Appendix E: Civics and Economics Unpacking Document

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Appendix E: Civics and Economics Unpacking Document"

Transcription

1 Appendix E: Civics and Economics Unpacking Document This document identifies possible curriculum content that could be taught in the Civics and Economics course that aligns to the Founding Principles Act (SL ). The last column, labeled Unpacking contains the information that shows the alignment of the standards to the Founding Principles Act. This content is underlined for easy identification and can be found on the following pages in this document: 3-26, 36 and CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 1 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

2 This document is designed to help North Carolina educators teach the Essential Standards (Standard Course of Study). NCDPI staff are continually updating and improving these tools to better serve teachers. Essential Standards: Civics and Economics Unpacked Content For the new Essential Standards that will be effective in all North Carolina schools in the school year. What is the purpose of this document? To increase student achievement by ensuring educators understand specifically what the new standards mean a student must know, understand and be able to do. What is in the document? Descriptions of what each standard means a student will know, understand and be able to do. The unpacking of the standards done in this document is an effort to answer a simple question What does this standard mean that a student must know and be able to do? and to ensure the description is helpful, specific and comprehensive for educators. How do I send Feedback? We intend the explanations and examples in this document to be helpful and specific. That said, we believe that as this document is used, teachers and educators will find ways in which the unpacking can be improved and made ever more useful. Please send feedback to us at and we will use your input to refine our unpacking of the standards. Thank You! Just want the standards alone? You can find the standards alone at Note on Numbering: H History, G Geography and Environmental Literacy, E Economic and Financial Literacy, C&G Civics and Government, C Culture CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 2 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

3 Civics and Government Essential Standard: CE.C&G.1 Analyze the foundations and development of American government in terms of principles and values. Concept(s): Power, Authority, Democracy, Compromise, Conflict Clarifying Objectives CE.C&G.1.1 Explain how the tensions over power and authority led America s founding fathers to develop a constitutional democracy (e.g., mercantilism, salutary neglect, taxation and representation, boycott and protest, independence, American Revolution, Articles of Confederation, Ben Franklin, George Washington, John Adams, Son of Liberty, etc.). Unpacking What does this objective mean a student will understand, know and be able to do? Salutary neglect between a nation and its colonies may alter the political and economic relationship and can lead to desires for reform and independence. Opposing perspectives relating to power and authority may lead to conflict within and among nations and can result in the development of new governments. (Frequent and free elections in a representative government) Civil disobedience often results from the belief of the individual that the government has a responsibility to protect the rights of individuals within the society. (Frequent and free elections in a representative government, rule of law, federalism, due process, Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances) Colonial and British perspectives concerning power, authority, and representative government. (Frequent and free elections in a representative government, Structure of government) A constitutional democracy is a form of representative democracy that depends on the participation of its citizens. (Frequent and free elections in a representative government, rule of law, federalism, due process, Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 3 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

4 balances) A constitutional democracy is a system of government based on popular sovereignty in which the structures, powers, and limits of government are set forth in a written or unwritten constitution. (Frequent and free elections in a representative government, rule of law, federalism, due process, Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, equal justice under the law, private property rights) Reasons for colonial unrest and rebellion, such as British control and taxation, and ways in which the American colonists responded. (Inalienable rights, rule of law, equal justice under the law, due process) For example: the establishment of the Sons of Liberty and Committees of Correspondence, Boston Tea Party, Continental Congress, Olive Branch Petition, Declaration of Independence. The connection between colonial conflicts and the major principles the framers placed in the United States Constitution. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, rule of law, equal justice under the law, federalism, individual rights set forth in the Bill of Rights) Key Terminology: Political relationship - Social relations involving plans to gain authority or power. Economic relationship - Cooperation in trade, finance, and investment existing between individual states, businesses, countries and sets of countries, etc. CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 4 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

