Daniel CÔTÉ, Danielle GRATTON, Jessica DUBÉ, Sylvie GRAVEL, Bob WHITE

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Daniel CÔTÉ, Danielle GRATTON, Jessica DUBÉ, Sylvie GRAVEL, Bob WHITE"

Transcription

1 Building intercultural competencies in monocultural organisations: issues and perspectives in planning rehabilitation services in Montréal (Québec, Canada) Daniel CÔTÉ, Danielle GRATTON, Jessica DUBÉ, Sylvie GRAVEL, Bob WHITE

2 Building intercultural competencies in monocultural organisations: issues and perspectives in planning rehabilitation services in Montréal (Québec, Canada) Daniel CÔTÉ, PhD, Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail (IRSST) Danielle GRATTON, PhD, Laboratoire de recherche en relations interculturelles (LABRRI) Jessica DUBÉ, PhD candidate, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) Sylvie GRAVEL, Ph.D., Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) Bob WHITE, PhD, Laboratoire de recherche en relations interculturelles (LABRRI) This paper presents several issues pertaining to intercultural encounters in the field of occupational health and work rehabilitation. The results are based on a study conducted in Montréal (Québec, Canada), a city where more than one third of the population is of foreign origin. According to the Québec Workers Compensation Board (CSST), almost 50% of workers affected by an occupational injury in this area are recent immigrants. This means that encounters between patients and health care providers are increasingly likely to be characterized by intercultural dynamics. After presenting the analytical model and after having taken into account micro and macro data, we suggest (following previous research in this area) that the different stakeholders involved in the healing process face intercultural barriers that significantly hinder the building of a therapeutic alliance. Our data suggest that clinicians and agents in the field might develop strategies on their own to adjust treatment options, but the lack of intercultural competencies at the organisational level leaves employees to fend for themselves in this regard. One consequence is the inability of the organisation to access and organise the expertise that has been developed through clinical experience over time, leading to a never-ending (re)development or reinvention of expertise by stakeholders and agents (e.g. institutional blindness). The lack of organisational intercultural competencies results in the failure to take into account the additional time required for interventions with clients in multi-ethnic settings. This can pose a risk to the health of health care workers: work overload, emotional distress, feeling of failure, and increased employee turnover. In conclusion, we address the question of developing intercultural competencies in organisations that are characterized by monocultural policies or structures. In a financial context of austerity and new managerial twists where clinicians and agents are asked to do more with fewer resources, it is increasingly difficult to integrate time as a fundamental parameter of the intervention, especially given the additional energy required to enable the co-construction of a therapeutic space. OA-IRSST 1

3 1 - Introduction This paper presents several issues pertaining to intercultural encounters in the field of occupational health and work rehabilitation. The results are based on a study conducted in Montréal (Québec, Canada), a city where more than one third of the population is of foreign origin. According to the Québec Workers Compensation Board (CSST), almost 50% of workers affected by an occupational injury in this area are recent immigrants 1. This means that encounters between patients and health care providers are increasingly likely to be characterized by intercultural dynamics. Context of the study Every year in Quebec, thousands of people are injured at work or face long-term sickness absence, often due to chronic pain. Some workers must undergo medical treatment such as physical rehabilitation to help them heal and return to work. When they undergo physical rehabilitation, the injured worker also has to adapt to the way of doing things in a medical setting with which they are not familiar. They might even ignore the existence of some health professions involved in the rehabilitation process, which in itself can be a source of misunderstanding 2. Scientific research shows that the response to pain varies greatly from one society to another, from one cultural context to another, and choices of treatment also vary a great deal 3-6. In Quebec, especially in the greater Montreal area, workers come from different backgrounds. About 35% of Montreal residents are born outside Canada which means there is a great deal of social and cultural diversity 7. There has been limited research to determine whether medical services are properly adapted to facilitate the return to work for people who are injured and undergo medical treatments 8. In order to answer these questions, we need to know more about the experience of people who were or are currently in physical rehabilitation so we can attempt to understand what happened during their rehabilitation and return to work. We also need to know about the experience of health practitioners and workplace representatives having to deal with diversity at work and long-term absence due to sickness 9,10. This research was developed to bridge the gap in the knowledge about the different stakeholders experience in intercultural interactions. In this paper we present results that describe the realities of intercultural encounters in the context of rehabilitation for work-related sickness. We suggest (following previous research in this area) that the different stakeholders involved in the rehabilitation and

4 return-to-work process face intercultural barriers that hinder the creation of a therapeutic alliance and positive clinical outcomes. 2 Theoretical Framework and Methodology This project draws upon an intercultural model allowing for a systemic analysis allowing for an understanding of cross-institutional interactions/negotiations and within a single organisation Considering the complexity of occupational injury prevention and rehabilitation, we developed a project that attempts to grasp complementary views from the representatives of different systems : the legislative and insurance system, the workplace system, the health care system, and the personal (including family) system i. These are the four leading aspects of the Québec workers compensation system 14. Since the beginning of the project we have completed a series of about thirty open-ended interviews with occupational therapists, physical therapists, rehabilitation counsellors and compensation agents, and we are currently recruiting workplace officials and injured workers from immigration backgrounds. A grounded theory approach to data collection and analysis has enabled the construction of hypotheses grounded in the multiple realities of practitioners 15. To support this objective we developed an inquiry model inspired by Cohen-Émerique s notion of critical incidents 16 and Vermersch s interviewing techniques known as explicitation Results Our data suggest that clinicians and agents in the field involved in the rehabilitation and returnto-work process face intercultural barriers that hinder the building of a therapeutic alliance. Those barriers can be divided into several different categories: 1) language and communication; 2) differing values, treatment and representations of illness, and 3) institutional blindness. Today, we will focus on the latter of these three categories--institutional blindness which can be defined as a lack of intercultural awareness or unwillingness or inability to perceive the constraints and the requirement of working within an intercultural environment. This blindness has consequences on practitioners daily routine and workload as well as on the global performance of the institution.

