation and Configuration, Customization, and Workflow. Application functionality discussed includes User Interface, Marketing Automation, Sales Management, and Customer Service. This course begins with the implementation of a new Microsoft CRM solution and then moves to the processes and functionality available to Microsoft CRM end-users. The course is intended to be introductory in nature and will focus heavily on instructor-led demonstrations. Audience This course is intended for small business partners new to Microsoft CRM who are seeking to gain an overview of its capabilities. Page 5

12 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition At Course Completion After completing this course, students will be able to: Install Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition. Perform many of the post-installation configuration tasks. Modify Microsoft CRM entities and forms to tailor the application to an organization's specific needs. Configure business automation functions using workflow rules. Decide when to use sales processes and how to implement them. Perform end-user tasks using the Marketing Automation, Sales Management, and Customer Service modules of Microsoft CRM. Prerequisites Before attending this course, students should have a working knowledge of: Microsoft Windows Small Business Server 2003 Microsoft Windows XP Microsoft Outlook 2003 Student Materials The student materials include comprehensive courseware and other necessary materials for this class. Page 6

13 Introduction Student Objectives What do you hope to learn by participating in this course? List three main objectives below Page 7

14 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Page 8

15 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition CHAPTER 1: INSTALLING MICROSOFT CRM SMALL BUSINESS EDITION Objectives Actively participating during this chapter helps you: Understand some of the differences between the Professional and Small Business Editions of Microsoft CRM Understand the Microsoft CRM licensing model Understand the software and hardware requirements of Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Install Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition using the simplified default installation option Review the advanced options available as optional steps in the server installation Send and receive faxes using Microsoft CRM integration with Microsoft Small Business Server fax service Install the Microsoft CRM Outlook client using the installation CD or the Small Business Server Manage Server Console Introduction This chapter provides an overview of Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition and highlights the differences from the Professional Edition. Pre-installation planning including licensing and hardware and software requirements is discussed. The lesson provides a step by step overview of the installation using the much simplified Small Business Edition installer. The additional installation steps required for the Professional Edition and provided as options for the Small Business Edition are also outlined. Students are introduced to the Microsoft CRM Outlook client and the two ways it can be installed. Page 9

16 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition There are two editions of Microsoft CRM 3.0, but only one Microsoft CRM Server Setup program. The two editions of Microsoft CRM 3.0 include: Professional Edition Small Business Edition The differences between these two editions involve three features of the Small Business Edition that integrate with Microsoft Windows Small Business Server. The three features are: Small Business Server Console Integration Microsoft CRM 3.0 Data Migration Wizard for Microsoft Office Outlook 2003 with Business Contact Manager Small Business Server Fax Server Integration The Microsoft CRM Server Setup program automatically determines which edition of Microsoft CRM to install based on the operating system of the server on which Microsoft CRM Server is installed. The two options include the following: Professional Edition, if the operating system is Windows Server 2000 or 2003 Small Business Edition, if the operating system is Small Business Server 2003 The Small Business Edition (SBE) provides a complete Microsoft CRM solution for small businesses, with a focus on ease of installation and reduced total cost of ownership. Ease of Installation Small Business Server 2003 is a version of Windows targeted for small businesses. In this market, software must be easy to install and the installation process almost completely automated. This design goal for SBS became a key goal as well for the Small Business Edition of Microsoft CRM 3.0. Key features of the SBE installation include the following: Installs the Microsoft CRM Server and the Microsoft CRM Exchange Router. Creates a client image (.msi file) that can be deployed to each Microsoft CRM Desktop Client for Outlook. The only data entry during an SBE installation involves entry of an organization name and license key. Page 10

17 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Certain environmental settings are assumed, such as the location of the database and the Exchange Router. When installing the Microsoft CRM Server, the SBE installation automatically creates and configures the Microsoft CRM web site. A custom installation option that allows the installation user to override the system defaults by walking through many of the installation steps used by the Professional Edition. NOTE: Although a Windows SBS customer still has the chance to override standard choices made during installation most small business are best served by taking the defaults. Unique SBE Functionality The Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition is a super-set of the Professional Edition. All Professional Edition functionality is present, together with the following additional features that are not available in the Professional Edition: Microsoft CRM Management tools integration with SBS Server Management console Microsoft CRM integration into the SBS Health Monitor, ensuring that Microsoft CRM is managed as easily as SBS Microsoft CRM Server integration with the SBS Fax Service so users can send and receive faxes from within Microsoft CRM Business Contact Manager migration The Microsoft CRM 3.0 Licensing Model Microsoft CRM 3.0 uses the same Microsoft Personal Identification (PID) licensing system used by all other Microsoft products. As you plan a Microsoft CRM 3.0 deployment, you must determine the number of user licenses you have to purchase, and at what user count increments. The Microsoft PID licensing system generates license keys that are pre-packaged with the product and appear on an orange sticker on the back of the CD. An example of a Microsoft PID license key is: BBH2G-D2VK9-QD4M9-F63XB- 43C33. Encoded within a PID license key is the following information: SKU that was purchased Language Version number Number of users Page 11

18 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition The Microsoft PID licensing system generates separate Microsoft CRM Server and Users license keys. Both Server and User license keys are required for each Microsoft CRM 3.0 deployment. The characteristics of each key include the following: Server license. A server license determines whether you can install the Microsoft CRM Server software. This is similar to server license keys for Microsoft SQL Server and Microsoft Exchange. The Microsoft CRM Server Setup program requires that you enter a server license key. The same server license can be used on multiple Microsoft CRM servers within a deployment. A server license has a zero user license count, unless it is a bundled license. Bundled licenses are discussed in the next topic. User license. A user license determines how many users can access the Microsoft CRM Server. A user license does not determine whether the user can install Microsoft CRM Server. In fact, a user license key will not work if you try to use it as the only key when installing the Microsoft CRM Server, even though the user and server license numbers look very similar. As long as a server license is entered during the Microsoft CRM Server set up, you can optionally enter one or more user licenses at the same time. There are two types of Server licenses: Professional Edition Small Business Edition There are three types of User licenses: 1 user license 5 user license 20 user license The number of user license keys entered for a deployment depends upon the number of licensed Microsoft CRM users the organization plans to deploy. User license keys are additive; that is, if you enter multiple keys, Microsoft CRM accumulates the total number of user licenses from each key to determine the total license count available for use. EXAMPLE: If an organization has 28 users they may purchase a 20 user license a 5 user license and three 1 user licenses. If an organization has 100 users they will need five 20 user licenses. Page 12

19 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Bundled Licenses Ordinarily server licenses do not have a user count associated with them. The exception to this rule is when the server license is a bundled license. An organization that purchases a bundled license receives just one license key. A bundled license key is recognized as both the server and user license. The key contains information for both the Microsoft CRM Server as well as a 5 user license. Additional client licenses can be purchased and used along with a bundled license in a Microsoft CRM deployment. Benefits of Using the Microsoft PID Licensing System The Microsoft PID licensing system provides the following benefits for customers of Microsoft CRM 3.0: Enables OEM and partner Installation. Because the organization name is not tied to the license key as it was in earlier versions of Microsoft CRM, OEMs and partners can preinstall Microsoft CRM 3.0 because they do not have to know the Organization name of the customer. Enables 90 day trial version The Microsoft PID licensing system enables Microsoft to send sample CDs to customers and partners. The PID system generates a trial version key that authorizes use of Microsoft CRM on a 90 day trial basis. When a trial key is entered during Microsoft CRM Server setup, the Setup program calculates the expiration date based on the installation date. In order to upgrade from a trial version of Microsoft CRM to a live version, simply enter a new, non-expiring key within the License Manager utility. You do not have to reinstall Microsoft CRM. Page 13

20 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Pre-Installation Requirements and Planning This section outlines the requirements that must be met and tasks that must be completed prior to beginning the Microsoft CRM SBE installation. Hardware Requirements Minimum Hardware Requirements Processor: Dual Intel Pentium (Xeon PIII) 700 MHz or comparable single CPU speeds RAM: 512 MB Hard Disk: 8 GB available hard disk space Modem: No modem Network Card: 1 Network Adapter card (10/100 Mb Ethernet) Recommended Hardware Requirements Processor: Dual 1.8 GHz (Xeon P4) or comparable single CPU speeds RAM: 1 GB or more, depending on the system configuration Hard Disk: SCSI hard drives with RAID 5, depending on the system configuration Modem: Two modems; one for Shared Fax Service and one for Remote Access Service, Shared Modem Service, and Internet Security and Acceleration Server dial-up service Network Card: 2 Network Adapter cards (100 Mb Network Card) Software Requirements Microsoft Windows Small Business Server 2003 Premium Edition w/ Service Pack 1 Microsoft SQL Server 2000 w/ Service Pack 4 Small Business Server 2003 Limitations Managing expectations is important when you plan and deploy Small Business Server as the infrastructure of a small business network. Understanding the limitations of Windows Small Business Server 2003 is part of managing expectations. The known limitations are as follows: One domain. You can have only one domain on a Small Business Server network. This domain must be the root of the forest. No trust relationships. Because only one domain is supported on a Small Business Server network, there can be no trust relationships with other domains. This restriction on trust relationships includes parent-child trust relationships. There can be other domain controllers on the network. Page 14

21 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Recommended maximum of 25 CRM clients. Windows Small Business Server 2003 is recommended for up to 25 users with Microsoft CRM, although Windows Small Business Server 2003 supports up to 75 users. Installing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition This section examines each step in the installation process for the Microsoft CRM Server 3.0 Small Business Edition. Each step is discussed in greater detail below. As you can see from Error! Reference source not found., a Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition installation takes considerably less steps than the 15 steps required with the Professional Edition. If you select the Custom installation option, then you will see all of the setup pages used by the Professional Edition install. Professional Edition Installation Steps Small Business Edition Installation Steps (assuming Standard installation) 1. License code information 1. License code information 2. End User License Agreement (EULA) 2. End User License Agreement (EULA) 3. Install required components 3. Install required components 4. Specify the Microsoft CRM organization name 4. Select installation option (standard or custom) 5. Participate in the Customer Experience Improvement program 5. Specify the Microsoft CRM organization name 6. Select installation location 6. Participate in the Customer Experience Improvement program 7. Web Site 7. System Requirements and the Environmental Diagnostic Wizard 8. Select SQL Server 8. Ready to install the application 9. Specify SQL Server Reporting Services Server 9. Installing Microsoft CRM Server Small Business Edition Page 15

22 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Professional Edition Installation Steps 10. Select the AD Organizational Unit Small Business Edition Installation Steps (assuming Standard installation) 11. Specify the security account for the Microsoft CRM Services 12. Exchange Server Settings 13. System Requirements and the Environmental Diagnostic Wizard 14. Ready to install the application 15. Installing Microsoft CRM Server Professional Edition TABLE 1 1: PROFESSIONAL VS. SMALL BUSINESS EDITION INSTALLATION STEPS As shown in Error! Reference source not found., the Small Business Edition is designed for the smaller organization with simpler deployment requirements. In a typical SBE installation, the system defaults are accepted for the following steps: The directory location of the system files The Server Setup program creates the Microsoft CRM web site The Small Business Server is identified as the SQL Server, the SQL Server Reporting Services Server, and the Exchange Server The existing Organizational Unit in Active Directory During the SBE installation, you can perform a custom installation. A custom installation basically performs the additional steps in Error! Reference source not found. that are not included in the default SBE installation. This allows you to enter override values for each step. Step 1 License Code Information Following the splash screen, the installation user is asked to enter their Microsoft CRM Server license code. A valid server license key must be entered on this page before the user can continue with the rest of the installation. However, this page can also be used for entering client license keys together with the server license key. Page 16

23 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition The Microsoft CRM Setup Wizard automatically detects whether you are installing on a Windows Small Business Server 2003 server or on a Windows Server 2000 or 2003 server. The server license key that you enter must correspond to the type of server on which you are installing Microsoft CRM. If you are installing on a Small Business Server, make sure your license is for Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition. Using a Microsoft CRM Professional Edition license key is not supported on Windows Small Business Server. If you are installing on a Windows 2000 or 2003 Server, make sure your license is for Microsoft CRM Professional Edition. Using a Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition license key is not supported on Windows 2000 or 2003 Server. NOTE: Client license keys can also be entered in the License Manager tool following the installation of the Microsoft CRM Server. FIGURE 1 1: LICENSE CODE SETUP Features of the License Code page include the following: The server license code that is entered in this page is the new PID license key that is included with the Microsoft CRM 3.0 CD. After entering each license key, the user should click Add to validate the key. Validated license keys are displayed in the page, together with the number of user licenses associated with it. A server license key will have zero (0) user licenses. Page 17

24 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition The installation user can also enter one or more client license keys. Each validated client license key is also displayed in the page, together with the license count associated with the key. A validated key can also be deleted from the page. There is no requirement of the order in which the server and client license keys are entered; the only stipulation is that the installation cannot continue until a server key is entered. Step 2 End User License Agreement The installation user can choose to print the End User License Agreement (EULA). However, the user cannot continue with the installation until the license agreement is accepted. Step 3 Install Required Components This page identifies any software components required by the Microsoft CRM Server Setup program that have not been installed on the Microsoft CRM Server. This page will not appear if all required components are already installed. Any components that appear on this page must be installed before Microsoft CRM can be installed. In order to install the missing components, you can exit Setup and install the components manually, or you can select the Install option on this page and the Setup program will install the components. The Next button on this page is disabled until Setup detects that the missing components have been installed. NOTE: Installing these components may require you to restart the computer. If you are prompted to restart the computer do so and then start setup again. FIGURE 1 2: INSTALL REQUIRED COMPONENTS Page 18

25 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Step 4 Select Installation Option (Standard or Custom) As mentioned above, it is recommended that most small business users choose the standard installation. Choosing the custom installation provides additional advanced installation options. Step 5 Specify the Microsoft CRM Organization Name This page allows the installation user to enter the organization's name. The organization name is used as follows: When the Microsoft CRM Server Setup program creates the Microsoft CRM database and the Metabase database, it appends the organization name to the start of each database name. The Microsoft CRM Server Setup program creates a root business unit in Microsoft CRM and assigns it the organization name entered here. BEST PRACTICE: Although any organization name can be entered as a best practice it is recommended that you use the organization's legal entity/trading name as the organization's name. Step 6 Participate in Customer Experience Improvement Program This page allows the organization to indicate whether they want to participate in the Customer Experience Improvement program with Microsoft. Features of this program include the following: Microsoft is able to gather anonymous information about your hardware configuration and how you use Microsoft software and services. The data is used to identify trends and usage patterns. Microsoft does not gather any personal or business specific data such as your name, address, or any other personally identifiable information There are no surveys to complete, no salesperson will call you, and you can continue to work without interruption Page 19

26 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition It is simple, friendly, and completely anonymous. FIGURE 1 3: PARTICIPATE IN THE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM The Customer Experience Improvement Program feature in Microsoft CRM 3.0 is turned off by default at product release. If you use a third party to install and/or configure the Microsoft CRM software on your computer system and you want to participate in the Microsoft Customer Experience Improvement Program, you should instruct the third-party provider to accept the invitation to participate in the Customer Experience Improvement Program on your behalf. If you decide that you want to turn off this feature after the third-party provider accepts the invitation to participate in the Customer Experience Improvement Program on your behalf, you may do so by using one of these options: Microsoft CRM server On the Start menu, point to Microsoft CRM, and click Deployment Manager to open Deployment Manager. Expand the Deployment Manager node, and in Server Manager, right-click on the Microsoft CRM server and click Customer Feedback. Microsoft CRM laptop client for Outlook In Outlook, on the CRM menu, click Options, and click the Customer Feedback tab. Clear the Participate in the Customer Experience Improvement Program check box. Page 20

27 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Step 7 System Requirements At this point all the system parameters used to install the Microsoft CRM server have been entered by the installation user. With this step the Server Setup program runs the Environmental Diagnostic Wizard. This tool verifies each system requirement for a successful Microsoft CRM Server installation. For any requirement that fails, you can double-click on the error to see a user-friendly description of the error and suggested steps to solve the problem. Failed tests must be corrected before the installation can proceed. If a problem will take time to correct, cancel setup at this time, fix the problem (or problems) and restart Setup again. You can click Next and proceed with the setup when all tests are successful. FIGURE 1 4: VERIFICATION OF SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS Step 8 Ready to Install the Application This page displays all the selections that you made on the previous pages. If there are any parameters that need adjusting, you can navigate back to the appropriate page and adjust the parameters accordingly. Step 9 Installing Microsoft CRM Server The Microsoft CRM Server Setup program installs the Microsoft CRM Server software. WARNING: You cannot cancel the installation after it begins. Page 21

28 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Optional Installation Steps The following steps are required in the Microsoft CRM Professional installation and are available as optional steps in the Small Business Edition installation. They are shown to illustrate the ease of the Small Business Edition installation vs. the Profession installation. Students should also be aware that these optional installation settings are available. Step 6 Select Installation Location This page identifies which directory location on the Microsoft CRM Server is used to store the Microsoft CRM server components. C:\Program Files\Microsoft CRM is the default location presented on the page. Step 7 Web Site The Web Site page indicates which web site should be used for storing the Microsoft CRM web components. The following two options are available: The installation user can select an existing web site from the dropdown list. NOTE: Select Refresh if the web site that you plan to use does not appear in this list. The installation user can select a check box that directs the Setup program to create a new web site. If you click the option to let the Setup program create the web site, the Microsoft CRM Web site that is created will be located at: C:\ProgramFiles\Microsoft CRM\Microsoft CRMWeb. Also located in this folder is a web.config file for this Web site. FIGURE 1 5: SELECT THE MICROSOFT CRM WEB SITE Page 22

29 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition During Microsoft CRM setup, you must use a web site that refers to a local folder location in the Path field on the home directory of the IIS console. During Microsoft CRM setup, if you specify a Web site that uses a "home" network shared folder on another server, Microsoft CRM Setup fails with any of the following errors: Error Invalid Drive: H:\ Installation failed prematurely... Failed to install Microsoft CRM Server Failed to Install MSI part of Microsoft CRM Server Setup Unspecified error ( ) Step 8 Select SQL Server This page indicates which SQL Server should be used as the database server for the Microsoft CRM installation. This page includes the following options: The installation user can select the SQL Server from a list of available servers in the domain. NOTE: Select Refresh if the SQL Server that you plan to use does not appear in this list. The installation user must select an option that indicates whether the Setup program should create a new database or connect to an existing database. The "Create new databases" option should be selected when the Setup program is installing the first Microsoft CRM Server in the organization's deployment. If multiple Microsoft CRM Servers are installed, select the "Connect to existing databases" option for each subsequent Microsoft CRM Server installation. Page 23

30 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition NOTE: If you select the "Connect to existing databases" option, the SQL Server that you select should be the server on which the existing database exists. The SQL Server is immediately validated when you select this option, and an error is displayed if the Microsoft CRM database does not exist on this server. FIGURE 1 6: SELECT SQL SERVER Step 9 Specify SQL Server Reporting Services Server This page directs the Server Setup program to either install Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Reporting Services (SRS) or connect to an existing SRS server to run the Microsoft CRM reports. The following options are available on the page: If you click the Install new Report Server option, you can also indicate whether the Server uses an SSL certificate. The following SSL options are available: If you click the Use Secured Sockets Layer (SSL) check box, the Setup Server program tries to associate a Secure Socket Layer (SSL) certificate with the web site for installing SRS. If a certificate is found, then SSL will be used for retrieving data from the Report Server. Page 24

