Asset Management Plan

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1 Stormwater Infrastructure Asset Management Plan Version 0 1 October 2012

2 Document Control Document ID: draft 2012 stormwater infrastructure asset management plan.doc Rev No Date Revision Details Author Reviewer Approver 1 13 th of June 2012 Draft (TRIM File: 12/141667) DVB MKG, RJH, JCO 2 15 th of October 2012 Draft Copy for Asset Management Committee Approval (TRIM File: 12/141667) DVB JCO 2 22 nd of October 2012 Final (TRIM File: 12/141667) DVB Asset Management Committee Council Copyright 2012 All rights reserved. The Institute of Public Works Engineering Australia.

3 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...4 Context...4 What does it Cost?...4 What we will do...4 What we cannot do...5 Managing the Risks...5 Confidence Levels...5 The Next Steps INTRODUCTION Background Goals and Objectives of Asset Management Plan Framework Core and Advanced Asset Management Community Consultation LEVELS OF SERVICE Customer Research and Expectations Strategic and Corporate Goals Legislative Requirements Current Levels of Service Desired Levels of Service FUTURE DEMAND Demand Drivers Demand Forecast Demand Impact on Assets Demand Management Plan Asset Programs to meet Demand LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT PLAN Background Data Infrastructure Risk Management Plan Routine Operations and Maintenance Plan Renewal/Replacement Plan Creation/Acquisition/Upgrade Plan Disposal Plan FINANCIAL SUMMARY Financial Statements and Projections Funding Strategy Valuation Forecasts Key Assumptions made in Financial Forecasts Forecast Reliability and Confidence PLAN IMPROVEMENT AND MONITORING Status of Asset Management Practices Improvement Program Monitoring and Review Procedures Performance Measures REFERENCES APPENDICES...61 Appendix A Maintenance Response Levels of Service...62 Appendix B Projected 10 year Capital Renewal and Replacement Works Program...63 Appendix C Projected Upgrade/Exp/New 10 year Capital Works Program...73 Appendix D Budgeted Expenditure in LTFP...77 Appendix D1 CCS Detailed Breakdown of Stormwater Infrastructure LTFP...78 Appendix E Abbreviations...79 Appendix F Glossary...80

4 4 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Context The City of Charles Sturt embraces some of Adelaide s oldest suburban developments with many housing and business facilities dating back many years. Over time and under current and previous Council guidance the area has grown to include many diverse services utilising a mixture of infrastructure and soft assets. For many years the City has grown both in size and demand with the coming years being no different in reflecting the State s 30 year plan for growth. Asset age and therefore intervening investment to ensure maintained condition and service continues to provide Council and its staff with a complicated challenge. Asset Management Plans provide an important scene setting as the City of Charles Sturt continues to balance investment in both growth and maintenance. What does it Cost? The projected outlays necessary to provide the services covered by this Asset Management Plan (AM Plan) includes operations, maintenance, renewal and upgrade of existing assets over the 10 year planning period is $120,685,000 or $12,069,000 on average per year. Council s estimated available funding for this period is $120,685,000 or $12,069,000 on average per year which is 100% of the cost to provide the service. This is a funding shortfall of $0 on average per year. Projected expenditure required to provide services in the AM Plan compared with planned expenditure currently included in the Long Term Financial Plan are shown in the graph This plan contributes to achieving the appropriate balance of social, cultural, environmental and economic services, the keys to sustainability. Whilst assets are about the physical, at the forefront to this planning is our community the current and future users of the assets. Stormwater infrastructure provides the community with infrastructure to transfer stormwater to receiving bodies such as River Torrens, West Lakes and the Gulf, to minimise suburban flooding and in some cases to encourage the capture of stormwater for re use. The Stormwater Infrastructure Service The stormwater infrastructure network comprises: Pipes 369 km Culverts 43 km Rising Mains 2.7 km Open Channels (lined) 5.4 km Pneumatic Cores 12.2 km Drainage Cells 1 km Side Entry Pits 7,910 pits Junction Boxes 4,341 pits Grated Inlet Pits 1,141 pits Headwalls 43 Headwalls Debris Collectors 15 collectors Gross Pollutant Traps and Outlet Structures 51 traps and outlet structures These infrastructure assets have an estimated current replacement value of $304 Million. Above: The purpose of the black Expenditure Year 1 line is to compare both methods of funding (budgeted and projected expenditure). Additionally, the line provides an opportunity to compare year 1 expenditure to the next 10 years of expenditure. What we will do Council plans to provide stormwater infrastructure services for the following: Operation, maintenance, renewal and upgrade of stormwater drain and pits to meet service levels set by Council in annual budgets. Develop Stormwater Management Plans of critical catchments to identify flood prone areas and determine strategy to mitigate the areas. Commence Water Proofing the West Stage Two. This is subject to contributory funding from the Stormwater Management Authority.

