SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PRACTICUM AND INTERNSHIP HANDBOOK

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1 SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PRACTICUM AND INTERNSHIP HANDBOOK SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM Department of Psychology University of Hartford 200 Bloomfield Avenue West Hartford, CT /14

2 OVERVIEW This handbook is intended to describe various facets of the professional training sequence involving the Professional Seminar & Practicum in School Psychology I & II and Internship in School Psychology I & II for students in the NASP Approved and NCATE Recognized School Psychology Program at the University of Hartford. The overall intention of this sequence is to provide students with a series of supervised, school-based, professional experiences involving the delivery of school psychological services under the joint supervision of a Certified School Psychologist located at a local school, as well as with a university faculty member credentialed as a Certified School Psychologist. Relative to the supervision component, both practicum and internship students are required to participate in two and a half hours of weekly university-based group supervision complemented by one hour of site-based weekly face-to-face clinical supervision during the practicum year and two hours of site-based face-to-face clinical supervision during the internship. Training experiences may include individual, group, and family counseling, psychological testing, consultation, case conference participation, and functions appropriate for a school psychologist. The School Psychology Program uses the NASP Training Standards as a foundation for guiding professional training experiences. As background, the Professional Seminar & Practicum In School Psychology I-II and Internship In School Psychology I-II follow pre-professional training experiences provided during the first year of coursework and training. Those experiences include supervised experiences in individual testing completed during the fall and spring of the first year, primarily involving cognitive, academic, and personality testing, as well as a year-long counseling sequence which includes supervised counseling experiences with video-taped supervisory components. These pre-professional experiences illustrate the developmental, sequential, professional-practitioner approach utilized in preparing students for the rigorous, two-year practicum and internship components. The Professional Seminar & Practicum in School Psychology I-II is a continuous, part-time, ten month experience involving two and a half days of service each week. The practicum sequence is completed during the second year of graduate training and involves a two and a half day a week commitment totaling a minimum of 600 hours of service. The Internship in School Psychology I-II (which can be completed on either a full-time basis in one year, or on a part-time basis over a two year period) involves the equivalent of a year-long, full-time, professional experience totaling a minimum of 1200 clock hours of professional service involving the delivery of school psychological services. The internship is conceptualized as a capstone experience. Students who successfully complete Professional Seminar & Practicum in School Psychology I are eligible For Professional Seminar & Practicum in School Psychology II. Students who successfully complete Internship in School Psychology I are eligible for Internship in School Psychology II. 2

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4 PROGRAM FACULTY The School Psychology Program at The University of Hartford is designed to produce competent, ethical, highly trained clinicians primarily interested in working with children in school settings. Housed in the Department of Psychology, the program currently has three licensed psychologists who assume primary responsibility for education and training. In addition, the Department of Psychology has faculty with expertise in such related areas as Cognitive Psychology, Developmental Psychology, and Health Psychology. All full-time faculty hold doctoral degrees. CORE FACULTY The School Psychology Program feels fortunate to have four psychologists who assume central responsibility for teaching and training in the School Psychology Program. All possess extensive professional experience, in addition to the requisite academic backgrounds required for teaching and training. Dr. Natalie N. Politikos is an Associate Professor of Psychology and serves as Director of the School Psychology Program. A Certified School Psychologist and Nationally Certified School Psychologist, her interests include assessment practices in school psychology, neuropsychology in the schools, multicultural aspects of diversity in assessment, as well as legal and ethical mandates as they affect daily practice. She received her Ph.D. from The University of Northern Colorado. Dr. Tony D. Crespi is a Professor of Psychology and serves as a primary advisor for many of the School Psychology graduate students. A Licensed Psychologist, Certified School Psychologist, Nationally Certified School Psychologist, Certified School Counselor, and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, he also holds Board Certification in School Psychology from the American Board of Professional Psychology. He has published extensively in areas spanning clinical supervision, credentialing, and professional training. He received his Ed.D. from The University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Dr. Natasha K. Segool is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and serves as primary advisor for many of the School Psychology graduate students. Dr. Segool is a Licensed Psychologist and Nationally Certified School Psychologist. Her professional interests center on the presentation and impact of anxiety disorders on school-aged children. In particular, she has conducted research on the relationship between test anxiety and test performance on high-stakes educational assessments. She is also more broadly interested in the development and adaptation of evidence-based treatments for emotional and behavioral disorders in school-based settings and in ways to increase children s access to mental health care through school and pediatric settings. She received her Ph.D. from The University of Michigan. Dr. Robert M. Leve is an Associate Professor of Psychology. A Licensed Psychologist and Board Certified Behavior Analyst, he also holds Board Certification from the American Board of Professional Psychology. His interests include Child and Adolescent Therapy, 4

