Updated Tree Survey and Inventory. San Jose City College. PREPARED FOR: Gilbane 4750 San Felipe Road, Bldg. 4 San Jose, CA 95135

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1 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory PREPARED FOR: Gilbane 4750 San Felipe Road, Bldg. 4 San Jose, CA PREPARED BY: HortScience, Inc. 325 Ray Street Pleasanton, CA December 2013

2 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report, September 2013 HortScience, Inc. Page i Executive Summary DRAFT Updated Tree Survey and Inventory This report includes the following information: An update of the health and condition of the approximately 700 trees surveyed as part of the 2009 HortScience inventory. A comparison of the current tree population and condition to that present in The identification of trees removed since Recommendations for tree management. Key results of the survey: Six hundred twenty-six (626) trees measuring 6 and larger in trunk diameter were surveyed at the site, representing 55 species. The 10 most-frequently occurring species accounted for 436 of the surveyed trees (70% of the population), and included coast redwood (166 trees), sweetgum (54), silver dollar gum (38), Chinese pistache (35), Canary Island pine (33), London plane and mayten (25 each), coast live oak (24), cork oak (21), and Southern magnolia (15). Tree condition varied widely by species, but overall the condition was good (49%). 33% were in fair condition; and 18% poor. Tree condition changed between 2009 and 2013, with a greater number of trees in poor and fair condition. Some of the most common species, including coast redwood, mayten and Southern magnolia had declined, which appeared to be due primarily to ongoing drought stress. A total of 72 of the trees surveyed in 2009 were no longer present. Forty-four (44) were in poor condition in 2009 and had been identified for removal. Most of the balance appeared to have been removed as part of ongoing facility improvement projects. Recommendations SJCC has had an active tree planting program and we recommend that this be continued. We assessed the performance of newly planted trees and identified those that should continue to be planted and those that should be phased out of the plant pallette. Prune 49 trees over the next 3-5 years (Table 2, page 12). Apply organic mulch within the dripline of trees. Increase irrigation to159 trees (Table 3, page 13). Alternatively, the campus should consider converting areas planted with thirsty material to more drought tolerant plantings. Monitoring the health, stability, infrastructure damage and over-irrigation for 28 trees (Table 4, page 17). Enlarge the opening in the tree grates for 28 trees (Table 5, page 18). Remove 84 trees, including 47 that were in poor health and are not expected to recover, and the 37 silver dollar gums along Laswell Ave. (Table 6, page 19).

3 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Table of Contents Page I. Introduction and Overview 1 II. Survey Methods 1 III. Description of Trees 2 Comparison to the 2009 Survey 6 IV. Discussion and Recommendations 7 Continue to plant new trees 7 Performance of new plantings 7 Provide existing trees with appropriate management 8 Pruning Mulch beneath the canopy Irrigation Provide tree protection during construction Monitoring and other maintenance activities Continue a tree removal and replacement program 11 List of Tables Table 1. Tree condition and frequency of occurrence. 5 Table 2. Trees recommended for pruning 12 Table 3. Trees recommended for irrigation 13 Table 4. Trees requiring monitoring and maintenance 17 Table 5. Trees requiring grate maintenance 18 Table 6. Trees recommended for removal. 19

4 List of Attachments Tree Assessment Forms Tree Assessment Map

5 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 1 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory I. Introduction and Overview The grounds and associated landscape at form the backdrop for the facility s educational activities. The trees are an integral element of the landscape, providing a wide variety of environmental and aesthetic benefits. The trees were planted in conjunction with development of the facility, over a period of 60 years. As trees are living, dynamic organisms, their form, health and structure continue to change over time. In addition, new construction and development has occurred around them. Gilbane is the construction company overseeing a wide array of construction activities on the campus. As part of the ongoing facility improvements and updated Landscape Master Plan, Gilbane requested that HortScience, Inc. update the 2009 Tree Survey and Inventory Report to assess the current condition of the trees, review and comment on recommendations provided in 2009, and provide current recommendations for tree care. This report provides the following information: Update of the health and condition of the approximately 700 trees contained in the 2009 inventory. Comparison of the current tree population and condition to that of Identification of trees removed since Identification of individual trees, groups of trees or species that are, or are not, performing well and require maintenance (irrigation, pruning, removal, etc.). Review of recommendations provided in the 2009 Tree Survey and Inventory Report, noting what actions have been accomplished and which still need to be addressed. Recommendations for management of trees to be implemented over the next 3-5 years. These recommendations should be integrated with other priorities, design goals and management needs of the College. II. Survey Methods Trees were surveyed in July of The survey included all trees identified in the 2009 Tree Survey and Inventory Report. The survey procedure consisted of the following steps: 1. Verifying that previously surveyed trees were present. If missing, note that fact. 2. Confirming the trunk diameter, species and location of the tree. 3. Visually assessing tree health and structure based on a ground survey using a scale of 0 5: 5 - A healthy, vigorous tree, reasonably free of signs and symptoms of disease, with good structure and form typical of the species. 4 - Tree with slight decline in vigor, small amount of twig dieback, minor structural defects that could be corrected. 3 - Tree with moderate vigor, moderate twig and small branch dieback, thinning of crown, poor leaf color, moderate structural defects that might be mitigated with regular care.