31 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition If you click the Use Secured Sockets Layer (SSL) check box and an SSL Server certificates is not associated with the web site, then an error message is returned. FIGURE 1 7: SSL ERROR MESSAGE If you do not click the Use SSL certificate check box, then data is retrieved from the Report Server within a potentially nonsecure deployment. If you click the Connect to existing Report Services Server option, then you must enter the URL of the existing report server. IMPORTANT: If you select Connect to existing Report Services Server, be sure to use the Report Server URL and not the Report Manager URL. To verify that you are using the correct URL, in a browser, go to what you expect is the Report Server URL. You should see a page titled <server>/reportserver /: with text showing the version number: Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services Version FIGURE 1 8: SQL REPORTING SERVICES SERVER Page 25

32 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Step 10 Select the AD Organizational Unit This page identifies the organizational unit within Active Directory that will contain the Microsoft CRM System Groups. You must point the Setup program to an existing domain or Organizational Unit. If you select an organizational unit, it must be in the same domain that Microsoft CRM is being installed to. To use this page click Browse to display the organizational tree structure within Active Directory, and then click either the domain or an organizational unit from within the domain. FIGURE 1 9: SELECT THE ORGANIZATIONAL UNIT Step 11 Specify the Security Account for the Microsoft CRM Services This page identifies which security account is used for the following Microsoft CRM services that are installed: Microsoft CRM ASP.NET SQL Reporting Services Page 26

33 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition You can either use the same account for each service, or specify a different account for each service. The accounts include the following: Local System account (see Note below) Network service account (this is the default for each service) Domain user account FIGURE 1 10: SPECIFY THE SECURITY ACCOUNT NOTE: If you select to install using a Domain user account and depending on the password policies you have implemented for your organization the password for the user may expire. The user will have to change the password for Microsoft CRM services to be the same as his or her logon. NOTE: The Local System account is only available on Windows 2000 Server; it is not an option on Windows Server NOTE: If you select to run the ASP.NET service under a domain user account that is not either a domain administrator or a local administrator you must set a local security policy after you install Microsoft CRM Server. This enables the ASP.NET service to work correctly. Page 27

34 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Step 12 Exchange Server Settings This page allows you to identify the Exchange Server that is used for processing incoming , as well as outgoing mail sent from the web client. The following features are included with options on this page: Incoming Exchange Server. Specifying the name of the incoming Exchange Server during Microsoft CRM Server Setup is a security feature. Microsoft CRM only s incoming from this server. The design goal is to prevent hackers from using any Exchange Server to send a Denial of Service attack on Microsoft CRM by requesting an extensive amount of activity creation. When you enter the name of the Incoming Exchange Server on this page, the Setup program adds it to the PrivUserGroup in the Active Directory organizational unit. If you leave the Incoming Exchange Server field blank, you receive the following warning message directing you to add the server to this security group. FIGURE 1 11: EXCHANGE SERVER WARNING MESSAGE Page 28

35 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Outgoing SMTP Server. These options control which SMTP server processes outgoing from web clients. The default option is to use the default SMTP server settings for all outgoing mail. Alternatively, you can use a remote SMTP server, in which case you must enter the server name, port, authentication method, username and password (if needed). You can also indicate whether this remote SMTP server requires a secure connection (SSL). FIGURE 1 12: EXCHANGE SERVER SETTINGS Page 29

36 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Microsoft CRM Integration with SBS Fax Service One of the features specific to the Small Business Edition of Microsoft CRM is that it integrates tightly with the Small Business Server Fax service. This integration allows faxes to be sent and received directly from within Microsoft CRM using the Fax activity. The Microsoft CRM-Fax Router Service is installed automatically, but is only enabled if the Windows Fax service is installed and enabled. When the Microsoft CRM-Fax Router Service is enabled, a queue called "Fax Queue" is automatically created in the Microsoft CRM application. This queue cannot be deleted or modified. Because the Microsoft CRM-Fax Router Service uses the existing Windows Fax service, configuration and administration tasks are performed using the existing Server Management Console in Small Business Server. These tasks include creating or modifying cover letters, viewing send/receive status of faxes, troubleshooting, etc. and should already be familiar to Small Business Server administrators. Incoming Fax Routing When the Microsoft CRM-Fax Router Service is enabled, incoming faxes are received and processed as follows: 1. The Windows Fax Service receives an incoming fax. 2. The Microsoft CRM-Fax Router Service intercepts the fax and runs the first page through its Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software. 3. The OCR software looks to see if there is a cover page and uses heuristic rules to attempt to capture the fax recipient name. 4. The captured recipient name is compared to the list of users' names in Microsoft CRM to see if there is a match. 5. If there is a match, a fax activity is created in Microsoft CRM and assigned to the matching user. 6. If there is no match (or if a recipient cannot be determined using the OCR software), a fax activity is created in Microsoft CRM and assigned to the Fax Queue. Page 30

37 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Sending Outgoing Faxes When the Microsoft CRM-Fax Router service is enabled, a button will be visible in the Fax Activity form labeled Send. This button can be used to send faxes directly from Microsoft CRM as follows: 1. Create a new Fax Activity. 2. Fill in all required information including Recipient and Cover Page. NOTE: Available cover pages are pulled from the Small Business Server Fax Management Console and are presented as a picklist of choices. 3. Save the activity. 4. Use the attachment button on the activity toolbar to attach the document to be faxed. NOTE: Because the Windows Fax service is used to send the fax, all document type restrictions for this service apply. Please review the Microsoft Small Business Server documentation for a list of supported document types. 5. Press the Send button in the activity toolbar. 6. The fax will be sent and an activity record created. Page 31

38 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Installing the Microsoft CRM 3.0 Client for Outlook Microsoft CRM Client for Outlook Overview The Microsoft CRM clients for Outlook that are available in Microsoft CRM 3.0 include: An online-only, multi-user client. This is referred to as the "Microsoft CRM 3.0 desktop client for Microsoft Office Outlook." The desktop client is designed for shared workstations and terminal services/citrix scenarios. This client supports multiple, sometimes concurrent, Outlook client users on the same computer. This client cannot be taken offline. An offline-enabled single-user client. This is the same Microsoft CRM client for Outlook that was available in earlier versions of Microsoft CRM. This client can function while online with the Microsoft CRM Server, as well as in an offline mode. It is referred to as the "Microsoft CRM 3.0 laptop client for Microsoft Office Outlook." FIGURE 1 13: MICROSOFT CRM CLIENTS FOR MICROSOFT OFFICE OUTLOOK When running the Client Setup program, you are asked to specify on the Welcome page which Outlook client you want to install. The earlier chapter titled Microsoft CRM Components examined in detail the differences between the two clients. Page 32

39 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Error! Reference source not found. displays a summarized list of the primary features of each client. Microsoft CRM 3.0 desktop client for Outlook Online-only, multi-user client Intended for computers that never go offline Enables multiple installations of the client on the same computer (for example, shift workers sharing a desktop machine) Installation does not install the MSDE database or the local web server No local (offline) platform logic Always online, so that no Microsoft CRM synchronization required Manual Outlook synchronization Microsoft CRM 3.0 laptop client for Outlook Online and Offline-enabled, singleuser client Intended for computers that are required to take data offline Only one installation per computer Installs a local MSDE database and a local web server for offline processing Offline processing uses local platform logic Requires offline Microsoft CRM synchronization New schedulable Outlook synchronization capability TABLE 1 2: MICROSOFT CRM CLIENTS FOR OUTLOOK COMPARISON Microsoft CRM 3.0 Client for Outlook Pre-Installation Requirements Both Microsoft CRM clients for Outlook require: Check ( ) box when verified Component Operating System Requirement Windows 2000 Professional with SP4; or Windows XP Professional with SP1 (Service Pack 2 is supported but not required) Internet Data Provider Office Internet Explorer 6.0 with SP1 or later; or Internet Explorer 7.0 Microsoft Data Access Components (MDAC) 2.8 with SP1 or later Microsoft Office 2003 Editions with SP1; or Microsoft Office XP (2002) with Service Pack 3 TABLE 1 3: MICROSOFT CRM CLIENT FOR MICROSOFT OFFICE OUTLOOK SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS Page 33

40 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition The following components are installed by the Microsoft CRM Outlook Client Setup program if they do not exist on your client computer: Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Desktop Engine (MSDE) with SP4 even if SQL Server 2000 is installed on the machine (only for the Microsoft CRM laptop client for Outlook) Microsoft XML Core Services (MSXML) 4.0 with SP2 Microsoft.NET Framework 1.1 with SP1 or later Windows Hotfix Q Both clients have similar software requirements, including the fact that the language of the client must match the language of the Microsoft CRM Server. For example, you cannot install a German version of Microsoft CRM Server and a Spanish version of the clients. The Microsoft CRM Server and the laptop and desktop Outlook clients installed within a Microsoft CRM deployment must all be the same language. While both clients share the software requirements mentioned above, there are also differences between the two, including: Both clients cannot be installed and cannot co-exist on the same computer at the same time. Each installation of the Microsoft CRM laptop client for Outlook supports only one user. Each installation of the Microsoft CRM desktop client for Outlook supports multiple users. However, each person logging on to the client computer must use the same client installation and the computer must be set to only one language configuration. To switch from one client to the other on the same computer, you must uninstall the existing client and install the other. Installing from the Client CD When installing the client directly from the Client CD, the installation user must be a Local Administrator on the computer. This is a requirement to simply run the Client Setup program itself, as well as a SQL requirement that allows the Setup program to create the MSDE database on the client computer. This section examines each step in the installation process for the Microsoft CRM 3.0 Client for Outlook. No screen images are displayed of each step, because the steps are basically the same as those documented in the lesson on Microsoft CRM Server Setup. Page 34

41 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Step 1 Select Client Type On the Welcome page, select which version of the Microsoft CRM Client for Outlook to install. The two options include: Install Laptop Client (Microsoft Outlook-integrated Microsoft CRM client with Offline Microsoft CRM) Install Desktop Client (On-line only Microsoft Outlook-integrated Microsoft CRM client) Step 2 End User License Agreement The installation user can select to print the End User License Agreement (EULA). However, the user cannot continue with the installation until the license agreement is accepted. Step 3 Install Required Components This screen identifies any software components required by the Microsoft CRM Client Setup program that have not been installed on the client machine. The installation user must simply click Install and the Setup program installs each missing component. This screen will not appear if all required components are installed. Step 4 Specify the Microsoft CRM Server Enter the URL of the Microsoft CRM Server to which the client machine will be connected. Step 5 Participate in the Customer Experience Improvement program This screen allows users to indicate whether they want to participate in the Customer Experience Improvement program with Microsoft. Features of this program include the following: Microsoft is able to gather anonymous information about your hardware configuration and how you use Microsoft software and services. The data is used to identify trends and usage patterns. Microsoft does not gather any personal or business specific data such as your name, address, or any other personally identifiable information. There are no surveys to complete, no salesperson will call you, and you can continue to work without interruption. It is simple, friendly, and completely anonymous. Step 6 Select Install Locations Select the directory in which the Client components will be installed. The default location is typically used. Page 35

42 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Step 7 System Requirements At this point all the system parameters being used to install the Client have been entered by the installation user. With this step the Client Setup program runs the Environmental Diagnostic Wizard, which verifies each system requirement. For any requirement that fails, Dr. Watson reporting provides a user-friendly description of the error and suggested steps to solve the problem. Step 8 Ready to Install the Application This screen displays all the selections that you made on the previous screens. If there are any parameters that need adjusting, you can navigate back to the appropriate screen and adjust the parameters accordingly. Step 9 Installing Microsoft CRM Client for Outlook The Microsoft CRM Client Setup program installs the Microsoft CRM client for Outlook. Install using Small Business Server Management Console The Outlook client can also be deployed through a network installation using Small Business Server's Management console. This method of installation does not require the end-user be a member of the Local Administrator group. Using the console is also preferable because it eliminates the need for the system administrator to be present at the physical client machine. Multiple installations can be configured and performed from the centralized server location. When Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition is installed on the Small Business Server, the two types of Outlook client are added to the list of client applications available for network installation. The Outlook client can then be added to a workstation using the Set Up Client Applications Wizard provided in the Manage Client Computers section of the Server Management console. When a user next logs in to the workstation, the installation will begin. Page 36

43 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition NOTE: Do not install both the laptop and desktop clients on the same machine. FIGURE 1 14: INSTALLING THE OUTLOOK CLIENT THROUGH SBS SERVER MANAGEMENT CONSOLE Page 37

44 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Conclusion This lesson has reviewed Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition and highlighted points related to its installation. Pre-installation topics such as licensing, requirements, and planning have been discussed. The simplified Small Business Edition installation procedure has been described in detail and the two ways of installing the Outlook client have been reviewed. Page 38

45 Chapter 1: Installing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Quick Interaction: Lessons Learned Take a moment and write down three Key Points you have learned from this chapter: Page 39

46 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Page 40

47 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition CHAPTER 2: CONFIGURING MICROSOFT CRM SMALL BUSINESS EDITION Objectives Actively participating during this chapter helps you: Use the Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Configuration Wizard Understand Microsoft CRM security concepts including privileges, access levels, and roles Understand security role defaults and customization flexibility Introduction This chapter discusses the implementation task to be performed during the postinstallation of Microsoft CRM. These tasks have been much simplified for small businesses due to the existence of the Small Business Edition Configuration Wizard. This wizard provides a step by step questionnaire to automate a number of otherwise manual tasks. The Microsoft CRM security model is discussed and security role customization is demonstrated. Using the Configuration Wizard After the Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition server installation is completed, a shortcut is created on the desktop labeled Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Configuration Wizard. The target executable is called Microsoft CRM.SBE.ConfigurationWizard.exe and is located in the Program Files\Microsoft CRM\Tools folder. The Microsoft CRM 3.0 SBE Configuration Wizard walks the configuration user through a simple questionnaire and automates a number of standard configuration tasks based on the answers provided. It simplifies the configuration stage of the Microsoft CRM implementation, providing an easier and more affordable installation for small businesses. Page 41

48 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition The user completing the wizard must be the same user who installed Microsoft CRM SBE and must have an understanding of the structure of the sales and service operations of the CRM organization. The wizard should be run and configuration settings prior to performing manual configurations or customizations and prior to entering data. After completing the wizard, the configuration settings can be saved in an XML file for later use, or directly applied through the wizard. Work cannot be saved until the wizard is completed, and as a result, the wizard must be completed in one sitting. Also be aware, that the wizard's configuration changes can only be applied once and can only be changed or undone manually. FIGURE 2 1: THE MICROSOFT CRM SBE CONFIGURATION WIZARD The Microsoft CRM 3.0 SBE Configuration Wizard guides the user through the following steps: Step 1: Define Organization Details In this section, provide the following organizational information: Primary industry served The wizard provides a picklist of standard industries and uses this information to define the subject hierarchy with Microsoft CRM. Subjects are used to categorize many types of information, such as cases and knowledge base articles. Page 42

49 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Does your company use more than one location for providing server? This is used later in the wizard to determine which customer service information needs to be provided. FIGURE 2 2: DEFINE ORGANIZATION DETAILS FORM Step 2: Edit Subjects A subject hierarchy is provided automatically based on the primary industry served chosen in step one. During this step, items can be edited, removed, or added to the subject list. FIGURE 2 3: EDIT SUBJECTS FORM Page 43

50 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Step 3: Define Sales Operations This step matches terminology and formats used in Microsoft CRM to match the way the organizations does business. This makes it easier for staff to use and decreases adoption time. How would you like to display full names in Microsoft CRM? The wizard provides a picklist of the following options. Last Name, First Name First Name Last Name Last Name, First Name Middle Initial First Name Middle Initial Last Name Last Name, First Name Middle Name First Name Middle Name Last Name What do you call the companies that you do business with? The wizard provides a picklist of both singular and plural forms of common terms. This choice will replace instances of the default term "Account" used in Microsoft CRM forms, reports, etc. The picklist options are: Account(s) Business(es) Vendor(s) Merchant(s) Company(ies) Family(ies) What do you call the individuals that you work with? The wizard provides a picklist of both singular and plural forms of common terms. This choice will replace instances of the default term "Contact" in Microsoft CRM forms, reports, etc. The picklist options are: Contact(s) Client(s) Guest(s) Patron(s) Donor(s) Patient(s) Page 44

51 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Do you use sales territories to manage your sales force? Select Yes or No depending on how sales force for the organization is structured. FIGURE 2 4: DEFINE SALES OPERATIONS FORM Step 3b: Define Territories If sales territories are used to manage the organization's sales force, they are entered during this step. Territories can help increase productivity and make it easier to manage the sales force. Territories can be created based on products or geographical regions. FIGURE 2 5: DEFINE TERRITORIES FORM Page 45

52 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Step 4: Define Top Competitors Monitoring the competition is important so that coaching can be provided for sales representatives on how to win contested opportunities. The Microsoft CRM Competitor Win Loss Report can be used to monitor success against each competitor. Enter up to five top competitors. FIGURE 2 6: DEFINE TOP COMPETITORS FORM Step 5: Define Service Options When customers experience trouble with products or services, ensuring a positive customer service experience can be the difference between keeping a customer and causing them to take their business elsewhere. Microsoft CRM provides service representatives with the information they need to resolve customer complaints quickly and with the right information. Provide the following service operation information: Do you provide customer support using ? If Yes, what is the address for support? What do you call the incidents that you track for customers? The wizard provides a picklist of both singular and plural forms of common terms. This choice replaces instances of the default term "Case" in Microsoft CRM forms, reports, etc. The picklist options are: Case(s) Incident(s) Ticket(s) Problem(s) Page 46

53 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Event(s) Bug(s) Do you use teams of service representatives, with each team having a specialty? FIGURE 2 7: DEFINE SERVICE OPTIONS FORM Step 6: Define Service Sites Grouping your service resources into sites will allow equipment and personnel to be assigned to a specific service area. This makes it possible to schedule services appropriately. FIGURE 2 8: DEFINE SERVICE SITES FORM Page 47

54 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Step 7: Define Service Queues Any customer service request or complaint that is ignored can cause a customer to take their business elsewhere. Queues help organize and balance the load on service representatives, and help avoid assigning activities and service to an employee who is out of the office. When knowledge based articles are published, queues can be used instead of individuals for the approval cycle. FIGURE 2 9: DEFINE SERVICE QUEUES FORM Step 8: Configuring Microsoft CRM Select whether to configure Microsoft CRM now or to save the configuration information to an XML file to use later. If Now is chosen, the configuration takes place immediately. If Later is chosen, a file name and location must be chosen for the created XML file. Page 48

55 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition To configure Microsoft CRM from this XML file later, the wizard must be run from a command window using the path and file name of the XML file. To run the wizard, in a command window, change directories to Program Files\Microsoft CRM\Tools folder, and then type Microsoft CRM.SBE.ConfigurationWizard.exe <file name>. FIGURE 2 10: CONFIGURING MICROSOFT CRM FORM Step 9: Review Summary After all questions have been completed, the wizard displays a summary of the configuration changes that will be applied. Review this list and correct any errors by navigating back to the step to be corrected. FIGURE 2 11: SUMMARY REVIEW Page 49

56 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Step 10: Select Microsoft Server Enter the URL of the Microsoft CRM SBE server. NOTE: You must have the Microsoft CRM System Administrator security role in order to continue. If you do not, click Back, and save the configuration information as an XML file to be used later. FIGURE 2 12: SELECT CRM SERVER FORM Step 11: Import Customization The configuration starts and a status bar shows total progress. The status of each customization area is displayed with an indicator showing whether the customization was skipped, succeeded, failed, or is in progress. FIGURE 2 13: IMPORT CONFIGURATION STATUS SCREEN Page 50