5 Learning Theory, and Applied Behavior Analysis. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. 5

6 BROAD PROGRAMMATIC MISSION, GOALS, AND OBJECTIVES The mission of the School Psychology Program is to prepare school psychologists with particular competencies to work in the schools with children, families, and educational systems. The program is designed to prepare highly qualified practitioners whose primary role is to maximize learning and developmental opportunities for children. Specifically, the program s primary goal is to produce highly competent clinicians who will meet employment demands for services involving: 1) Assessment and Diagnosis, 2) Counseling and Psychotherapy, and 3) Consultation and Collaboration. Mission: To prepare highly qualified school psychologists with particular competencies to work with children, families, and educational systems. Goal I: To train specialist school psychologists with particularly strong competencies involving assessment and diagnosis. [The program fosters and maintains an education and training environment in which students are firmly grounded in a data-based knowledge base and accountability framework to achieve this goal]. Objectives: A) Students will be well grounded and demonstrate knowledge and competencies involving cognitive, psychoeducational, and personality assessment measures. B) Students will demonstrate knowledge of and competencies in major classification and diagnostic systems upon which special education and mental health classificatory and diagnostic decisions are constructed. C) Students will receive pre-practicum, practicum, and internship experiences upon which assessment and diagnostic skills can be established. D) Students will demonstrate knowledge of inter-individual differences impacting assessment and diagnosis (e.g. learning abilities and disabilities, child psychopathology, gender, culture, socioeconomics, and life span development. E) Students will integrate knowledge of life span development, student diversity, and child psychopathology into psychological assessment and diagnostic evaluations. Goal II: To train specialist level school psychologists with particular competencies involving counseling and psychotherapy. [The program emphasizes this goal through an intense coursework sequence and integrated practicum and internship continuum which embraces an empirically validated approach to prevention, crisis intervention, and mental health]. Objectives: A) Students will be well-grounded in and demonstrate knowledge of major counseling models and perspectives including individual, group, and family frameworks. B) Students will understand, articulate, and practice knowledge of prevention, crisis intervention, and mental health approaches to promote mental health and well-being in children through practicum and internship experiences. 6

7 C) Students will have knowledge of individual, group, and family systems and those interventions able to be implemented within educational systems. D) Students will understand the mixture of multicultural diversity, gender development, child psychopathology, and associated family, social, and community influences on counseling and development. E) Students will demonstrate knowledge of, adherence to ethical and legal guidelines involving the delivery of mental health services to children within the context of schooling. Goal III. To train specialist level school psychologists with particular competencies in consultation and collaboration. [The program provides in-depth training and supervision]. Objectives: A) Students will demonstrate a conceptual understanding of major consulting models, B) Students will practice consulting skills and develop specific evaluations reflecting consulting skills through a sequential progression of pre-practicum, practicum, and internship experiences. C) Students will develop a consulting philosophy and professional portfolio outlining professional kills and competencies. D) Students will demonstrate professional skills and the identity of a school psychology trainee able to consult with multiple constituencies and stakeholders. E) Students will demonstrate knowledge of major consulting skills and roles able to positively impact children, families, classrooms, and schools. Goal IV: To train specialist-level school psychologists with a strong identity as a school psychologist and with a strong commitment to ethical goals and standards. Objectives: A) Students will demonstrate knowledge of school psychology as a profession, and specialty within professional psychology, and be knowledgeable about its historical roots, traditional and emerging roles and functions, and scope of practice. B) Students will demonstrate a strong commitment to ethical standards of practice and demonstrate adherence to ethical and legal guidelines in all aspects of professional work. C) Students will demonstrate knowledge of ethical and legal standards of practice impacting school psychology in public schools as well as in private sectors of practice. D) Students will demonstrate an understanding of ethical and legal standards in school psychology as well as an appreciation for standards impacting related professions. 7