5 CE.C&G.1.2 Explain how the Enlightenment and other contributing theories impacted the writing of the Declaration of Independence, the US Constitution and the Bill of Rights to help promote liberty, justice and equality (e.g., natural rights, classical theories of government, Magna Carta, Montesquieu, Locke, English Bill of Rights, etc.). Theories of liberty, justice, and equality that are developed over time often shape the political documents and foundations of a nation. (U.S. Constitution, N.C. Constitution, Declaration of Independence, Supreme Court Decisions, Congressional Acts) New ideas or ways of thinking are often integrated into a nation s founding and development. (Inalienable rights, structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, rule of law, equal justice under the law, federalism, individual rights set forth in the Bill of Rights) Constitutional governments may be founded upon ideas such as freedom, equality and the rights of individuals. (Inalienable rights, structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, rule of law, equal justice under the law, federalism, individual rights set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) The philosophical theories of the Enlightenment and the 18 th century from men such as Locke, Rousseau, Hobbes, Jefferson, and Montesquieu (Inalienable rights, structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, rule of law, and equal justice under the law). American colonists brought with them the knowledge of Enlightenment theories and those theories impacted the development of government in the United States. (Inalienable rights, structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, rule of law, equal justice under the law, federalism, individual rights set forth in the Bill of CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 5 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

6 Rights, individual responsibility) The fundamental principles of the Declaration of Independence as contained in the Preamble. (Inalienable rights, rule of law, equal justice under the law) The fundamental principles of the United States Constitution. (Separation of powers with checks and balances, rule of law, federalism) The ways in which the Preamble to the United States Constitution reflects the purpose of government in the United States. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, due process, federalism). The freedoms established in the Bill of Rights. (Inalienable rights, structure of government, equal justice under the law, due process, federalism, individual rights set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) Key Terminology: Philosophical Theories - The theories and ideas that shaped the development of intellectual philosophies and spanned many popular political, social and economic debates. The point of a theory is to explain observations, which in turn seek to explain the world or society in which we live. Constitutional Government - A constitutional government is any government with defined parameters, structure, and function as established by a constitution. CE.C&G.1.3 Evaluate how debates on power and authority between Federalists and Anti- Federalists have helped shape government in the Multiple perspectives on power and authority often guide the development of a nation s government. CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 6 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

7 United States over time (e.g., Hamilton, Jefferson, Madison, Federalist Papers, strong central government, protection of individual rights, Elastic Clause, Bill of Rights, etc.). For example: Components of both Federalist and Anti-Federalist beliefs are reflected in contemporary political debate on issues such as the size and role of government, federalism, and the protection of individual rights. Groups and individuals pursuing their own goals may seek to direct the priorities, decisions and actions of a government. Components of both continuity and change, over time, can be seen in competing perspectives concerning governmental power and authority. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, rule of law, equal justice under the law, federalism, individual rights set forth in the Bill of Rights) Compromise is often necessary for government to carry out its duties and obligations to citizens. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances) How the failures of the Articles of Confederation and arguments over governmental power and authority in the United States contributed to calls for a new type of government. For example: Shay s Rebellion, economic difficulties, inability of the Congress to pass legislation, disputes between states Major arguments for and against ratifying the United States Constitution. (Rule of law, federalism, individual rights set forth in the Bill of Rights) CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 7 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

8 Differences between Federalist and Anti-Federalist thoughts and writings. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, federalism, individual rights set forth in the Bill of Rights) Key Federalists and Anti-Federalists in the debate over ratifying the United States Constitution. (Federalism, Individual rights set forth in the Bill of Rights) Various examples of compromise within government For example: Ways in which the final original draft of the Constitution could be seen as a result of debate and compromise (the 3/5ths Compromise, the Great Compromise, Bill of Rights). Modern debates concerning government power and authority based on early debates on the Constitution. CE.C&G.1.4 Analyze the principles and ideals underlying American democracy in terms of how they promote freedom (i.e. separation of powers, rule of law, limited government, democracy, consent of the governed / individual rights life, liberty, pursuit of happiness, selfgovernment, representative democracy, equal opportunity, equal protection under the law, diversity, patriotism, etc.). Shared values and principles may be necessary for a group of people to progress and form a political system. Principles and ideals underlying democracy are designed to promote the freedom of the people in a nation. A nation may agree on values and principles philosophically, but disagree on the practical application of those same values and principles. Democratic freedom requires the active participation of a nation s citizens. CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 8 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