57 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Configuring Microsoft CRM SBE Security Goals of the Microsoft CRM Security Model The goals of the Microsoft CRM security model include the following: To give users access to the appropriate levels of information required to do their jobs. Categorize types of users to define roles and restrict access based on those roles. Support data sharing so that users can be granted access to objects they do not own for a specified collaborative task. Prevent a user from accessing objects that the user does not own or share. FIGURE 1: FUNCTION OF ROLES Types of Security These goals are accomplished through use of two types of security models, each of which is incorporated in security roles. Role-based security in Microsoft CRM focuses on grouping a set of privileges together which describe the tasks performed by a user in a specific job function. Object-based security in Microsoft CRM focuses on user rights to the primary business objects such as Leads, Opportunities, Contacts, Accounts, and Incidents (Cases). This kind of security forms the core of the Microsoft CRM solution. Page 51

58 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition The combination of role-based security and object security defines the overall security rights users possess within their Microsoft CRM application. Although default roles are automatically created by the Microsoft CRM Server Setup program to make implementations easier, quicker, and less costly, custom roles can also be created to satisfy unique security requirements. Security Configuration Options Microsoft CRM implementers and administrators should clearly understand the use of security roles in their Microsoft CRM implementations. Two options are available when configuring system security: Microsoft CRM can be quickly deployed by assigning each user one or more default roles that map to their job functions. For some businesses, the privileges and access levels included in the default roles do not provide the preferred security level. In those cases, the default roles can serve as a template to create customized roles. This lesson examines the privileges and access levels that are built in to each role, and reviews the steps involved in creating new roles and customizing existing roles to fit your business requirements. Privileges and access levels work together through the use of security roles. Privileges Privileges define what actions a user can perform on each entity in Microsoft CRM. Privileges are pre-defined in Microsoft CRM and cannot be changed. A few examples of privileges include: Create Read Write Delete Access Levels Access levels indicate which records associated with each entity the user can perform actions upon. Although default access levels are assigned to each privilege, the access level can be changed. EXAMPLE: If a role allows the user to delete accounts, then the access level associated with the account delete privilege will indicate which accounts the user can delete. Page 52

59 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Security roles Each role provides a combination of privileges and access levels specific to a Microsoft CRM job function. A licensed user must be assigned one or more roles before he or she can access Microsoft CRM. FIGURE 2: ACCESS LEVEL, PRIVILEGE, AND ROLE RELATIONSHIP Controlling Data Access Data access is controlled through the combination of privileges and access levels within security roles. Defining access levels for each entity and action through security roles allows a System Administrator control over every record and action a user can perform upon them. Sharing Data Although this is controlled through access levels, it can also be controlled through specific data sharing capabilities on a per record basis. For more information about sharing specific records, see one of the courses in the Microsoft CRM Applications series training. Privileges Privileges are the most basic security unit in Microsoft CRM, defining what actions a user can perform on each entity in the system. When thinking of privileges, think "actions" as in, actions each user can perform on an account, contact, or lead. EXAMPLE: Considering your organization's business model, should your sales representatives be allowed to create an invoice, read an opportunity, update a customer service case, and delete an account? The privileges mentioned in this example are just a fraction of the privileges that must be analyzed on a role by role basis during the implementation planning stage. In fact, Microsoft CRM 3.0 security roles include approximately 300 privileges. Page 53

60 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Privileges are the foundation of each underlying security check. Privileges are built into the product, which means: They cannot be added or removed. The manner in which they are used to grant access to certain functionality cannot be changed. New roles can be constructed that incorporate the existing privilege set. There are two basic types of privileges used in Microsoft CRM security roles. Most privileges map to specific entities, such as delete Accounts, read Contacts, and assign Service Cases. Other privileges are more administrative or task-based privileges that do not map to a specific entity. These include such privileges as Print, Export to Microsoft Excel, and Assign Roles. FIGURE 3: PRIVILEGE OVERVIEW The net result is that administrators are provided with very precise control over every action each user can perform in the system. Page 54

61 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition EXAMPLE: A section of the default Sales Manager role is displayed in Figure 4. The privileges such as Create, Read, Write, and Delete are displayed along the top of the tab, and the entities to which each privilege is associated are displayed in the left column (Account and Contact). The icon that appears under each privilege/entity combination refers to the access level associated with that privilege and entity. FIGURE 4: PRIVILEGES WITHIN A ROLE Common Privileges for Each Entity The primary security privileges available for most entities include the following: Privileges Description Create Allows the user to create a record for the specified entity. NOTE: One additional stipulation exists to create records for an entity. As an added security measure the role must provide BOTH the Create and Read privileges for that entity for the user to be able to create a record Privileges Description Read Write Delete Append Append To Allows the user to read a record for this entity. This controls which records are displayed on views and reports. Allows the user to update (change) a record for this entity. Allows the user to delete a record for the entity. Allows the user to append (attach) this entity to another entity. Allows the user to append other entities to this entity. Page 55

62 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition NOTE: The Append and Append To privileges work in combination with each other. For example if a Note is attached to a Case you must have the Append privilege on the Note and the Append To privilege on the Case. Privileges Description Assign Share Allows the user to assign ownership of a record for this entity to another user. Allows the user to share a record for this entity with another user or team. Sharing enables another user to access a record. TABLE 2 1: COMMON PRIVILEGES Task-Based Privileges The Business Management tab in each security role includes several task-based privileges that are not related to a specific entity. Some of these privileges are more administrative type tasks, such as Assign Role and ISV Extensions. Others are more user-oriented, daily tasks that can be applied to any entity, such as Export to Excel and Print. NOTE: While task-based privileges are located in most of the tabs within a security role, the majority of tasks are located at the bottom of the Business Management tab. This tab is displayed in Figure 5 for the Salesperson role. FIGURE 5: TASK BASED PRIVILEGES IN EACH ROLE Page 56

63 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Access Levels Privileges indicate what actions a user can perform on each entity, whereas access levels define which records for that entity the user can perform those actions upon. Access levels are based on a combination of: User ownership The business unit to which the user belongs Microsoft CRM supports the following five access levels for each privilege and entity (these are presented in "most-restrictive" to "least-restrictive" order): Access Level None User Business Unit Parent: Child Business Unit Organization Description You cannot perform the action on that entity. You can only perform the action upon the records for that entity that you own, in addition to records that have been shared with you, and records that have been shared with any team in which you are a member. This gives you User access, in addition to the ability to perform the action on all records for that entity that are owned by users assigned to your business unit. This provides you with Business Unit access. Additionally, you have the ability to perform the action on all records for that entity that are owned by users assigned to business units subordinate to your business unit, regardless of how far down in the organizational hierarchy the subordinate business units may appear. You can perform the action on all records for that entity, regardless of who owns the record within your organization. TABLE 2 2: ACCESS LEVELS Page 57

64 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Hierarchical Access Each access level includes records made available by all access levels below the level granted to the user by the privilege. For example, if you have Parent:Child Business Unit Read access for Accounts, then by default you implicitly have Business Unit and User Read access for Accounts as well. This relationship is displayed in Figure 6. FIGURE 6: HIERARCHICAL ACCESS LEVELS Page 58

65 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Access Level None The None access level restricts the user from performing that action on ANY records within that entity even on records owned by that user. In a strict manner of speaking, a privilege is not assigned to a security role if the access level is set to None. Conversely, a privilege is assigned to a role when the access level is changed from None to another value. EXAMPLE: Gail Erickson is the Sales Manager for Adventure Works' Western Region. Adventure Works has decided that as Sales Manager, there are some privileges she should be restricted from performing such as creating, writing, and deleting Views. To guarantee this, a copy of the default Sales Manager role is created and the None access level is assigned to the Create, Write, and Delete privilege for the Views entity. Gail is assigned this new role instead of the default Sales Manager role. FIGURE 7: NONE ACCESS LEVEL Page 59

66 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Access Level User Except for the None access level, User access is the most restrictive of the remaining levels that provide some form of access. If your role provides User access for a specific entity and privilege, you can only perform that action on the following records for that particular entity: Records that you own Records owned by someone else but have been shared with you Records shared with a Team in which you are a member EXAMPLE: In Adventure Works Cycle, Douglas Hite is a Customer Service Representative in the Customer Support business unit. Douglas has "User Account Create" and "User Account Write" access. The User level access for these two privileges enables Douglas to create new Accounts and edit (change) any records that are assigned to him, shared with him by other users, or shared with any team in which he is a member. FIGURE 8: USER ACCESS LEVEL Page 60

67 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Access Level Business Unit Business Unit access is the next step up from User level access. Business Unit access for a specific entity and privilege gives you the following: User Access rights Access to records that are owned by or shared with other users assigned to the same business unit as you EXAMPLE: Stefan DelMarco is the Customer Support Manager at Adventure Works Cycle. He manages the Customer Service representatives and is required to assign and review all accounts and cases assigned to these representatives. Assigning him "Business Unit Case Create" access enables him to create cases for any customer assigned to the Customer Support business unit. Similarly, if Stefan has "Business Unit Account Delete" access, he can delete any Account record that is owned by him or any user who is assigned to the Customer Support Business Unit. FIGURE 9: BUSINESS UNIT ACCESS LEVEL Page 61

68 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Access Level Parent:Child Business Unit Parent:Child Business Unit access is the next step up from Business Unit access. Parent:Child Business Unit access for a specific entity and privilege gives you the following: User and Business Unit access rights Access to records owned by users and shared with users who are assigned to any business unit subordinate to your business unit regardless of how deep in the organizational structure the user's business unit appears EXAMPLE: Mary Baker is the VP of Sales and Marketing for Adventure Works Cycle. She manages all the Sales and Marketing representatives for the Field Sales and Marketing Divisions. By assigning Mary "Parent:Child Opportunity Read" access, she can view all opportunities that are owned by any user who is assigned to the Sales & Marketing business unit or any one of its child business units. Because the Adventure Works Cycle, Customer Care, Customer Support, and OEM Support business units are not subordinate to Mary's business unit, she cannot view opportunities owned by users assigned to those business units. FIGURE 10: PARENT:CHILD BUSINESS UNIT ACCESS LEVEL Page 62

69 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Access Level Organization Organization access is the least restrictive of all access rights. Organization access for a specific entity and privilege allows you perform that action on records owned by any user within the whole organization, regardless of the business unit to which the owner belongs. There are no access restrictions with Organization access. EXAMPLE: David Lawrence is the System Administrator for Adventure Works Cycle. He requires the ability to reassign ownership of any record in the system, regardless of the business unit to which the owner of the record belongs. If his System Administrator role gives him Organization Lead Assign access, David can reassign any lead that is entered in the system, regardless of who owns the record. FIGURE 11: ORGANIZATION ACCESS LEVEL Page 63

70 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Security Roles A security role is the combination of privileges and access levels for a specific job function. Although you can create custom roles for individual users, Microsoft CRM's focus from an implementation standpoint is on security roles at the job function level. This enables a specific role to be assigned to one or more users, each of whom performs the same job function. Default Roles When Microsoft CRM is installed, the Microsoft CRM Server Setup program automatically creates a series of default security roles in the root business unit. Both the Microsoft CRM 3.0 Professional Edition and Small Business Edition install 13 default roles. The resulting security models for each Microsoft CRM edition correspond directly with the typical job functions performed within their target business environments. For each default role: Access levels for read privileges are typically more liberal (Organization and Parent:Child) Access levels for update privileges have been strategically limited to the operational requirements of each role Microsoft CRM includes the following default security roles: Administrative CEO-Business Manager System Administrator System Customizer Customer Service Customer Service Manager Customer Service Representative Scheduler Schedule Manager Sales & Marketing Vice President of Sales Sales Manager Salesperson Vice President of Marketing Marketing Manager Marketing Professional Page 64

71 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Default Roles Small Business Edition There is no difference in the default roles that are automatically installed by the Microsoft CRM Server Setup program for the Professional Edition and Small Business Edition of Microsoft CRM. However, there may be a difference in how the roles are treated by organizations running the Small Business Edition. In small businesses, individual users generally perform multiple roles that are typically split among multiple workers in mid- to large-sized organizations. This means the small business administrator may have to assign multiple functional roles to each user, because the default roles are associated with job titles that may not exist in the small business. The following issues should be considered when planning security roles in a Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition deployment: The small business administrator may potentially extend more privileges to each user than desired if multiple functional roles are assigned to a user to satisfy the user's security needs. Custom roles may have to be created to assign the exact combination of privileges required by small businesses. The Importance of Default Roles There are several advantages to using Microsoft CRM's default roles: The Microsoft CRM user accounts can be quickly activated, while providing a secure, 360-degree view of customers. Each user can be assigned default roles based on their job functions to reduce system startup time. Because the access level settings within each default role are based on extensive Microsoft market research, users are not provided with privileges that fall outside the boundaries of acceptable actions for their particular job function. Following deployment, each user's specific requirements relative to those provided by their default role(s) can be analyzed and adjusted. Page 65

72 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Role Characteristics When creating a Microsoft CRM security role, it must be assigned to a specific business unit. The relationship between roles and business units includes the following characteristics: Each role must be assigned to a specific business unit. The security roles created for a business unit are automatically inherited by each of its "child" business units when each child business unit is created. Multiple business units may each contain a role that has the same name, but the access levels for each privilege and entity may be completely different. WARNING: Although it is possible, this is generally not considered a best practice. It would be better to have roles with different names if the access levels are different. This prevents confusion between the roles. When a Microsoft CRM user account is created, it must be assigned at least one security role in order to access Microsoft CRM. The relationship between roles and users includes the following characteristics: A user can only be assigned roles that belong to the same business unit to which the user is assigned. When a role is assigned to a user, the user has access to all the privileges specified in that role as dictated by its access levels. A user can be assigned more than one role. EXAMPLE: Adventure Works Cycle has ten sales representatives in their organization, four of whom maintain customer service information for the corporate accounts. The System Administrator assigns the default Salesperson role to each representative. This gives each representative the ability to view both Sales and Customer Service information about each account; however, it does not give them the ability to add or maintain customer service cases or other service-related information. Because four of the representatives need this update capability, the System Administrator assigns them the Customer Service Representative role. Therefore, six of the representatives have the Salesperson role, and four representatives have both the Salesperson and Customer Service Representative roles. If a user is assigned multiple roles, the user's privileges are the union of access rights assigned to all those roles. Page 66

73 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition If a user is assigned more than one role and the access level for a specific entity and privilege conflict between the roles, the access level granted to the user is the least restrictive for that entity and privilege. FIGURE 12: ROLE CHARACTERISTICS EXAMPLE: Adventure Works assigned Mary Baker both the Sales Manager and Marketing Professional roles. The Sales Manager role has Business Unit Account Delete access, and the Marketing Professional role has User Account Delete access. This means Mary has Business Unit Account Delete access, because this access level is less restrictive than User Account Delete. When you see a specific privilege provided by a role, the correct terminology is to refer to the privilege in the following manner: <access level>, <entity>, <privilege> Page 67

74 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Figure 13 displays an example of how the terminology is configured for Business Unit Write access for the Order entity. FIGURE 13: ROLE TERMINOLOGY System Administrator Role The System Administrator role is unlike any other default role because it provides administrative control over security and maintenance to the whole application. As a result, a unique set of restrictions have been placed on this role that are not included with any other default role. These include the following: The default System Administrator role cannot be deleted or modified. The last user account assigned the System Administrator role cannot be disabled. Any attempt to perform one of these actions causes an error. If your organization requires modification to the privileges defined in the System Administrator role, copy the role over as a new role and then modify the security rights in the new role. To make sure the default System Administrator role is assigned during the installation of Microsoft CRM Server 3.0 or during an upgrade from a prior release, the following procedures have been implemented within the setup and upgrade processes: When you run the Microsoft CRM Server Setup program in a new deployment, the System Administrator role is automatically assigned to the user running the Setup program. Page 68

75 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition If upgrading an existing Microsoft CRM 1.2 deployment to Microsoft CRM 3.0 and the System Administrator role does not exist in the existing implementation (in other words, it was deleted), the upgrade program automatically restores the role and assigns it to the user running the upgrade. If the System Administrator role exists during an upgrade but is not assigned to a user account in the Microsoft CRM 1.2 implementation, the upgrade program automatically assigns it to the user running the upgrade. FIGURE 14: SYSTEM ADMINISTRATOR ROLE System Customizer Role Microsoft CRM 3.0 includes a System Customizer role that is designed for users who customize forms, views, and mappings through the System Customization tool. The System Customizer role enables non-system administrators to customize forms, views, and mappings. By default, the System Customizer role has less administrative privileges than the System Administrator role. Page 69

76 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Demonstration Creating and Copying Security Roles Introduction As an aid to managing security, Microsoft CRM provides default security roles. A security role is represented by a position title, such as Sales Manager or Customer Service Representative. Assigned to each role are privileges that are typically required by people serving in that position. Besides default roles, you can also create custom security roles for your organization. These can be created either new or by copying an existing default or custom role. When you create a new role, you must assign it to a specific business unit. All child business units of the business unit in which you create the new security role are also assigned the new security role. As new roles are propagated down the organizational hierarchy, so too are changes and deletions made to security roles. Procedures Create a New Role Start by creating a new role called Program Manager in Adventure Work's Marketing business unit. Only set up a few of the privileges and entities for the new role. This exercise should be enough to familiarize you with the work that has to be performed to create a new role. 1. Navigate to the Security Roles page. a. On the Home page, click the Settings side tab. b. On the Settings page, click Business Unit Settings and then click Security Roles. 2. On the Actions toolbar, click New Role. 3. In the role form, on the Details tab, type Program Manager in the Role Name field. In the Business Unit drop-down list, click Marketing. 4. Using the Privilege shortcut. Now define a set of access levels using the Privileges shortcut. In the Core Records tab, click the Read privilege. Note the change to the access levels for each entity. This sets almost every access level to User access. Click the Read heading one more time until the access levels are set to Business Unit. 5. Individual access level changes. Now change individual access levels that are exceptions to this Business Unit access level. Click the access levels for the Read privilege and the Account, Contact, Lead, and Opportunity entities and change them to Organization. Clicking each access level two more times changes it to Organization. Page 70

77 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition 6. Using the Entity shortcut. One more example here, this time defining access levels using the Entity shortcut. Navigate to the Sales tab and then click the Quote entity until all privileges are set to Organization. Now click on the Competitor entity. Notice how all the access levels change from None all the way to Organization with just one click. If you click on the Competitor entity again, it cycles back to None. This is an example of an entity that has limited access levels for each privilege. 7. Save the changes by clicking Save and Close. Copy a Role Even by using the privilege and entity shortcuts, you can see that creating a role can be lengthy process. In comparison, we will demonstrate another approach to creating a new role. This includes: copy an existing role over as a new role; and then change those access levels in the new role that are different from the existing role. 1. To copy a role, you must first change the Security Roles view to display the roles that are in the business unit associated with the role you are copying. This is also the business unit to which the new role will be assigned. Since we are still in the Security Roles view, click National Marketing from the Business Unit drop-down list. Since National Marketing is a child business unit of Marketing, notice how the Program Manager role that we just created in the prior exercise for the Marketing business unit has also been automatically created at this child business unit. 2. On the Actions bar, click Copy Role. 3. In the Copy Role dialog box, click Marketing Manager from the Role to copy drop-down list. 4. In the New Role Name box, type Product Group Manager. 5. Because we want to change the privileges for the new security role, select the Open role when copying is complete check box. 6. Click OK. 7. Click the Core Records tab. 8. We want the Product Group Managers to be able to delete any one of the core records, regardless of the owner. Additionally, the Product Group Manager should be able to assign any Account or Contact record in the organization. Page 71