8 E) Students will demonstrate professional identities as school psychologists through membership and participation in state and national organizations and through professional goals. NASP PROFESSIONAL TRAINING GOALS The National Association of School Psychologists [NASP} has developed twelve over-arching training areas which serve as major points around which training can be organized and evaluated. The are summarized to help provide a foundation for training and discussion. 2.1 Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability: School psychologists have knowledge of varied models and methods of assessment that yield information useful in identifying strengths and needs, in understanding problems, and in measuring progress and accomplishments. School psychologists use such models and methods as part of a systematic process to collect data and other information, translate assessment results into empirically-based decisions about service delivery, and evaluate the outcomes of services. Data-based decision-making permeates every aspect of professional practice. 2.2 Consultation and Collaboration: School psychologists have knowledge of behavioral, mental health, collaborative, and/or other consultation models and methods and of their application to particular situations. School psychologists collaborate effectively with others in planning and decision-making processes at the individual, group, and system levels. 2.3 Effective Instruction and Development of Cognitive/Academic Skills: School psychologists have knowledge of human learning processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of cognitive and academic skills. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, develop appropriate cognitive and academic goals for students with different abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions. Such interventions include, but are not limited to, instructional interventions and consultation. 2.4 Socialization and Development of Life Skills: School psychologists have knowledge of human developmental processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social skills. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, develop appropriate behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social goals for students of varying abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions. Such interventions include, but are not limited to, consultation, behavioral assessment/intervention, and counseling. 2.5 Student Diversity in Development and Learning: School psychologists have knowledge of individual differences, abilities, and disabilities and of the experiential, socioeconomic, genderrelated, and linguistic factors in development and learning. School psychologists demonstrate the sensitivity and skills needed to work with individuals of diverse characteristics and to implement strategies selected and/or adapted based on individual characteristics, strengths, and needs. 2.6 School and Systems Organization, Policy Development, and Climate: School psychologists have knowledge of general education, special education, and other educational and related services. They understand schools and other settings as systems. School psychologists work with individuals and groups to facilitate policies and practices that create and maintain safe, supportive, and effective learning environments for children and others. 8

9 2.7 Prevention, Crisis Intervention, and Mental Health: School psychologists have knowledge of human development and psychopathology and of associated biological, cultural, and social influences on human behavior. School psychologists provide or contribute to prevention and intervention programs that promote the mental health and physical well-being of students. 2.8 Home/School/Community Collaboration: School psychologists have knowledge of family systems, including family strengths and influences on student development, learning, and behavior, and of methods to involve families in education and service delivery. School psychologists work effectively with families, educators, and others in the community to promote and provide comprehensive services to children and families. 2.9 Research and Program Evaluation: School psychologists have knowledge of research, statistics, and evaluation methods. School psychologists evaluate research, translate research into practice, and understand research design and statistics in sufficient depth to plan and conduct investigations and program evaluations for improvement of services School Psychology Practice and Development: School psychologists have knowledge of the history and foundations of their profession; of various service models and methods; of public policy development applicable to services to children and families; and of ethical, professional, and legal standards. School psychologists practice in ways that are consistent with applicable standards, are involved in their profession, and have the knowledge and skills needed to acquire career-long professional development Information Technology: School psychologists have knowledge of information sources and technology relevant to their work. School psychologists access, evaluate, and utilize information sources and technology in ways that safeguard or enhance the quality of services. BACKGROUND As a critical part to your professional training, all students in the School Psychology Program are expected to complete two separate professional training experiences. During the second year of graduate training, students participate in a year-long (part-time) practicum placement. Typically, this will involve a commitment to a placement involving a minimum of two and a half days a week (a minimum of 600 hours). Students who successfully complete the first semester of practicum are eligible to move on to the second semester of practicum. Following the completion of the required course work for eligibility for certification in school psychology, students complete a year-long, full-time, internship in a approved site. All training is conducted in neighboring school systems. The following supervision experiences are involved: 1. Individual face-to-face supervision for a minimum of one hour weekly from a sitebased Certified School Psychologist. 2. Group supervision on a weekly basis with a university faculty member credentialed as Certified School Psychologist. 9

10 PRACTICUM OBJECTIVES Practicum training precedes internship training in school psychology. That is to say, while the internship is often viewed as a capstone to training, the practicum often serves as a more global professional introduction to the field, introduces students to general roles, responsibilities, and professional issues, and typically serves as the initial professional training component. Practicum students should: 1. Receive an opportunity to integrate theoretical, classroom knowledge with initial applied introductory professional experiences as a school psychologist. 2. Receive continuing feedback relative to readiness for continuing with professional training. 3. Receive a preparatory supervised training opportunity with experience in the provision of direct service to clients. This may include co-therapy, responsibility for selected cases as a counselor and/or psychotherapist, as well as assessment duties. 4. Receive an opportunity to work collegially in an approved site. Attendance at faculty/staff meetings, participation in planning and placement team meetings and case conferences, and initial teacher and administrator consultation assignments are important duties students can experience. 5. Receive weekly, face-to-face, site-based supervision with a certified school psychologist complemented by weekly, group, university-based clinical supervision. 6 Receive an opportunity to share with a supervisor their professional reactions to the process of becoming a school psychologist, thereby receiving an opportunity to process feedback on performance issues. 7 Receive an opportunity to consider contemporary ethical consideration in school psychology and explore the implications for professional practice. 8. Receive progressively more responsible duties and responsibilities in school psychology. 9. Be exposed to professional mentors and role models in school psychology. Specifically, by observing a practicing school psychologist, students are exposed to an important trainer-trainee relationship where student can observe a credentialed school psychologist engaged in the delivery of services. 10