5 5 Implement a Stormwater Quality Improvement Program to improve the quality of stormwater run off. Continue to implement the Box Culvert Replacement Program targeting box culverts in poor condition and that pose a risk to public safety. What we cannot do Council does not have enough funding to provide all services at the desired service levels or provide new services. Works and services that cannot be provided under present funding levels are: Provision of flood protection to all properties in significant rain events (greater than 1 in 5 year ARI). Monitoring of the quality and treatment of all storm water being discharged to current EPA Water Quality Standards. Managing the Risks There are risks associated with providing the service and not being able to complete all identified activities and projects. We have identified major risks as: Failure of box culverts resulting in property damage, road collapse and potential injury. Flooding and property damage (public and private) in moderate rainfall event due to inadequate capacity of drains. Insufficient resources (funding, equipment, crews) to replace/renew asset in accordance to useful/serviceable life and maintaining existing controls. Lack of knowledge of the condition of assets resulting in poor decision making. We will endeavour to manage these risks within available funding by: Conducting camera inspection of every box culvert, every 8 to 10 years or on an as needs basis. There has been a Box Culvert Replacement Capital Works Program since 2003/04. The program is prioritised in the high risk exposure areas. Continuing to carry out flood plain mapping to identify flooding issues. The local knowledge of the drainage works team enables a proactive approach to combat issues of flooding and inundation. Council staff monitors high risk areas in rainfall events. Additionally, there is an increased level of service for areas at high risk of flooding and inundation. There is also provision of sand bags to private properties on an exception basis. Completing the Stormwater Management Plan (SMP) for critical catchments. This will enable Council to identify appropriate treatment works to include in the Long Term Financial Plan. Additionally, improve the collection of condition data on stormwater assets. The Council can then quantify the issues, identify resource requirements and time frames. This will enable the establishment of acceptable service levels for stormwater infrastructure. Improve the process for capturing and analysing condition data. Hence, this will allow the prioritisation of the stormwater works program based on risk Confidence Levels This AM Plan is based on a reliable level of confidence information. Table 6.5 describes reliable as data based on sound records, procedures, investigations and analysis documented properly but has minor shortcomings. For example some of the data is old, some documentation is missing and/or reliance is placed on unconfirmed reports or some extrapolation. Dataset is complete and estimated to be accurate ± 10%. As data accuracy is critical to the long term accuracy of an AM Plan and financial forecasting, Council is committed to the continuous improvement of asset registers, asset handover and data collection procedures. The Next Steps The actions resulting from this Asset Management Plan are: Prioritise and allocate resources for flood mitigation based on recommendations of Stormwater Management Plans. Continue to replace box culverts in poor condition. Use an integrated approach to infrastructure construction by allocating resources for Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) projects and drainage works associated with road and other works. Improve the quality of stormwater being discharged using Gross Pollutant Traps (GPT) and WSUD infrastructure. Questions you may have What is this plan about? This Asset Management Plan covers the infrastructure assets that serve the City of Charles Sturt community s stormwater infrastructure requirements. These assets include pipes, box culverts, drainage cells, rising mains, open channels, pneumatic cores, side entry pits, junction boxes, grated inlet pits, pit head walls, debris collectors, gross pollutant traps, outlet structures, soakage pits and trash racks throughout the Council area that protect the public and property from suffering the consequences of urban flooding/inundation.

6 6 What is an Asset Management Plan? Asset management planning is a comprehensive process to ensure delivery of services from infrastructure is provided in a financially sustainable manner. The Asset Management Plan details information about infrastructure assets including actions required to provide an agreed level of service in the most cost effective manner. The plan defines the services to be provided, how the services are provided and what funds are required to provide the services. What options do we have? Resolving the funding shortfall involves several steps: 1. Improving asset knowledge so that data accurately records the asset inventory, how assets are performing and when assets are not able to provide the required service levels. 2. Improving our efficiency in operating, maintaining, renewing and replacing existing assets to optimise life cycle costs. 3. Identifying and managing risks associated with providing services from infrastructure. 4. Making trade offs between service levels and costs to ensure that the community receives the best return from infrastructure. 5. Identifying assets surplus to needs for disposal to make saving in future operations and maintenance costs. 6. Consulting with the community to ensure that stormwater infrastructure services and costs meet community needs and are affordable. 7. Developing partnership with other bodies, where available to provide services. 8. Seeking additional funding from governments and other bodies to better reflect a whole of government funding approach to infrastructure services. What happens if we don t manage a shortfall? It is likely that Council will have to reduce service levels in some areas, unless new sources of revenue are found. For stormwater infrastructure, the service level reduction may include flooding/inundation of high risk areas. What can we do? Council can develop options, costs and priorities for future stormwater infrastructure services, consult with the community to plan future services to match the community service needs with ability to pay for services and maximise community benefits against costs.