5 Our data suggest that while the practitioners develop strategies to overcome communication barriers and cross-cultural misunderstanding to adapt to patients personality, cultural preferences and beliefs about healthcare, they often find themselves without institutional support. Practitioners develop strategies on their own to adjust treatment options, but the lack of organisational intercultural competencies (OIC) leaves employees to fend for themselves in this regard. We describe two aspects of the problem here. First, we describe some strategies and constraints experienced by practitioners (closely related to organisational support), and second, we describe suggestions expressed by practitioners for developing organisational intercultural competencies. 3.1 Strategies and constraints Practitioners developed strategies to catch up with their patients despite the perceived lack of organisational awareness with regards to intercultural issues. The strategies entail adjusting to patients pace and discussing intercultural issues in team meetings. Situation 1 exposes those strategies while situation 2 describes the possible relation between the level of organisational cultural awareness and employee-based support. Situation 1 Adjusting to patient s pace Here is a quote from an interview we conducted with a 40-years old physical therapist (PT) working in a private clinic in Montréal. He addresses the necessity to take time and to adjust to cultural differences while having no OIC to provide clear orientations. You must get used to cultural barriers, so you have to develop a strategy of action based on cultural difference as such. You also have to adjust to the client's pace that is not always the same as in North America [ ] we rarely have time to spend an entire hour talking with the client and ask questions to better understand his culture [ ] I would like to know more about their culture and how it works [but] it requires more response time to talk with the person to better understand his culture. Here, we do not take the time. (Male, 40 years old, physical therapist)

6 This strategy appears to go against the grain of a work environment and corporate principles that do not allow time for accommodations of this type. A monocultural organisation would not consider it necessary to resolve misunderstandings or disagreements based on cultural difference. But as the interview progressed, we also found that the time factor was not the only factor to be considered. In fact, some intercultural issues that we defined as critical incidents were at times discussed during team meetings, but certain issues related to cultural identity appeared to be a taboo that is not easy to address, especially if this brings out issues related to performance ( personal failure, weakness or incompetency ), or the fear of evoking value judgements or participating in discriminatory behaviour. We tried to address it during interdisciplinary team meetings. But practitioners are uncomfortable in naming a difficult case, because it is often seen as a kind of weakness, you know, a kind of weakness if you have not been able to?. (Male, 40 years old, physical therapist) So, even if team discussion is suggested as a possible strategy, there are limits in addressing those issues as long as personal performance, a feeling of self-efficiency and discomfort are not defused and overcome. In addition to performance issues addressed by this PT, the fear of lacking intercultural competencies may create a discomfort or anxiety among professionals, many of whom are worried about weakening the therapeutic alliance by asking inappropriate or intrusive questions. So, even if intercultural issues are concealed and not explicitly addressed in team meetings, these issues still have an effect on personal performance, service delivery and treatment outcomes. The inability to name the problem or the fact of denying it an organisational relevance has two effects: 1) it reinforces the belief that acknowledging differences is negative, threatening or potentially compromising; 2) it reduces discussion to the question of personal performance without questioning the role of organisational performance in intercultural interactions, especially when a clinic is located in a socio-economically deprived and multicultural area. Here we are faced with a paradoxical situation where a consistent practice would be to spend more time with the patient; while on the other hand, the institutional constraints limit the

7 possibilities for establishing a meaning intercultural exchange.a practitioner may keep in line with the regulations and orientations that apply to the clinic, but by doing so, he or she may deviate from the commitments to his or her professional association, especially if he or she has relevant knowledge with regards to therapeutic efficacy. There are ways to do things differently despite institutional blindness and organisational constraints. For example, as suggested by a public insurer rehabilitation counsellor, spending more time at some critical moment of the rehabilitation process can have the effect of reducing the overall intervention time. The very beginning of the compensation process is often identified as a crucial or critical moment where trust and therapeutic alliances have to be put into place. Situation 2 / Cultural Awareness and Employer Support The next situation describes a practitioner s experience within a rehabilitation clinic s network where the clinic she belongs to is the only one experiencing intercultural issues. When asked about organisational support in intercultural competency development, she says: I think we do not have much institutional support because we do not live the same reality in Montreal compare to elsewhere in the suburbs. Maybe the managers know a little bit more about intercultural reality when they are located in Montreal, but we are the only clinic in Montreal. This is new stuff, it's been three years that the clinic is open and they [clinics within the network] are starting to get used to this kind of reality. They are becoming more aware of the intercultural reality. Awareness is the first thing. After that, we need to understand all of this [cultural gaps], but this step is not yet completed. And then you have to [provide institutional] support for this (Female, 27 years old, occupational therapist in the private sector) For this practitioner, intercultural sensitivity (or cultural awareness) can be developed within a homogeneous environment, but it is identified as the very first step for developing OIC. Other steps would be the ability to understand intercultural gaps and to support an entire organisation orientation which is not the case at the moment. Acceptance, adaptation and integration are far from being fully integrated in the corporate development. 3.2 Suggestions for Developing OIC

8 According to the participating practitioners, developing OIC requires: 1) training staff at all levels, including administrative staff and managers; 2) recurring training because of staff turnover, and 3) creating a space for discussion and exchange. This occupational therapist (OT) summarised the idea of training staff at all levels: I think it is always better to give training to employees and employers at the same time, as the employer becomes aware of the concerns of employees and becomes aware of the trainer's reply. If everyone hears the same thing, I think it's better (Female, 27 years old, occupational therapist) This same OT discusses the staff turnover issue. She traces a causal link between staff turnover and the complexity of working with a multi-cultural clientele. She says: We lost three assistants here because they were no longer able to do their job [managing absences and delays]. Two of them have suffered from depression and another has just left her position to find another job. They say it is too difficult a clientele. (Female, 27 years old, occupational therapist in the private sector) Finally, creating a space for discussion and exchange is a recurrent idea expressed by many practitioners. Lunch conferences, clinical workshops, continuing education are commonly referred to, in addition to other strategies that are already used on a regular basis (ex. working with interpreters, seeking help from co-workers from the same country or cultural area, seeking help from non-profit community organisations dedicated to the immigrants or to a specific ethnic group, etc.) But these solutions can work only if performance issues are brought to a team or organisational level where critical incidents relating to intercultural dynamics can be discussed. Intercultural competency is an organisational competency outside of individual communication skills, awareness, and attitudes 2,9, Another condition for success would be to overcome the taboos regarding naming cultural gaps and differences. Unfortunately, according to Bennett s continuum of cultural competency in health care, many organisations are still operating through denial, defensiveness and minimisation 21.

9 4 Implications for Intervention and Emerging Hypotheses From the point of view of stakeholders, the lack of OIC makes it impossible to take into account the additional time required for interventions with patients in multi-ethnic settings. Additional time requirements pose a risk to the health of health care workers: work overload, emotional distress, feeling of failure, and increased turnover (this factor was suggested by some informants and needs to be further investigated). This factor is not fully acknowledged within monocultural organisations where the performance issue is mainly regarded in terms of cost effectiveness and duration of action regardless of the complexity of a situation. Organisations lacking in intercultural competencies do not pay enough attention to the clienteles characteristics and specific needs, and to the field workers conditions, ignoring emotional distress and feeling of failure. In this context, efforts devoted to the understanding of the patient s perspective and trajectory have limited weight in the management of financial and human resources. Despite the fact that immigrants and minority workers often require more time per intervention 9,22, this reality seems to be poorly understood at higher levels of decision-making. This is why many clinicians stressed the need to train all the staff at all levels of the organisational hierarchy to sustain a common awareness of intercultural issues in the treatment and recovery process, not only those employees (for example clinicians or compensation agency officers) who have direct, face-toface, interactions. Acknowledging a given population s specific needs and characteristics might lead to a culturally-fair design while preventing occupational risks among its own employees. But the road to this ideal is still long and winding in a context of fragmented tasks. This is particularly true where the efficacy of intervention is measured through the lens of cost-performance; a culturally adapted treatment (that implies an extension of duration) still might be perceived as negatively affecting global institutional performance when compared to similar organisations with a clientele that is more culturally homogeneous. 5 Concluding thoughts Developing intercultural competencies in monocultural organisations has become a major issue in large cosmopolitan cities 23. In the financial context of austerity and new managerial twists where clinicians and agents are asked to do more with fewer resources, and where organisational performance tends to be fragmented into a sum of individual performance, it is not easy to