11 10. Receive continuing feedback and performance evaluation regarding areas of strength and weakness impacting the delivery of comprehensive school psychological services. INTERNSHIP OBJECTIVES The Internship in School Psychology is an advanced professional training sequence conducted following the completion of the practicum (a minimum of 1200 hours). As such, the internship is only available to advanced students who have been evaluated as possessing the skills and professional and emotional maturity for the professional internship. Typically, the internship is the final training sequence prior to students receiving university recommendation for State Department of Education certification as a school psychologist. Internship students should: 1. Receive an intensive professional training experience beyond the level of the professional practicum. 2. Receive continuing opportunities to integrate theoretical knowledge and applied skills in an approved setting. 3. Be provided with an opportunity to gain increasingly independent direct service responsibilities. This may include assessment, counseling and psychotherapy, consultation, and related duties expected of a school psychologist. 4. Receive an opportunity to work collegially in an approved site while gaining a minimum of 1200 hours of professional experience. Attendance at faculty/staff meeting and increasingly responsible participation in planning an placement team meetings and case conferences are examples of areas where interns should demonstrate increasingly responsible performance. 5 Receive an increasingly diverse range of problems and cases appropriate for developing autonomous skills as a school psychologist. 6. Receive weekly, face-to-face, site-based clinical supervision with a Certified School Psychologist complemented by university-based supervision. 7 Receive an opportunity to share with colleagues their personal and professional experience the process of becoming a school psychologist. 8. Be provided with an opportunity to consider contemporary ethical guidelines for school psychologists with consideration to implication for professional practice. 11

12 9. Be provided with increasingly diverse practice responsibilities, including a range of different ages, assessment questions, and counseling and consultation assignments, in order to develop a broad range of competencies. 10. Receive a continuum of developmentally appropriate professional experiences intended to provide preparation for functioning as an autonomous, certified school psychologist. 12

13 CONNECTICUT COMPETENCIES AND INDICATORS FOR PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS Connecticut State Department of Education Bureau of Certification and Professional Development School psychologist competencies and indicators: Demonstrates facility in reading, writing and mathematics. Demonstrates knowledge of his or her special area of practice in education. Demonstrates a knowledge of personality theories and personality dynamics. Demonstrates a knowledge of learning and emotional problems and strategies for remediation. Demonstrates a knowledge of psychological assessment and its application to questions of educational development. Demonstrates a knowledge of the physical, social, emotional and cognitive aspects of human learning. Demonstrates knowledge of human growth and development as it relates to the teaching-learning process. Demonstrates understanding of the major theories of human development. Demonstrates understanding of how physical, social, emotional and intellectual development affects learning. Demonstrates understanding of the relationship between learning problems and school adjustment problems. Demonstrates understanding of the interrelationship between teaching styles and learning styles. Demonstrates understanding of the impact of stress, disability, disease and deprivation (including neglect and abuse) on human behavior and development. Demonstrates knowledge of the public school system. Knows and understands the governance of schools at the local, state and federal levels. Understands how the organization of the district and school has an impact upon the school community. Understands the rights and responsibilities of students, parents and staff. 13

14 Implements interventions to achieve selected objectives. Plans and implements individual and/or group treatment services (i.e. individual or group counseling, behavior modification). Assists in designing programs to enhance the cognitive, affective, social and vocational development of students. Designs and develops procedures for preventing disorders, promoting mental health and improving affective educational programs. Monitors the effectiveness and outcomes of intervention program. Effectively communicates with students, family members, school personnel and the community at large. Reports psychological evaluation findings, both written and oral, in clear, concise and accurate terms. Provides for two-way communication with clients and involves them in assessment, intervention and program evaluation procedures. Interprets school psychology services to pupils, parents, staff and the community. Assists in developing and implementing I.E.P. components when school psychology related services are called for. Demonstrates an ability to transmit ideas, concepts and pertinent data in an effective manner. Establishes rapport with students and staff and fosters positive interactions through verbal and nonverbal communication. Fulfills liaison role, as appropriate, with community agents who serve the school district. Facilitates communication between home and school. Helps students develop positive self-concepts. Recognizes and understands the worth of all students and the opportunities that racial, cultural, sexual and religious diversity present in the school environment. Demonstrates sensitivity to and respect for the needs and feelings of students, parents and staff. Demonstrates patience, empathy and enthusiasm in dealing with students. Assists staff to implement strategies which foster student positive self-concepts. Effectively organizes time, space, materials and equipment for delivery of specialty services. Establishes priorities, schedules, routines and procedures for delivering specialty services. 14