7 7 2. INTRODUCTION 2.1 Background This Asset Management Plan is to demonstrate responsive management of assets (and services provided from assets), compliance with regulatory requirements, and to communicate funding needed to provide the required levels of service over a 20 year planning period. The Asset Management Plan follows the format for AM Plans recommended in Section of the International Infrastructure Management Manual 1. The Asset Management Plan is to be read with Council s Asset Management Policy, Asset Management Strategy and the following associated planning documents: City of Charles Sturt Community Plan 2027 Shaping the Western Suburbs City of Charles Sturt Corporate Plan City of Charles Sturt Towards One Planet Living: Greening the Western Suburbs City of Charles Sturt Engineering & Open Space Guidelines City of Charles Sturt Environmental Sustainability Policy City of Charles Sturt Asset Accounting Policy City of Charles Sturt Asset Management Policy City of Charles Sturt Asset Fund Policy Port Road Stormwater Management Plan The infrastructure assets covered by this Asset Management Plan are shown in Table 2.1. These assets are used by Council to provide appropriate stormwater drainage infrastructure services to its community. The figures are effective from October 1st Table 2.1: Assets covered by this Plan DRAINS Asset category Dimension Replacement Value Pipes 369 km $176,528,482 Box Culverts 43 km $59,229,659 Drainage Cells 1 km $571,093 Rising Mains 2.7 km $873,325 Open Channels (lined) 5.4 km $9,423,436 Pneumatic Cores 12 km $18,949,033 PITS and Junction Boxes Side Entry Pits (SEP s) 7,910 pits $18,106,309 Junction Boxes (JB s) 4,341 pits $12,529,997 Grated Inlet Pits (GIP s) 1,141 pits $2,408,115 Gross Pollutant Traps and Outlet/Inlet Structures Debris Collectors 15 collectors $56,000 GPT, Outlet Structures 31 GPT s & 20 Outlet Structures $5,370,618 Headwalls 43 Headwalls $50,820 Inlet Structures 8 Inlet Structures $40,000 TOTAL $304,136,888 (Tonkin Consulting 2011, p.16) 1 IPWEA, 2011, Sec 4.2.6, Example of an Asset Management Plan Structure, pp

8 8 Assets Excluded in the Plan: The following stormwater assets are excluded from this plan; 1. Stormwater Pump Stations and associated infrastructure: Stormwater Pump Stations are a critical part of stormwater infrastructure. Council has undertaken major upgrades to pump stations over the last 7 years. It is anticipated that the works at Frogmore Road pump station in 2013 and Beach Street pump station in 2014 will be finalised by The next version of the Stormwater Infrastructure Asset Management Plan will be consolidated to include the pump stations excluding any buildings, sheds and outhouses (building assets). 2. Recycled Water Lilac Infrastructure: Recycled water infrastructure is a new type of asset class the City of Charles Sturt is inheriting from Water Proofing the West, St Clair Woodville and St Clair Cheltenham Developments. These assets are considered to be a work in progress and are not included in the current asset inventory. However the capital costs associated with new assets being created as part of Water Proofing the West Project are included in the financial projections. Key stakeholders in the preparation and implementation of this Asset Management Plan are: Shown in Table Table 2.1.1: Key Stakeholders in the AM Plan Key Stakeholder Role in Asset Management Plan Councillors, Mayor/Board Members Represent needs of community/shareholders; Stewardship in allocating resources to meet the organisation s objectives; providing services while managing risks; Ensure organisation is financially sustainable. Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Allocate resources to meet the organisation s objectives in providing services while managing risks; Ensure organisation is financial sustainable. General Manager of Asset Management Overall responsibility for Asset Management; Services Ensure funds are invested appropriately to ensure best value for money is delivered to the community; Provide leadership in influencing decision making processes related to AM. Asset Management Portfolio Managers Provide Leadership for effective Asset Management; Identify resource requirements for delivering various asset management services to the community; Ensuring Asset Management services are provided in accordance with Corporate Plan and Council priorities; Deliver services in a cost effective and sustainable manner. Asset Managers of the Asset Classes Identifying resource requirements for specific asset classes; Responsible for reviewing and keeping AM plan up to date; Responsible for preparing budget submissions in accordance with the AM plan; Delivering nominated renewal, upgrade projects; Responsible for Asset Officer; Coordinate with Asset officers and field workgroup leaders to identify areas of need, process improvement. Asset Officers and Data Owners Custodian of Asset data; Responsible for keeping asset data up to date; Preparation of asset management Plan; Assist with financial accounting for assets. Field workgroups and their leaders Operation and Maintenance management to meet agreed levels of service; Highlight issues requiring attention of senior management. Internal users of Asset Services (e.g. Library and Community Servicers) Provide timely advice as to future asset usage and requirements; Communicate asset condition and maintenance requirements as needed.

9 Key Stakeholder The community (residents, businesses, property owners) 9 Role in Asset Management Plan Be aware of service levels and costs; Participate in consultation processes; Provide feedback on services. State and Federal Government Provide Leadership in promoting Best Practice Asset Management; Facilitate Training and Education Re: Current AM Plan; Recognising the importance of LG Assets to community and provide funding and other assistance to sustain. Council s organisational structure for service delivery from infrastructure assets is detailed below, 2.2 Goals and Objectives of Asset Management The Council exists to provide services to its community. Some of these services are provided by infrastructure assets. Council has acquired infrastructure assets by purchase, by contract, construction by Council staff and by donation of assets constructed by developers and others to meet increased levels of service. Council s goal in managing infrastructure assets is to meet the defined level of service (as amended from time to time) in the most sustainable (including cost effective) manner for present and future consumers. The key elements of infrastructure asset management are: Providing a defined level of service and monitoring performance. Managing the impact of growth through demand management and infrastructure investment. Taking a lifecycle approach to developing cost effective management strategies for the long term that meet the defined level of service,

10 10 Identifying, assessing and appropriately controlling risks. Having a long term financial plan which identifies required, affordable expenditure and how it will be financed. 2 Sustainability meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generation to meet their own needs. (World Commission on Environment and Development. (1987). Our Common Future. The Bruntland Commission, UNESCO). 2.3 Plan Framework Key elements of the plan are: Levels of service specifies the services and levels of service to be provided by Council. Future demand how this will impact on future service delivery and how this is to be met. Life cycle management how Council will manage its existing and future assets to provide defined levels of service. Financial summary what funds are required to provide the defined services. Asset management practices. Monitoring how the plan will be monitored to ensure it is meeting Council s objectives. Asset Management Improvement Plan. A road map for preparing an Asset Management Plan is on the next page. 2 Based on IPWEA, 2011, IIMM, Sec 1.2 p 1 7.