6 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page Tree in decline, epicormic growth, extensive dieback of medium to large branches, significant structural defects that cannot be abated. 1 - Tree in severe decline, dieback of scaffold branches and/or trunk; most of foliage from epicormics; extensive structural defects that cannot be abated. 0 Dead. 4. Identifying if management recommendations provided in the 2009 Tree Survey and Inventory Report had been carried out or still needed to be performed. 5. Identifying current tree management needs for the next 3-5 years. III. Description of Trees Six hundred twenty-six (626) trees were reassessed, representing 55 species (Table 1, page 5). Overall, the tree population had not changed significantly over the past 4 years. Cost redwood was still the most frequently occurring species, with 166 trees. Sweetgum (54 trees), silver dollar gum (38), Chinese pistache (35), Canary Island pine (33), London plane and mayten (25 each), coast live oak (24), cork oak (21), and Southern magnolia (15) were still well represented at the site. The 10 most-frequently occurring species comprised 436 trees, or 70% of those reassessed. Overall, the condition of the surveyed trees was good with 49% (307 trees) in the good and excellent categories. Two hundred and nine (209) trees, or 33%, were in fair condition and 110 poor (18%). Although the overall health of the tree population was good, the condition of several of the keystone species had deteriorated: Coast redwood, with 166 trees (26% of the tree population) continued to experience water-stress, resulting in browning of the needles and die-back of twigs and branches (Photo 1, following page). For 128 of the redwoods, the condition had declined between 2009 and now. Currently, 30 of the trees were in poor condition, 87 fair and 49 good. Aside from being the dominant species at the site, a grove of coast redwoods make-up the backdrop to the main entry at the corners of Leigh and Moorpark Avenues. Condition of the redwoods can be expected to continue to decline without application of sufficient supplemental irrigation (but not with recycled water). Sweetgums, with 54 trees (9% of the population), had improved in overall condition. Twelve (12) were in poor condition, 20 in fair and 22 in good. The change was at least in part due to the removal of the overhead utility lines along Kingman Ave., for which the trees had been repeatedly topped. The removal of the utilities has allowed the trees to put on new growth but their structure will take time to recover. Topping creates wounds, potentially leading to decay in the topping points, alters the structure of the tree, and produces regrowth with weak attachments that have a higher likelihood for failure. The condition of the silver dollar gums (38 trees, or 6%), had changed very little. The species is represented by a row of trees along Laswell Ave., all of which have been topped as part of their routine maintenance.

7 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 3 Photo 1: Coast redwoods at the campus, such as those along Leigh Ave., had declined in condition. Browning of needles, dieback of twigs and branches and dead tops were prevalent and are an indicator of severe drought stress. Chinese pistache continued to perform well at the site. Thirty-five (35) were reassessed across the campus. Most had been planted in clusters, with metal grates covering the tree well. Many were growing against the walls of the grates (Photo 2, following page), which if left uncorrected, will disrupt and distort trunk development. Overall condition of Canary Island pines was similar to Thirty-three (33) trees were reassessed, 30 of which were in good condition and 3 in fair, representing a change in condition for two (2) trees from good to fair. London planes have been a solid performer at the campus. Twenty-five (25) of the trees were reassessed, 24 of which were in good condition and one (1) was in fair. Like the Chinese pistache, these were generally planted in clusters, with metal grates covering the tree wells. Trunk growth is rapidly increasing and without quick action to expand tree grates, trees are at risk of being girdled and killed (Photo 2, following page). Maytens had continued to decline. Six (6) were in poor condition, 10 were in fair and nine (9) in good. Six (6) had been removed and several had migrated from good condition to fair and from fair to poor. Those in the worst condition had been planted in small, parking lot cut-outs (i.e. between buildings # ). It appeared to be water-stress related and may be a combination of elevated temperatures found in parking lots, inadequate soil volume in the small cut-outs and insufficient irrigation.

8 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 4 Photo 2: A group of London planes (# ) had been planted at the Student Services Center. Trees were in good health, but many had outgrown their tree grates. If left uncorrected, grates may girdle trees. Inset shows trunk beginning to envelope the grate. The 24 Coast live oaks were in good (17 trees) to fair (7 trees) condition. The species continues to perform well and new plantings, such as those in parking lot 2 (along Moorpark Ave.), which appeared to be thriving. Some mature specimens, such as #443 and 444, were growing in heavily irrigated lawns. These and other native species are adapted to dry summer conditions and are intolerant of summer irrigation. While the trees will tolerate irrigation when young, summer irrigation near the trunk can eventually lead to fatal root diseases. Cork oaks (21 trees) were in similar condition as in These were young trees located in the surface parking lot north of the garage. Trees were still in good condition (15 trees), with two (2) in fair and four (4) in poor. This represents a change from good to fair for two (2) trees and from fair to poor for two (2) trees. Mature Southern magnolias (15 trees) were located along the Moorpark Ave. frontage. These trees have declined in the past 4 years and six (6) trees were now in poor condition, five (5) were fair and four (4) were in good condition. The species performs best in hot conditions where there is ample water. San Jose is hot, but lacks rainfall and water stress is likely the cause of the decline.