78 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition a. The quickest way to change the Delete privilege for all core entities is to click the Delete privilege column heading (in other words, using the Privilege short-cut). Click it once. Notice all the access levels change to User. Continue to click it until it cycles through the different combinations and all entities (except User Query) are set to Organization. b. Next, click the individual access levels for the Assign Account privilege and set it to Organization. Repeat for the Assign Contact privilege. 9. Click Save and Close. Create a New Business Unit and Verify the Roles The prior exercise demonstrates how the Program Manager role that we created for the Marketing business unit was automatically copied down to the National Marketing business unit, which is a child of the Marketing business unit. This exercise verifies that all the roles of a parent business unit which include both default roles and the two custom roles that we just created are copied down to child business units whenever a new child business unit is created. 1. Because we are still on the Security Roles page, click the Business Unit Settings hyperlink that appears in the Location trail above the bottom navigation bar. 2. Click Business Units. 3. On the Actions bar, click New Business Unit. 4. In the business unit form, type OEM Marketing in the Name field. Click National Marketing in the Parent Business drop-down list. 5. Click Save and Close. 6. Click the Business Unit Settings hyperlink in the Location trail. 7. Click Security Roles. 8. Click OEM Marketing from the Business Unit drop-down list. 9. The Program Manager and Product Group Manager roles should be displayed in the list, together with the other default roles that were copied down from the National Marketing parent business unit. Open these two roles and verify the settings that you made earlier. Page 72

79 Chapter 2: Configuring Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Conclusion The chapter has provided an overview of the core tasks to be performed during the post-installation phase of the Microsoft CRM implementation. The Small Business Edition Configuration Wizard simplifies and automates a number of these tasks to ease the Microsoft CRM implementation for small businesses. The Microsoft CRM security model has been described and students have been introduced to the default roles and customization possibilities of the model. Page 73

80 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Quick Interaction: Lessons Learned Take a moment and write down three Key Points you have learned from this chapter: Page 74

81 Chapter 3: Customizing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition CHAPTER 3: CUSTOMIZING MICROSOFT CRM SMALL BUSINESS EDITION Objectives Actively participating during this chapter helps you: Use the Microsoft CRM SBE customization tools Create custom entities in Microsoft CRM Use the Microsoft CRM SBE Workflow tools Introduction Microsoft CRM provides a rich set of customization tools. These tools allow for the modification of forms and fields in existing Microsoft CRM entities and the creation of entirely new entities with their own custom attributes. Microsoft CRM Workflow tools automate business processes ensuring consistent marketing, sales, and service experiences for CRM users and customers alike. The goal of this chapter is not to provide a comprehensive study of CRM customization, but rather to provide students with a basic understanding of what is possible using the customization tools. Using Microsoft CRM SBE Customization Tools Most of the basic customization capabilities of Microsoft CRM can be found in the Customization subarea of the Settings area in the Navigation pane. Most of the customizations described in this section are included under Customize Entities. You must select an entity to customize. Forms Forms represent how data is displayed and entered in the application. You can modify how the form is organized and which fields are displayed. You can also include client-side code which responds to events in the form. Views Views are used to locate records. Views are a type of saved query where the results are presented to the user in a grid. Views are defined per entity. System Views A system administrator or customizer can define the Public Views available to all users. They can also restrict views to only be available to certain teams of users. These are known as Private Views. Users can select different views to see the data presented with different columns and filtering. Page 75

82 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition NOTE: Users can create their own personal views by saving an Advanced Find search. A view includes: The columns that are displayed You can control the order and width of the columns Some filter criteria A default sort order Previews When you click on the arrow in a view row, you can view some additional fields without opening a form in a new window. The fields you see in the preview are configurable. Attributes You can select which attributes to display as fields in a form. If an attribute you require does not exist, you can create a new one. The definition of attributes includes: Type The datatype used to store the data in the database Format How the data is displayed for the user Display name The name used to reference this attribute Requirement Level Whether the user must enter data for this attribute Relationships When you define custom entities, you need to describe their relationships with other entities. Organizing relationships with other entities establishes connections. For example, the existing system relationships in Microsoft CRM have relationships. An Activity can be related to an Opportunity. An Opportunity must be related to either an Account or Contact. Every Account or Contact is associated with a User, and every User is associated with an Organization. Your custom entities will be more useful if you relate them to other entities in a similar way. Page 76

83 Chapter 3: Customizing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition System Entities already have relationships, but you can change the behavior of these relationships. You can modify how these relationships define Relationship Behavior between entities. Relationship Behavior Relationship Behavior refers to the actions that are performed on related entities when actions are performed on an entity. For example, when you re-assign an account to a new sales representative: Do you want all the opportunities related to that account to automatically be re-assigned to the same new sales representative? Do you want only the open opportunities to be re-assigned? Do you want only the opportunities that are were owned by the previous owner of the account to be re-assigned? Do you want none of the opportunities to be re-assigned? NOTE: Relationships are described in Chapter 3 "Custom Entities." Re-naming Entities You can change the names of entities to meet the terminology used by the organization. For example, Microsoft CRM uses "Account" to describe a customer that is a business. You can change the name of the entity from "Account" to "Company" if the organization uses different terminology. NOTE: Renaming an entity requires a number of manual steps to ensure that all references to the entity are consistent. System Messages When you re-name an entity, the system messages need to be changed so they are consistent. These include any standard error messages displayed by Microsoft CRM. Customization Permissions By default, the System Administrator and System Customizer security roles have the necessary privileges to perform customizations. Page 77

84 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Customization Privileges In order to perform the basic customizations included in this chapter, a user needs to belong to a role that includes all the privilege found in the Customization tab: Entity Attribute Relationship Form View Process These privileges have two possible access levels: Organization None Selected You can not grant these privileges for a specific business unit. Importing/Exporting Customization Privileges Only the System Administrator Role has the privileges to import and export customizations. Publishing Most entity customizations need to be saved and published before use. Publishing makes the customizations visible to users. Publishing customizations allows you to complete a number of inter-related customizations and make them available to users at the same time. You can publish customizations made to one of the following: A single entity A group of entities All entities at once Page 78

85 Chapter 3: Customizing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Procedure: Publishing Your Work You can publish customizations for the current entity, selected entities, or all customizations. To publish customizations for one entity, on the entity form, on the Actions menu, click Publish. To publish all customizations, click Save and Close to close the entity form. On the Actions toolbar of the Customize Entities list, click More Actions, and then click Publish All Customizations. To publish customizations for specific entities and items, click Save and Close to close the entity form. In the Customize Entities list, select the entities that you want to publish, and then on the Actions toolbar, click Publish. Exporting Customizations Exporting customizations provides a way to save your customization work so that it can be used again. It also provides a way to back-up an existing set of customizations in case you need to restore the organization's customizations to an earlier state. Items Exported You can export and import: Entity customizations Template customizations SiteMap isv.config The exported customizations are saved as an.xml file which can be used as a backup, or to import to another Microsoft CRM implementation. If you have an.xml file containing customizations, you can import this file to Microsoft CRM. You can export the following: All customizations as a set. Specific customizations for any entity or set of entities. Only customizations that have been published are exported. Page 79

86 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Demonstration: Form Customization This demonstration illustrates how form customizations can be applied to a deployment. Steps are provided so you can follow along with the instructor. Scenario Adventure Works Cycle wants to reorganize their Account form to better fit their business processes. Goal Description These are the goals that will be achieved in this demonstration: Create an Address tab between the Details and Administration tab. Primary and Secondary addresses will be displayed there. Business and Company Information will be displayed on the General tab. The Details tab and the Description field will be removed. The Contact Methods in the Administration tab will be formatted to require less vertical space on the form. See Figure 3-1 and Figure 3-2 for a "before" and "after" reference. FIGURE 3 1: CONTACT METHODS SECTION BEFORE FIGURE 3 2: CONTACT METHODS SECTION AFTER Page 80

87 Chapter 3: Customizing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Steps These Steps begin SETTINGS CUSTOMIZATIONS CUSTOMIZE ENTITIES ACCOUNT FORMS AND VIEWS FORM Step 1: Add a Tab 1. Click Add a Tab from the Common Tasks area. 2. Enter "Addresses" as the name of the tab. 3. Click OK. Step 2: Move a Tab 1. Select the Addresses Tab. 2. Click the green left arrow until the Addresses Tab is between the Details and Administration Tab. Step 3: Move Sections 1. Click the General Tab and select the Address Section. 2. Click Change Properties. 3. Change the Location Property to "Addresses." 4. Click OK. 5. On the Details Tab, use the same method to move the Business Information and Company Information sections to the General tab. Step 4: Add a Section 1. On the Addresses Tab, click Add a Section. 2. Enter the following properties: Property New Setting Name Secondary Address Show the name of this section on the form Checked Show divider line below the section name Checked Section Layout Variable Field Height Column Format Two Columns (2:1) 3. Click OK. Page 81

88 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Step 5: Edit an Existing Section 1. Select the Address Section and click Change Properties. 2. Change the Name property to "Primary Address." 3. Click OK. Step 6: Remove Tab, Section and Field 1. Select the Details Tab. 2. Click Remove and OK. NOTE: The Description Section and Field are removed with the Details Tab. Step 7: Add New Fields to a Section 1. Select the Secondary Address Section you created in Step Click Add Fields. 3. Select the following fields: Address 2: City Address 2: Street 1 Address 2: ZIP/Postal Code 4. Click OK. Step 8: Move the Fields in the Section 1. Select each field and use the green arrows to position them. 2. Position them like this: Address 2: Street 1 Address 2: City Address 2: ZIP/Postal Code Step 9: Change the Labels of the Fields For each of the field in the Secondary Address section: 1. Double-click the field. 2. Remove the text "Address 2: "from the Label. 3. Click OK. Page 82

89 Chapter 3: Customizing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Step 10: Adjust Field Layout Properties 1. For each of the five Contact Methods listed in the Administration Tab: a. Select the field. b. Click Change Properties. c. On the Formatting tab, set Layout to "One Column". d. Set Control Formatting to "Checkbox". e. Change the label to "No <Label>". Example: " " becomes "No " 2. Reposition the field to use less vertical space. NOTE: Reference Figure and Figure in the Goal Description as an example. Step 11: Preview, Save, Publish and Verify Customizations 1. Select PREVIEW CREATE FORM to preview Customizations. 2. Click Save and Close. 3. Select ACTIONS PUBLISH. 4. Navigate to Workplace open some account records to confirm changes. Step 12: Export your Customizations 1. On the Navigation Pane, click Settings, click Customization, and then click Export Customizations. 2. Select the Account entity, then on the Actions toolbar, click More Actions, and then click Export Selected Customizations. 3. Confirm the export and save your customizations as "Demo Account Form Customizations.xml" in C:\CUSTOMIZATIONS\CH2. Page 83

90 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Creating Custom Entities Microsoft CRM 3.0 allows you to create entirely new entities for Microsoft CRM through the Customize entities area in the customization tools. Adding custom entities greatly extends your ability to make Microsoft CRM support the business processes for a wide range of organizations. This can be done quickly and inexpensively because no programming is required. Custom entities may significantly change the way you approach customizing the application. To understand this better, it is valuable to contrast customization strategies: Without Custom entities With Custom entities Without Custom Entities When an application does not support custom entities your options for connecting the business model and software model are limited. Three common approaches are: Buying another application Developing extensions to the application Overloading Entities Buying Another Application If the CRM application does not support a particular business process, the solution may be to purchase a specialized application that will support it. Although this frequently solves the short term need, the problem of integrating that solution with the CRM application remains and the organization has another application to maintain. Developing Extensions to the Application This process requires that a developer build functionality that is integrated using application integration capabilities and the APIs documented in an SDK. Because of the cost, time, complexity and maintenance involved there are many cases where this will not be tried. Overloading Entities If you only have a limited number of entities and they do not map to the business model, it has been very common to force the available entities to serve more than their intended purpose. It is required to apply the business process, but it makes the application more difficult to use and more difficult to gather valuable reporting data from. Page 84

91 Chapter 3: Customizing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition One example of this is how the Account entity has frequently been used to store information about partners, resellers, and vendors. These relationships have many common data points as accounts, such as names and addresses but technically they are not customers in the strictest sense. The interactions the organization has with partners, resellers, and vendors may be very different from the interactions they have with customers. Another example is using the Case Entity to handle internal Help desk requests. This requires creating contact records for Employees to represent the Customer. NOTE: The practice of overloading existing entities is such a common practice that CRM implementers and organizations that have implemented CRM may have come to accept it as unavoidable. The availability of Custom Entities may require re-examining these expectations. With Custom Entities When the customizer can create custom entities they have more opportunities to add value. Specifically: Wider capabilities More precise definitions Wider Capabilities The customizer can build applications that are integrated with Microsoft CRM. These can range from small enhancements to, in an extreme case, applications that are only nominally related to the core CRM functionality. Except for relationships to the organization and the users the application does not have to be tightly integrated with other Microsoft CRM system entities. But all the custom entities have the infrastructure that provides a User Interface, Security, Data Storage, Web Service based APIs, Workflow, Reports, and client-side code. More Precise Definitions With the ability to define entities that are customized to the organizations needs, the practice of overloading entities can become less necessary. The different relationships that the organization seeks to manage do not have to be mixed together with similar relationships because of the lack of available options. Examples The following examples represent some possible uses for custom entities. Quality Assurance Bank Account Event Reseller Project Page 85

92 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Quality Assurance When providing support for customers, some organizations want to track information about product defects that are reported by customers. This enables them to analyze the cost associated issues related to quality so that they can target their efforts on those areas that will be most effective. It is natural that this data be associated with the case in which a customer reports a problem, but storing the details in a separate entity allows for the issues that are reported to be re-assigned, tracked and reported on separately. It also supports the case where a single Case might deal with more than one type of quality assurance problem. Bank Account Some organizations have to collect and maintain sensitive information about their customers. This may include bank account information that the customer has shared to enable automatic payment. Creating a Bank account entity allows for this data to be stored more securely and still gives wider access to the information about the customer. The security role settings related to the Customer's bank account can be more restrictive. This also allows for the situations where customers may have any number of bank accounts. Event An organization may want to conduct special events. These could include classes, seminars, or parties. These events have a location, a date, a list of Contacts who have been invited and a list of those who attended. Tasks may have to be created to coordinate logistics. Attendees may be asked to complete a survey to evaluate the success of the event. Reseller When a company sells products through a channel their resellers represent an important relationship. Without a separate entity, this kind of information is frequently entered into the Account entity. But the Account entity is best used when it stores information about Customers, that is; someone who owns or is likely to buy the organization's products or services. Although a reseller buys products and services they may not own them. The whole relationship and business processes defining the interactions with a reseller may be significantly different from they are with a customer. Creating a reseller entity provides an area to capture information about all Resellers storing information that is of specific interest in the organization's relationship to Resellers. Information about their volume of sales, the training they have received, and satisfaction levels of their customers can be stored in the Reseller entity. If the Reseller also owns the organizations products that relationship is managed through the Account record like any other customer. Page 86

93 Chapter 3: Customizing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Project An organization may want to group certain activities at a higher level. The project Entity stores information about the project leader and the goals of the project. Tasks and Activities can be associated with the Project and other entities like Campaigns, Marketing Lists and Users can be linked to the project Page 87

94 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Demonstration: Create a Custom Entity Introduction In this demonstration you learn how to create a custom entity. The instructor will illustrate the process by creating a custom entity called "Reseller." Scenario Adventure Works Cycle sells their products through a network of resellers. These resellers place orders to Adventure Works Cycle on behalf of their customers. Adventure Works Cycle fulfills the order and provides service after the sale. Because of the 1-to- many relationship between Resellers and Accounts, AWC has decided to create a custom "Reseller" entity to separate these resellers from their Customer records. The Reseller entity will be associated with several other system and custom entities, but the first step is to create the entity. Goal Description The Reseller Entity will be created according to the specification in Table 3 1. The Reseller entity will have the additional attributes described in Table 3 2: Property Value Name Reseller Plural Name Resellers Ownership type User Schema Name New_Reseller Description An entity to store information on Resellers Associated Entities Notes and Activities Areas Showing this entity Sales Primary Attribute Details Display Name Name Schema Name New_name Requirement Level Business Required Type/Format nvarchar/text Maximum Length 100 TABLE 3 1: RESELLER ENTITY SPECIFICATION Page 88

95 Chapter 3: Customizing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Display Name Schema Name Type/Format Maximum Length Requirement Level Street 1 New_street1 nvarchar/text 100 No Constraint City New_city nvarchar/text 100 No Constraint Postal New_postalcode nvarchar/text 10 No Constraint Code TABLE 3 2: RESELLER ENTITY ATTRIBUTES Steps These steps begin at SETTINGS CUSTOMIZATION CUSTOMIZE ENTITIES. Step 1: Create the Entity 1. Click New from the Actions bar. 2. Enter the information from Table Save the Entity. Step 2: Set the Entity Attributes 1. Click the Attributes side tab to view the attributes for the entity. 2. For each of the Attributes in Table 3-2: a. Click New. b. Enter the Attribute information. c. Click Save and Close Step 3: Form & View Customization 1. Click the Forms and Views side tab. 2. Open the Form. 3. Create a Section: Name Label Layout Address Show the name of this section on the form. Show divider line below the section name. Variable Field Width Page 89

96 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition 4. Add the fields created in Step 2 to the Address section. 5. Modify the field properties and position so that the Section looks like Figure 3 3. FIGURE 3 3: RESELLER ADDRESS SECTION 6. Save your changes Step 4: Publish and Confirm Changes 1. Publish the Reseller entity. 2. View the Resellers entity from the Sales area. 3. Create a new Reseller record. Using Microsoft CRM SBE Workflow Workflow is probably the single most powerful type of customization in Microsoft CRM. Workflow allows for creating automated business processes. This guarantees that customers receive a consistent experience with the organization. The core concepts of Microsoft CRM Workflow are as follows: Business Process Automation Microsoft CRM Workflow is a powerful tool that can help business managers define, automate, and enforce specific business rules, policies, and procedures. Workflow simplifies and streamlines current business processes. Workflow can be used to make businesses efficient in their day-to-day operations. Actions and Conditions Workflow enables actions to occur without direct interaction by the users, based on rules set up by the business. Workflow rules are triggered by events within Microsoft CRM when specific actions are performed and specified conditions are met. Types of Workflow There are two types of Workflow: Workflow Rules Sales Processes Page 90

97 Chapter 3: Customizing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Workflow Rules Workflow rules apply to most commonly used entities including custom entities. See Table 3 3: Entities that Support Workflow. Sales Processes Sales Processes are an advanced form of Workflow. They apply only to Opportunities. This chapter introduces Workflow Rules before introducing the additional functionality included in Sales Processes. Workflow Tools Microsoft CRM includes four tools to design and manage workflow processes. These are described in Figure 3-4. FIGURE 3 4: WORKFLOW TOOLS Permissions To create Workflow rules you must have the ability to log into the Microsoft CRM Server. Workflow Manager is installed on the server and does not have a web-based user interface. You may use terminal services to access the server remotely. To open Workflow Manager you must have Organization level access to the Process and Process Instance entities. By default, only two security roles have this level of access to these privileges on these entities: System Administrator System Customizer System Administrator Role System Administrator Role should be used to create Workflow Rules. Actions performed based on events in workflow will occur in the security context of the user who defined the rule. By default, the System administrator is the only security role that has privileges to use Workflow Manager AND can perform all tasks that might be needed in Microsoft CRM. Page 91