11 11 Road Map for preparing an Asset Management Plan Source: IPWEA, 2006, IIMM, Fig 1.5.1, p CORPORATE PLANNING Confirm strategic objectives and establish AM policies, strategies & goals. Define responsibilities & ownership. Decide core or advanced AM Pan. Gain organisation commitment. REVIEW/COLLATE ASSET INFORMATION Existing information sources Identify & describe assets. Data collection Condition assessments Performance monitoring Valuation Data AM PLAN REVIEW AND AUDIT INFORMATION MANAGEMENT, and DATA IMPROVEMENT ESTABLISH LEVELS OF SERVICE Establish strategic linkages Define & adopt statements Establish measures & targets Consultation LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES Develop lifecycle strategies Describe service delivery strategy Risk management strategies Demand forecasting and management Optimised decision making (renewals, new works, disposals) Optimise maintenance strategies DEFINE SCOPE & STRUCTURE OF PLAN IMPLEMENT IMPROVEMENT STRATEGY FINANCIAL FORECASTS Lifecycle analysis Financial forecast summary Valuation Depreciation Funding IMPROVEMENT PLAN Assess current/desired practices Develop improvement plan IS THE PLAN AFFORDABLE? ITERATION Reconsider service statements Options for funding Consult with Council Consult with Community ANNUAL PLAN / BUSINESS PLAN

12 Core and Advanced Asset Management This Asset Management Plan is prepared as a core Asset Management Plan over a 20 year planning period in accordance with the International Infrastructure Management Manual 3. It is prepared to meet minimum legislative and organisational requirements for sustainable service delivery and long term financial planning and reporting. Core asset management is a top down approach where analysis is applied at the system or network level. Future revisions of this Asset Management Plan will move towards advanced asset management using a bottom up approach for gathering asset information for individual assets to support the optimisation of activities and programs to meet agreed service levels. The City of Charles Sturt is currently planning the implementation of a centralised Asset Management Information System that will include consolidated asset registers and a works planning system. It is envisaged that this system will be a pivotal tool in the journey from core to advanced asset management planning. 2.5 Community Consultation Future revisions of the Asset Management Plan will incorporate community consultation on service levels and costs of providing the service. This will assist Council and the community in matching the level of service needed by the community, service risks and consequences with the community s ability and willingness to pay for the service. 3. LEVELS OF SERVICE 3.1 Customer Research and Expectations The organisation has not carried out any targeted research on customer expectations with regards to preparing this plan. This will be investigated for future updates of the Asset Management Plan. 3.2 Strategic and Corporate Goals This Asset Management Plan is prepared under the direction of Council s Community, Sustainability and Corporate Plans. Relevant Council goals and objectives and how these are addressed in this Asset Management Plan are (see next page): 3 IPWEA, 2011, IIMM.

13 13 Table 3.2: Council Goals and how these are addressed in this Plan Goal Objective How Goal and Objectives are addressed in AM Plan An economically prosperous, attractive and functional city Coordinate the upgrade of street infrastructure All streets where elements are to be upgraded within a five year period of each other are integrated into one project. Stormwater assets in streets are assessed for structural condition and capacity as part of the road reconstruction design process. The long term financial plan includes provisions for stormwater upgrade associated with road works Create and maintain attractive landscaped streetscapes which incorporate principles of Water Sensitive Urban Design Ensure that stormwater systems are well maintained Water Sensitive Urban design to be considered and incorporated as part of the detailed design process of large open space and engineering projects. The Long term financial plan includes provisions within the operations budget and the capital upgrade budget for Water Sensitive Urban Design Water Sensitive Urban Design projects where appropriate. A proactive approach is taken to the maintenance of community infrastructure underpinned by asset management plans and within the framework of relevant legislation and financial constraints. Refer to Section 3.4 for further details A City which values, protects and enhances the natural environment Promote understanding and appreciation of the value of natural areas The natural environment is recognised and valued The long term financial plan considers investment in Gross Pollutant traps and wetlands to achieve this goal Encourage water sensitive urban design (WSUD) in all new developments The Engineering and Open Space Guidelines include requirements for WSUD to be incorporated in new developments. The St. Clair development will incorporate 6 Ha of wetlands and is an example how this objective will be addressed. Council will exercise its duty of care to ensure public safety is accordance with the infrastructure risk management plan prepared in conjunction with this AM Plan. Management of infrastructure risks is covered in Section Legislative Requirements Council has to meet many legislative requirements including Australian and State Legislation and State Regulations. These include (see Table 3.3 Legislative Requirements below)