10 integrate time as a fundamental parameter of the intervention, especially if this situation requires more energy develop a therapeutic alliance through co-construction 24,25. Promoting the development of a clear organisational orientation and commitment in terms of intercultural competencies is not easy either. Organisations, clinics or workers compensation regional bureaus, are part of a wider system: health care system (variety of care management), legislative and insurance system (society s safety net), workplace system (work relatedness, employees assistance and accommodation), and personal system (coping, social relationship, beliefs, communication patters, etc.). While there is a growing body of evidence supporting the need for a culturally adapted institutional response to health care, it seems that evidence-based policymaking looks like policy-based evidence-making 26. Evidence and policy-making are interrelated. To set research priorities we must determine how evidence is made, constructed, and how research capacity is build, planned and sponsored 27,28. Political interference in evidence-making is not a new phenomenon. The willingness to take actions may be based on ideological or paradigmatic assumptions where facts or social phenomena may be concealed, misinterpreted, misused, or simply ignored. References 1. CSST. Plan stratégique Québec, QC: Commission de la santé et de sécurité du travail (CSST); Côté D. Intercultural communication in health care: challenges and solutions in work rehabilitation practices and training: a comprehensive review. Disabil Rehabil 2013; 35(2): Kvarén C, Johansson E. Pain experience and expectations of physiotherapy from a cultural perspective. Advances in Physiotherapy 2004; 6(1): Löfvander MB, Engström AW. The immigrant patient having widespread pain. Clinical findings by physicians in Swedish primary care. Disabil Rehabil 2007; 29: Magnussen L, Nilsen S, Råheim M. Barriers against returning to work - as perceived by disability pensioners with back pain: A focus group based qualitative study. Disabil Rehabil 2007; 29(3): Sloots M, Dekker JHM, Pont M, Bartels EAC, Geertzen JHB, Dekker J. Reasons of dropout from rehabilitation in patients of Turkish and Moroccan origin with chronic low back pain in The Netherlands: A qualitative study. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine 2010; 42(6): Québec. Migrations internationales et interprovinciales, Québec, Montréal: Institut de la statistique du Québec. Consulté le 20 février 2013 sur:

11 8. Sloots M, Dekker JHM, Bartels EAC, Geertzen JH, Dekker J. Adaptations to pain rehabilitation programmes for non-native patients with chronic pain. Disabil Rehabil 2011; 33(15-16): Dressler D, Pils P. A qualitative study on cross-cultural communication in post-accident in-patient rehabilitation of migrant and ethnic minority patients in Austria. Disabil Rehabil 2009; 31(14): Fitzgerald MH, Williamson P, Russell C, Manor D. Doubling the cloak of (in)competence in client/therapist interactions. Medical Anthropology Quarterly 2005; 19(3): Baillargeon P, Pinsof WM, Leduc A. Modèle systémique de l'alliance thérapeutique. Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée/European Review of Applied Psychology 2005; 55(3): Kosny A, MacEachen E, Lifshen M, et al. Delicate dances: immigrant workers' experiences of injury reporting and claim filling. Ethn Health 2012; 17(3): Schultz IZ, Stowell AW, Feuerstein M, Gatchel RJ. Models of return to work for musculoskeletal disorders. Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 2007; 17(2): Loisel P, Durand MJ, Berthelette D, et al. Disability prevention. New paradigm for the management of occupational back pain. Disease Management and Health Outcomes 2001; 9(7): Charmaz K. Constructing Grounded Theory. A Practical Guide Through Qualitative Analysis. London: Sage; Cohen-Émerique M. L'interculturel dans les interactions des professionnels avec les usagers migrants. Alterstice 2011; 1(1). 17. Vermersch P. L'entretien d'explicitation en formation initiale et en formation continue. Paris: ESF; Gibson D, Zhong M. Intercultural communication competence in the healthcare context. International Journal of Intercultural Relations 2005; 29: Taylor-Ritzler T, Balcazara F, Dimpfl S, Suarez-Balcazar Y. Cultural competence training with organizations serving people with disabilities from diverse cultural backgrounds. Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation 2008; 29(2): Wray EL, Mortenson PA. Cultural competence in occupational therapists working in early interventiontherapy programs. 2011; 78(3): Bennett MJ. Towards ethnorelativism: A developmental model of intercultural sensitivity. In: Paige M, ed. Education for the intercultural experience. Yarmouth, ME: Intercultural Press; Battaglini A. L'intervention de première ligne à Montréal auprès des personnes immigrantes: estimé des ressources nécessaires pour une intervention adéquate: Direction de la Santé Publique, Montréal; Lewis A, Bethea J, Hurley J. Integrating cultural competency in rehabilitation curricula in the new millennium: Keeping it simple 64. Disabil Rehabil 2009; 31(14): MacEachen E, Kosny A, Ferrier S, Chambers L. The "toxic dose" of system problems: why some injured workers don't return towork as expected. Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 2010; 20(3): Sauret M-J, Sidi A. Incidences du libéralisme sur l'évolution des métiers de la clinique. Recherches en psychanalyse 2011; 2(12): , DOI: /rep Marmot MG. Evidence based policy or policy based evidence? British Medical Journal 2004; 328(7445):

12 27. Choi BCK, Pang T, Lin V, et al. Evidence based public health policy and practice. Can scientists and policy makers work together? Journal of Epidemiological Community Health 2005; 59: Coory MD. Ageing and healthcare costs in Australia: a case of policy-based evidence? Medical Journal of Australia 2004; 180: i Basically, a system can be defined as a set of interacting or interdependent elements forming an integrated whole. These elements are composed by rules, methods and procedures that govern actions. The term institution is also used to describe a system (source: Wikipedia).

Contact information. Dr. Agnieszka Kosny, Scientist Institute for Work & Health 416.927.2027, ext. 2167 akosny@iwh.on.ca or akosny@gmail.

Contact information. Dr. Agnieszka Kosny, Scientist Institute for Work & Health 416.927.2027, ext. 2167 akosny@iwh.on.ca or akosny@gmail. Contact information Additional copies of this report and the full study report on which it is based are available at: www.iwh.on.ca/immigrant-workers-experiences If you have any questions or comments,

More information

BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL INJURY MANAGEMENT. Introduction. The traditional medical model

BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL INJURY MANAGEMENT. Introduction. The traditional medical model BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL INJURY MANAGEMENT Introduction This paper outlines HWCA s position on a biopsychosocial approach to injury management and recognises work undertaken by Workers Compensation Authorities

More information

Why is psychological harassment important for occupational health and safety?