9 Ideals that are considered fundamental to American public life (individual rights, self-government, justice, equality, diversity, patriotism, the common/public good, etc.). Principles that are considered fundamental to American constitutional democracy (rule of law, representative government, shared powers, checks and balances, federalism, individual rights, etc.). Significant conflicts over the practical application of American philosophical values and principles. (individual rights, individual responsibility, rule of law, federalism, equal justice under the law) For example: disputes over the nature and morality of American slavery, the expansion of citizenship, civil rights for all individuals, state versus federal government. Key Terminology: Civil society - This is that sphere of voluntary individual, social, and economic relationships and organizations that, although limited by law, is not part of governmental institutions. Civil society provides a domain where individuals are free from unreasonable interference from government. By providing for independent centers of power and influence, civil society is an indispensable means of maintaining limited government. Political and economic freedoms and limited government are interrelated. ( CE.C&G.1.5 Evaluate the fundamental principles of American politics in terms of the extent to which they have been used effectively to maintain constitutional democracy in the United States (e.g., rule of law, limited government, democracy, consent of the A government system in which the structures, powers and limits of government are set forth in a constitution often relies on its founding principles to maintain order. (Inalienable rights, structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, frequent and free elections in a representative government, rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 9 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

10 governed, etc.). individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) A constitutional democracy may allow competing ideas, values, and principles to compete in a peaceful manner. (Inalienable rights, structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, frequent and free elections in a representative government, rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) The relationship between citizens and their government requires mutual consent. (social contract, rule of law, inalienable rights, equal justice under the law) Basic principles of United States government and their purpose. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, rule of law, equal justice under the law) The concept of the social contract. (Inalienable rights) Occasions when conflict within the United States has challenged the maintenance of constitutional democracy. (federalism, due process, Bill of Rights, rule of law, equal justice under the law, separation of power with checks and balances) For example: Whiskey Rebellion, US Civil War, Jim Crow, Great Depression, Court packing, Civil Rights movement, differing political perspectives concerning liberty, power, and authority CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 10 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

11 Key Terminology: Principles of American Constitutional Democracy Popular sovereignty and constitutional government. Constitutional government includes rule of law representative institutions, separated and shared powers, checks and balances, individual rights, separation of church and state, federalism, and civilian control of the military. Civics and Government Essential Standard: CE.C&G.2 Analyze government systems within the United States in terms of their structure, function and relationships. Concept(s): Government Systems, Structure, Functions, Power, Responsibility, Citizenship Clarifying Objectives CE.C&G.2.1 Analyze the structures of national, state and local governments in terms of ways they are organized to maintain order, security, welfare of the public and the protection of citizens (e.g., federalism, the three branches, court system, jurisdictions, judicial process, agencies, etc.). Unpacking What does this objective mean a student will understand, know and be able to do? Governments are often structured to maintain a balance of power between branches and divisions of authority responsible for ensuring the basic needs of citizens are met. (Inalienable rights, structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, frequent and free elections in a representative government, rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) A system of government established by a constitution may result in the complex dispersal of powers that are shared between different levels of authority. (Inalienable rights, structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, frequent and free elections in a representative government, rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) A complex and multi-level system of government may reflect the principle CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 11 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