14 14 Table 3.3: Legislative Requirements Legislation Local Government Act 1999 State Records Act 1997 Environment Protection Act 1993 Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare Act 1986 Development Act 1993 Public And Environmental Health Act 1987 Requirement Sets out role, purpose, responsibilities and powers of local governments including the preparation of a long term financial plan supported by asset management plans for sustainable service delivery. The Act also sets out the establishment of the Stormwater Management Authority that guides spending on relevant grant money. To ensure the City of Charles Sturt records and stores all relevant information as set out by the State Government of SA. To ensure that all reasonable and practicable measures are taken to protect, restore and enhance the quality of the environment having regard to the principles of ecologically sustainable development. To take a constructive role in promoting improvements in occupational health, safety and welfare practices and assisting in the preservation of public health and safety in all undertakings of Council. An Act to provide for planning and regulate development in the state; to regulate the use and management of land and building and for other purposes. An Act Dealing With Public And Environmental Health; To Repeal The Health Act 1935, The Noxious Trades Act 1934 And The Venereal Diseases Act 1947; And For Other Purposes. Council will exercise its duty of care to ensure public safety in accordance with the infrastructure risk management plan linked to this AM Plan. Management of risks is discussed in Section Current Levels of Service Council has defined service levels in two terms. Community Levels of Service measure how the community receives the service and whether the organisation is providing community value. Community levels of service measures used in the Asset Management Plan are: Quality Function Capacity/Utilisation How good is the service? Does it meet users needs without compromising the needs of current and future generations? Is the service over or under used? Technical Levels of Service Supporting the community service levels are operational or technical measures of performance. These technical measures relate to the allocation of resources to service activities the council undertakes to best achieve the desired community outcomes and demonstrate effective organisational performance.

15 15 Technical service measures are linked to annual budgets covering: Operations the regular activities to provide services such as opening hours, street sweeping frequency, mowing frequency, drain cleaning, drain inspection etc. Maintenance the activities necessary to retain an asset as near as practicable to an appropriate service condition (e.g. road patching, footpath repairs, building and structure repairs, pit and drain repair). Renewal the activities that return the service capability of an asset up to that which it had originally (e.g. frequency and cost of road resurfacing and pavement reconstruction, drain replacement and building component replacement). Upgrade the activities to provide an higher level of service (e.g. widening a road, sealing an unsealed road, replacing a drain with a larger size) or a new service that did not exist previously (e.g. a new library). Asset managers plan, implement and control technical service levels to influence the customer service levels. 4 Council s current service levels are detailed in Table 3.4 below 4 IPWEA, 2011, IIMM, p 2.22

16 16 Table 3.4: Current and Desired Service Levels Key Performance Measure COMMUNITY LEVELS OF SERVICE Level of Service Objective Performance Measure Process Current Level of Service Desired Level of Service Quality Providing an efficient and environmentally friendly disposal of stormwater runoff Customer Request Management (CRM) Reports. Programmed inspections. All sweeping is planned and quantified in advance. Meeting weekly to discuss sweeping activities. DRAIN CLEANING Programmed cleaning of all pits and drains Monday to Thursdays on a specific program (Friday's for reactive cleaning). Jet vac on standby after hours and on weekends if a significant rain event has been forecasted by the Bureau of Meteorology. Open Drains silt removal yearly. DRAIN CLEANING Programmed cleaning of all pits and drains Monday to Thursdays on a specific program (Friday's for reactive cleaning). Jet vac on standby after hours and on weekends if a significant rain event has been forecasted by the Bureau of Meteorology. Open Drains silt removal yearly. STREET SWEEPING 1. Sweeping (streets and car parks) in Response to request where hazards exist 1 business day. STREET SWEEPING 1. Sweeping (streets and car parks) in response to request where hazards exist 1 business day. 2. All other sweeping (streets and car parks) requests other than programmed activities 3 business days. 2. All other sweeping (streets and car parks) requests other than programmed activities 3 business days. 3. Residential Streets At an Interval of 6 to 7 weeks (Average of 8.5 times per year). 3. Residential Streets At an Interval of 6 to 7 weeks (Average of 8.5 times per year). * A specialised program of sweeping as specified for the following: * A specialised program of sweeping as specified for the following: Roads with high leaf litter, fruit or nut drop Twice weekly on a seasonal basis. Roads with high leaf litter, fruit or nut drop Twice weekly on a seasonal basis. Roads with Norfolk Island Pines (Henley & Grange) Weekly Beachside streets Weekly to remove sand from sand blown onto streets Digital Precinct (Hindmarsh) Twice weekly Roads with Norfolk Island Pines (Henley & Grange) Weekly Beachside streets Weekly to remove sand from sand blown onto streets Digital Precinct (Hindmarsh) Twice weekly