Why is psychological harassment important for occupational health and safety? Why is psychological harassment important for occupational health and safety? K A T H E R I N E L I P P E L C A N A D A R E S E A R C H C H A I R I N O C C U P A T I O N A L H E A L T H A N D S A F E T

More information

The Physiotherapy Pilot. 1.1 Purpose of the pilot

The Physiotherapy Pilot. 1.1 Purpose of the pilot The Physiotherapy Pilot 1.1 Purpose of the pilot The purpose of the physiotherapy pilot was to see if there were business benefits of fast tracking Network Rail employees who sustained injuries whilst

More information

THE COSTS AND BENEFITS OF ACTIVE CASE MANAGEMENT AND REHABILITATION FOR MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS

THE COSTS AND BENEFITS OF ACTIVE CASE MANAGEMENT AND REHABILITATION FOR MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS This document is the abstract and executive summary of a report prepared by Hu-Tech Ergonomics for HSE. The full report will be published by Health and Safety Executive on their website in mid-august 2006.

More information

BODY STRESSING INJURIES. Key messages for rehabilitation providers

BODY STRESSING INJURIES. Key messages for rehabilitation providers BODY STRESSING INJURIES Key messages for rehabilitation providers CONTENTS BACKGROUND 4 DELAYS IN PROVIDING REHABILITATION OR RETURN TO WORK ASSISTANCE TO EMPLOYEES INJURED AT WORK 6 DELAYS IN LODGING

More information

BODY STRESSING INJURIES. Key messages for rehabilitation providers

BODY STRESSING INJURIES. Key messages for rehabilitation providers BODY STRESSING INJURIES Key messages for rehabilitation providers CONTENTS BACKGROUND 4 DELAYS IN PROVIDING REHABILITATION OR RETURN TO WORK ASSISTANCE TO EMPLOYEES INJURED AT WORK 6 DELAYS IN LODGING

More information

THE BENEFITS OF EARLY INTERVENTION OF MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURIES AT THE WORKPLACE

THE BENEFITS OF EARLY INTERVENTION OF MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURIES AT THE WORKPLACE THE BENEFITS OF EARLY INTERVENTION OF MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURIES AT THE WORKPLACE Lorraine Mischuk, O.T. Reg.(MB) C.W.C.E. Maximize Human Capabilities (MHC) What are the costs of Musculoskeletal (MSI) Injuries?

More information

Promoting newcomer health and safety through the engagement of settlement agencies. Agnieszka Kosny Institute for Work & Health Toronto, Canada

Promoting newcomer health and safety through the engagement of settlement agencies. Agnieszka Kosny Institute for Work & Health Toronto, Canada Promoting newcomer health and safety through the engagement of settlement agencies Agnieszka Kosny Institute for Work & Health Toronto, Canada Work we are doing with settlement agencies that serve recent

More information

Use of the HELiCS Resource in a Spinal Injury Rehabilitation Service

Use of the HELiCS Resource in a Spinal Injury Rehabilitation Service Case Study Three Use of the HELiCS Resource in a Spinal Injury Rehabilitation Service The purpose of this case study is to present an example of the use of the HELiCS Resource in a Spinal Injury Rehabilitation

More information

SCDLMCA2 Lead and manage change within care services

SCDLMCA2 Lead and manage change within care services Overview This standard identifies the requirements associated with leading and managing change within care services. It includes the implementation of a shared vision for the service provision and using

More information

PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAMME GUIDANCE DRAFT SCOPE

PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAMME GUIDANCE DRAFT SCOPE NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CLINICAL EXCELLENCE PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAMME GUIDANCE DRAFT SCOPE 1 Guidance title Guidance for primary care services and employers on the management of long-term sickness

More information

THE EUROPEAN DEFINITION OF GENERAL PRACTICE / FAMILY MEDICINE

THE EUROPEAN DEFINITION OF GENERAL PRACTICE / FAMILY MEDICINE Network organisation within WONCA Region Europe - ESGP/FM European Academy of Teachers in General Practice (Network within WONCA Europe) THE EUROPEAN DEFINITION OF GENERAL PRACTICE / FAMILY MEDICINE SHORT

More information

MODIFIED TRAINING PROGRAMME FOR TRAINERS AND TEACHERS OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY IN TAJIKISTAN

MODIFIED TRAINING PROGRAMME FOR TRAINERS AND TEACHERS OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY IN TAJIKISTAN MODIFIED TRAINING PROGRAMME FOR TRAINERS AND TEACHERS OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY IN TAJIKISTAN These materials have been prepared within the framework of the project Technical Assistance to the Sector Policy

More information

INCOME PROTECTION THE BASICS WHAT IF?

INCOME PROTECTION THE BASICS WHAT IF? INCOME PROTECTION THE BASICS WHAT IF? If you couldn t work due to illness or injury, could you cope financially? We all hope we ll never find out, but the reality is nearly a third of us will have close

More information

Standards of proficiency. Occupational therapists

Standards of proficiency. Occupational therapists Standards of proficiency Occupational therapists Contents Foreword 1 Introduction 3 Standards of proficiency 7 Foreword We are pleased to present the Health and Care Professions Council s standards of

More information

Shawn Marshall, MD, MSc (Epi), FRCPC, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI) and University of Ottawa, Ontario Email: smarshall@toh.on.

Shawn Marshall, MD, MSc (Epi), FRCPC, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI) and University of Ottawa, Ontario Email: smarshall@toh.on. Development and Implementation of a Clinical Practice Guideline for the Rehabilitation of Adults with Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Québec and Ontario Bonnie Swaine, PhD, Centre de recherche

More information

Policy for Preventing and Managing Critical Incident Stress

Policy for Preventing and Managing Critical Incident Stress Policy for Preventing and Managing Critical Incident Stress Document reference number HSAG 2012/3 Document developed by Revision number 1.0 Document approved by Consultation with 14 September 2012 Presented

More information

REPORT ON CONSULTATIONS:

REPORT ON CONSULTATIONS: REPORT ON CONSULTATIONS: Amending the Workers Compensation Act to Provide Presumptive Coverage for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder JUNE 2015 A Report Prepared by the Workers Compensation Board on behalf

More information

30 minutes from now. Management of Temporary Disability and Sickness Absence in Europe: The Netherlands, Sweden and Spain

30 minutes from now. Management of Temporary Disability and Sickness Absence in Europe: The Netherlands, Sweden and Spain Management of Temporary Disability and Sickness Absence in Europe: The Netherlands, Sweden and Spain Ute Bültmann PhD Associate Professor, Rosalind Franklin Fellow Department of Health Sciences, Community