15 Makes appropriate efforts to maintain schedules, routines, and procedures to reflect the established priorities. Attempts to provide a work setting that is attractive and conductive to providing appropriate specialty services. Assesses student needs and progress. Evaluates human behavior on the basis of test results, clinical observations, interviews with students, teachers, other school personnel and parents, school records and reports of other professionals. Independently interprets and presents findings to teachers in order to help them understand and teach their students. Demonstrates a working knowledge of a wide range of assessment techniques suitable for students from ages pre-school to 21. Selects assessment techniques which are appropriate for referral. Coordinates assessment with school personnel so as to avoid duplication or unnecessary procedures. Establishes positive rapport with students in order to achieve maximum cooperation and motivation. Collects assessment information in accordance with established standards and procedures. Analyzes and integrates assessment data to facilitate an understanding of the whole child. Uses assessment instruments only for purposes and populations for which there are acceptable validity and reliability. Uses and encourages the use of assessment practices which lead themselves to the development of effective educational interventions. Effectively meets the needs of exceptional students. Obtains and uses information about students from available records. Demonstrates understanding of behaviors resulting from mental, physical, emotional, sensory, speech or any other handicapping impairments. Assists parents to better understand handicapping condition and how they interfere with a child s learning. Strives to contribute to the establishment of a positive learning environment. Identifies and assesses the social/emotional needs of students to make recommendations for enhancing the overall learning environment of the school. Promotes appropriate behavior standards for students. Advocates for effective disciplinary practice given the individual needs of the students. 15

16 Meets professional responsibilities. Demonstrates responsibility for professional improvement and ongoing selfevaluation. Assists in the planning, organization and review of school psychology services. Works cooperatively with colleagues and administrators. Follows the policies and procedures of the school district. Encourages the support of parents and the community in the functioning of the school. Obtains and uses appropriate information about students from parents. Assists staff to achieve effective parent-teacher communication, based upon mutual respect. Informs parents of community resources and services and helps them gain access to such resources as independently as possible. Helps parents to communicate their needs and concerns effectively to school and community agency staff. Identifies unmet needs in the community which, if addressed, might facilitate student learning and then advocates for the fulfillment of these needs. Consults and collaborates with appropriate parties involved in the education of students. Demonstrates a knowledge of consultation theory and practice. Consults with school personnel, families and others to facilitate the education and psychosocial progress of children. Assists teacher in the development of effective management strategies for students manifesting significant educational programs. Consults with student support specialists to implement coordinated and comprehensive intervention/prevention programs. Consults with parents to assist in developing home management programs and to help them to use the results and recommendations of assessments. Consults with administrators to assist in resolving school issues and crises that have implications for the psychological well-being of students and staff. Consults and collaborates with other community professional to provide a continuum of services and advocacy for children in need. Assists in the development of a coordinated plan for accountability and evaluation of all services provided in order to maintain and improve the effectiveness of services. Serves as member of interdisciplinary teams assisting students to benefit from their school experiences. 16

17 Provides services and practices in accord with professional ethical and legal requirements. Respects the privacy of students and parents and holds in confidence all information obtained in the course of professional services unless there is a compelling reason to do otherwise. Obtains informed consent of students and/or parents before taping, recording or permitting third-party observation of counseling sessions. Conducts services in a manner which protects the due process rights of the students and their parents as defined by state and federal laws and regulations. Actively seeks appropriate consultation with superiors, mentors, and peers when expanding into areas of infrequent practice. Limits professional activities to only those areas in which competency has been demonstrated. 17