12 of popular sovereignty, enable citizens to hold their governments accountable and help to ensure protection for the rights of the people. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, frequent and free elections in a representative government, rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) Functions of government involve a complex relationship among the branches of government at all levels, which often collaborate to address the rights, security, and welfare of citizens. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances) Reasons for America s implementation of a federalist system of government. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, federalism) Powers that are shared and held individually by state and federal governments within a federalist system. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, federalism) The structure and functions of government at national, state and local levels. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, federalism) How various divisions within government function to address order, security and welfare of citizens. How conflicts between branches and levels of government within the federalist constitutional system have or have not been resolved. (structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, federalism) CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 12 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

13 CE.C&G.2.2 Summarize the functions of North Carolina state and local governments within the federal system of government (e.g., local charters, maintain a militia, pass ordinances and laws, collect taxes, supervise elections, maintain highways, types of local governments, etc.). A nation s written constitution often reflects the agreed upon powers of government and the fundamental principles by which people live. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, federalism) The regulation of resources, act of policymaking, and implementation of laws often are based on the government s role and responsibility to ensure the safety and welfare of the people. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, federalism) The principles of the current North Carolina Constitution (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances) The functions of state and local governments. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, federalism) The responsibilities and duties of state and local government. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, federalism) How and why government responds to social and economic changes. CE.C&G.2.3 Evaluate the U.S. Constitution as a living Constitution in terms of how the words in the Constitution and Bill of Rights have been interpreted and applied throughout their existence (e.g., precedents, rule of law, Stare decisis, judicial review, supremacy, equal protections, establishment clause, symbolic speech, due process, right to privacy, etc.). A written constitution can set forth the terms and limits of a government s power. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, frequent and free elections in a representative government, rule law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) Interpretation and application of founding ideals and principles may change over time. (US Constitution, Bill of Rights) CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 13 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

14 A nation s founding documents reflect and preserve its basic ideals and principles. (US Constitution, NC Constitution, Declaration of Independence) The purposes for the United States Constitution as outlined in the Preamble. The meaning of a living Constitution. (US Constitution, NC Constitution) The role of the courts in interpreting the Constitution. (US Constitution, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, federalism, due process) The purpose of the first 10 amendments, the freedoms each grants, and their relevance to each citizen. (federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) The processes for amending the United States Constitution. (US Constitution) The reasons for and significance of later Amendments to the Constitution. (Equal justice under the law, frequent and free elections in a representative government) Theory, need, and practice behind an unwritten constitution CE.C&G.2.4 Compare the Constitutions and the structures of the United States and North Carolina governments (e.g., the various NC Constitutions, Bill of Rights, Declaration of Rights, Preambles, the organization of, the powers of, responsibilities, etc.). The structure and processes of national and state governments may protect and preserve the democratic system. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, frequent and free elections in a representative government, rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 14 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

15 National constitutions often take precedence over state constitutions. (US Constitution, NC Constitution) The structure of the United States and North Carolina Constitutions. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances) The structure of the United States and North Carolina governments. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances) The major differences and similarities between the United States and North Carolina Constitutions. (U.S. Constitution, N.C. Constitution, Preamble to the NC Constitution, federalism) How disputes between the federal government and the state government have or have not been resolved. (US Constitution, NC Constitution, federalism) CE.C&G.2.5 Compare United States system of government within the framework of the federal and state structures as well as in how they relate with governmental systems of other nations (e.g. republicanism, federalism). ` Examples of constitutional conflicts between state and federal laws and decisions (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, US Constitution, NC Constitution, federalism) The structure of government often reflects the priorities and goals of a nation, state, or ruling power. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances) Political change at the state level may cause conflict at the national level and vice versa. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, federalism) In democratic forms of government, ultimate power often lies with the people. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, frequent and free elections in a representative government, rule of CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 15 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