17 17 CARPARK SWEEPING CARPARK SWEEPING Foreshore Car parks Weekly Other car parks every 6 weeks A specialised program of sweeping is specified for: Civic Centre, Henley Square & Digital Precinct Weekly. Manual Sweeping to compliment mechanical sweeping cycles. Foreshore Car parks Weekly Other car parks every 6 weeks A specialised program of sweeping is specified for: Civic Centre, Henley Square & Digital Precinct Weekly. Manual Sweeping to compliment mechanical sweeping cycles. Function Providing the community with safe and effective stormwater infrastructure network. The number of Customer Requests (CRM s) logged. CRM Analysis Reports Review/update of Stormwater Infrastructure Asset Management Plans yearly 1. Damaged lids and pits identified in inspections and CRM's. 2. Jet Vac and camera on road carrying out on programmed maintenance schedule with 1 day a week devoted to reactive maintenance. 1. No potential safety hazards to public as a result of damaged stormwater infrastructure. 2. Jet Vac and camera on road carrying out on programmed maintenance schedule with 1 day a week devoted to reactive maintenance. 3. Replacing damaged SEP lids in impact prone areas with heavy duty variants. 3. Proactively identify areas where SEP lids are likely to be or have been damaged frequently and replace with heavy duty variants. Capacity/Utilisation Ensuring stormwater infrastructure provided can meet the required capacity. This depends on area topography and calculation of Average Rainfall Interval (ARI) No of CRM s relating to property/street flooding 1. Consultants undertake analysis of areas to have new stormwater infrastructure and determine the appropriate sizes and quantity/length of pits and drains. 2. Drainage is reviewed in road reconstructions where nil or inadequate drainage was provided. Drainage would be upgraded or installed where it did not exist. 1.Stormwater runoff is contained in the underground system for rain events up to 1 in 5 year ARI (Average recurrence interval) rain event Stormwater runoff is contained within the road reserve for rain events up to 1:10 year ARI rain event. 2. Drainage is reviewed in road reconstructions where nil or inadequate drainage was provided. Drainage would be upgraded or installed where it did not exist

18 18 TECHNICAL LEVELS OF SERVICE Operations & Maintenance 1. Programmed Cleaning Schedule for Jet Vac. Allow one day a week for reactive maintenance. 1. No of CRM s logged Average (between Jan May) length of drains cleaned per month is 1684 l/m of drains (120 l/m) per day. This figure includes weekends and staff training days. The total l/m of drains cleaned per day depends on variables such as if the gang experience a lot of tree roots at certain locations where there are a lot of trees. 1. Target length of drains to be cleaned is between 180l/m to 200l/m per day. Respond to Stormwater Pit Maintenance 95% of the CRM's in the 20 business day time frame. 2. Camera Inspection Van working in collaboration with Jet vac to identify drains to be cleaned. Allow one day a week (Friday) for reactive maintenance. 2. Works Scheduler/Estimator reports on no of camera van inspections out to Council monthly. 2. Drain Inspection Van on programmed inspections Mon Thurs and Friday s devoted to reactive maintenance. 2. Drain Inspection Van on programmed inspections Mon Thurs and Friday s devoted to reactive maintenance. 3. Responding to CRM Requests by the public for damaged SEP lids. 3. Works Scheduler/Estimator reports on Engineering Works carried out to Council monthly. 3. Rapid Response have a response time of 2 working days to make the situation safe and put temporary measures in place (out of the 20 business day turn around time). The remaining working days out of the 20, Engineering & Construction will aim to complete the CRM. Based on the last four years of data ( ), approximately 81.3% of CRM's were responded to in the agreed time frame of 20 business days. 3. GPTs and trash racks to be cleaned and maintained such that pollutants reaching the receiving waters is minimised. Cleaning of GPTs to minimise stormwater inundation upstream. Trash racks in flood risk areas will continue to be emptied after major rain events

19 19 4. Empting Trash nets/racks and GPT s and maintenance to them to enhance capacity of stormwater network. 4. Works Scheduler/Estimator reports on Engineering Works carried out to Council monthly. 4. High priority GPTs and Trash racks (8 locations in flood risk areas) are emptied after major rain events. Routine inspection of the GPTs is conducted at 8 week intervals, where all GPT s and Trash Racks are cleaned out. 4. High priority GPTs and Trash racks (8 locations in flood risk areas) are emptied after major rain events. Routine inspection of the GPTs is conducted at 8 week intervals, where all GPT s and Trash Racks are cleaned out. Renewal 1. Activities that return the service capability of an asset up to that which it had originally. For example, a renewal or like for like replacement of as box culvert in a street. Currently no performance measures 1. A risk based approach for replacement of assets in poor condition. Box culvert replacement program since Box culverts in poor condition are prioritised and replaced to minimise risk of collapse. A rolling program of road reconstructions is carried out ever year. If there are stormwater drains at a road reconstruction site, they are inspected to determine condition and whether or not they require to be replaced. 1. A condition based renewal program will be optimal. It is hoped this can be achieved when the entire network has been inspected with the camera and the camera reports are recorded in an analysable format. The inspections of drainage beneath roads due to be reconstructed will continue to occur. Action will be taken to upgrade/renew drainage, pending the drainage inspection. Upgrade/New 1. Activities to provide a higher level of service, such as construction of new stormwater infrastructure where there was none before. Floodplain Modelling & Stormwater Management Plans. CRM Reports 1. A rolling program of road reconstructions is carried out ever year. The stormwater drains at a road reconstruction site are inspected to determine condition and whether or not they require to be replaced. 1. Providing flood protection to all properties in a 1:100 ARI is the optimal level of service. However this may be economically unrealistic. A more realistic solution will be to complete priority catchments, undertake Stormwater Management plans and undertake works based on a cost benefit analysis. Additionally, it may involve removing and disposing a smaller sized Side Entry Pit and installing a larger size to meet the increased demand at the particular location. Camera van routine inspections crew will forward drains in very poor condition to key staff members to determine course of action to take. Floodplain Mapping & Stormwater Management Plans (SMP) determine hot spots and provides solutions to problem areas. Camera van crew will continue to forward details of drains in poor condition to council staff to action. The Floodplain Mapping and Stormwater Management Plans will continue to enhance council s efforts in identifying problem areas.