9 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 5 Table 1. Tree condition & frequency of occurrence., San Jose CA Common Name Scientific Name Condition Rating No. of Poor Fair Good Trees (1-2) (3) (4-5) Kashmir maple Acer oblongum Japanese maple Acer palmatum Norway maple Acer platanoides Red maple Acer rubrum Calif. buckeye Aesculus californica European birch Betula pendula River she-oak Casuarina cunninghamiana Blue Atlas cedar Cedrus atlantica 'Glauca' Deodar cedar Cedrus deodara Camphor Cinnamomum camphora Red-flowering gum Corymbia ficifolia Nichol's gum Eucalyptus nicholii Silver dollar gum Eucalyptus polyanthemos Red ironbark Eucalyptus sideroxylon European beech Fagus sylvatica Raywood ash Fraxinus oxycarpa 'Raywood' Evergreen ash Fraxinus uhdei Modesto ash Fraxinus velutina glabra 'Modesto' Australian willow Geijera parviflora Ginkgo Ginkgo biloba Honey locust Gleditsia triacanthos f. inermis Hollywood juniper Juniperus chinensis 'Kaizuka' Goldenrain tree Koelreuteria paniculata Crape myrtle Lagerstroemia indica Sweetgum Liquidambar styraciflua Tulip tree Liriodendron tulipifera Tan oak Lithocarpus densiflorus Southern magnolia Magnolia grandiflora Saucer magnolia Magnolia x soulangiana Crabapple Malus sp Mayten Maytenus boaria Flax-leaf paperbark Melaleuca linariifolia Dawn redwood Metasequoia glyptostroboides Olive Olea europaea Canary Island pine Pinus canariensis Shore pine Pinus contorta Aleppo pine Pinus halepensis Italian stone pine Pinus pinea Monterey pine Pinus radiata Yellow pine Pinus strobus Chinese pistache Pistacia chinensis (Continued, following page)

10 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 6 Table 1. Tree condition & frequency of occurrence, continued., San Jose CA Common Name Scientific Name Condition Rating No. of Poor Fair Good Trees (1-2) (3) (4-5) London plane Platanus x hispanica African fern pine Podocarpus gracillor Peach Prunus persica Flowering cherry Prunus serrulata Flowering pear Pyrus kawakamii Coast live oak Quercus agrifolia Holly oak Quercus ilex Valley oak Quercus lobata Pin oak Quercus palustris Red oak Quercus rubra Cork oak Quercus suber Coast redwood Sequoia sempervirens Giant sequoia Sequoiadendron giganteum Mexican fan palm Washingtonia robusta Total % 33% 49% 100% Comparison to the 2009 inventory In 2009, a total of 698 trees were surveyed: 72 of those were not present in Fortyeight (48) of the trees removed were young to semi-mature, with diameters between 6 and 18. The remaining 24 trees were semi-mature to mature, with diameters between 19 and 45. Forty-four (44) of the trees removed since 2009 were in poor condition and had been recommended for removal. It appeared that majority of the remaining removals were part of ongoing facility improvement projects around the campus. The percentage of trees in good, fair and poor condition had changed between the 2009 and 2013 assessments. Most notably, there was a shift in the percentage of trees in the good and fair categories, with 33% in fair and 49% in good (previously 25% fair and 60% good). The shift in overall tree condition was tied the change in condition of some of the most commonly encountered species. Coast redwoods, maytens and Southern magnolias had declined between 2009 and present, with a lower percentage of the trees in the good and excellent categories and more in moderate and poor condition. The decline of these species appeared to be due to water stress.

11 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 7 IV. Discussion and Recommendations The trees at are a valuable asset to the campus community. For the most part, trees were in good health and have received high-quality care. To maintain the existing quality at the College, we recommend the following management actions. Continue to plant new trees. The 2009 Tree Survey and Inventory Report included several general recommendations regarding the planting of new trees that are still applicable and which are summarized here: Select quality nursery stalk, with healthy roots, crown, trunk and branch structure. Guidelines for selecting quality nursery stock were provided in the 2009 Tree Survey and Inventory Report (see attachments). Select appropriate species. Use current plant performance as a model in selecting species for future use. Consider incorporating more species native to the San Jose area into sites where they will perform well. Matching species to water conservation goals. We recommend the use of species that do not have high water demands. Selection of future species must also consider their tolerance to recycled water, as the campus is positioned to convert some of the landscape areas to be irrigated with recycled water. Matching species to site conditions. Consideration must be given to the potential for conflict between selected species and existing site constraints, such as irrigation regimes, above and below ground utility lines, buildings and hardscape. Performance The performance of newly planted trees was noted during the course of our field work and is summarized below. The trees that are performing well should be considered for future plantings, and those that are not should be phased out and avoided as part of future plantings. The following recommendations are in addition to those provided in the 2009 Tree Survey and Inventory Report. Coast live oaks in Parking Lot 2 (north of the Science Complex) were vigorous and appeared to be thriving in what is a harsh environment (Photo 3, following page). Do not plant these trees in irrigated landscapes. Similarly, Chinese pistache planted in parking lots and medians across the campus were in good to excellent condition (Photo 4, following page). Ginkgos planted along the West Concourse were performing well. Trees tended to lean to the east, which may be a result of dominant wind directions. If additional ginkgos are to be planted, it is important that only males be selected, as the fruit from the female ginkgo has a foul odor. European olives planted around the Student Services building were performing well. The trees may have an unruly structure for the first few years but will respond to periodic structural pruning. We do not recommend planting additional coast redwoods, especially in parking lots. As discussed, the trees are thirsty and may not be appropriate as an ongoing element of the landscape. Fastigiate copper beach planted south of the Learning resource Center are performing well. The variety has a narrow form appropriate for tight planting spaces near buildings or along walkways.