More information

Workers Compensation Board of Nova Scotia. Issues Identification Paper Chronic Pain: Causal Connection to Original Compensable Injury

Workers Compensation Board of Nova Scotia. Issues Identification Paper Chronic Pain: Causal Connection to Original Compensable Injury Workers Compensation Board of Nova Scotia Issues Identification Paper Chronic Pain: Causal Connection to Original Compensable Injury Date: April 16, 2007 Table of Contents Introduction.2 Background.4 What

More information

Employer s Guide to. Best Practice Return to Work for a Stress Injury

Employer s Guide to. Best Practice Return to Work for a Stress Injury Employer s Guide to Best Practice Return to Work for a Stress Injury Employers Guide to Best Practice Return to Work for a Stress Injury 1. Early Intervention 2. Claim Lodged 3. Claim Acceptance 4. Return

More information

Ph. Mairiaux, School of Public Health, University of Liège ph.mairiaux@ulg.ac.be

Ph. Mairiaux, School of Public Health, University of Liège ph.mairiaux@ulg.ac.be Ph. Mairiaux, School of Public Health, University of Liège ph.mairiaux@ulg.ac.be 6 th Biennial Congress, Belgian Back Society November 17 2012, Brussels In Belgium 80% of sick listed people are spontaneously

More information

Workplace rehabilitation providers and WorkCover

Workplace rehabilitation providers and WorkCover Workplace rehabilitation providers and WorkCover What to expect from your workplace rehabilitation provider This guide aims to provide workers and employers with information regarding the role of WorkCover

More information

Standards of proficiency. Operating department practitioners

Standards of proficiency. Operating department practitioners Standards of proficiency Operating department practitioners Contents Foreword 1 Introduction 3 Standards of proficiency 7 Foreword We are pleased to present the Health and Care Professions Council s standards

More information

ONLINE GAMBLING WHEN THE REALITY OF THE VIRTUAL CATCHES UP WITH US

ONLINE GAMBLING WHEN THE REALITY OF THE VIRTUAL CATCHES UP WITH US ONLINE GAMBLING WHEN THE REALITY OF THE VIRTUAL CATCHES UP WITH US Gouvernement du Québec, 2014 INTRODUCTION On February 10, 2010, the Québec government announced, in the Gazette officielle du Québec,

More information

EVALUATION AS A TOOL FOR DECISION MAKING: A REVIEW OF SOME MAIN CHALLENGES

EVALUATION AS A TOOL FOR DECISION MAKING: A REVIEW OF SOME MAIN CHALLENGES Papers and Chapters 2014-03-EN December 2014 EVALUATION AS A TOOL FOR DECISION MAKING: A REVIEW OF SOME MAIN CHALLENGES Marie-Hélène Boily, Hervé Sokoudjou 1 1. Issue The results-based management devoted

More information

SUMMARY. Helping Front-Line Health and Social Services Professionals Detect Elder Abuse. Summary. Highlights

SUMMARY. Helping Front-Line Health and Social Services Professionals Detect Elder Abuse. Summary. Highlights Helping Front-Line Health and Social Services Professionals Detect Elder Abuse SUMMARY May 2014 Summary of a scientific advisory entitled Recherche de cas de maltraitance envers des personnes aînées par

More information

COURSE APPROVAL GUIDELINES APS COLLEGE OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGISTS

COURSE APPROVAL GUIDELINES APS COLLEGE OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGISTS COURSE APPROVAL GUIDELINES APS COLLEGE OF HEALTH PSYCHOLOGISTS Updated October 2000 Page 2 1. General Introduction and Principles The College of Health Psychologists aims to promote excellence in teaching,

More information

The Missing Link: Supervisors Role in Employee Health Management. Insights from the Shepell fgi Research Group

The Missing Link: Supervisors Role in Employee Health Management. Insights from the Shepell fgi Research Group The Missing Link: Supervisors Role in Employee Health Management Insights from the Shepell fgi Research Group The Missing Link: Supervisors Role in Employee Health Management Introduction During difficult

More information

Aligning action with aims: Optimising the benefits of workplace wellness

Aligning action with aims: Optimising the benefits of workplace wellness Aligning action with aims: Optimising the benefits of workplace wellness Dr Michael McCoy Medibank Health Solutions Strategy & Corporate Development Health & Wellbeing September 2011 Aligning action with

More information

What are Cognitive and/or Behavioural Psychotherapies?

What are Cognitive and/or Behavioural Psychotherapies? What are Cognitive and/or Behavioural Psychotherapies? Paper prepared for a UKCP/BACP mapping psychotherapy exercise Katy Grazebrook, Anne Garland and the Board of BABCP July 2005 Overview Cognitive and

More information

Consensus Based Disability Management Audit TM (CBDMA TM ) HISTORICAL OVERVIEW

Consensus Based Disability Management Audit TM (CBDMA TM ) HISTORICAL OVERVIEW Consensus Based Disability Management Audit TM (CBDMA TM ) HISTORICAL OVERVIEW Table of Contents Table of Contents... 2 Introduction... 3 Introduction to the CBDMA... 3 Widely Accepted in a Diverse Range

More information

BODY STRESSING RISK MANAGEMENT CHECKLIST

BODY STRESSING RISK MANAGEMENT CHECKLIST BODY STRESSING RISK MANAGEMENT CHECKLIST BODY STRESSING RISK MANAGEMENT CHECKLIST This checklist is designed to assist managers, workplace health staff and rehabilitation providers with identifying and

More information

Healthy workplaces and productivity

Healthy workplaces and productivity Making the healthy workplace business case and leading change Graham S. Lowe, Ph.D. Presentation at The European Network of Enterprise for Health, Mondragón, Spain, 14 October 2003. www.grahamlowe.ca Copyright

More information

Employment Injuries: Compensation and Rehabilitation of Workers

Employment Injuries: Compensation and Rehabilitation of Workers Employment Injuries: Compensation and Rehabilitation of Workers CHAPTER 4 Audited Entities : Commission de la santé et de la sécurité du travail (CSST) Ministère du Travail, de l Emploi et de la Solidarité

More information

How Schools Can Improve their Functioning as Professional Learning Communities 1. European Conference on Education Research. Helsinki, 27 août 2010

How Schools Can Improve their Functioning as Professional Learning Communities 1. European Conference on Education Research. Helsinki, 27 août 2010 1 How Schools Can Improve their Functioning as Professional Learning Communities 1 European Conference on Education Research Helsinki, 27 août 2010 Martine Leclerc Ph.D., professeure, Université du Québec

More information

SIPA. An integrated system of care for frail elderly persons

SIPA. An integrated system of care for frail elderly persons SIPA. An integrated system of care for frail elderly persons François Béland, PhD Département d administration de la santé Université de Montréal Co-Directeur, SOLIDAGE Groupe de recherche Université de