98 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition System Customizer Role The System Customizer Role also has the privileges to use Workflow Manager, but by default the System Customizer role is restricted to only enable access to records owned by the user. The System Customizer Role can be used to perform testing of workflow, but should not be used for creating workflows on a production system unless: The System Customizer role is modified to provide greater levels of access on key privileges for each entity - OR - The user has greater levels of access because they are associated with other Security Roles which provide that access. Creating a Workflow Rule The first step in defining a workflow rule is creating the workflow. As soon as the workflow is created, you can define it by adding actions and conditions. Entities That Support Workflow Rules User owned entities that represent an interaction with a customer generally support workflow. These are listed in Table 3-3. Custom user-owned entities also support workflow. NOTE: The entity instance that is associated with a particular workflow rule is called the bound object. Account Appointment Campaign Campaign Activity Campaign Case Contact Contract Response Fax Invoice Lead Letter List Opportunity Order Phone Call Quote Service Activity Task TABLE 3 3: ENTITIES THAT SUPPORT WORKFLOW Page 92

99 Chapter 3: Customizing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Activity Entities that do not Support Workflow Rules Table 3-4 lists activity entities which do not support workflow. These activities are generated by Microsoft CRM and are not user-owned. Opportunity Close Order Close Quote Close Case resolution TABLE 3 4: ACTIVITY ENTITIES THAT DO NOT SUPPORT WORKFLOW Rule Name The name that you select for the rule should be descriptive and unique. We recommend that you establish a standard naming convention that helps you quickly identify the function for the rule. Manual Workflows should have a name that lets users differentiate it from other types of workflow when they choose it from within the application. Rule Description Rule Description provides an area for a detailed description of the rule. Although the Description field accepts a long string of characters, only the first characters are visible in the User Interface. Workflow Events Workflows are triggered by events. Table 3-5 lists the available Workflow events. The event that triggers workflow is defined when the workflow is created and cannot be changed. Event Create Manual Assign Change Status Occurs When an object is created Generally intended to be used when the users select "Apply Rule" from the Actions menu within the application. When the ownership of an object is transferred to a different user. When the current status (or "state") of an object changes. An example would be changing the status of an Account from Active to Inactive. TABLE 1 5: WORKFLOW EVENTS Manual Rules Manual rules are different because they are not associated with an event. By default, all rules are available for users in the Apply Rule dialog from the Actions menu. This includes both manual rules and rules based on an event. Page 93

100 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Demonstration: Activity Creation Actions This demonstration will apply each of the Activity Creation Actions. Scenario A new add-on product has been developed. In an effort to sell this new product to existing customers, this workflow will be used to initiate steps in approaching these existing customers. A list has been created identifying all Accounts who own the product. Goals Create a phone call activity for the owner of the Account. Create a note on the Account to log that they have been identified as a prospect for this new product. Create an activity to send a message to the account advising them to expect a call from the Opportunity Owner. Steps Step 1: Create a Workflow Rule Create a manual workflow rule on the account entity called "Account Actions". Step 2: Create Phone Call Activity Use the information in Table 3 6 to create a phone call activity. Subject Type Priority Due Description Call about new Product Phone Call Normal 2 days later Call and tell them about the new product. TABLE 3 6: PHONE CALL ACTIVITY SETTINGS Page 94

101 Chapter 3: Customizing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Step 3: Create Note Use the information in Table 3 7 to create a note on the Account. Subject: Note text: File Attachment New Product Prospect This Account has been identified as a prospect for the new product C:\CUSTOMIZATION\CH4\NEW PRODUCT BROCHURE.PDF TABLE 3 7: NOTE SETTINGS Step 4: Create Use or Create an template to be included in the . NOTE: In the classroom for course 8525 this template has been created in the CRM Implementation. Title: Subject: Note text: For New Product For {!Account :Account Name;Valued Customer} Hi We have a new product that I'd like to talk to you about. I'll give you a call in a couple days. If you have any questions contact {!User : Full Name; Your sales representative..} at Adventure Works Cycle Best Regards, {!User : First Name:} TABLE 3 8: TEMPLATE SETTINGS This uses three "slugs" to create Dynamic text. These slugs are configured using the information in Table 3 9. Field Account : Account Name User : Full Name User : First Name Default Value Valued Customer Your sales representative TABLE 3 9: DYNAMIC TEXT VALUES Page 95

102 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Sales Processes Step 5: Test the Rules 1. Select an Account record from a view and select MORE ACTIONS APPLY RULE. 2. Select the Account Actions Workflow and Click OK. 3. Open the Account and click Activities. You should see a new phone call activity with the subject "Call about new product." 4. Click History. You should see an activity that has been completed. This indicates that the message has been sent. 5. Click Information and then click the Notes tab. You should see a note with the New Product Brochure attachment. Sales Process Overview The process of selling a product or service can vary greatly among industries and even organizations within the same industry. Even within an organization, the processes might be different depending on the product line, different types of customers, and the methods defined by individual sales managers. Sales Process Stages A Sales Process is an effort to manage the closing of sales. A Sales Process establishes a set of stages that categorize all the open sales opportunities. Each stage is associated with a probability that the opportunity will reach a successful conclusion. Each stage also includes a minimum number of activities which must be concluded before the next stage can be reached. Sales Process Goals Sales Processes are put in place for a number of reasons. These reasons include: To assist a Sales manager to forecast future sales. To provide guidance to sales people so that they consistently apply the most effective methods. To help ensure that all legal requirements are met. To allow sales people and managers to recognize which opportunities represent the best opportunities in order to achieve the maximum amount of revenue. When to Use Sales Processes Sales Processes are commonly used when there is a lengthy or complex sales cycle. Using a Sales Process when the sales cycle is short or simple usually adds too many steps to the process. Page 96

103 Chapter 3: Customizing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Sales Processes in Microsoft CRM In Microsoft CRM, Sales Processes are implemented as a special type of workflow. Sales processes can only be created for the Create and Manual events. They include most of the actions found in workflow as well as the ability to define stages. The conditions available in Sales Processes are limited to: Checking the status of activities created by the Sales Process. Checking the values of related objects in order to exit the Sales Process. Adding Multiple Check Conditions to Sales Processes Adding multiple check conditions in Sales Processes can be somewhat counterintuitive. When you first create the Sales Process you can click Insert Condition to add a Check Condition. This provides the 'if..then.. else' structure. You can then include Check Entity conditions within that structure. Clicking Insert Condition automatically adds more Check Entity conditions. However, you can also include another Check condition structure if you first select the sales process event text at the top of the workflow window and then click Insert Condition. For a Sales Process based on the create event the event text will say "When opportunity is created." This way you can include a more complex set of conditions to determine whether the Sales process should exit. The conditions will be processed from the top down and if any of the sets of conditions are true, the Sales Process will exit. Multiple Sales Processes Because Sales processes can be defined as Manual rules, they can be executed as sub-processes from a workflow rule on an Opportunity. Because workflow rules afford greater flexibility in using conditions, the workflow rule can evaluate the Opportunity and include logic to choose whether to apply the sales process or which one of several sales processes should be applied. Ending a Sales Process Sales Processes represent a path to the successful completion of the sale. At any time, the user can close the sales opportunity as a win or a loss, and the Sales Process ends. Sales Processes and Activities When a Sales Process is applied to a Sales Opportunity, the sales stage and all the activities associated with that stage are visible on the opportunity form. The Sales Process then waits until all the activities are complete before moving on to the next stage and assigning the next set of activities to the sales person. Page 97

104 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Change Stage Users have the capability to advance to a further stage and be assigned the set of activities for that stage. When this is done, the Sales Process continues to advance automatically. However, users also have the ability to select an earlier sales stage. Performing this action causes the automation to stop, and advancing to the next stage, becomes a manual process. Page 98

105 Chapter 3: Customizing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Demonstration: Adventure Works Cycle Sales Process This demonstration will introduce a basic sales process. Goal The goal of this demonstration is to understand Sales Process Logic and see how they work. Steps Step 1: Review AWC Sales Process 1. Select Entity Type = Opportunity and View = Sales process. 2. Select the AWC Sales Process and double click it to open it. 3. Note the logic of the Sales Process in the AWC Sales process. A Manual Rule B stage: <name of stage>, close probability = <value between 0 and 100> C <Activity>: <name of activity> D <Action>: <action detail> wait E <Activity>: <name of activity> is (either) completed (or) canceled end stage TABLE 3 10: SALES PROCESS STAGE a. Event: This is a Manual Sales process. NOTE: Sales Processes can only be based on the Create or Manual events. b. Stage: Sales Processes are groups of stages. Each stage has a "stage..wait..end stage" structure. Each Stage is associated with a close probability. c. Activity: Activities are generated for completion during this stage. d. Action: Actions can also be included within a stage. e: Exit Criteria: With one exception, the only type of condition available in a Sales Process is the Wait Activity condition. This condition can be configured to check whether the activities created within the stage have been either completed or cancelled. Page 99

106 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition NOTE: At the beginning of a Sales Process check entity conditions may be included. Based on the result of these conditions the Sales process can exit. Step 2: Test the AWC Sales Process 1. Open a new Opportunity in Microsoft CRM. 2. Fill in the required fields an save the opportunity. 3. Select ACTIONS APPLY RULE SELECT AWC SALES PROCESS, click OK. 4. Click the Sales Process tab. If there is nothing there, wait a moment and click the refresh grid button. 5. Note that the Sales process stages will be presented. Note the five Open activities. 6. Open each of the tasks and save them as completed. 7. Wait a moment and click the refresh grid button. Note that the next six tasks become open. 8. On the Information tab for the opportunity. Note that the probability field is set to 25, corresponding to the Qualified Sponsor (D) stage. 9. Select ACTIONS CHANGE STAGE and choose Decision Due (B). Click OK. 10. Wait a moment and click on the refresh grid button. Note that the Decision Due (B) stage has become active. The Probability of the incident is set to 75. This shows how the Qualified Power Sponsor (C) stage has been skipped. Page 100

107 Chapter 3: Customizing Microsoft CRM Small Business Edition Conclusion Microsoft CRM customization is a powerful tool for and needs to be considered for any implementation. This chapter has outlined the different options for customization and has provided examples for each option. The chapter did not provide a complete view of all the topics related to Microsoft CRM customization, but provided students with an overview and examples to understand what possibilities exist using the customization tools. Page 101

108 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Quick Interaction: Lessons Learned Take a moment and write down three Key Points you have learned from this chapter: Page 102

109 Chapter 4: Using Marketing Automation CHAPTER 4: USING MARKETING AUTOMATION Objectives Actively participating during this chapter helps you: Understand the various ways to create and manage lists used in marketing campaigns Plan and create campaigns Launch and manage campaigns Introduction This lesson highlights the components of Microsof CRM Marketing Automation. Students are introduced to the tasks required to create and manage marketing campaigns and associated marketing lists. The lesson is intended as an overview and introduces these tasks at a very high level. Creating and Managing Marketing Lists In Microsoft CRM, you can create and manage a marketing list for a specific campaign or create lists that can be used at a later time or by any campaign. Lists can be created using existing customer information and importing the contact details from various sources into a single repository. A list of new customers or prospects can come from a variety of sources including: Acquiring a list from an external source in a compatible format for importing Manage and maintain a contractual agreement with a list vendor The data used to create the list goes through several stages: Import the list into a staging repository Clean the list to eliminate duplicates and existing customers, and handle missing, incorrect, or out of date data problems Move the list into final storage for use in analysis or processing NOTE: It is a good idea to maintain the source of list entries for future reference. Also, maintain any notes about the list entries for example, past transactions, customer service issues, or do-not-call preferences. Page 103

110 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition The criteria used to develop a list depend on the needs and the type of organization. Criteria to select members for a list can be static, including the following types of information: Income level Family size Location of residence Financial status Number of pets Cars Own or rent house Source of list The criteria could also include more dynamic items such as: Recent events in prospect's life or work Pattern of spending Most valuable accounts Leads with high potential that are created from meeting potential customers in a business seminar All accounts that bought a related product in the last six months Qualifying a List The Advanced Find feature in Microsoft CRM is a tool that you can use to query your existing Microsoft CRM data to locate accounts that meet the criteria that you have established for a particular list. After a list is created it can be further refined using additional search criteria. For example, a list already exists that contains a large group of customers that meet one key piece of criteria. Additional options are available to specify criteria to eliminate particular accounts. This process creates a unique list targeted at the specific market to help achieve success for your campaign. Page 104

111 Chapter 4: Using Marketing Automation EXAMPLE: A campaign is planned to reduce inventory of children's bicycles prior to the holiday season. There is already a list of existing retail customers. Additional criteria is applied this list to determine which customers to include or eliminate. The list of existing retail customers is queried to include only those contacts that meet the following criteria: Credit limit of at least $10, Located in Washington To remove members from a list, click Manage Members and select either: Remove members by Advanced Find Find members to keep by Advanced Find Procedure: Create a Marketing List Use the following steps to create a new marketing list. You can edit an existing marketing list by following step 1 to navigate to the Lists area. Then, open the list you want to edit. Use the information in this procedure to guide you in entering data or making changes. 1. In the Navigation Pane, click Marketing, and then click Marketing Lists. 2. On the Actions bar, click New. 3. On the General tab, you must enter information in the following boxes. Name Member type 4. Enter any other information that you have for the list. Owner is automatically populated with the name of the current user logged onto Microsoft CRM. 5. On the Notes tab, click Click here to enter a new note and add any other information that applies to your campaign. 6. Click Save or Save and Close. NOTE: In Cost you must enter a value with commas and decimal points only. Do not enter a dollar sign ($). Page 105

112 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Procedure: Import a Marketing List 1. In the Navigation Pane, click Marketing, and then click Marketing Lists. 2. From the main menu, click Tools, and then click Import. 3. In the Bulk Import wizard, in Source import file, either type the file name of a list, or click Browse to search for the file. The file must be a.txt, delimited file. 4. Select the Record type, Field Separator, and Field Data Delimiter for the imported file. These options specify what kind of content is in the file, and how the content is formatted. 5. To import the list, click Next. 6. Click Save or Save and Close. Procedure: Copy Members from One List to Another List 1. In the Navigation Pane, click Marketing, and then click Marketing Lists. 2. From the list, select the marketing list you want to copy the members from. 3. On the Actions toolbar, on the More Actions menu, click Copy to. 4. In the Look Up Records dialog box, in the Look for list, select the type of record you want to find. 5. Select the list you want to copy to, and then click OK. 6. When the Confirmation message appears, click OK. 7. Click Save or Save and Close NOTE: When you copy members the marketing lists must be the same type for example contacts to contacts. Page 106

113 Chapter 4: Using Marketing Automation Procedure: View a List for an Account, Contact, Lead, or Campaign 1. In the Navigation Pane, click Marketing, and then click one of the following types of records: Accounts Contacts Leads Campaigns 2. From the list of records, open the one you want to view. 3. Expand Marketing, and then: If you are viewing records for accounts, contacts, or leads, then click Marketing Lists. If you are viewing records for campaigns, then click Target Lists. 4. Click Save or Save and Close. NOTE: In the forms for accounts, contacts, and leads, you can also add the record to other lists. On the standard toolbar, click Add To List. In the form for campaigns, you can also add the campaign record to other lists. On the standard toolbar, click Add To Existing List. Creating and Saving Advanced Find Views Advanced Find is used to locate customers using specific information. Criteria are defined based on needs and a view is created. The view can be saved for future use allowing quick access to frequently used information. As needs change, the view can be modified and the changes saved. A saved view can also be used as the basis for another, more specific view. When a view is saved, it is given a unique name and an optional description to help identify it later. The columns that display in the result can also be defined. A saved view is accessible from the Advanced Find window and the My Views section on the records list page. The results of saved views can be exported to Microsoft Excel pivot tables or spreadsheets, and to Microsoft Word mail merge files. These files will refresh with current Microsoft CRM data each time they are opened, and the files can be shared with other Microsoft CRM users. Page 107

114 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Demonstration: Use Advanced Find to Create a List This demonstration shows you how to use the Advanced Find function to select members to create a marketing list. Scenario The marketing manager has determined the criteria to use in Microsoft CRM to evaluate current accounts as potential customers. The customer needs to meet the following criteria: Have at least 1500 employees At least $500,000,000 in Annual Revenue After locating the group of customers the search criteria should be saved for future use. Goal Description Use Microsoft CRM to accomplish the following: Create a marketing list Use Advanced Find to add members to the list Steps Follow these steps to create a list: 1. In the Navigation Pane select Marketing, and then click Marketing Lists. 2. On the Actions toolbar, click New. 3. On the General tab, in Name, type Product Enhancement as the name for the list. 4. For Member Type, select Account. 5. Type the Purpose: Product Enhancement Campaign and Description: Customers that may be interested in new product. 6. Click Save. 7. In the Navigation Pane, click Marketing List Members. 8. Click Manage Members. 9. Select Use Advanced Find to add members and click OK. 10. In the Look for field, select Account. Page 108

115 Chapter 4: Using Marketing Automation 11. In the details area, click Select and select No. of Employees. Select the Operator, Is Greater Than, type 1500 in the Value field. 12. On the next line, click Select and select Annual Revenue. Select the Operator, Is Greater Than, type 500,000,000 in the Value field. 13. Click Save. Provide a Name for the query: Annual Revenue and No. of Employees, and click OK. FIGURE 1 1: ADVANCED FIND 14. Click Find. 15. Select Add all members returned by search to the marketing list. 16. Click Add to Marketing List. 17. In the List form, click Save and Close. FIGURE 1 2: MARKETING LISTS Page 109

116 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Creating Campaigns When you run a campaign, there are many details that you must implement and manage, including campaign dates, budget constraints, marketing lists, sales literature, and products. For example, you can use Microsoft CRM when you want to run a new campaign to let your customers know about a forthcoming sale on certain products. After you create the campaign, you can change the details of the campaign. For example, if your manager tells you that the shipment of products for the campaign has been delayed, you can change the start and end dates to take into account the delay. You can also apply workflow rules to campaigns to automate campaign processes. For example, you might apply a workflow rule that automatically assigns any leads generated by a campaign to specific sales representatives. When you create a new campaign, some of the information about the campaign is automatically generated by Microsoft CRM. On the General tab, the Campaign Code is generated automatically after you save the new campaign. On the Financials tab, the Total Cost of Campaign Activities and Total Cost of Campaign are automatically calculated. All information on the Administration tab is automatically generated. The Owner and Modified by boxes are populated with the current user's name. Microsoft CRM includes all the elements needed to generate a campaign. When planning a campaign determine the following: Purpose of the campaign Message to communicate about products Target audience Resources Required Cost Use Microsoft CRM to create a new campaign, or to edit and modify an existing campaign. At a minimum, the following information is required: Name for the campaign Start and end criteria Define any product, service, or promotional details Allocate resources Collateral to include Page 110

117 Chapter 4: Using Marketing Automation FIGURE 1 3: CAMPAIGN CONSIDERATIONS During all stages of planning and creation, you can take advantage of existing campaign templates to complete most of the information for the campaign. Using a template can greatly reduce the amount of planning time required for a campaign. With templates you can make sure that multiple campaigns driven by various staff contain the right activities, product information, or other items that should be kept consistent. Templates can be modified or published for use by any number of Microsoft CRM users. If you have a centralized marketing team that provides support for staff located in other regions or countries, you can make the templates available to sales representatives who can modify the templates to use their local data. After you have created the campaign, run a test of the campaign using a small sample of customers to determine if the decisions that you made about the campaign provide you with the responses you expect. Page 111