16 law, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) Democratic practice may facilitate the maintenance and structure of the institutions of a nation. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, frequent and free elections in a representative government, rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) Differences between the federal and state structure of governments. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, federalism ) Differences and similarities between the United States system and structure of government and the government systems and structures of other nations. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances, federalism ) For example: One significant difference between the United States and some other major democracies is the selection and role of the head of government. In parliamentary systems, the head of government is a prime minister selected from the parliament, and is typically the leader of the majority political party or coalition. The prime minister appoints a cabinet of ministers often consisting of other members of parliament. A separate head of state may be a monarch or an elected President (or comparable official). Ways in which foreign constitutions, both historical and extant, compare to the United States Constitution. (US Constitution, rule of law). Note: Selection of countries to compare to the United States should be up to the CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 16 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

17 CE.C&G.2.6 Evaluate the authority federal, state and local governments have over individuals rights and privileges (e.g., Bill of Rights, Delegated Powers, Reserved Powers, Concurrent Powers, Pardons, Writ of habeas corpus, Judicial Process, states rights, Patriot Act, etc.). teacher. The priorities and goals of a government may determine how a nation addresses the rights of individuals and the maintenance of the common good. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) Constitutional democracy often develops from both the need for authority and the need to limit authority. (Structure of government, rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) The definition of the common good. The types of authority various levels and branches of government can exercise over the people. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) The limits of governmental authority over the people. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) The rights and privileges citizens have in the United States and the differences between the two. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 17 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

18 in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) Examples reflecting the conflict between preserving the rights of individuals and protecting the common good. (Rule of law, private property rights, federalism, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility, equal justice under the law) For example: arguments over gun control, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, eminent domain, criminal rights, victim rights Key Terminology: Common good - The good or well-being of an entity such as a nation, company or an organization. The concept is that the good of the entire group can be no more than the good of each individual or particular component. CE.C&G.2.7 Analyze contemporary issues and governmental responses at the local, state, and national levels in terms of how they promote the public interest and/or general welfare (e.g., taxes, immigration, naturalization, civil rights, economic development, annexation, redistricting, zoning, national security, health care, etc.). The social, political, and economic impact of how policy is established and implemented is often determined by the level of government at which decisions are made. (Structure of government, separation of powers with checks and balances) Government responses to contemporary issues often create or defuse controversy depending upon the political, economic, social, or cultural agenda of groups or organizations. Controversies often exist regarding government response to contemporary issues and may result in the failure to develop long term solutions to local, state, or national problems. CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 18 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

19 Individuals and institutions may be shaped by government actions and respond in ways which result in social protest or community and national unity. The definition of public interest. How the public interest is influenced by the ideal of the common good. Various examples of public interests in the United States. Arguments over the definition of general welfare in the United States and how local, state and national governments attempt to resolve them. Examples of contemporary issues affecting the United States and how government and citizens respond. Key Terminology: Public interest - The public interest refers to the welfare of the general public (in contrast to the selfish interest of a person, group, or firm) in which the whole society has a stake and which warrants recognition, promotion, and protection by the government and its agencies. CE.C&G.2.8 Analyze America s two-party system in terms of the political and economic views that led to its emergence and the role that political parties play in American politics (e.g., Democrat, Republican, promotion of civic responsibility, Federalists, Anti-Federalists, Influence of third parties, precincts, the political spectrum, straight ticket, canvass, A nation s political systems are often comprised of adversarial groups which must find ways to resolve conflict and balance competing interests. Alternative political parties play an important role in the debate over policy and government. (Frequent and free elections in a representative government, individual responsibility) CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 19 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

20 planks, platform, etc.). The history, development and characteristics of the two-party system. (Frequent and free elections in a representative government) The dominant political parties and platforms in the United States and their distinguishing characteristics, as well as how these parties and platform may have changed over time. (frequent and free elections in a representative government) How the dominant political parties in the United States attempt to balance the competing interests of their members. (Frequent and free elections in a representative government) Advantages and disadvantages of a two-party system. (Frequent and free elections in a representative government) How political parties allow citizens to participate in government. (Frequent and free elections in a representative government, individual responsibility) The definition and importance of civic responsibility to a political system. (Frequent and free elections in a representative government, individual responsibility) Examples of and the role of alternative parties in the American system of politics For example: Alternative parties bring up new ideas or press for action on certain issues. (Frequent and free elections in a representative government, individual responsibility) Third parties can change the outcome of elections by drawing votes CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 20 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