12 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 8 Flowering pears planted around the High Tech Center building were not performing well. Some of the trees were dead and others had dead branches indicative of fire bilght, a bacterial disease (Erwinia amylovora). The bacteria over-winters on wood of affected trees. As the weather warms in the spring, the bacteria multiply and are transported to other pears by wind, rain and insects. Fire blight initially causes flower, twig and shoot dieback, but can kill limbs and small trees. Photo 3 (L) shows a young coast live oak in parking lot 2. Photo 4 (R) shows a young Chinese pistache in the main parking lot off of Kingman Ave. Both species were performing well. Provide existing trees with appropriate management The 2009 Tree Survey and Inventory Report included recommendations for pruning, mulching, irrigation, tree protection, etc. Based on our recent assessment, the following treatments are recommended as a supplement to existing practices and those provided previously. This list provides an update on the status of recommendations provided previously. I have also identified additional areas of concern and recommendations. 1. Pruning Proper pruning will enhance tree health and structure, thereby increasing resistance to pests and other stresses as well as increasing longevity and safety. Currently, we identified 49 of the trees requiring some amount of pruning (Table 2, page 12). The primary treatments for mature trees are crown cleaning, structural pruning, providing clearance and management of weight on lateral branches. A summary of the current pruning recommendations and status of the 2009 recommendations is provided below. Pruning guidelines were provided in the attachments to the 2009 Tree Survey and Inventory Report and are still current and applicable.

13 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 9 Twenty-four (24) of the trees currently identified for pruning were recommended for pruning as part of the 2009 Tree Survey and Inventory Report, including #8, 18, 49, 129, 130, 157, 263, 278, 425, , 438, 445, 447, 469, 471, 545, 586, 828, and 865. Prune 26 trees to clean crowns or remove dead or broken branches. Prune nine (9) trees to restructure their crowns, including four (4) of the sweetgums along Kingman Ave. where overhead utility lines were removed. Prune 12 trees for reduction of the length and extension of lateral branches. Prune five (5) trees to provide clearance over sidewalk, roads, etc. Prune young and newly planted trees early to enhance development of strong branch structure. 2. Mulch beneath the canopy Many trees would benefit from the application of 2 to 4 of organic mulch beneath their canopies. Mulch serves to moderate soil temperature, reduce evapotranspiration, decrease competition from weeds and maintain good soil structure. Chippings from pruning are a ready source of mulch. Several of the trees, such as sweetgums # and coast live oaks # , had been mulched with a crushed rubber product (Photo 5, following page). I recommend using organic material for mulch, which will break-down over time, adding nutrients to the soil and improving structure. 3. Irrigation Many of the campus trees, especially coast redwoods, would benefit from additional irrigation. This will require checking the existing irrigation system (assuming there is one) to verify it is functioning properly. If the irrigation system is not operating, or operating poorly, additional water will need to be applied by some other means. Application rates and methods will vary depending on the species, size and location of the tree. In general, the use of soaker hoses, temporary soil berms or other surface applications that reduce run-off and allow water to penetrate the top of soil will be required. Table 3, page 13, provides a list of the trees recommended for additional irrigation. Mature redwoods, which represent 122 of the 159 trees recommended for additional irrigation, require consistently moist soil to a depth of 18 to 24. In addition, the species is intolerant of the elevated salt levels in most recycled water. As water becomes a more precious commodity, conversion of coast redwoods to a more drought tolerant species, such as deodar cedar or Blue Atlas cedar, should be considered. There are areas on the campus that appear to no longer be receiving irrigation. Trees in these areas that are not adapted to summer drought and were established with supplemental irrigation can be expected to decline now that irrigation has been withdrawn. Conversion of the plant material in these areas to more drought tolerant species may be a better long-term solution than supplying additional irrigation to water-thirsty trees.

14 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 10 Similarly, there are areas where species adapted to dry summer conditions are planted in an irrigated lawn setting and are receiving too much water (i.e. coast live oaks #436 and 437). Tree longevity could be improved by removing the turf and converting the area around the trees to low water using ground covers and shrubs (see Table 3, page 15). 4. Provide for tree protection during construction projects In order to ensure that development activities do not damage existing trees, we recommend that tree preservation become an integral part of the planning process for construction projects. At a minimum, this would require involving the Grounds Maintenance staff in the design review process for projects. In addition, projects should include tree preservation measures such as protective fencing and remedial treatments. Photo 5: A young maple in the General Education courtyard had a mowing circle and mulch. However, the mulch was not organic but crushed rubber, which will not provide the long-term benefits that organic mulch provides. During the course of our field work (both the 2009 and current field work), we witnessed construction activities, storage of materials and movement of construction equipment in and around trees that likely resulted in their decline. The most obvious example of this was the trees in the West Green, or what used to be the west Green (#63, 66-68, 70 and 76). These were mature specimens in fair to good condition in There were construction activities around the trees in 2009 without adequate protection measures in place. These trees are now all in fair to poor condition; some of which are not expected to recover and will need to be removed (i.e. #66-68 and 70 Photo 6, following page).