20 Desired Levels of Service Indications of desired levels of service are obtained from community consultation/engagement. The asset management planning process includes the development of 3 scenarios to develop levels of service that are financially sustainable. 4. FUTURE DEMAND 4.1 Demand Drivers Drivers affecting demand include population change, changes in demographics, seasonal factors, vehicle ownership rates, consumer preferences and expectations, technological changes, economic factors, agricultural practices and environmental awareness, etc 4.2 Demand Forecast The present position and projections for demand drivers that may impact future service delivery and utilisation of assets were identified and are documented in Table Demand Impact on Assets The impact of demand drivers that may affect future service delivery and utilisation of assets are shown in Table 4.3 below

21 21 Table 4.3: Demand Drivers, Projections and Impact on Services Factors Influencing Demand Present Position Projection Impact on Council Services Sub division expansion Minimum 300m 2 allotments with reasonable private open space Minimum 150m 2 allotments with little private open space according to the CCS Planning Department. This figure is based on brand new large development such as St Clair, Brompton & Bowden Other small residential developments will still maintain a minimum of 300m 2 with reasonable private open space Increase in impermeable area Capacity of existing stormwater system inadequate to cope with excess runoff Increased pollutants in receiving waters New Residential Developments (Bowden, Woodville West St Clair & AAMI Stadium) Large tracts of open space (except for Bowden & Woodville West) Areas will be developed for residential housing, open space & apartments Increased impermeable area Capacity of existing stormwater system inadequate to cope with increased runoff Increased pollutants in receiving waters Environmental Awareness Awareness through education and water quality improvements as part of capital projects. Council will implement Water Sensitive Urban infrastructure Managing stormwater to minimize impacts on coastal and offshore ecosystems from weeds, sedimentation and elevated concentrations on nutrients and contaminants Improvement in the quality of stormwater water run off within the city Changing rainfall intensities and frequencies (climate change effects) Minor stormwater infrastructure upgrades to protect properties where possible Provide sandbags to residents/businesses for protection Emptying GPT s and trash racks before every major storm event Increasing number of capital projects involving renewing and upgrading stormwater infrastructure pipes, SEP s and box culverts Increasing resources to undertake stormwater works to meet the demand and protect private properties

22 22 Table 4.3: Demand Drivers, Projections and Impact on Services Factors Influencing Demand Present Position Projection Impact on Council Services Increasing number of larger vehicles on the road i.e. 4WD s, buses, road trains Repairing damaged stormwater structures (via CRM or inspections etc). Undertake Inspections and renewal/upgrade of Box Culverts within Council owned areas. No inspections or renewals/upgrades of Box Culverts beneath busy DPTI roads are currently undertaken Upgrade/replace the SEP lids and other structures with heavy duty alternatives Continue to repair/ replace damaged stormwater infrastructure Less call outs as a result of installing heavy duty infrastructure Will be required to undertake condition assessment of Box Culverts beneath DPTI owned roads that pose a high risk to public safety Greater likelihood of impacts to SEP s and JB s due to increased vehicles on the road Will require funding from Council to undertake inspections of Box Culverts in high risk areas including along DPTI owned roads. Council camera van and personnel taken away from programmed maintenance schedule to carry out work on council owned drainage in Department for Transport, Planning & Infrastructure (DPTI) owned Roads Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) initiatives State government guidelines, currently discretionally used Initiatives will be legislated in future years Increased expenditure in maintenance and capital works Additional maintenance on existing wet systems Several wet systems not cleaned or maintained for several years Need for arterial drains to be upgraded to minimize the wet system Need for additional Resources Need to develop procedures for regular maintenance of systems Increased demand for using open space for dual purposes (stormwater retention and recreation) Current examples of this are in Woodville West, St Clair, Cooke Reserve, Ray Street Reserve, Gleneagles Reserve are project initiatives where stormwater retention and detention have been used in open space Opportunities for stormwater retention and detention on open space will need to incorporate creative designs catering for recreation, sport and stormwater requirements The impact on open space services is currently unknown and will be evaluated on a case by case basis