118 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Demonstration: Create a Campaign For this demonstration, the planning and budgeting stages have already been completed and a target customer list is prepared. The demonstration begins with the steps to create the actual campaign. Scenario The marketing manager has planned a campaign for a new product with a promotion on price. The campaign will be targeted to the Small Retailers List that already exists. The new campaign is created in Microsoft CRM by copying an existing campaign for a product launch that has similar tasks and activities. The additional details are provided in the demonstration steps. Login to Microsoft CRM 1. Using the Microsoft CRM Ready Client image, launch Microsoft Outlook. 2. Provide login credentials if prompted. 3. For purposes of this training class, use the following login credentials: User ID Password Patricia Pa$$w0rd NOTE: In the demonstration database, the "0" in the password is the number zero. Step 1: Campaign Planning and Budgeting Marketing Automation is an important component in annual budgeting and marketing planning exercises. Whether budgeting and marketing planning is the responsibility of marketing vice-president, a marketing manager, or someone else in your organization, Marketing Automation reports can be used for building the marketing plan. By analyzing the report that provides data on the financial effect of campaigns, your organization can determine which campaigns were successful. Using this data, changes can be made with regard to the campaigns that should continue to run and those that should not. Also, this data might also provide valuable information about the timing of critical campaigns. Combine this data with competitor information, and the marketing plan can be your best defense to beating other companies to market with new products and service. Also, by evaluating sales growth based on other Microsoft CRM reports, the marketing plan can incorporate new campaigns to meet aggressive sales quotas for products balanced against the budget limitations imposed on the campaign. Page 112

119 Chapter 4: Using Marketing Automation For purposes of this demonstration, the planning and budgeting for the campaign step has been completed. The campaign is for an end of the year promotional price discount for all current products. The budget is $25,000 and the expected revenue is $135,000. Step 2: Determining the Target Customer List For purposes of this demonstration, it has already been decided that the target customers for the campaign are the Small Retailers. Step 3: Creating the New Campaign The Marketing Manager uses the Campaign form in Marketing Automation to create a new campaign. The existing campaign, Product launch campaign for new mountain bike series WX-1300, is used as the source for the new campaign. Entering Base Campaign Information In the new campaign form, initial information about the campaign is defined including the following: Name of the campaign Start and end dates Financial information Steps to create the new campaign: 1. In the Navigation Pane, click Marketing. 2. Click Campaigns. 3. Open the campaign called Product launch campaign for new mountain bike series WX On the Actions menu, click Copy as Campaign. 5. Type the Name of the new campaign: Year End Promotion. NOTE: You cannot type in a Campaign Code. Microsoft CRM automatically generates a code number after you save your new campaign. 6. Select the Campaign Type as Direct Marketing. 7. In Expected Response, type the percentage of responses you expect the campaign to generate. For this campaign, type 70. Note: The maximum number you can enter is Select the Price List. Click the Lookup button, select Wholesale and click OK. 9. Type the details of the offer: Year end sale, 20% off last year's models. Page 113

120 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition 10. Set the Proposed Begin Date to November 1 and the Proposed End Date to December 31 of the current year. 11. Type a description for the campaign: campaign to small retailers offering 20% off last year's products. 12. Click the Financials Tab. 13. The Budget Allocated is $25,000 and Estimated Revenue is $135,000. Miscellaneous Costs Click Save. FIGURE 1 4: CAMPAIGN FORM Adding Target Lists to the Campaign The campaign is targeted toward the Small Retailers. The list has already been created for this group and needs to be associated with the campaign. The current list for the campaign needs to be removed. Steps to add the lists to the campaign: 1. Click Target Marketing Lists. 2. Click the All Retailers List. 3. Click More Actions and select Remove. Click OK to confirm the action. Page 114

121 Chapter 4: Using Marketing Automation 4. Click Find. Type small in the Look for box and select the Small Retailers List. Click the selected item and then click the arrow to move the item to the Selected records area and click OK. 4. Click OK on the dialog box that prompts to add the list to the campaign activities. 5. Click Save. FIGURE 1 5: CAMPAIGN FORM TARGET MARKETING LISTS Specifying Campaign Details The Sales Literature already associated with the campaign is appropriate for this promotion. Since the promotion is for all of last year's products, the products are not indicated on the campaign. Steps to review details for the campaign: 1. Click Sales Literature. 2. View the information for the literature associated with the campaign. FIGURE 1 6: CAMPAIGN FORM SALES LITERATURE Page 115

122 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Creating Planning Tasks and Campaign Activities Part of planning and creating campaigns requires that you complete several tasks and activities. Planning tasks are performed during the planning phase of a campaign. For example, putting together brochure packets and researching information are planning tasks. Campaign Activities are activities that result in contacting a customer through one of the channels, such as sending an or making a phone call. Using Microsoft CRM, you can create and track the various activities that you have to complete for your campaign to be successful. The Campaign Activity form, which you can access from the Campaign form, lets you create and track all the activities that you or others in your organization need to complete. This form lets you capture basic activity information along with detailed data about budgeted costs. You can also specify the work that is required, such as drafting a letter, to complete the activity, the vendor you are working with, scheduled start and end dates, priorities, and anti-spamming tracking. As the campaign progresses, you can update the activity with actual start and end dates and budget information. If the campaign that the activity is associated with has a marketing list, you can add the list to the activity. Additionally, you can designate how many days must pass before members on the list can be sent additional literature or correspondence. This is particularly useful in businesses that have separate sales and marketing departments. In this demonstration, the marketing manager needs to get budget approval for the promotional product campaign. This is created as a planning task for the campaign and assigned to another manager, Gail Erickson. The budget should be approved by September 2. The Campaign Activities associated with the campaign are accurate. A brochure will be faxed to all of the members of the Small Retailers List. Page 116

123 Chapter 4: Using Marketing Automation Steps to create planning tasks: 1. Click Planning Tasks. 2. Click New. 3. Complete details of Subject: Budget approval for year end promotion campaign, and the Due date September 2 of the current year. 4. Click Save and Close. FIGURE 1 6: PLANNING TASKS 5. Click the Budget Approval task. Click Assign on the Actions toolbar. Click the Lookup button to display the users. Select Gail Erickson and click OK. Click OK again to return to the Planning Tasks. Page 117

124 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Steps to edit campaign activities: 1. Click Campaign Activities. 2. Open the activity: Send product brochure and offer details. 3. Verify the Channel is Fax. 4. Change the Scheduled Start date to October 31 of the current year and the Scheduled End date to November 1 of the current year. 5. Click Save. FIGURE 1 7: CAMPAIGN ACTIVITIES Launching and Managing Campaigns Use Marketing Automation to run and manage a campaign. After launching a campaign, the target market will begin responding. At this stage of the campaign, Marketing Automation shifts its emphasis from being a list and campaign system to a sales-focused, sales-management system with corresponding lead management, lead import, and activity tracking, which all tie back to the campaign and activities. To manage the campaign while underway or to assess the final success, Microsoft CRM provides a flexible format for entering and presenting cost and performance data. For example, the marketing manager can use activity views and campaign activity reports to manage the execution and associated sales processes. Processes may include: Page 118

125 Chapter 4: Using Marketing Automation Manage the campaign-related activities View the number of opportunity-related activities being generated Identify where leads and opportunities are low or are slowing down Determine the actual costs versus the payoff of a particular activity FIGURE 1 8: CAMPAIGN PROCESSES As each activity executes, modification can be made to a campaign to combat competitors, handle responses, or track undelivered mail. In addition, the staff or vendor can easily manage aspects of the campaign including budget, timing, and leads that are generated based on campaign responses. Page 119

126 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Demonstration: Managing the Campaign This demonstration continues with the next step of the campaign created above. Step 4: Managing the Campaign This portion of the Marketing Automation process involves completing the campaign activities. Various features of Microsoft CRM are used to complete the tasks, and the marketing campaign is updated to show that the items are complete. Management has approved the campaign and it is approved and ready to launch. Steps to launch the campaign: 1. Click Campaigns. 2. Select the Year End Promotion campaign. 3. Click the Information. 4. Select Launched in the Status Reason. 5. Click Save. Distribute Campaign Activity The marketing staff member uses Microsoft CRM to send out s to the Small Retail customer list. Steps to create the Fax activity: 1. With the Year End Promotion campaign open, select Campaign Activities and open the Send product brochure and offer details activity. Verify that the Channel field is set to Fax. 2. Click Distribute Campaign Activity. Complete the Subject for the fax: Special Year End Offer. 3. Click Distribute. Click OK on the I will own new Faxes option button. 4. Close the Activity window and the campaign. Page 120

127 Chapter 4: Using Marketing Automation 5. The system creates a Fax activity record for each customer associated with the target list. In the Navigation Pane select My Accounts. Open the account Bike Products and Accessories. Click Activities. The Special Year End Offer fax displays as an activity for the customer. FIGURE 1 9: CAMPAIGN ACTIVITIES Step 5: Recording Campaign Reponses The fax activity is marked complete. All other campaign activities have taken place and responses to the campaign are received. An existing customer, Bike Products and Accessories responded to the campaign and is interested in ordering 10 bikes. This is a good customer and the response should be converted to an opportunity. Page 121

128 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Steps to record a Campaign Response: 1. Open the Year End Promotion Campaign. 2. Click Campaign Responses. 3. Click New. 4. Select the Response Code: Interested. 5. Click Lookup or use the Form Assistant and select the customer Bike Products and Accessories. 4. Complete the Subject: Would like to place order, and enter Interested in ordering mountain bikes in response to campaign in the area below the subject. 5. Click Save. FIGURE 1 10: CAMPAIGN RESPONSE Page 122

129 Chapter 4: Using Marketing Automation Steps to convert the Campaign Response: 1. Click Convert Campaign Response. 2. Select to Create new record for a customer. The existing customer, Bike Products and Accessories defaults. 3. Select to create an Opportunity. Verify that the Open new records box is checked. FIGURE 1 11: CONVERT CAMPAIGN RESPONSE 3. Click OK and close the Response form. The Opportunity record displays. 4. Save and Close the record. Page 123

130 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Step 6: Closing the Campaign The Marketing Manager marks the campaign closed. Steps to close the campaign: 1. Click Campaigns. 2. Open the Year End Promotion Campaign. 3. Click the Status Reason and select Completed. 4. Click Save and Close. Assessing the Success of a Campaign To manage the campaign while underway or to assess the final success, Microsoft CRM provides a flexible format for entering and presenting cost and performance data. For example, your marketing manager can use activity views and campaign activity reports to manage the execution and associated sales processes. Processes may include: Manage the campaign-related activities View the number of opportunity-related activities being generated Identify where leads and opportunities are low or are slowing down Determine the actual costs versus the payoff of a particular activity At any point in time the marketing staff member and the sales representatives should be able to look for marketing related information in their content. They can view the following types of information: Status of campaigns planned Status of campaigns running Status of campaigns recently ended Analysis on archived campaigns (reports) Results from campaigns Direct results actual responses to campaigns, banner clicks, telephonic responses Indirect results sales orders logged with the campaign identifiers, quotes extended, increase in sales All activity information at the account or contact level Campaign targeting information Which campaigns involved a particular account or contact Responses from the account or contact Which accounts and contacts are or are not available to target in the next campaign Page 124

131 Chapter 4: Using Marketing Automation Quick Campaigns Quick campaigns are designed for when you want to send out a sales promotion to a group of customers and collect their responses without doing all the planning required for a full campaign. Quick campaigns require less work on your part, but still give you the response tracking data that you can obtain with a full campaign. You can create quick campaigns from the Marketing Lists, Accounts, Contacts, or Leads areas. You can also do a search in Advanced Find and create a quick campaign from the resulting list of records. For example, if it is the tenth week of the quarter and you realize that you might not reach your end-of-quarter sales goals, you can create a quick campaign to help you meet your quota. You might want to set up a phone-call quick campaign to a select group of your contacts that you remember being interested in a particular product. By completing a few tasks, you will have a list of phone-call activities for each of your contacts that you can complete and track to make sure that any interested parties result in actual sales. In addition to phone-call quick campaigns, you can create fax, letter, , and appointment quick campaigns. You can also use the Microsoft CRM client for Outlook to complete fax, letter, and quick campaigns by using mail merge. You can use quick campaigns to: Quickly send promotions to groups of customers. Collect, view, and take action on responses. Compose personalized messages using a template (available on with the Microsoft CRM client for Outlook). View the activities created from the quick campaign and status on those activities. View the records for the customers who were contacted. View the records for customers who could not be contacted and the reason they were not included. Page 125

132 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Demonstration: Quick Campaign This demonstration shows how to use a saved view and create a task for the result list using the Quick Campaign function. Scenario A Sales Representative wishes to create a task to telephone each customer that has not received information regarding a marketing campaign in the last three months in the city of Duvall. Use the saved view to locate the specific customers. Goal Description This demonstration accomplishes the following: Use a Saved View. Create tasks for customers using a Quick Campaign. Steps Follow these steps to execute the Saved View: 1. Select Contacts. 2. In the View field, select the Contacts: No Campaign Activities in Last 3 Months saved view. Click the Address 1: City column to sort the data by city. 3. Click the first record for the city Duvall, hold down the Shift key and click the last contact record to select all of the contacts in Duvall. Follow these steps to use the Quick Campaign function to create the phone call: 1. Click Create Quick Campaign on the Actions bar. 2. Select For selected records. 3. Click Next on the Welcome screen of the Create Quick Campaign Wizard. Type a name for the campaign: Telephone Calls for Duvall, and click Next. 4. Select the type of activity: Phone Call, and click Next. The activity should be assigned to you. 5. Complete the details of the phone call activity, type the subject: Offer special deal, and click Next. 6. Confirm the details and click Create. Page 126

133 Chapter 4: Using Marketing Automation Follow these steps to view the activities created by the Quick Campaign: 1. Select My Work in the Navigation Pane. 2. Select Activities. The items are sorted by Activity Type, scroll down to Phone Call. 3. Locate the Offer Special Deal phone call activities. FIGURE 4 12: ACTIVITIES Page 127

134 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Conclusion This lesson introduced the Marketing Automation features of Microsoft CRM. Microsoft CRM provides a number of list creation and import functions. Lists are used to specify the audience for marketing campaigns. Marketing Automation provides functionality to create, launch, and manage campaigns. Assessment functions provide real-time views of campaign status and are used to determine the success of campaigns. A quick campaign is a type of campaign requiring less work, but still provide response tracking. Page 128

135 Chapter 4: Using Marketing Automation Quick Interaction: Lessons Learned Take a moment and write down three Key Points you have learned from this chapter: Page 129

136 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Page 130

137 Chapter 5: Using Sales Management CHAPTER 5: USING SALES MANAGEMENT Objectives Actively participating during this chapter helps you: Manage leads and opportunities Close the sale using quotes, orders, and invoices Understand sales processes Introduction This lesson provides an overview of the Microsoft CRM Sales Management module and associated processes. It focuses on the workflow of generating an opportunity and pushing it through to a quote, an order, and ultimately an invoice. Page 131

138 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Managing Leads Prospects are a driving force in helping your organization to grow. In Microsoft CRM, prospects are called leads. The most important thing to remember about leads is the more information you have on a lead, the more likely you are to turn them into an opportunity, and eventually make them a customer. In most instances, leads are the start of the sales process; however, it is not necessary to have a lead prior to creating a contact, account, or even an order in Microsoft CRM. But if your sales process does start with leads, then once you have entered them into Microsoft CRM, you can manage their status, qualify them, or convert them to an opportunity, account, or contact. You can also disqualify them if they are not interested, or reactivate them if they express interest in the future. You can track information about prospective customers, and then qualify and assign inquiries. Leads are tracked separately from customers through the sales cycle. This lets you focus on building your customer base. Leads entered into Microsoft CRM can be automatically routed to the correct salespeople or teams based on rules defined by the organization or administrator. Besides routing rules, you can track leads and close sales consistently and efficiently with other workflow rules that automate stages in the sales process. Scenario This scenario describes how a company may use the web to gather leads and use Microsoft CRM to assign the leads using a workflow process. Leads can also be entered and assigned manually. Each morning, a Sales Representative receives a list of leads that have visited the company Web site since the previous day. The Sales Representative takes this list and uploads the leads to Microsoft CRM using the Import Leads functionality. The company also generates leads in a number of other ways: Participation in trade shows Requests for product information resulting from magazine advertisements Purchase of marketing lists for direct mail campaigns After they are entered, leads are automatically pushed through a pre-configured workflow rule that based on geographic location assigns the leads and creates activities. The next step is to contact the lead. The Sales Representative has a number of options available: Update profile information such as the company Web site Enter notes about a particular interaction Qualify the lead into an account, contact, and opportunity Page 132

139 Chapter 5: Using Sales Management When the Sales Representative encounters a lead that is not interested in pursuing a sales relationship, the lead is disqualified. This enables the lead to remain in the system to be used for later market research or be reactivated if there is later interest. The Sales Representative indicates a reason for disqualifying the lead. The company tracks the results of the leads that resulted in closed sales, and which method of lead source produced the closed sale so that they know where to focus the marketing campaigns. NOTE: Leads are not connected to accounts or contacts but you can track activities (telephone calls appointments letter or task) for a lead. When a lead is converted the existing activities do not move forward to the new account and contact records but remain associated with the lead. The new account contact or opportunity record contains a link to the originating lead. It is important for organizations to establish a well-defined methodology for qualifying leads. Determine the answers to the following questions regarding current policy: What is the definition of a qualified lead? Is there a current process? Is the process consistent? Clearly defined policies and procedures aid data capture, provide a consistent sales process, and ultimately result in more consistent sales results and forecasting. Is the information important to Marketing and Sales or just Marketing? Create a policy around the rule, not the exception. FIGURE 5 1: QUALIFY AND CONVERT LEADS Page 133

140 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Scenario A company's process for qualifying a lead involves engaging a marketing associate to be responsible for sorting through the initial leads based on the information provided. The leads with potential are assigned to sales representatives. This allows salespeople to get better-qualified leads so they also do not have to spend time on leads that do not result in sales. When qualifying a lead, the marketing associate follows these steps as a guideline: 1. Customers requesting more information complete a lead form that requests basic information about the company and the best way to contact them. 2. Based on territory, leads are separated and the specified method of contact is used to send a customized marketing , direct mail, or telephone call to find additional qualifying information. Potential questions might include: Is there a budget for the products or services? Do they meet purchase timeframe requirements to become qualified? Do their needs match the solution you can provide? What other solutions are they evaluating? 3. Accumulate the data retrieved from the s, information request cards, and telephone calls. 4. Assign the leads with the qualifying policy to a salesperson for more follow-up information. 5. If the lead meets the criteria defined, convert the Lead to an Opportunity.Closing the Sale. Page 134

141 Chapter 5: Using Sales Management Managing Opportunities An opportunity is a potential sale, which is similar to a lead. However, the subtle difference is that with an opportunity you can forecast sales revenue, set a potential close date, and factor in a probability for the sale to occur. Also, an opportunity requires that you link the record to a particular price list. This is needed for the automated pricing of the proposed products that the opportunity is interested in purchasing. You can create a new opportunity that did not originate from a lead, or you can convert qualified leads to opportunities without reentering the data, and then you can track opportunities through the sales cycle. Your sales force can use Microsoft CRM to track information about each opportunity, such as the: Contact information. Stage of the opportunity. Salesperson who is actively working on the opportunity. Assignment of revenue credit if the sale is won. Assessment on the probability of closing the sale and turning the opportunity into a customer. Projected closing date of the sale. In Microsoft CRM, an opportunity is designed to show the products a customer would like to get information about, not what he or she would like to order. Because of this, when you add a discounted product to an opportunity, the discount is not reflected in the opportunity's estimated revenue. If you know what the customer would like to order and want to calculate the estimated revenue based on product discounts, create a quote instead of an opportunity. In the Estimated Revenue section of the opportunity, for Revenue, choose how you would like the estimated revenue to be added. a. Select System Calculated if you want the estimated revenue to be generated as the summation of the products selected for the opportunity. b. Select User Provided if you want the estimated revenue to be filled in manually. Page 135