15 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page Monitoring and other maintenance activities We recommend monitoring the health, stability, infrastructure damage, and irrigation management for 28 trees (Table 4, page 17), 18 of which were identified for monitoring in Part of the maintenance program at the college should include the removal of support stakes on new plantings after 1-2 growing seasons. The goal of stakes is to support the tree while it develops anchoring roots. Leaving the stakes in place for too long can injure the tree and limit its ability to support its self. It is imperative to enlarge tree grates before trunks have begun to contact them. As trees expand in diameter, they will grow around the edge of grates, damaging the tree. We noted 28 trees requiring maintenance of the tree grate (Table 5, page 18). If one side of the tree has enveloped a grate and it cannot be easily extracted, that section should be cut and left in place, rather than damaging the tree to try to remove it. Continue the program of tree removal and replacement Tree removal is an integral part of a comprehensive management program, just as are tree planting and routine maintenance. While mature trees are aesthetically appealing, they can present significant maintenance and safety problems as they decline. We recommend removing 84 trees (Table 6, page 19). About half of these were in poor health and 37 were the silver dollar gum eucalyptus along Laswell Avenue. The Laswell trees are recommended for removal due to poor structure as a result of the history of topping, and because the trees have outgrown the space provided and have damaged the surrounding infrastructure. Of the 47 trees in poor health, 22 were young to semi-mature landscape trees, with diameters between 6 and 18. Twenty-five (25) had diameters of 19 or greater and should be the focus of the initial removal effort. Seventeen (17) of the trees should be removed in the next 1-2 years. The remaining 30 trees had secondary priority and should be removed in 2 to 5 years. Eleven (11) of these were recommended for removal in 2009, including #2, 7, 17, 20, 363, 404, 657, 658, 742, 822 and 826. Photo 6: Ginkgo #70 was in fair condition in It is now in poor condition and has been recommended for removal. The decline of the tree may be in part related to inadequate protection during construction activities. Eight (8) of the trees identified for pruning were Raywood ash trees that are in decline (#425, and ). The campus should consider if pruning now is the best use of resources or if the trees should be removed and replaced.

16 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 12 Table 2. Trees recommended for pruning., San Jose CA Tag Species Trunk Recommendation Number Diameter (in.) 8 Southern magnolia 22 Crown Clean 18 Southern magnolia 22 Crown Clean 21 Camphor 28 Prune to reduce branch extension N. 27 Sweetgum 24 Prune to improve structure; inspect topping points 29 Blue Atlas cedar 26 Prune to reduce branch extension N. 49 Southern magnolia 20 Clean crown 73 Evergreen ash 36 Clean crown 100 Honey locust 8 Crown Clean 124 Red oak 32 Prune for light clearance 129 Southern magnolia 24 Crown clean 130 Southern magnolia 23 Crown Clean 157 Aleppo pine 28 Prune to improve structure 159 Coast redwood 38 Prune dead top 164 European beech 24 Prune or remove 214 Pin oak 15 Prune dead branch 263 Red oak 50 Prune to reduce branch extension and monitor attachment 278 Modesto ash 38 Crown clean, remove ivy 315 Sweetgum 12 Prune to restructure crown 316 Sweetgum 19 Prune to restructure crown 317 Sweetgum 19 Prune to restructure crown 318 Sweetgum 12 Prune to restructure crown 323 Coast live oak 18 Prune to reduce branch extension 334 Australian willow 19 Prune to reduce branch extension S. 370 Canary Island pine 30 Prune to remove hanger 389 Coast redwood 36 Prune to remove dead branch N. 425 Raywood ash 19 Prune or remove 427 Raywood ash 16 Prune or remove 428 Raywood ash 15 Prune or remove 429 Raywood ash 17 Prune or remove 430 Raywood ash 16 Prune or remove 431 Raywood ash 17 Prune or remove 432 Raywood ash 18 Prune or remove 433 Raywood ash 9 Prune or remove 445 River she-oak 25 Crown clean 447 Deodar cedar 25 Prune to reduce branch extension N. 468 Canary Island pine 27 Prune to reduce branch extension 469 Canary Island pine 25 Prune lateral N. 470 Canary Island pine 26 Prune to remove hanger 471 Canary Island pine 27 Prune to reduce branch extension S. 538 Canary Island pine 26 Prune to remove hanger 545 Canary Island pine 24 Prune to reduce branch extension, improve structure and clean crown 555 Silver dollar gum 16,15,15,14,12 Prune for light clearance 559 Coast redwood 26 Prune over sidewalk 586 Aleppo pine 38 Prune & cable 642 Coast redwood 26 Prune over sidewalk 828 Coast live oak 31 Prune to reduce branch extension N. over parking lot

17 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 13 Table 3. Trees recommended for additional irrigation., San Jose CA Tag Species Trunk Number Diameter (in.) 110 Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Southern magnolia Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood 36 (Continued, following page)

18 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 14 Table 3. Trees recommended for additional irrigation, continued., San Jose CA Tag Species Trunk Number Diameter (in.) 188 Coast redwood Coast redwood Mayten Mayten Mayten Australian willow Australian willow Red maple Red maple Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Flax-leaf paperbark Flax-leaf paperbark Flax-leaf paperbark Flax-leaf paperbark Flax-leaf paperbark Sweetgum Sweetgum Sweetgum Sweetgum Coast redwood Coast redwood Canary Island pine Canary Island pine Canary Island pine Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Mayten Mayten Mayten Crape myrtle Crape myrtle Crape myrtle Deodar cedar Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood 15 (Continued, following page)