18 III. FIELD EXPERIENCES/INTERNSHIP School psychology candidates have the opportunities to demonstrate, under conditions of appropriate supervision, their ability to apply their knowledge, to develop specific skills needed for effective school psychological service delivery, and to integrate competencies that address the domains of professional preparation and practice outlined in these standards and the goals and objectives of their training program. 3.1 Supervised practica and internship experiences are completed for academic credit or are otherwise documented by the institution. Closely supervised practica experiences that include the development and evaluation of specific skills are distinct from and precede culminating internship experiences that require the integration and application of the full range of school psychology competencies and domains. 3.2 The internship is a collaboration between the training program and field site that assures the completion of activities consistent with the goals of the training program. A written plan specifies the responsibilities of the training program and internship site in providing supervision, support, and both formative and summative performance-based evaluation of intern performance. 3.3 The internship is completed on a full-time basis over one year or on a half-time basis over two consecutive years. At least 600 hours of the internship are completed in a school setting. 3.4 Interns receive an average of at least two hours of field-based supervision per fulltime week from an appropriately credentialed school psychologist or, for non-school settings, a psychologist appropriately credentialed for the internship setting. 3.5 The internship placement agency provides appropriate support for the internship experience including: (a) a written agreement specifying the period of appointment and any terms of compensation; (b) a schedule of appointments, expense reimbursement, a safe and secure work environment, adequate office space, and support services consistent with that afforded agency school psychologists; (c) provision for participation in continuing professional development activities; (d) release time for internship supervision; and (e) a commitment to the internship as a diversified training experience. TRAINING REQUIREMENTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES Both practicum and internship training are integral to school psychology training. As such, this opportunity is only available to students who have been accepted into the program and 18

19 who have been evaluated as ready for Practicum/Internship. Overall, practicum is considered to involve a developmental training experience with the second semester of practicum considered more intensive than the first semester. Internship is considered to provide students with an intensive, continuing, culminating professional experience. While the emphasis and duties may vary somewhat from site to site, all training is expected to provide experience in the delivery of school psychological services. As noted, practicum students are expected to work at their sites a minimum of two and a half days a week. (Note: The exact number of hours and specific days are determined between the student and the work site. However, a minimum of 600 hours of supervised experience are required.) The Internship in School Psychology is generally expected to provide a full-time, year-long, experience in the delivery of school psychological services, totaling a minimum of 1200 clock hours of professional service. (Note: The internship may be completed over a twoyear period with the approval of the Director of the School Psychology Program.) All students completing both practicum and internship training are required to appropriately indicate to all clients and faculty their training status as a Practicum Student In School Psychology or as a School Psychology Intern. This requirement must be strictly adhered to throughout the training experience. SITE SELECTION The process of site selection is an important, and often personal, process which involves the school, university faculty, and students. On the basis of individual interests, and with the approval of the Director of the School Psychology Program, students may elect to complete part of the practicum training in an approved child guidance agency offering educational services, as well as in a traditional school setting. Internship training, however, must occur in a school setting. Moreover, regardless of setting, only settings which allow supervision from a Certified School Psychologist are used. In preparation for the practica and/or internship, students should be expected to prepare a professional resume/vita prior to beginning the interview process. This should contain name, address, phone numbers, and should indicate education, relevant course work and professional skills, as well as relevant background experiences. The resume is a professional document which can help agency and school supervisors conduct an initial screening of potential trainees. Clearly, site selection involves work by the student. In addition to the preparation of a professional resume, ordinarily the student will contact agencies and schools, with the approval of university training faculty, to arrange an appointment for an interview. These interviews are critical as this allows the student and the agency the opportunity to learn if the "fit" is agreeable. In addition, the application of an appropriate training site can be viewed as a valuable interviewing and training experience for the practicum and internship trainee. 19

20 Relative to professional training, it should be noted that ordinarily practicum placements are non-paid experiences. The majority of internship training sites experiences are also not paid. However, there are, sometimes, competitive opportunities for paid internships. Ordinarily, these are gained by the most qualified students typically only be those who already may hold a previous graduate degree. Students should recognize that A) A current job may not be used as a training site as this would, minimally, constitute a dual relationship and B) Paid internships often detract from learning opportunities as students become paid employees. Finally, the program only uses sites within the State of Connecticut as all students must attend weekly university-based group supervision meetings. ON-SITE SUPERVISION Direct supervision is provided by a supervisor at the site. As the relationship between the student and supervisor is critical to the success of the experience, students should carefully weigh the "fit" with a potential supervisor. Supervisors provide a minimum of one hour of individual face-to-face supervision weekly for practicum students and two hours of supervision for interns. Relative to placements, the School Psychology Program utilizes Certified School Psychologists for all school placements. This is deemed important for socialization. Trainees interested in seeking training in non-traditional school settings should be aware that while there are a number of Licensed Psychologists who are also Certified School Psychologists, these individuals are not in abundance. Further, the program strongly believes in school-based training. All students seeking to become Certified School Psychologists should know that the program only utilizes certified school psychologists as site supervisors and non-traditional settings may only be utilized for a portion of training experiences. Current training sites and supervisors follow. 20

21 SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY SUPERVISION CASE PRESENTATION FORMAT (for additional information please see Case Guidelines in Appendix) Background Age: Grade/Location: Year Identified For Special Education Services Provided Family Background Developmental/Social Life Skills Assessment Protocols Cognitive Assessment Academic Skills Personality Assessment Evaluative Recommendations Behavioral Academic Social Skills Team Decisions 21