142 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Procedure: Add a Related Record to the Opportunity To add a product to an opportunity, you must have selected a price list on the Opportunity form. After you have done this, you can add one or more products to the opportunity. The price list is required because Microsoft CRM uses the list to calculate the: Price Per Unit ($), Volume Discount ($), Manual Discount ($), and Extended Amount ($). Values for these fields display after you save the opportunity. 1. In the Navigation Pane, click Sales, and then click Opportunities. 2. In the list of opportunities, open the opportunity to which you want to add a product. 3. Under Details, click Products. 4. On the Actions bar, click New Opportunity Product. 5. On the General tab, enter information or observe any noted restrictions or requirements as needed: Product: Click Lookup to search for and add a product. Unit: Click Lookup to search for and add a unit. Quantity: Enter the number of product items. 6. Manual Discount ($): If appropriate, enter a discount. Click Save or Save and Close. Procedure: Close an Opportunity Whether you win a sale or lose it, you will want to close the opportunity. If you have lost the sale, you can delete the opportunity, but deletions are not recommended because they are permanent. If you delete the opportunity, related items such as attachments and notes are also deleted, in addition to the audit trail for your sales organization. Therefore, it is best to close the opportunity. You have the option to reopen the opportunity later if it becomes a viable sale. 1. In the Navigation Pane, click Sales, and then click Opportunities. 2. In the list of opportunities, open the opportunity you want to close. 3. On the Actions menu, click Close Opportunity. 4. In the Close Opportunity dialog box, click a Status option. If you select Won, enter the appropriate information in the following fields: Status Reason: The default for this field is Won. Your systems administrator can make changes to the default status for your organization if desired. Page 136

143 Chapter 5: Using Sales Management Actual Revenue ($): This value should represent the actual agreed upon price. Close Date: You must enter the date in the format your organization has set for dates. For example, 01/01/2006 or Description: Enter the reason for the win. If you select Lost, enter the appropriate information in the following fields: Status Reason: Select an option. The default options are Canceled or Out-Sold. Actual Revenue ($): You do not have to enter a value. However, it is helpful to know what the deal was worth had it been achieved. Close Date: You must enter the date in the format your organization has set for dates. For example, 01/01/2006 or Competitor: If you know the competitor you lost the deal to, click Lookup to search for a competitor. Description: Enter the reason for the loss. 5. Click OK. 6. On the Standard toolbar, click Close. Procedure: Reopen a Closed Opportunity An opportunity you closed previously might become viable again. If this occurs, you can reopen the opportunity. You cannot reopen a deleted opportunity. You must create a new opportunity if you deleted one instead of closing it. 1. In the Navigation Pane, click Sales, and then click Opportunities. 2. In the View list, click Closed Opportunities. 3. In the list of opportunities, open the opportunity you want to reopen. 4. On the Actions menu, click Reopen Opportunity. 5. In the dialog box, click OK. 6. Click Save or Save and Close. Page 137

144 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Closing the Sale: The Sales Management Life Cycle In most Sales organizations, managers track a lot of data for analysis. This is contrary to the goal of the sales person who prefers to sell products instead of entering data for analysis. Sales people are rewarded not for doing data entry, but for meeting quotas. This causes conflict between what management wants for analysis and the amount of data entry that a sales person performs. Microsoft CRM helps an organization find the balance between these elements by providing a customer relationship product that is easier to use, without as many required fields. By providing a structure for tracking sales activities, the Microsoft CRM Sales Management module helps sales people ensure: A shorter sales cycle Greater close rates Improved customer retention Microsoft CRM Sales assists Sales Representatives with the following tasks: Manage leads and opportunities Measure and forecast sales results Efficiently track customer communications Automate stages in the sales process FIGURE 5 2: SALES MANAGEMENT PROCESS FLOW Page 138

145 Chapter 5: Using Sales Management Demonstration: Sales Management Scenario A Sales Representative is meeting with Raman Iyer at Mountain Toy Store, an existing customer. Raman saw an advertisement for new products and is interested in them for a promotional event the store is having. To maintain a consistent sales process, the Sales Representative takes the information and performs a specific series of tasks in Microsoft CRM: 1. Enter the information in Microsoft CRM as a lead for marketing purposes to track where leads originate. 2. Qualify the lead and convert it to create an opportunity and associate the opportunity with the existing Account. 3. Add the products the customer is interested in to the opportunity to assist when preparing the quote. 4. Perform sales activities such as telephone calls, and meetings. 5. Prepare a quote from the opportunity and convert the quote to an order and invoice. Step 1: Creating a Lead Leads can be entered into the system using either the Lead Form or an import process. This section discusses the process for entering a lead using the Lead form. Importing is covered in the Lead Management lesson. Follow these steps to create the lead: 1. In the Navigation Pane, click Sales, and then click Leads. 2. On the Actions toolbar, click New. 3. On the General tab, in the Topic box, enter a description of the product or service in which the lead has indicated an interest. For example: Interested in our new products for promotional event. 4. Fill out basic information about the lead, such as the Name, and company: Raman Iyer, Mountain Toy Store, and a Description: Wants to stock up on our newer products for their promotional event. 5. On the Details tab, since this is an existing customer, the address information is not necessary. Indicate the Lead Source as Advertisement. 6. On the Administration tab, in the Status Reason select Contacted to indicate that the lead has been contacted. Page 139

146 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition 7. Click Save. FIGURE 5 3: LEAD FORM Step 2: Qualifying and Converting the Lead The Sales Representative may perform some activities for the lead to determine whether the lead is qualified. If the customer is interested in purchasing products or services, the Sales Representative converts the lead to an opportunity. The customer Mountain Toy Store already exists in the Microsoft CRM system. This is a wholesale customer. Steps to qualify and convert the lead: 1. If the lead is not already displayed, locate the lead and open it. 2. On the Actions toolbar, click Convert Lead. 3. Select to create an Opportunity. Page 140

147 Chapter 5: Using Sales Management 4. Click Lookup in the Potential Customer field. Type Mountain in the Look For field and click Find. Select Mountain Toy Store and click OK. FIGURE 5 4: CONVERT LEAD 5. Check the box Open newly created records. The information from the Lead form populates the Opportunity form. 6. In the Opportunity form, select a pricelist for the customer (this is a required field). Click the Lookup button and select Wholesale. 7. Click Save. Page 141

148 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition FIGURE 5 5: OPPORTUNITY FORM Page 142

149 Chapter 5: Using Sales Management Step 3: Adding Products to the Opportunity The customer is interested in purchasing ten of the Silver mountain bikes (HL Mtn Frame Silver, 38, item number FR-M94S-38). Steps to add products to the opportunity: 1. If the Opportunity is not already open, locate and open the Opportunity. 2. Click Products. 3. Click New Opportunity Product. 4. Locate and select a product. Click Lookup. Type HL Mtn in Look For and click Find. Select the HL Mtn Frame Silver, 38 item and click OK. 5. Click Lookup in the Unit field and select Single. Click OK. 6. Type 10 in the Quantity field. 7. Click Save. Note the extended amount is calculated for the potential order. 8. Close the Opportunity Product form. FIGURE 5 6: OPPORTUNITY PRODUCT FORM Page 143

150 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Step 4: Recording Sales Activities The Sales Process may determine the activities that should occur with the customer before preparing a quote or placing an order. Additional activities can be recorded. The Sales Representative contacts Mountain Toy Store to tell them the estimated amount of the sale. The fifteen minute telephone call activity is recorded in the opportunity. Steps to record the activity: 1. If the Opportunity is not already open, locate and open the Opportunity. 2. Click Activities. 3. Click New Activity. 4. Select Phone Call and click OK. 5. Type the subject of the telephone call: Provide price estimate. 6. Type the details of the call: Talked to Raman Iyer and supplied the estimated price for the products. Prepare written quote for their consideration. 7. Set the Duration of the call to 15 minutes and select today's date and the current time. 8. Click Save and Close. FIGURE 5 7: OPPORTUNITY FORM - ACTIVITY Page 144

151 Chapter 5: Using Sales Management Step 5: Creating Quotes, Orders and Invoices This demonstration completes the process that began with the lead and uses the opportunity to generate a quote. The quote becomes an order when the customer decides to purchase the products and an invoice is then created. The steps are shown here to illustrate the process. This topic is discussed in more detail in the Completing the Sale lesson. Steps to Create the Quote, Order, and Invoice: 1. If the Opportunity is not already open, locate and open the Opportunity. 2. Click Quotes. Click New Quote. The quote form displays with the information from the Opportunity, including the products. FIGURE 5 8: QUOTE FORM 3. Select Actions, Activate Quote. When the quote is activated, it is complete and ready to present to the customer. 4. Once the quote is accepted by the customer, locate the quote and select Actions, Create Order. Page 145

152 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition 5. The Status Reason defaults to Won. Click OK on the Create Order window. FIGURE 5 9: CREATE ORDER 6. The Order window displays. Click Actions, select Fulfill order. FIGURE 5 10: FULFILL ORDER DIALOG WINDOW 7. Click Actions, select Create Invoice. Page 146

153 Chapter 5: Using Sales Management Use Sales Processes and Workflow Rules Use Microsoft CRM to automate internal business processes by creating workflows to carry out routine tasks that involve daily business operations. These processes can be designed to ensure that the right information gets to the right people at the right time, and help users keep track of the steps they have to take to complete their work. Use workflow rules to define, automate, and enforce specific business rules, policies, and procedures. Using Workflow Processes A workflow process is a group of interrelated action steps and the rules that drive the transition between these steps. When a workflow process is created, the event that will trigger the workflow process is defined. Each step in the process is a set of actions that are created within Microsoft CRM, for example, the creation of an activity, assignment of a lead, or sending of an message. Business workflow processes apply across the organization and are created by someone with sufficient privileges, such as the system administrator or business owner. For example, your system administrator can create a workflow process to handle the assignment and follow-up for leads, accounts, or opportunities, and another process to initiate and finalize contracts. FIGURE 5 10: WORKFLOW PROCESS Page 147

154 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Using Sales Processes Opportunities have special workflow processes called sales processes. A sales process consists of a sequential list of steps, or rules, called stages, through which each opportunity must progress. A successful sales person develops a process they use while selling. If they sell more than one type of product, or serve more than one type of customer, they may be using multiple sales processes. A defined sales process provides a number of advantages: Provides the organization a common vocabulary to discuss potential sales Reduces forecast review time and pipeline confusion Is designed to help control the process of selling to maximize sales Once the critical steps to closing sales are established, the sales process helps confirm that each step is understood and completed. These crucial steps are known as sales stages. A collection of sales stages is a sales process. Each sales stage has related activities and actions. Microsoft CRM Standard Edition allows a single, manual, sales process. Microsoft CRM Professional Edition provides the following advantages: Automated tasks such as creating activities, performing actions, or changing the percentage for the close probablilty, can be created Users involved in the sales process can be notified of actions and events Documents needed for quotes and final agreements can be provided The more controlled the sales process is, the more frequently closed sales occur. Using sales processes can result not only in more sales, but also maintains consistency in the sales process thereby, maintaining a certain level of quality in the sales interactions that can lead to more efficient and more profitable sales. Page 148

155 Chapter 5: Using Sales Management BEST PRACTICE: Establishing or reviewing an organization's sales processes should be done during the implementation needs-analysis phase. Proper planning and testing of the sales processes should be executed before an organization goes live with a Microsoft CRM implementation. FIGURE 5 11: SIMPLE SALES PROCESS FIGURE 5 12: COMPLEX SALES PROCESS Page 149

156 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Scenario NOTE: This sales process does not exist in the demonstration data. It was created as an example of a simple sales process to aid in explanation of the sales process and workflow functions. A company uses a number of different Sales processes depending on different factors. One factor is the amount of Revenue. If an opportunity is for more than $50000 the Sales person is expected to use a simple sales process to associate the tasks they perform with a probability of success. This is a simple Sales process that includes the following stages. Investigate In this stage the Salesperson evaluates whether this opportunity represents a good investment of their time. Evaluate In this stage the Sales person confirms that their company will be able to deliver the products for the opportunity. Negotiate This stage represents the negotiation process. Close This stage represents closing the deal. Won This stage represents closing the opportunity. When the sales process is applied, information is populated in the Sales Process tab of the opportunity. When this sales process is applied to an opportunity, activities are created to Research the Account and Evaluate Competitors. When all of the activities associated with a stage are marked complete, the activities associated with the next stage in the process are created. For example: Check Inventory and Check Open Opportunities. An explanation of the stages and activities in this sales process are described in detail in the table: Stage: Investigate close probability = 10 Task Research Account Description Verify that the Account is legitimate Task Evaluate Competitors Description Determine which competitors might be involved Exit Criteria Task: Research Account Complete Task: Evaluate Competitors Complete Page 150

157 Chapter 5: Using Sales Management Stage: Evaluate close probability = 20 Task Description Task Description Exit Criteria Check Inventory Confirm we have enough inventory to fill an order Check Open Opportunities Check if any other Opportunities could require the same inventory Task: Check Inventory Complete Task: Check Open Opportunities Complete Stage: Negotiate close probability = 10 Task Description Task Description Exit Criteria Submit Quote Submit a Quote for the order Follow up Call Follow-up on the quote. Ask for the order. Task: Submit Quote Complete Phone Call: Follow-up Call Complete Stage: Close close probability = 90 Task Description Task Description Exit Criteria Signed Documents Get the documents signed Update Microsoft CRM Update the Opportunity record Task: Signed Documents Complete Task: Update Microsoft CRM Complete Stage: Won close probability = 100 Action FIGURE 5 12: BASIC SALES PROCESS Change State to Won Page 151

158 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Conclusion This lesson has provided an overview of Microsoft CRM Sales Management. Students have been introduced to the various sales objects, including: Leads Opportunities Quotes Orders Invoices The relationships of these objects have been explained as well as where each object fits in the sales life cycle. A sales process scenario has been presented that demonstrates the purpose and potential of the workflow automation provided with Microsoft CRM. Page 152

159 Chapter 5: Using Sales Management Quick Interaction: Lessons Learned Take a moment and write down three Key Points you have learned from this chapter: Page 153

160 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Page 154

161 Chapter 6: Using Customer Service CHAPTER 6: USING CUSTOMER SERVICE Objectives Actively participating during this chapter helps you: Create and manage service cases Create knowledge base articles and understand the stages an article goes through during its lifespan Create contracts and contract templates Understand the service scheduling engine Introduction This lesson provides an overview of the Microsoft Business Solutions CRM Customer Service module and associated processes. Demonstrations are provided for creating case, knowledge base article, and contract service objects. The lesson also provides an overview of the Service Scheduling Engine and demonstrates a potential scheduling scenario. Page 155

162 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Managing Cases Case management is the primary function of the Customer Service module, and you can use Microsoft CRM to create, view, and track actions and communications related to cases. Cases can be opened by either a customer or a customer service representative (CSR), but only a CSR can resolve a case or reactivate it once it has been resolved. You can use the Microsoft CRM communication activity tools to manage cases, including setting up appointments, making telephone calls, and sending , letters, or faxes. You can also find out what activities have already occurred and how much time was spent on them. Microsoft CRM also provides you with a reporting tool that can be used to measure statistics such as call lengths, resolutions; number of calls handled, and average length of cases. Case Management enables incidents reported by customers to be logged and tracked from creation through resolution. Note the following concepts when working with cases: Cases can be related directly to both Service Contracts and Products. Service staff can create cases using a simple user interface that tracks all actions. This includes the time spent to reach a resolution. When working on tasks, such as setting up appointments, staff can perform the following for activities and communications: Create View Track This makes telephone calls, and sending , letters, or faxes easier. Case Resolution Process This section describes how a case is managed once it enters the organization. 1. A Case is Opened. A customer submits a problem by letter, telephone call, fax, or . A case is created in Microsoft CRM, including the date the case was created, a case tracking ID number, a title and description of the case, and any other information, as appropriate. Page 156

163 Chapter 6: Using Customer Service 2. The Case is Assigned to a SR or Queue. The CSR who is assigned to the case, or a SR in the queue who accepts the case, reviews it, and responds to the customer. 3. The Case is Resolved and Closed. When the case is resolved, the customer is sent an message to confirm the resolution. After a case is resolved, the SR who was assigned to it is still responsible for the case. This provides a method for tracing what happened to the case. 4. The Customer Reports that the Issue is Unresolved and the Case is Reopened. When a case is reopened, it bypasses the routing mechanism and is assigned directly to the CSR who resolved the case. 5. The CSR Reactivates the Case and Continues to Work on it until it is Resolved. The time spent on a reactivated case is measured separately, so you can track the performance and quality by comparing the time spent initially and subsequently when the case was reactivated. FIGURE 6 1: LIFE CYCLE OF CASES BEST PRACTICE: Although you do not have to have activities created for a case, creating activities related to cases is the only way to document the time spent on the case. It is also a good way to monitor incident reporting. Page 157

164 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Demonstration: Case Creation This demonstration illustrates how to create a case in Microsoft CRM. Scenario A Road-440 bicycle was scratched during shipment to Certified Bicycle Supply. They would like a replacement bike shipped to them. Goal Description The service representative creates a case and relates it to the Certified Bicycle Supply account. Steps Log on to the Microsoft CRM Client for Outlook as Roger Van Houten. 1. In the Navigation Pane select Service, and then select Cases. 2. Click New. 3. The new case form opens. 4. Add the details for the new case: Title Customer Subject Case Type Satisfaction Owner Status Reason Priority Road-450 Bike scratched during transit Certified Bicycle Supply Road-450 (Select Bikes, Road Bikes, Road-450 and click OK) Problem Dissatisfied In Progress High 5. Click the Notes tab and type the text of the note: Customer would like a replacement bike shipped to them. 6. Click Save Page 158

165 Chapter 6: Using Customer Service Managing the Knowledge Base Most businesses with a Service department need a central area to store information to help solve customer issues or questions. The Knowledge Base tool provides internal users with information about the organization's products and services that they use to answer frequently asked customer questions. This information is in the form of articles and is organized by subjects. The Knowledge Base in Microsoft CRM provides the following features: All information is stored in one location. The information is consistently formatted. The information is consistently available. The information is visible to everyone in the organization. An advanced searching tool based on full text or key words. The Knowledge Base provides an easy-to-use browse and search engine that lets users find the exact information that is required by searching against all the words in the Knowledge Base. BEST PRACTICE: Considerations should be taken when deciding who has privileges to create, approve, reject, and publish KB articles. The articles are a major source for users to find information related to products, problems and resolutions, and company information. Additionally, article entry should be planned in advanced before entering data in the form to maintain consistency and accuracy. Knowledge Base Terminology Before discussing using the Knowledge Base tool, it is important to understand some of the objects used with the Knowledge Base. It is searchable by keyword and header text, and it supports a full-text search. Note the following objects: An Article is a type of structured content that is published to the Knowledge Base and available for searching by for the user. An Article Template is a template used to create an article, describing the sections and formatting required for the article. An Article Comment captures comments on articles. The Knowledge Base is similar to the other record types of Microsoft CRM, but there are also some differences in how the Knowledge Base works and is managed. Page 159

166 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition The following are key points related to the Knowledge Base tool: Knowledge Base is structured using the Template and Article objects. Knowledge Base articles are created by using templates. A template provides an article structure that determines how content is displayed. The Knowledge Base Articles include the information published to users. Unlimited Knowledge Base templates and unlimited Knowledge Base articles can be created and stored. Knowledge Base articles cannot be assigned or shared. Knowledge Base articles are visible to all users who have the appropriate security privileges. Knowledge Base articles are organized by subjects. This enables for easy searching by subject with the Knowledge Base. The Life Cycle of Knowledge Base Articles The Knowledge Base articles have a life cycle making sure that only approved articles are visible and available for application users to browse and search. FIGURE 6 2: LIFE CYCLE OF THE KNOWLEDGE BASE ARTICLE Page 160