19 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 15 Table 3. Trees recommended for additional irrigation, continued., San Jose CA Tag Species Trunk Number Diameter (in.) 568 Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Deodar cedar European birch European birch Mayten Mayten Mayten Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood 7 (Continued, following page)

20 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 16 Table 3. Trees recommended for additional irrigation, continued., San Jose CA Tag Species Trunk Number Diameter (in.) 887 Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Coast redwood Cork oak Cork oak Cork oak Cork oak Coast redwood Coast redwood 11

21 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 17 Table 4. Trees recommended for monitoring and maintenance., San Jose CA Tag Species Trunk Recommendation Number Diameter (in.) 19 Italian stone pine 28 Monitor or remove 53 European beech 28 Monitor health 54 European beech 21 Control aphids 68 Valley oak 22 Reduce summer irrigation and monitor health 76 Evergreen ash 32 Monitor 150 Coast redwood 28 Monitor Infrastructure damage 164 European beech 24 Monitor health 167 European beech 24 Monitor health 211 Pin oak 14 Monitor health 258 Australian willow 21 Monitor damage 260 Australian willow 21 Monitor damage 278 Modesto ash 38 Remove ivy 323 Coast live oak 18 Reduce summer irrigatation & monitor health 361 Coast redwood 27 Monitor infrastructure damage 362 Coast redwood 44 Monitor infrastructure damage 367 Canary Island pine 23 Monitor infrastructure damage 368 Canary Island pine 27 Monitor infrastructure damage 372 Canary Island pine 20 Monitor infrastructure damage 388 Coast redwood 23 Monitor stability 389 Coast redwood 36 Monitor stability 417 Coast live oak 20 Reduce summer irrigation & monitor health 436 Coast live oak 23 Adjust irrigation to avoid trunk 437 Coast live oak 8 Adjust irrigation to avoid trunk 443 Coast live oak 21 Reduce summer irrigation & monitor health 444 Coast live oak 19 Reduce summer irrigation & monitor health 657 Giant sequoia 20 Monitor/remove 658 Giant sequoia 30 Monitor/remove 803 Coast live oak 6 Over watered/adjust irrigation to avoid trunk 804 Coast live oak 6 Over watered/adjust irrigation to avoid trunk 806 Pin oak 11 Over watered/adjust irrigation to avoid trunk 839 Pin oak 10 Address chlorosis

22 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 18 Table 5. Trees requiring grate maintenance., San Jose CA Tag Species Trunk Number Diameter (in.) 845 Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache Chinese pistache London plane London plane London plane London plane London plane London plane London plane London plane London plane 7

23 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 19 Table 6. Trees recommended for removal., San Jose CA Tag Species Trunk Removal priority Number Diameter (in.) 2 Southern magnolia 22 Remove now 7 Southern magnolia 22 Remove now 14 Southern magnolia 27 Remove now 17 Southern magnolia 19 Remove now 19 Italian stone pine 28 Expect to remove in future 20 Camphor 25 Remove now 66 Camphor 28 Expect to remove in future 67 Camphor 32 Expect to remove in future 68 Valley oak 22 Expect to remove in future 70 Ginkgo 20 Remove now 90 Japanese maple 11 Remove now 98 Honey locust 11 Remove now 101 Honey locust 8 Remove now 123 Coast redwood 36 Remove now 131 Southern magnolia 17 Expect to remove in future 133 Southern magnolia 19 Expect to remove in future 164 European beech 24 Expect to remove in future 166 European beech 18 Remove now 197 Japanese maple 13 Expect to remove in future 240 Mayten 13 Expect to remove in future 246 Mayten 11 Expect to remove in future 314 Australian willow 17 Remove now 322 Australian willow 13 Expect to remove in future 328 Sweetgum 10 Expect to remove in future 349 Sweetgum 25 Remove now 350 Sweetgum 18 Expect to remove in future 352 Sweetgum 24 Expect to remove in future 363 Red ironbark 27 Remove now 375 Mayten 13 Expect to remove in future 404 Deodar cedar 26 Expect to remove in future 425 Raywood ash 19 Expect to remove in future 427 Raywood ash 16 Expect to remove in future 428 Raywood ash 15 Expect to remove in future 429 Raywood ash 17 Expect to remove in future 430 Raywood ash 16 Expect to remove in future 431 Raywood ash 17 Expect to remove in future 432 Raywood ash 18 Expect to remove in future 433 Raywood ash 9 Expect to remove in future 657 Giant sequoia 20 Expect to remove in future 658 Giant sequoia 30 Expect to remove in future 742 Monterey pine 30 Remove now 749 Yellow pine 18 Expect to remove in future (Continued, following page)