23 23 Table 4.3: Demand Drivers, Projections and Impact on Services Factors Influencing Demand Present Position Projection Impact on Council Services Increasing community expectations of higher levels of service less evidence of flooding Presently under resourced Prioritised Capital Works Program to be developed Additional stormwater systems required Risk of increased cost to Council Increasing community expectations availability of services during storms e.g. Emergency Services. The community may expect council to respond to flooding emergencies more frequently Currently the expectation does exist Funding in Council emergency services and design will need to be increased to meet this demand Funding and design will need to be increased to meet this demand Climate change impacting on rainfall intensities, therefore increasing probability of residents and local business suffering personal injury and/or property damage Council has a budget for a Floodsafe Community Education program in place in 2012/13 Council currently undertaking a Regional Climate Change Adaptation Study with West Torrens & Port Adelaide Enfield Councils Council currently developing a Regional Zone Emergency Management Plan Effects of climate change potentially increase rainfall intensities; consequently increasing probability of residents/local business suffering frequent personal injury/property damage funding is required to educate public on how to protect themselves and their property Regional Climate Change Adaptation Study will identify strategies and actions to minimise impact of climate change Additional funding required to fund Floodsafe Community Education Program Flooding Hotspots Council is very aware of these hot spots from previous major rain events and has implemented some actions to address local hotspots where possible and viable Hot spots in Council area will likely to increase Completing floodplain mapping for rest of catchment areas Council s resources will become stretched and Council s public image jeopardised, as a result of responding increased CRM s

24 24 Table 4.3: Demand Drivers, Projections and Impact on Services Factors Influencing Demand Present Position Projection Impact on Council Services Projected Population Increase in Council area Council s current population is just under 107,000 An increase in residents: 126,000 residents by ,000 residents by 2036 Council to provide quality services to growing population Population growth will increase number of housing, impervious areas and subsequent runoff volumes and demand for additional stormwater drainage capacity will increase Council resources will be stretched Relying less on potable water supplies (stormwater harvesting) Undertaking water harvesting initiatives (Water Proofing the West) New St Clair development and Woodville West Rejuvenation provides each resident/business with recycled water connection Bidding for more funding/grants to create more stormwater harvesting opportunities around the city Increased Capital spending by Council on related projects Increased income from sale of recycled stormwater Increased demand for resources to maintain harvesting infrastructure

25 Demand Management Plan Demand for new services will be managed through a combination of managing existing assets, upgrading of existing assets and providing new assets to meet demand and demand management. Demand management practices include non asset solutions, insuring against risks and managing failures. Non asset solutions focus on providing the required service without the need for the Council to own the assets and management actions including reducing demand for the service, reducing the level of service (allowing some assets to deteriorate beyond current service levels) or educating customers to accept appropriate asset failures 5. Examples of non asset solutions include providing services from existing infrastructure such as aquatic centres and libraries that may be in another Council area or public toilets provided in commercial premises. Opportunities identified to date for demand management are shown in Table 4.4. Further opportunities will be developed in future revisions of this Asset Management Plan. Table 4.4: Demand Management Plan Summary Demand Driver Community demand for flooding mitigation Demand Management Plan Undertake catchment analysis and modelling to determine priorities and funding required for flood mitigation. The Council s flood protection standards set out design standards based on risk. Stormwater, inlets, outlets, trash racks and Gross Pollutant Traps (GPT s) are regularly cleaned, repaired & emptied to ensure flows are not obstructed. Developers are required to treat and reduce the volume of stormwater entering the Council drainage system. Continue to work with private land owners (including Golf courses) to detain floodwaters and link these initiatives with potential users of the water. Encourage the use of permeable paving where possible to minimise stormwater runoff in land development projects, residential buildings and council projects. Community demand for preserving and enhancing environment through water harvesting and treatment Educate and support the community to improve water use practices on their own properties, including a strong focus on increasing storage and use of rainwater. Develop a WSUD guideline to provide further information and guidance to developers, including those implementing small in fill developments. Increase the total area of vegetated areas managed for their biodiversity function prior to aquifer injection or discharge into Gulf, St Vincent. Competitive pricing for supply of recycled stormwater to promote an alternative water supply. 5 IPWEA, 2011, IIMM, Table 3.4.1, p 3 58.

26 Asset Programs to meet Demand The new assets required to meet growth will be acquired free of cost from land developments and /or constructed/acquired by Council. New assets constructed/acquired by Council are discussed in Section 5.5. The estimated cumulative value of new contributed and constructed asset values are summarised in Figure 1. Figure 1: Upgrade and New Assets to meet Demand Fig 1: Investment in Stormwater Assets is expected to increase from $31.9 million in 2013 to 200 million in The major contributors to the increase include $38 Million towards the Water Proofing the West Project Stage 1, which includes the installation of Lilac Recycled Water Infrastructure in 2013/14. Additionally, investment totalling $27.5 Million has been allocated to Water Proofing the West Stage 2 between and Stormwater Infrastructure upgrades in the Trimmer/Meakin Catchment Area between where $500K is allocated to undertake the works. At the completion of the Trimmer/Meakin Catchment, Henley/Fulham Catchments will be constructed between 2021/22 to 2025/26 at a cost of $22 million over 5 years. From 2026/27 to 2030/32, flooding mitigation works in other catchments will occur at a cost of 25 million over 6 years. Contributed assets are estimated to be at 0.5% of current Asset Value per annum. The 0.5% growth in contributed was calculated using council s Geographical Information System (GIS) and using total number of assets in the new St Clair Development divided by the council s total stormwater infrastructure inventory. We are using this figure as a guide for growth of stormwater assets. Acquiring these new assets will commit Council to fund ongoing operations, maintenance and renewal costs for the period that the service provided from the assets is required. These future costs are identified and considered in developing forecasts of future operations, maintenance and renewal costs in Section 5.

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