22 PRACTICUM INTERNSHIP SUPERVISORS SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY PROGRAM SITE/SUPERVISOR BLOOMFIELD PUBLIC SCHOOLS Mandie Dziedzic Carmen Arace Middle School 350 Park Ave. Bloomfield, CT / BRISTOL PUBLIC SCHOOLS Amy Sousa Martino Memorial Boulevard Middle School 70 Memorial Boulevard Bristol, CT (860) CANTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Canton High/Middle Schools 76 Simonds Ave Canton, CT / x262 Mary Dorpalan, Director of Pupil Personnel 860/ John Pierce Center Intermediate School 39 Dyer Ave. Canton, CT / Brigitte Duffy Cherry Brook Elementary School K-3 860/

23 CHESHIRE Darcy Early Intervention Center 1686 Waterbury Rd. Cheshire, CT / / CREC Melissa Carilli Faienza University of Hartford Magnet School, CREC District 196 Bloomfield Avenue West Hartford, CT (860) EXT 2654 COLCHESTER PUBLIC SCHOOLS Scott Cohn, Ph.D. William J. Johnston Middle School 360 Norwich Ave. Colchester, CT / (school) (860) (cell) 860/ (H) COLUMBIA PUBLIC SCHOOLS Joseph Prince Horace W. Porter School 3 Schoolhouse Rd. Columbia, CT / ext. 114 EAST HARTFORD Dr. Scott Edington, Director of Psychological Services O Brien Elementary School 52 Farm Drive, East Hartford, CT (860) Jessica Bartolini-Buggeln East Hartford Middle School 777 Burnside Avenue 23

24 East Hartford, CT (Direct Line to Jess's Office) Rosanna Wilson Hockanum Elementary School 191 Main Street East Hartford, CT / EAST HARTFORD/GLASTONBURY MAGNET 305 May Rd. East Hartford, CT (860) Glenn Peterson, Ph.D., Principal EAST WINDSOR Lynn Rookey East Windsor Middle School Lynn Rookey ELLINGTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Carin Farachi Windermere School 2 Abbott Rd. Ellington, CT (860) ext 151 GLASTONBURY- NAYAYG ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Wendy Paggioli Nayaug School 222 Old Maids Lane South Glastonbury, CT (860)

25 GLASTONBURY HIGH SCHOOL Elisa Faberzak 860/ I Blair Jensen, Ph.D. 860/ Donna Wakim 860/ GRANBY PUBLIC SCHOOLS Granby High School 315 Salmon Brook St. Granby, CT / Jennifer Mitchell Robinson (Practicum Only) Granby Memorial High School 315 Salmon Brook St. Granby, CT / Thomas DiCorletto, Ph.D., Director 860/ Heidi MacDonald Wells Road Elementary School 860/ Scott MacDonald Granby Middle School 321 Salmon Brook Street Granby, CT ext Thomas DiCorletto, Director, 860/ HEBRON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Kate Greatorex (formerly Jagodzinski) RHAM Middle School (Regional School District 8) 25 RHAM Rd Hebron CT / , x4713 (work) 25

26 860/ (cell) Lauren O Leary RHAM High School 25 RHAM Rd Hebron, CT Eric Protulis Special Education Director RHAM Middle School 25 Rham Road Hebron, CT (860) LEBANON PUBLIC SCHOOLS Lebanon Elementary School Jessica Scorso 479 Exeter Road Lebanon, CT (860) (school) (direct line) NEW BRITAIN PUBLIC SCHOOLS Paula Zenobi Pulaski Middle School 757 Farmington Ave. New Britain, CT / x109 Jayme Sullivan Jefferson Elementary School 140 Horse Plain Rd. New Britain, CT (860) Dr. Eric Colon Rodriguez Roosevelt Middle School 860/ x220 Jocelyn Chen New Britain High School 110 Mill Street 26

27 New Britain, CT / x670 Jonathan Fieldman Gaffney Elementary School 322 Slater Rd. New Britain, CT / (work) 860/ (cell) NORWICH FREE ACADEMY Shelly Bigelli Arrika Kalwara 305 Broadway Street Norwich, CT (860) Beth Serra 305 Broadway Street Norwich, CT NORTHWEST REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT #7 (Winstead) Paula Morabito Special Education Director Shared Services 94 Battastoni Dr. Winstead, CT / (C) Quentin Ruckert Liz Kuhn Regional High School 100 Battastoni Drive Winstead, CT / x (C) Rosalind Rozi Leibowitz Northwest Regional School No Battistoni Drive Winsted, CT / ext