24 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 20 Table 6. Trees recommended for removal, continued., San Jose CA Tag Species Trunk Removal priority Number Diameter (in.) 751 Silver dollar gum 25 Remove 752 Silver dollar gum 18 Remove 754 Silver dollar gum 19 Remove 755 Silver dollar gum 18 Remove 756 Silver dollar gum 18 Remove 757 Silver dollar gum 17 Remove 758 Silver dollar gum 19 Remove 759 Silver dollar gum 16 Remove 760 Silver dollar gum 14 Remove 761 Silver dollar gum 16 Remove 762 Silver dollar gum 20 Remove 763 Silver dollar gum 20 Remove 764 Silver dollar gum 16 Remove 765 Silver dollar gum 17 Remove 766 Silver dollar gum 20 Remove 767 Silver dollar gum 22 Remove 769 Silver dollar gum 24 Remove 770 Silver dollar gum 21 Remove 771 Silver dollar gum 21 Remove 772 Silver dollar gum 25 Remove 773 Silver dollar gum 20 Remove 774 Silver dollar gum 26 Remove 775 Silver dollar gum 21 Remove 776 Silver dollar gum 18 Remove 777 Silver dollar gum 18 Remove 778 Silver dollar gum 18 Remove 779 Silver dollar gum 20 Remove 780 Silver dollar gum 21 Remove 781 Silver dollar gum 17 Remove 782 Silver dollar gum 17 Remove 783 Silver dollar gum 22 Remove 784 Silver dollar gum 24 Remove 785 Silver dollar gum 24 Remove 786 Silver dollar gum 20 Remove 787 Silver dollar gum 24 Remove 788 Silver dollar gum 24 Remove 789 Silver dollar gum 24 Remove 822 Mayten 9 Remove 826 Mayten 6 Remove 827 Flowering cherry 7 Expect to remove in future 923 Cork oak 7 Expect to remove in future 924 Cork oak 10 Expect to remove in future

25 Updated Tree Survey and Inventory Report HortScience, Inc., December 2013 Page 21 Summary Trees at the San Jose Community College make a significant contribution to the educational experience, and provide a wide variety of environmental and aesthetic benefits. This is the second assessment of the trees in the past 5 years. It is clear that the District is committed to the ongoing management of the tree resource at the San Jose Community College. We encourage that commitment and are hopeful that the recommendations provided will assist the District in their mission to improve the health, safety and longevity of the trees for everyone s benefit. If you have any question regarding my observation or recommendations, please contact me. HortScience, Inc. John Leffingwell Board Certified Master Arborist WE-3966B Registered Consulting Arborist #442 Attachments: Tree Assessment Forms Tree Assessment Map

26 Tree Assessment San Jose, California July TREE Removed SPECIES TRUNK CONDITION CONDITION Recommendations COMMENTS No. as of DIAMETER 1=poor 1=poor 2013 (in.) 5=excellent 5=excellent 1 Southern magnolia Thin crown; twig and branch dieback. 2 Southern magnolia Remove Extensive dieback. 4 x Southern magnolia 14 1 Little live material remains. 7 Southern magnolia Remove Extensive dieback; codominant trunks at 7' w/ included bark & bleeding. 8 Southern magnolia Crown Clean Twig dieback; girdling roots. 14 Southern magnolia Remove Multiple attachments at 6'; twig and branch dieback; history of branch failure. 17 Southern magnolia Remove Extensive dieback. 18 Southern magnolia Crown Clean Twig dieback in upper crown; laterals; branch wound. 19 Italian stone pine Monitor or remove Codominant trunks at 15'; half of tree failed. 20 Camphor Remove Extensive dieback. 21 Camphor Prune for end weight Multiple attachments at 7'; twig dieback; branch on North wounds. 23 Pin oak Codominant trunks at 6'; good form and structure; minor dieback. 27 Sweetgum Aerial inspection & In tree well; upright form; previously topped at 30'. prune 28 Sweetgum In tree well; previously topped at 30'. 29 Blue Atlas cedar Prune for end weight In elevated planter; one-sided west. 30 Saucer magnolia 9,7 3 4 Codominant trunks at 1'; crown bowed south. 49 Southern magnolia Clean crown Twig dieback; in elevated planter. 53 European beech Control aphids, Twig dieback; trunk and branch wounds; small Monitor health broken branches. 54 European beech Control aphids No basal flare north; girdling roots. 55 Holly oak Multiple attachments at 8'; narrow attachments. 56 Holly oak Slight lean west; epicormic shoots. 57 Holly oak Codominant trunks at 7' w/ wide attachment; epicormic shoots. 58 x Holly oak 20 5 Slight lean south; trunk wound. 59 x Mayten 10 1 Little live material remains. 60 x Victorian box 29 4 Multiple attachments at 6'; trunk wounds; root wound. Page 1

27 Tree Assessment San Jose, California July TREE Removed SPECIES TRUNK CONDITION CONDITION Recommendations COMMENTS No. as of DIAMETER 1=poor 1=poor 2013 (in.) 5=excellent 5=excellent 61 x Flowering pear trees in 2' wide planter; topped w/ poor form and structure. 62 x Camphor 27 2 Half dead. 63 Camphor Twig and branch dieback; basal wounds. 66 Camphor Remove/future Twig and branch dieback; extensive root wounds. 67 Camphor Remove/future One-sided south; root wounds; basal decay. 68 Valley oak Remove/future, Reduce summer irrigation and monitor health Codominant trunks at 8'; twig dieback; irrigated lawn 5' 360 around tree; very wet soil. 70 Ginkgo Remove Dead top; large trunk wound; declining. 72 Chinese pistache Trunk and branch wounds; one-sided east. 73 Evergreen ash Clean crown Extensive dieback in upper crown; multiple root wounds; central leader dead. 76 Evergreen ash Monitor Codominant trunks at 15'; included bark; previously topped at 35'; possible armilaria. 77 Japanese maple Row of 3 trees; most w/ bark separating on south (sun scald). 78 x Japanese maple 12 3 Extensive sun scald. 79 x Japanese maple 15 2 Extensive sun scald; twig and branch dieback. 84 x African fern pine 8 3 In 2' wide planter; topped at 8'. 85 x African fern pine 10 3 In 2' wide planter; topped at 8'. 86 x Mayten 10 2 Twig and branch dieback. 87 x Holly oak 22 4 Minor twig dieback in upper crown; epicormic shoots. 88 x Holly oak 20 4 Twig dieback in upper crown; branch wounds. 89 x Japanese maple 15 3 No tag; sun scald; twig and branch dieback. 90 Japanese maple Remove Sun scald twig and branch dieback; bark separating; extensive dieback. 93 x Japanese maple Group of 10 trees; 3 dead; extensive sun scald. 96 x Honey locust 5 1 In planter; only basal sprouts. 97 Honey locust Minor twig and branch dieback, injured by mowers; trunk wound. 98 Honey locust Remove Moderate twig and branch dieback; surface roots. Page 2