More information

Overarching MPH Degree Competencies

Overarching MPH Degree Competencies Overarching MPH Degree 1. Describe basic concepts of probability, random variation and commonly used statistical probability distributions. 2. Apply common statistical methods for inference. 3. Describe

More information

Myths and Facts About People with Disabilities

Myths and Facts About People with Disabilities Myths and Facts About People with Disabilities Myths are roadblocks that interfere with the ability of persons with disabilities to have equality in employment. These roadblocks usually result from a lack

More information

WORKPLACE STRESS: a collective challenge WORLD DAY FOR SAFETY AND HEALTH AT WORK 28 APRIL 2016

WORKPLACE STRESS: a collective challenge WORLD DAY FOR SAFETY AND HEALTH AT WORK 28 APRIL 2016 WORKPLACE STRESS: a collective challenge WORLD DAY FOR SAFETY AND HEALTH AT WORK 28 APRIL 2016 WHAT IS WORK-RELATED STRESS? Stress is the harmful physical and emotional response caused by an imbalance

More information

Preparing Globally Minded Students and Employees

Preparing Globally Minded Students and Employees Preparing Globally Minded Students and Employees Nancy Arthur University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada NATCON Papers 2000 Les actes du CONAT Copyright 2000 Nancy Arthur The author owns the copyright of this

More information

Chapter 1: Health & Safety Management Systems (SMS) Leadership and Organisational Safety Culture

Chapter 1: Health & Safety Management Systems (SMS) Leadership and Organisational Safety Culture Chapter 1: Health & Safety Management Systems (SMS) Leadership and Organisational Safety Culture 3 29 Safety Matters! A Guide to Health & Safety at Work Chapter outline Leadership and Organisational Safety

More information

The Guide to Managing Long-Term Sickness. Civilians in Defence

The Guide to Managing Long-Term Sickness. Civilians in Defence The Guide to Managing Long-Term Sickness Civilians in Defence Contents Introduction 3 Section 1 Initial Planning Fit for Work: focusing on planning a successful return to work and full capability Why plan

More information

About the consultation

About the consultation Hearing Aid Council and Health Professions Council consultation on standards of proficiency and the threshold level of qualification for entry to the Hearing Aid Audiologists/Dispensers part of the Register.

More information

A BETTER TOMOR W. A balanced approach to Occupational Therapy & Case Management REHAB OPTIONS

A BETTER TOMOR W. A balanced approach to Occupational Therapy & Case Management REHAB OPTIONS A BETTER TOMOR W Beech House, 54b High Street, Chapmanslade, Wiltshire, BA13 4AN T: 01373 832459 info@rehaboptions.co.uk www.rehaboptions.co.uk Registered in England & Wales No 5860678 Designed by Plum

More information

Fluctuating conditions, fluctuating support: Improving organisational resilience to fluctuating conditions in the workforce

Fluctuating conditions, fluctuating support: Improving organisational resilience to fluctuating conditions in the workforce January 2015 Fluctuating conditions, fluctuating support: Improving organisational resilience to fluctuating conditions in the workforce An executive summary of the second white paper of the Health at

More information

State of Workplace Mental Health in Australia

State of Workplace Mental Health in Australia State of Workplace Mental Health in Australia L1, 181 Miller Street North Sydney 2060 www.tnsglobal.com KEY FINDINGS Mentally healthy workplaces are as important to Australian employees as physically

More information

INTERVENTION PROVIDING FEEDBACK TO PHYSICIANS AND PHARMACISTS TO IMPROVE DRUG USE

INTERVENTION PROVIDING FEEDBACK TO PHYSICIANS AND PHARMACISTS TO IMPROVE DRUG USE INTERVENTION PROVIDING FEEDBACK TO PHYSICIANS AND PHARMACISTS TO IMPROVE DRUG USE Final Report Submitted to the Canadian Health Services Research Foundation October 2004 Régis Blais, Ph.D. Claudine Laurier,

More information

Guideline: responsibilities for direction and delegation of care to enrolled nurses

Guideline: responsibilities for direction and delegation of care to enrolled nurses Guideline: responsibilities for direction and delegation of care to enrolled nurses Te whakarite i ngā mahi tapuhi kia tiakina ai te haumaru ā-iwi Regulating nursing practice to protect public safety May

More information

Occupational Therapy Solutions to Common Workplace Issues. A Manual to Enhance Workforce Management

Occupational Therapy Solutions to Common Workplace Issues. A Manual to Enhance Workforce Management Occupational Therapy Solutions to Common Workplace Issues A Manual to Enhance Workforce Management Ottawa 2010 All rights reserved No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system

More information

Surviving the Medico-legal Process

Surviving the Medico-legal Process Surviving the Medico-legal Process Dr Jeannie Higgins February 2002 Invited paper International RSI Awareness Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI) & Overuse Injury Association Canberra, Australia Overview The

More information

Health Care Benefits Early Intervention and Rehabilitation

Health Care Benefits Early Intervention and Rehabilitation 1 ST RUNNER UP 2014 ALUCA TURKSLEGAL SCHOLARSHIP Health Care Benefits Early Intervention and Rehabilitation Natalie Agnoletto - TAL Question 7 At this year s FSC Life Insurance Conference, CEO John Brogden

More information

WHERE CAN PSYCHOLOGY TAKE ME?

WHERE CAN PSYCHOLOGY TAKE ME? WHERE CAN PSYCHOLOGY TAKE ME? There are many careers in Psychology and many types of psychologist. If you are thinking of a career in Psychology, you need to go to university to study Psychology at undergraduate

More information

Applied Psychology. Course Descriptions

Applied Psychology. Course Descriptions Applied Psychology s AP 6001 PRACTICUM SEMINAR I 1 CREDIT AP 6002 PRACTICUM SEMINAR II 3 CREDITS Prerequisites: AP 6001: Successful completion of core courses. Approval of practicum site by program coordinator.

More information

Spire Healthcare Clinical Job Descriptions

Spire Healthcare Clinical Job Descriptions Spire Healthcare Clinical Job Descriptions 1 Job Title / Code Physiotherapy Manager (00145) 2 Reports To Matron / Clinical Services Manager / General Manager 3 Department Spire Hospital 4 Job Purpose To

More information

Q: Rehabilitation Nursing

Q: Rehabilitation Nursing Q: Rehabilitation Nursing Alberta Licensed Practical Nurses Competency Profile 163 Priority: One Competency: Q-1 Apply the Rehabilitation Process Q-1-1 Q-1-2 Q-1-3 Q-1-4 Q-1-5 Q-1-6 Demonstrate knowledge

More information

Accreditation Standards and Service Provider Guidelines for Saskatchewan Workers Compensation Board. Primary Occupational Therapy Service Providers.