167 Chapter 6: Using Customer Service The approval process provides control. Knowledge Base article life cycle steps include the following: 1. When a new article is created, it is a draft article. Draft articles reside in the Knowledge Base Manager Draft folder in the Service Module. 2. As soon as a draft article is saved, it can be submitted for approval. Submitting a draft article moves the article from the Draft folder to the Unapproved folder to wait for review and approval. Unapproved articles may be Approved or Rejected. 3. As soon as an article is approved, the article is moved from the Unapproved folder to the Published folder. Published articles are visible to all users through Knowledge Base Search in Workplace. 4. Any article that is Rejected is moved back to the Draft folder and the article status will be changed back to Draft mode. 5. When articles are published, they are read-only. Note the following other considerations during the life cycle of an article: Published articles might not be deleted, but might be Unpublished. Unpublished articles return to the Knowledge Base Manager Unapproved folder awaiting approval, rejection, or deletion. Draft, Unapproved, and Published articles might have comments associated with them through the Add Comment Action. EXAMPLE: The Knowledge Base editor could add a comment to an article to explain why it was rejected and returned to a draft status so the author could make the appropriate revisions before re-submitting it for approval. The status of Knowledge Base articles are: New (unsaved articles) Draft (in the Draft folder) Unpublished (in the Unpublished folder) Published (in the Published folder) Page 161

168 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Demonstration: Create an Article This demonstration illustrates how to create Knowledge Base Articles in Microsoft CRM. Scenario The Service Representative has received many calls from customers asking how to find a bike that is the best fit for them. The Service Representative wants to place this question and answer to the Adventure Works Cycle Knowledge Base. Goal Description The Service representative needs to create a new article in Microsoft CRM. This article will include a question and relevant answer information. Steps NOTE: You are logging into the Microsoft CRM Web Application as this task cannot be performed in the Microsoft CRM Client for Outlook 1. Log on to the Microsoft CRM Web Application: User ID: Roger Password: Pa$$w0rd. 2. In the Navigation Pane, click Service, and then click Knowledge Base. 3. On the Actions toolbar, click New. 4. In the Select a Template dialog box, select the 'Question and Answer' template, and then click OK. 5. In the Title box, enter the information from the provided table. Title Tips on buying the right bicycle for you. 6. In the Subject box, click Lookup button. 7. In the Subject Lookup dialog box, select Bikes then the 'Bicycle General' subject and then click OK. 8. In the Keywords dialog box, enter the information from the provided table. Page 162

169 Chapter 6: Using Customer Service 9. Type the keywords that are relevant to this article and separate each keyword with a comma. Keywords bikes, buying, general, fit, size, right, bicycle 10. In the Question and Answer sections, enter the following information from the provided table. 11. To write the content, click in a section of the form and start typing. Question Answer How do you select the perfect bike or, a bike that best fits you? If you are looking for a perfect fit, our bike department can calculate your measurements and fit you with a new bike that best matches you and your needs. 12. Click Save or Save and Close. Note: Microsoft CRM automatically moves the article into the Draft folder in the Knowledge Base area. 13. Submit the article. FIGURE 6 3: CREATING AN ARTICLE Page 163

170 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Using Contracts When customers purchase a product, they might be allowed a specified level of service, also known as warranty service. This service offers them support through: Telephone Internet Contracts define the nature of the service relationship with a customer. This includes: How much and what level of service the customer is allowed How this service is delivered At what price the service is delivered These service agreements are frequently relative to products a customer has purchased. Contracts in Microsoft CRM provide the following: Effective tracking for service agreements Quick access for service representatives to service agreement details Attachments to Service Cases. This allows for the case to be automatically deducted from the Contract FIGURE 6 4: CONTRACT CONCEPTS Page 164

171 Chapter 6: Using Customer Service Creating Contract Templates A contract template is a framework for creating new contracts. You can use templates to make sure that contracts are consistent across the organization. You can create different templates for different types of customer service support and define the elements of the contract. For example, you can create one contract template for software support and another one for hardware support. When customers contact customer service, the level of service is consistent and based on your business policies. Users can define future contracts to include: Customer billing cycles Types of support (support for five cases per month versus ten hours of support) Available support times When a new contract is created, the user can select from the list of available templates. NOTE: Before the Contract record form is opened the Contracts Template Explorer appears and the contract template is selected. A contract cannot be created without a contract template. Contract Template Elements The contract template provides the following for the contract: Allotment Type Define how contracted services are allocated by: Coverage dates to cases or incidents Service Number of cases Discount Type Can be an amount or percentage. Billing Frequency There are five different frequencies available: Monthly Bi-Monthly Quarterly Semiannually Annually Page 165

172 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Response Level Can be used to specify which support level a contract can be. Calendar Can be used to indicate the days and hours that support is effective. Page 166

173 Chapter 6: Using Customer Service Demonstration: Contract Template Creation This demonstration illustrates how to create contract templates in Microsoft CRM. Scenario Adventure Works Cycle has recently implemented and begun to use Microsoft CRM. The Service Manager is required to enter contract templates into Microsoft CRM. These contract templates will define the service contracts that the organization wants to provide to its customers. Goal Description The Service Manager is required to create a contract template in Microsoft CRM. This contract template is warranty based service is based on coverage dates. The coverage dates for this kind of service contract is typically annually, for customers who purchase their bikes from Adventure Works Cycle. These customers receive support 24 hours a day, seven days a week. As soon as this contract template is created, service representatives can select this service contract when required. Steps NOTE: You are logging into the Microsoft CRM Web Application as this task cannot be performed in the Microsoft CRM Client for Outlook 1. Start the Microsoft CRM Web application. Log on as Roger Van Houten User ID: Roger Password: Pa$$w0rd. NOTE: Contract Templates must be created by using the Web client. 2. In the Navigation Pane, click Settings, and then click Templates. 3. Select Contract Templates. 4. Click New, from the Actions Menu. Page 167

174 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition 5. Enter the information from the provided table for the new contract template. Name Warranty Based Service Abbreviation AWC Svc Temp 1 Billing Frequency Allotment Type Response Level Description Calendar 6. Click Save and Close. Annually Number of Cases Gold Template for Bike Service by coverage dates 24 x 7 support FIGURE 6 5: CONTRACT TEMPLATE Page 168

175 Chapter 6: Using Customer Service Creating a Contract You can create contracts only for existing accounts and customers. In addition, you can create contracts from templates or by copying an existing contract and modifying it appropriately. The following factors are important to note when creating a contract: Unique ID assignments Contracts cannot be invoiced without a contract line Invoiced and Active status modifications Note and Attachment additions Case and contract lines association Each contract is assigned a unique ID that cannot be used for another contract unless it is being renewed. In that case, the renewed contract is saved as a draft with an ID that corresponds with the original. If a contract with an Invoiced or Active status is modified, the amended contract remains associated with the original account. You can add notes and attachments to contracts, and trigger workflow items off contract status, contract start date, or contract end date. You can also associate cases with contract lines. This enables you to track allotment usage and cases generated by a customer to his or her contract. There are three steps to creating a contract: Create a draft of the main contract in which you specify customer information and the terms of the service provided. Add a contract line to specify which products and locations are covered by the contract. Invoice and activate the contract. Page 169

176 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Demonstration: Create a Contract Based on an Existing Contract This demonstration illustrates how to create a contract based on an existing service contract in Microsoft CRM. Scenario The Service Representative has just had a telephone conversation with a customer from Active Cycling. The customer is interested in a one year contract for Long Term Service. The Service representative recalls creating a similar contract for Cash and Carry Bikes and has decided to copy that contract, and enter the new information for Active Cycling. Goal Description The Service Representative uses Microsoft CRM to accomplish the following: Steps Copy the existing contract Add contract lines Invoice the customer 1. Start the Microsoft CRM Client for Outlook. Log on as Roger Van Houten User ID: Roger Password: Pa$$w0rd. 2. In the Navigation Pane, click Service, and then click Contracts. 3. In the View, select, All Contracts. 4. From the list, open the Cash and Carry Bikes (1 year contract for Cash and Carry Bikes, contract ID 104) contract. NOTE: This contract should have a status of Invoiced. 5. In the contract form, on the Actions menu, click Copy Contract. 6. In the Copy Contract dialog box, clear Include canceled contract lines, and then click OK. Page 170

177 Chapter 6: Using Customer Service 7. When the new contract form opens, change the details to reflect the following new contract information. Contract Name Customer Contract Start Date Contract End Date Bill to Customer Billing Start Date Billing End Date 1 year contract for Long Term Service for Active Cycling Active Cycling Today's date One year from today's date Active Cycling Today's date One year from today's date 8. Click Save or Save and Close. FIGURE 6 6: CREATING A CONTRACT BASED ON AN EXISTING CONTRACT Contract Lines Adding contract lines to a contract is the second step in creating and invoicing a contract. When you created the contract, you entered basic information about the customer and the type of support provided. Page 171

178 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Contract lines, also known as service contract lines, describe what kind of support the contract covers. This includes: Specific dates Product covered How many cases or total minutes of allotted support are provided (for example, 100 alloted minutes or 15 cases.). The contract line also tracks the amount of the allotment that has been used. You can define several contract lines for each contract (for example, one for parts and another for maintenance), but a contract must have at least one contract line before it can be invoiced. Contract Lines can just be a contract service line and do not have to be associated with a product. Contract Lines can be used to link the contract to a product and each contract line can only have one product linked to it at a specific time. Contract Line can have different start and end dates within the boundaries of the Contract Start and End Dates. This provides flexibility for the organization. For example, they can add a new Contract Line to the contract and continue to work with the existing contract instead of creating a new one. Contract Lines can be canceled when renewing a contract, having this level of detail allows for much more flexibility regarding how to handle different situations. Cases may be related to Contract Lines. This helps describe the type of support that the customer is allowed to. They can also be used to describe the remaining allotments that correspond to the cases associated with it. (see the "Case Management" chapter for more information about Cases) Page 172

179 Chapter 6: Using Customer Service Demonstration: Adding Contract Lines to a Contract This demonstration illustrates how to add contract lines to a contract. Scenario The Service Representative created a contract for Active Cycling but has not yet added the contract lines to the new contract. Goal Description Use Microsoft CRM to accomplish the following: Create a Contract Line for the total cases/minutes. Invoice the customer. Steps 1. Start the Microsoft CRM Client for Outlook. Log on as Roger Van Houten User ID: Roger Password: Pa$$w0rd. 2. In the Navigation Pane, click Service, and then click Contracts. 3. In the View, select, All Contracts 4. From the list, open the Latest Sports Equipment (contract ID: CNR RIXO) contract. This contract should have a status of Draft. 5. Under Details, click Contract Lines. 6. Add the information in the following table to create the new contract line. Title Fix Suspension Contract Start Date Leave current date Contract End Date One year from today's date Total Cases/Minutes 1000 Total Price 500 Page 173

180 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition 7. Click Save. 8. In the contract form, on the Actions menu, click Invoice Contract, and then click OK. FIGURE 6 7: CREATING CONTRACT LINES Service Scheduling Service Scheduling is designed for service providing companies. The feature specializes in resource and time management. When making customer appointments, Service Scheduling automatically considers the availability of your employees, facilities, and equipment to ensure that resources are ready for the customer. Some of the benefits of Service Scheduling include: Appointments can be scheduled tighter while improving service quality. A predictable workload for employees prevents over-scheduling. Reliable time estimates for your customers and clients. Page 174

181 Chapter 6: Using Customer Service The Service Scheduling feature of Microsoft CRM is powerful, complex, and flexible. The following diagram shows the relationship of some of these key concepts. FIGURE 6 8: SCHEDULING CONCEPTS Scheduling Terminology Service A service is a type of work provided to a customer and performed by one or more resources. For example, bike repair or tax consultations are services. To define a service, you enter general information about the service, identify the resources needed to provide the service, and then describe these requirements by creating a selection rule. Selection Rule In its simplest form, a selection rule is the list of users, facilities, or equipment that are required to perform a service. You can define resources by how busy they are, and whether the resources are from the same site or business location. For each service, create at least one selection rule by select one or more users, facilities, and equipment to perform it. Conditional sub rules can be used to further refine a resource selection. Microsoft CRM displays your selection rules in a tree view. When you search for a service activity time, the selection rules consider the lowest-level sub rule first, and then the next level up, until the top-level rule is reached. Page 175

182 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Service Activity Microsoft CRM Service Scheduling keeps track of the services you provide as a service activity. A service activity combines a service, at least one resource, a specific time, a place, and a customer. To schedule a service activity, you first select the service and then search for an available time. Microsoft CRM uses the service's selection rules and the resource's work schedule to present a list of available times. After you select the time that you want, the service activity is added to the schedule. Resources Resources are people (Microsoft CRM users), facilities (such as a room or hall, where a service activity can be performed), and equipment. Individual resources have work schedules that define when they are available to work. Resource Groups A resource group is a pool of similar resources, from which individuals can be chosen for a service activity. These resources generally can be thought of as being interchangeable. Perhaps the members of one resource group have the same skill set (or at least a skill set appropriate for a certain service activity). In other words, resource groups are used in Microsoft CRM to model the skills (or other characteristics) required to perform or deliver a service. Selection Criteria Selection criteria can be used to determine how your resources are allocated. For example, you can choose to set up the service to make sure that a technician is scheduled as fully as possible before another technician is scheduled. Or you can also choose the opposite, to make sure that all technicians are scheduled relatively evenly. By default, services are set up to select resources without comparing how many service activities are scheduled for each resource. When a selection criterion is added to a selection rule, the sub rules are considered first. If you have two equal sub rules, one that looks for Most Busy and another that looks for Least Busy; each sub rule offers the appropriate resource based on their selection criteria. Those resources are then considered by the rule on the next level up. Capacity Scheduling Microsoft CRM can set up services and resources to take into account different sized facilities or the experience levels of your users. This is capacity scheduling. Capacity is a relative unit that you define. For example, you can define capacity in a bicycle repair shop as the number of bikes the shop has room to accommodate at the same time. Page 176

183 Chapter 6: Using Customer Service Capacity can also measure skill level. For example, a junior bike technician has the ability to perform one bike inspection per hour, and a senior technician has the ability to perform four bike inspections per hour. If two bikes must be inspected in one hour, it takes either two junior technicians, or one senior technician who can perform the inspections in half the time. Effort Required When you add effort required into the selection rule, every time a user searches for an available service activity time, the selection rules inspect the resources for capacity available. If the resource is scheduled, then that resource's capacity is reduced by the effort required for the service. Define When Resources Are Available The availability of each resource can be defined; including vacations, time-off, working hours, capacity, and maintenance. You can view the schedule for resources, compare it to other resource schedules, and check for conflicts. Microsoft CRM can then determine which resources or combination of resources are available to perform a service at a specific date and time. In addition, you can set the days your organization is closed for holidays and other events, as well as exempt individual resources from the closure schedule. Page 177

184 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Demonstration Scenario Adventure Works Cycle has recently implemented Microsoft CRM, and must add users and resources to the work schedule in Microsoft CRM, so that they can be scheduled for services. Adding users is part of the Microsoft CRM Installation, and discussed in the Installation and Configuration Course. As soon as users and resources are added to the schedule, the service administrator must determine the type of work that is to be scheduled and sold to customers. The service must then be entered into Microsoft CRM. Before saving the service the Service Scheduling Manager must define a selection rule to determine how resources are selected for service activities. The service scheduler can now begin to schedule services for Customers of Adventure Works Cycle. At the end of the day, the Service Scheduling Manager takes a few minutes to review a report of the volume of service activities. 1. Enter a new service in Microsoft CRM. The Service is for 'Wheel Alignment.' 2. Define the resource selection rules for the service. For this example, Mathew Pereira the Bike Technician is the only resource required to perform this service. 3. Schedule a service for the Brown Bicycle Company in Microsoft CRM, for the next available time slot. 4. Open up the service activity volume report. Page 178

185 Chapter 6: Using Customer Service Step 1: Creating a Service You can schedule services with your customers as service activities. FIGURE 6 9: SERVICE FORM Follow these steps to create the service: 1. Log on to the Microsoft CRM Web Application: User ID: Roger Password: Pa$$w0rd. 2. In the Navigation Pane, click Settings. 3. Under Settings, click Settings, and then in the Settings area click Services. 4. On the Actions toolbar, click New. 5. On the General tab, you must enter information in the following fields: Name: Wheel Alignment, Initial Status Reason: Requested, Default Duration: 2 hours, Start Activities Every: 30 minutes, Beginning At: 8:00 AM. 6. Enter 'Wheel Alignment Service for 2005 and 2006 Bicycles' into the Description box. 7. Save the Service. Page 179

186 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition Step 2: Define the Selection Rule For each service, you define at least one selection rule and select one or more users, facilities, and equipment to perform it. FIGURE 6 10: WHEEL ALIGNMENT SERVICE FORM Steps to add a simple selection rule: 1. On the 'Wheel Alignment' Service form, click the Required Resources tab, and then double-click the first selection rule in the right pane. Selection rules appear in the tree beside. 2. In the Edit a Selection Rule dialog box, enter the following information. Quantity: 1. NOTE: If you select All then all of the selected resources are included in the service activity. 3. Enter: Mathew Pereira the Bike Technician is the only resource required to perform this service, into the Description. 4. Select Any Site, from the Selection Site list NOTE: This option defines whether the resources all must be from the same site or if they can be from any site in the business unit. Page 180

187 Chapter 6: Using Customer Service 5. Click OK. 6. To add individual users, facilities, equipment, or teams to the selection rule, click Add Resources. 7. In the Look Up Records dialog box, select Mathew Pereira, and click OK 8. Save and Close the Service form. Step 3: Schedule a Service After your services and schedules are set up, you can schedule the services with resources and customers. FIGURE 6 11: SERVICE ACTIVITY Steps to schedule a service: 1. Log on to the Microsoft CRM Web Application: User ID: Roger Password: Pa$$w0rd. 2. In the Navigation Pane, click Service, and then click Service Calendar. 3. On the Actions toolbar, click Schedule. NOTE: If you click New and then Service Activity you will create a service activity without checking for available times Page 181

188 Implementing Microsoft CRM 3.0 Small Business Edition 4. On the Schedule Service Activity form, you must enter the following information: Account: Brown Bicycle Company, Service: Wheel Alignment. Resources: You can select Mathew Pereira's record from a filtered list in the Form Assistant pane, or you can click to search for the record. 5. Click Find Available Times. The next available times are displayed. 6. Under Available Times select on the service that has a scheduled start time of 8:00 AM. 7. Click Schedule. 8. Enter "Wheel Alignment for Brown Bicycle Company' into the Subject. 9. Click Save or Save and Close. NOTE: The service activity appears as a color block on the Service Calendar as well as on the calendar in the Workplace and Activities areas. 10. Next, enter the following information into the service calendar Look for: Wheel, Type: Service Activity, into Service Calendar and click Find. 11. Locate and Open the Wheel Alignment for Brown Bicycle service activity. Page 182

189 Chapter 6: Using Customer Service Service Scheduling Reports There is one default report provided for service scheduling, the Service Activity Volume report. This report tracks the patterns in service activity volume. If the default reports don't provide the information you need, try creating an Advanced Find search, and exporting the results to Microsoft Office Excel. FIGURE 6 12: REPORTS Steps to run a report: 1. Log on to the Microsoft CRM Web Application: User ID: Roger Password: Pa$$w0rd. 2. In the Navigation Pane, Select Workplace, then Reports, in the Reports area, change the category. 3. Change the Category to: Search Results, and select ALL as the Entity. 4. On the Actions toolbar, click More Actions, and then click Run Report. Page 183

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