28 Tree Assessment San Jose, California July TREE Removed SPECIES TRUNK CONDITION CONDITION Recommendations COMMENTS No. as of DIAMETER 1=poor 1=poor 2013 (in.) 5=excellent 5=excellent 99 Honey locust Severe surface roots; minor twig dieback. 100 Honey locust Crown Clean One-sided north; twig and branch dieback; top dead. 101 Honey locust Remove Surface roots; scaffold girdled by wire; multiple 102 x Honey locust 9 2 In planter; extensive dieback. 103 x Honey locust 3,1 3 In planter; poor form. 104 x Honey locust 10 1 In planter; extensive dieback in upper crown. 105 x Coast redwood 30 4 Good tree; slightly thin crown. 106 x Coast redwood 34 4 Good tree; slightly thin crown. 107 x Coast redwood 32 3 Codominant trunks at 7' w/ narrow attachment; thin crown. 108 Coast redwood Good tree. 109 Coast redwood Good tree. 110 Coast redwood Irrigate Very thin crown. 111 Coast redwood Irrigate Codominant trunks at 5' w/ narrow attachment; thinning crown. 112 Coast redwood Irrigate Good tree. 113 Coast redwood Irrigate Crowded; good tree. 114 Coast redwood Irrigate Crowded; asymmetric crown. 115 Coast redwood Irrigate Lost top. 116 Aleppo pine Crown Clean Multiple attachments at 10', 3 upright scaffolds emerge at this point. 117 Coast redwood One-sided west. 118 Coast redwood Good tree. 119 Coast redwood Good tree. 120 Coast redwood Irrigate Good tree. 121 Coast redwood Irrigate Thinning crown. 122 Coast redwood Irrigate Thinning crown. 123 Coast redwood Remove Very thin crown. 124 Red oak Prune SW stem for street light 125 Coast redwood Irrigate Good tree; lost top. 126 Coast redwood Irrigate Good tree; windswept. 127 Coast redwood Irrigate Good tree; windswept; thin crown. Multiple attachments at 4' w/ narrow attachment; good form. Page 3

29 Tree Assessment San Jose, California July TREE Removed SPECIES TRUNK CONDITION CONDITION Recommendations COMMENTS No. as of DIAMETER 1=poor 1=poor 2013 (in.) 5=excellent 5=excellent 128 Southern magnolia Twig & branch dieback; thinning 129 Southern magnolia Irrigate, Crown clean Twig dieback; epicormic shoots. 130 Southern magnolia Crown Clean Twig dieback; surface roots. 131 Southern magnolia Remove/future Twig dieback; small cavity northeast. 132 x Southern magnolia 15 2 Twig & branch dieback; thinning. 133 Southern magnolia Remove/future Thinning canopy; twig and branch dieback. 134 Southern magnolia Twig dieback; trunk wound. 135 Southern magnolia Upright form; twig dieback. 136 Coast redwood Irrigate Good tree; thinning crown. 137 Coast redwood Irrigate Good tree; thinning crown. 138 Coast redwood Good tree. 139 Coast redwood Good tree. 140 Coast redwood Good tree. 141 Coast redwood Good tree. 142 Coast redwood Good tree. 143 Mayten One-sided north. 144 Coast redwood Irrigate Slightly thin crown. 145 Coast redwood Irrigate Crowded; asymmetric crown. 146 Coast redwood Irrigate Curve in trunk; upright. 147 Coast redwood Irrigate Slightly thin crown; crowded. 148 Coast redwood Irrigate Crowded; asymmetric crown. 149 Coast redwood Irrigate Slightly thin crown. 150 Coast redwood Irrigate, Monitor Good tree; next to curb. infrastructure damage, irrigate 153 Hollywood juniper 12,8 4 4 Bowed over walk. 154 Hollywood juniper 10,8,7,7 4 4 Bowed over walk. 155 Hollywood juniper 12,7,6 4 4 Bowed over walk. 156 Hollywood juniper 13,12,9 4 4 Bowed over walk. 157 Aleppo pine Prune for structure Multiple attachments at 25'; poor branch structure. 158 Coast redwood Irrigate Slightly thin crown; small hangers. 159 Coast redwood Irrigate/prune top Slightly thin crown; dead top. 160 Coast redwood Irrigate Slightly thin crown. 161 Coast redwood Irrigate Thin crown. Page 4

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