Accreditation Standards and Service Provider Guidelines for Saskatchewan Workers Compensation Board. Primary Occupational Therapy Service Providers. 1. Intent Accreditation Standards and Service Provider Guidelines for Saskatchewan Workers Compensation Board Primary Occupational Therapy Service Providers This document sets out the: accreditation standards,

More information

POLICY. Sickness Management Policy

POLICY. Sickness Management Policy POLICY Sickness Management Policy Contact Officer Director of Personnel Purpose The Sickness Management Policy plays a significant role in facilitating the health and wellbeing of staff and promoting health

More information

Registered Nurse (Nurse Practitioner) Accreditation Standards and Service Provider Guidelines

Registered Nurse (Nurse Practitioner) Accreditation Standards and Service Provider Guidelines 1. Intent Registered Nurse (Nurse Practitioner) Accreditation Standards and Service Provider Guidelines The intent of this document is to set out the accreditation standards and the service provider guidelines

More information

COURSE 4A. Leadership of Healthcare Organizations Prof. Kenneth R. White CONTENT OF THE COURSE

COURSE 4A. Leadership of Healthcare Organizations Prof. Kenneth R. White CONTENT OF THE COURSE COURSE 4A Leadership of Healthcare Organizations Prof. Kenneth R. White CONTENT OF THE COURSE The purpose of the course is to explore and analyze the leadership role of the health care managers and executives.

More information

Intercultural communication in health care: challenges and solutions in work rehabilitation practices and training: a comprehensive review

Intercultural communication in health care: challenges and solutions in work rehabilitation practices and training: a comprehensive review Intercultural communication in health care: challenges and solutions in work rehabilitation practices and training: a comprehensive review Daniel Côté This article was published in Disability and Rehabilitation,

More information

Rehabilitation Counseling Rehabilitation Science and Technology School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Rehabilitation Counseling Rehabilitation Science and Technology School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh Rehabilitation Counseling Rehabilitation Science and Technology School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh Overview of Rehabilitation Counseling for Warrior Transition

More information

The Independent Medical Evaluation Begins with You. Mistakes

The Independent Medical Evaluation Begins with You. Mistakes The Independent Medical Evaluation Begins with You Alice M. Adams, RN, LNCC Atlanta GA psychological.com thelegalnurse.com Independent Medical (or Psychological) Evaluations should be an opportunity for

More information

Rehabilitation of employees back to work after illness or injury Policy and Procedure

Rehabilitation of employees back to work after illness or injury Policy and Procedure Rehabilitation of employees back to work after illness or injury Policy and Procedure Document reference number HSAG 2011/3 Document developed by Revision number 4.13 Document approved by Approval date

More information

PEER REVIEW HISTORY ARTICLE DETAILS TITLE (PROVISIONAL)

PEER REVIEW HISTORY ARTICLE DETAILS TITLE (PROVISIONAL) PEER REVIEW HISTORY BMJ Open publishes all reviews undertaken for accepted manuscripts. Reviewers are asked to complete a checklist review form (http://bmjopen.bmj.com/site/about/resources/checklist.pdf)

More information

Improving primary care management of depression in adults with comorbid chronic illnesses

Improving primary care management of depression in adults with comorbid chronic illnesses Executive summary of current research Improving primary care management of depression in adults with comorbid chronic illnesses Principal Investigator Jane McCusker, MD DrPH Co-Investigators Martin Cole,

More information

Expert Witness Services for Personal Injury Lawyers

Expert Witness Services for Personal Injury Lawyers Advanced Assessments Ltd Expert witnesses and Psychologists A Member of the Strategic Enterprise Group 180 Piccadilly, London, W1J 9HP T: 0845 130 5717 Expert Witness Services for Personal Injury Lawyers

More information

Counselor Education Program Mission and Objectives

Counselor Education Program Mission and Objectives Counselor Education Program Mission and Objectives Our Mission The LSU Counselor Education program prepares students to function as professional counselors in a variety of human service settings such as

More information

Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain & Process, 2nd

Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain & Process, 2nd Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain & Process, 2nd Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain & Process, 2nd 1. Introduction Occupational Therapy Practice Framework; Framework An official

More information

Injured Worker s Guide to. Best Practice Return to Work for a Stress Injury

Injured Worker s Guide to. Best Practice Return to Work for a Stress Injury Injured Worker s Guide to Best Practice Return to Work for a Stress Injury The best practice return to work guidelines for a stress injury were developed by the Australian Services Union with the support

More information

Work Matters. The College of Occupational Therapists Vocational Rehabilitation Strategy College of Occupational Therapists

Work Matters. The College of Occupational Therapists Vocational Rehabilitation Strategy College of Occupational Therapists Work Matters The College of Occupational Therapists Vocational Rehabilitation Strategy College of Occupational Therapists About the publisher The College of Occupational Therapists is a wholly owned subsidiary

More information

University College London Hospitals. Psychological support services for people affected by cancer

University College London Hospitals. Psychological support services for people affected by cancer University College London Hospitals Psychological support services for people affected by cancer 2 3 Introduction - the psychological impact of cancer The diagnosis and treatment of cancer can have a devastating

More information

TUFTS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Institutional Educational Objectives

TUFTS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Institutional Educational Objectives 1 TUFTS UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE Institutional Educational Objectives The central aim of the School of Medicine is to produce highly competent, intellectually curious and caring physicians. To this

More information

Dual Diagnosis Dr. Ian Paylor Senior Lecturer in Applied Social Science Lancaster University

Dual Diagnosis Dr. Ian Paylor Senior Lecturer in Applied Social Science Lancaster University Dual Diagnosis Dr. Ian Paylor Senior Lecturer in Applied Social Science Lancaster University Dual diagnosis has become a critical issue for both drug and mental health services. The complexity of problems

More information

Personal Assessment Form for RN(NP) Practice for the SRNA Continuing Competence Program (CCP)

Personal Assessment Form for RN(NP) Practice for the SRNA Continuing Competence Program (CCP) Personal Assessment Form for RN(NP) Practice for the SRNA Continuing Competence Program (CCP) Completing a personal assessment is a mandatory component of the SRNA CCP. It allows a RN and RN(NP) to strategically

More information

Description of Physical Therapy

Description of Physical Therapy Description of Physical Therapy The World Confederation for Physical Therapy (WCPT) is committed to supporting Member Organisations. It is in this spirit that this description of physical therapy has been

More information

BEYOND WORKING WELL: A BETTER PRACTICE GUIDE. A practical approach to improving psychological injury prevention and management in the workplace

BEYOND WORKING WELL: A BETTER PRACTICE GUIDE. A practical approach to improving psychological injury prevention and management in the workplace BEYOND WORKING WELL: A BETTER PRACTICE GUIDE A practical approach to improving psychological injury prevention and management in the workplace CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 5 RESEARCH 7 HOLISTIC SYSTEMS APPROACH

More information

Mental Health and Nursing:

Mental Health and Nursing: Mental Health and Nursing: A Summary of the Issues What s the issue? Before expanding on the key issue, it is important to define the concepts of mental illness and mental health: The Canadian Mental Health

More information

Nurse Practitioner Mentor Guideline NPAC-NZ

Nurse Practitioner Mentor Guideline NPAC-NZ Nurse Practitioner Mentor Guideline NPAC-NZ Purpose To provide a framework for the mentorship of registered nurses to prepare for Nurse Practitioner (NP) registration from the Nursing Council of New Zealand.