28 ROCKY HILL Ted Dorrington Griswold Middle School 144 Bailey Rd Rocky Hill, CT (860) Debra Levine Lynch West Hill Elementary School 95 Cronin Drive Rocky Hill, CT (860) SIMSBURY PUBLIC SCHOOLS Julie Chanese, Ph.D. Latimer Lane Elementary School 33 Mountain View Rd. Weatogue, CT / (o) 860/ (h) Ginny Demseaux (*prefers interns) Tootin Hills Elementary Dr. Billie McNeely, Psy. D. Squadron Line Elementary School 860/ ext. 119 Dr. Patricia Sullivan, Ph.D. Squadron Line Elementary School Helen Donaher- Director, Secondary School Psychologists Dorothy Norman, Supervisor, Special Education Elementary School Psychologists VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOLS Platt Regional Vocational Technical School Henry (Hank) Galarraga 28

29 600 Orange Ave. Milford, CT Hank Galarraga 203/ / x325 Wilcox Technical School Melissa Tweedie 298 Oregon Rd. Meriden, CT / WEST HARTFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS Hall High School 975 North Main St. West Hartford, CT / Duffy Elementary School 95 Westminster Dr. West Hartford, CT x166 Joshua Richards Conard High School 110 Beechwood Rd. West Hartford, CT (860) Cheryl Pacyna King Phillip Middle School 100 King Philip Drive West Hartford, CT / x1079 WESTPORT PUBLIC SCHOOLS Greens Farms Elementary School 17 Morningside Drive South Westport, CT (203)

30 Dr. Victoria Panico (860) Dr. Panico: Dr. Abigail Judge. (860) Dr. Judge: WINDHAM PUBLIC SCHOOLS Eva Mathieu Windham Middle School 123 Quarry St. Willimantic, CT SITE GRIEVANCES When students are dissatisfied with the placement, or supervisor, these concerns should be directed to the on-site supervisor. If this proves unsuccessful, the student should discuss these issues with the faculty supervisor. If the faculty supervisor is unable to address and resolve the issue(s), the faculty supervisor may speak with the on-site supervisor. Students may request a change of placement in the event the difficulties are deemed unresolvable. However, every effort must be made to resolve difficulties before a change is made as the training placement is viewed as a contractual agreement. Changes in placements are likely to delay graduation and program completion as a new placement will ordinarily begin the following Fall. In the event that on-site supervisors feel trainees are unsatisfactory, the supervisor should first speak directly with the student. If unsuccessful, the supervisor should contact the university faculty. The on-site supervisor may request to terminate a student placement. However, the supervisor is expected to consult with the Director of the School Psychology Program before making final determination. When students are dissatisfied with the university supervisor, the student may speak directly with that supervisor. If unable to resolve the difficulty, students should speak with their advisor. In the event that the academic advisor is the same as the supervisor, they should speak with a member of the core faculty. Faculty supervisors may request a change of student supervisee through this procedure if another faculty member is available and willing to provide supervision. 30

31 MALPRACTICE INSURANCE All students are expected to obtain malpractice insurance prior to the start of practicum training. A critical professional responsibility, the program faculty can provide information on relatively low-cost insurance which can be obtained - usually at student rates - prior to beginning the second year of training. PRACTICUM EVALUATION 1. Throughout the semester, on-site and university faculty supervisors will conduct an on-going evaluation of the student's progress. 2. A written evaluation will be completed at the end of each semester by the on-site supervisor, as well as by the student. Students are responsible for maintaining records of client contact hours, assessment responsibilities, and overall duties which are then validated by the on-site supervisor. This documentation is turned in to the university supervisor. All supervisors must complete formal outcome assessment evaluations contained in this document. 3. Periodically, on-site supervisors will meet, either individually or as a group, with university faculty to review each student. 4. During the semester, each student will have an individual interview with their major advisor. At that time, the faculty will provide evaluation for continuation in professional training. Students are encouraged to ask faculty for feedback as to strengths and weaknesses. This is an opportunity for the student to receive feedback which they can expect throughout the course of their program. 5. At the end of each semester, students will receive a grade in the training sequence. Each student will have unique strengths and weaknesses to address during the training. Students should note that: Decisions regarding continuation include: 1. Written self-reports by students. 2. Faculty evaluations. 3. Academic progress. 4. On-site supervisor evaluative reports. Criteria regarding readiness for advanced practicum training and recommendation for certification include demonstrated emotional maturity; professionalism; relationship skills; and organizational, assessment, and clinical skills. 31

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