More information

Canadian Nurse Practitioner Core Competency Framework

Canadian Nurse Practitioner Core Competency Framework Canadian Nurse Practitioner Core Competency Framework January 2005 Table of Contents Preface... 1 Acknowledgments... 2 Introduction... 3 Assumptions... 4 Competencies... 5 I. Health Assessment and Diagnosis...

More information

ecald Supporting the healthcare workforce to develop CALD cultural competencies Introducing CALD Learning Tools and Resources

ecald Supporting the healthcare workforce to develop CALD cultural competencies Introducing CALD Learning Tools and Resources ecald Culturally And Linguistically Diverse Supporting the healthcare workforce to develop CALD cultural competencies Introducing CALD Learning Tools and Resources CALD courses are for anyone working in

More information

Standards of proficiency. Arts therapists

Standards of proficiency. Arts therapists Standards of proficiency Arts therapists Contents Foreword 1 Introduction 3 Standards of proficiency 7 Foreword We are pleased to present the Health and Care Professions Council s standards of proficiency

More information

Mental Health HEALTH POLICIES

Mental Health HEALTH POLICIES Stress4 Mental Health and HEALTH POLICIES 01. Proactive Health Policy 02. Internal Health Relationships 03. Health Surveillance and Screening 04. Mental Health and Stress 05. Getting People Back to Productive

More information

POLICY: 04-05 PART I Chapter: BENEFITS Subject: RETURN-TO-WORK SERVICES Authorization: BoD Resolution 2001/07/38 August 21, 2001

POLICY: 04-05 PART I Chapter: BENEFITS Subject: RETURN-TO-WORK SERVICES Authorization: BoD Resolution 2001/07/38 August 21, 2001 REFERENCE: Workers Compensation Act, RSA 2000, Sections 1(1)(f), 54, 56, 63, 89, and 137.1 POLICY: When a work-related injury results in compensable work restrictions that impair a worker s employability

More information

Workers' Compensation Act, 1981 (as amended), Sections 1(1)(d), 49,51,57, and 83

Workers' Compensation Act, 1981 (as amended), Sections 1(1)(d), 49,51,57, and 83 04-05 PART I REFERENCE : Workers' Compensation Act, 1981 (as amended), Sections 1(1)(d), 49,51,57, and 83 When a work-related injury results in compensable work restrictions that impair a worker's employability

More information

such as loneliness and computer/ict illiteracy. (see also the staff working paper Ageing well in the information Society )

such as loneliness and computer/ict illiteracy. (see also the staff working paper Ageing well in the information Society ) Contribution of the European Network of Occupational Therapy in Higher Education to the Debate around the Consultation Paper Europe s Social Reality by Roger Liddle and Fréderic Lerais ENOTHE The European

More information

Program of Study: Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration

Program of Study: Bachelor of Science in Health Care Administration Program of Study: Bachelor of Science in Administration Program Description The Bachelor of Science in Administration (BSHA) is an undergraduate professional degree designed to prepare students for entry-level

More information

SCDLMCE2 Lead the performance management of care service provision

SCDLMCE2 Lead the performance management of care service provision Lead the performance management of care service provision Overview This standard identifies the requirements when leading and managing the performance of the care service provision. It includes identifying

More information

PROGRAMME AND COURSE OUTLINE MASTER S PROGRAMME IN MULTICULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION. 12O ECTS credits. The academic year 2013/2014

PROGRAMME AND COURSE OUTLINE MASTER S PROGRAMME IN MULTICULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION. 12O ECTS credits. The academic year 2013/2014 PROGRAMME AND COURSE OUTLINE MASTER S PROGRAMME IN MULTICULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 12O ECTS credits The academic year 2013/2014 Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences Faculty

More information

Faculty of KINESIOLOGY and HEALTH STUDIES

Faculty of KINESIOLOGY and HEALTH STUDIES UR Career Guide 1 Faculty of KINESIOLOGY and HEALTH STUDIES Profile of Opportunities What programs are offered? The Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies (KHS) offers the Bachelor of Kinesiology (BKin)

More information

Health and Safety Workshops Program 2015 16

Health and Safety Workshops Program 2015 16 Health and Safety Workshops Program 2015 16 BC Teachers Federation Health and Safety Training Program Goals and objectives of the BCTF health and safety training program 1. To ensure that the BCTF has

More information

Preface. A Plea for Cultural Histories of Migration as Seen from a So-called Euro-region

Preface. A Plea for Cultural Histories of Migration as Seen from a So-called Euro-region Preface A Plea for Cultural Histories of Migration as Seen from a So-called Euro-region The Centre for the History of Intercultural Relations (CHIR), which organised the conference of which this book is

More information

RETURNING TO WORK FOLLOWING A SERIOUS INJURY SUCCESS LIES IN THE HANDS OF THE REHABILITATION TEAM

RETURNING TO WORK FOLLOWING A SERIOUS INJURY SUCCESS LIES IN THE HANDS OF THE REHABILITATION TEAM RETURNING TO WORK FOLLOWING A SERIOUS INJURY SUCCESS LIES IN THE HANDS OF THE REHABILITATION TEAM by Leonard H. Kunka Thomson, Rogers Following a serious personal injury, one of the most challenging and

More information

A workers compensation guide for employers

A workers compensation guide for employers A workers compensation guide for employers When a worker is injured 1 C CONTENTS PURPOSE OF THIS GUIDE 4 NSW workers compensation system 4 Your obligations 5 The evidence for recovery at work 5 The benefits

More information

SCHEDULE A DEREK M. NORDIN. Vocational Rehabilitation Consultant

SCHEDULE A DEREK M. NORDIN. Vocational Rehabilitation Consultant SCHEDULE A DEREK M. NORDIN Vocational Rehabilitation Consultant Education: Master of Education, Counselling Psychology University of British Columbia, 1980 Professional Teaching Certificate University

More information

Constituent Union HSPBA Enhanced Disability Management Program: Overview

Constituent Union HSPBA Enhanced Disability Management Program: Overview Constituent Union HSPBA Enhanced Disability Management Program: Overview The EDMP is a collaborative holistic program between the employer, employee and union. All regular employees must be referred to

More information

MANAGEMENT OF STRESS AT WORK POLICY

MANAGEMENT OF STRESS AT WORK POLICY MANAGEMENT OF STRESS AT WORK POLICY Co-ordinator: Director of HR Reviewer: Grampian Area Partnership Forum Approver: Grampian Area Partnership Forum Signature Signature Signature Identifier: NHS/OH&S/Pol

More information