21 away from one of the main parties. (Frequent and free elections in a representative government, individual responsibility) Key Terminology: Civic responsibility - A civic responsibility is a duty each citizen of a country owes the country. There are tangible and intangible civic responsibilities. Intangible civic responsibilities would be things like: Being an informed voter, contributing to the common good, and obeying the law. Tangible responsibilities are jury duty and voting for a president or in local elections. Political system - A system involving government and its politics, which includes the members who are in power within a country. A system by which a body of people is administered and regulated. Political issues - are matters which directly or indirectly affect a system involving government and its politics and are considered to be problems and controversies related to power and authority. Civics and Government Essential Standard: CE.C&G.3 Analyze the legal system within the United States in terms of the development, execution and protection of citizenship rights at all levels of government. Concept(s): Rights, Legal System, Protection, Citizenship, Rule of Law, Responsibility Clarifying Objectives CE.C&G.3.1 Analyze how the rule of law establishes limits on both the governed and those who govern while Unpacking What does this objective mean a student will understand, know and be able to do? Democratic governments often seek to work with its citizens to make CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 21 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

22 holding true to the ideal of equal protection under the law (e.g., the Fourteenth Amendment, Americans with Disabilities Act, equal opportunity legislation). and enforce laws that ensure the general welfare of the people and maintain the common good. (Structure of government, rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) In a democracy, rule of law often shapes the behavior of citizens, establishes procedures for making policies, and limits the power of government. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) Equal protection of the law promotes equal treatment as an element of fundamental fairness that prohibits discrimination by government institutions. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) How to define rule of law and recognize why it is an important concept for democratic governance. (Rule of law) How the definition of the concept of equal protection under the law has changed over time. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law) Specific constitutional and legal protections that provide equal protection to all citizens and how the courts have interpreted them over time. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law) The concept of limited government and how that concept has changed over time. (Structure of government, rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism) CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 22 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

23 CE.C&G.3.2 Compare lawmaking processes of federal, state and local governments (e.g., committee system, legislative process, bills, laws, veto, Filibuster, Cloture, Proposition, etc.). Note: Teachers may select the content that they use to address the rule of law and equal protection. Governments may be required by a constitution or model of governance to follow a particular process and procedures in lawmaking. (Federalism) Political parties may play a major role in shaping public policies and laws and all levels of government. (Equal justice under the law, private property rights, due process, individual responsibility) The formal process and procedure for how a bill becomes a law. (Structure of government, rule of law, frequent and free elections in a representative government) The role of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches in the federal law making process and procedure. (Structure of government, rule of law, frequent and free elections in a representative government) Similarities in the lawmaking processes and procedures on the national, state and local levels. (Structure of government, rule of law, frequent and free elections in a representative government) Explain the purpose for procedural techniques that are designed to block legislation (vetoes, filibusters, referenda). CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 23 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

24 How party politics play a role in the law making process. CE.C&G.3.3 Analyze laws and policies in terms of their intended purposes, who has authority to create them and how they are enforced (e.g., laws, policies, public policy, regulatory, symbolic, procedural, etc.). Laws may be enforced by different government agencies in order to ensure domestic tranquility. The priorities of a nation are often reflected in the governmental policies and statutes shaped and implemented through the guidance of national and state agencies.(federalism) Conflicts over values, principles and interests may make agreement difficult on certain issues of public policy and may result in the failure to develop long term solutions to local, state, or national problems. For example: affirmative action, environmental protection, equal rights, etc. The responsibilities of various national, state, and local agencies to enforce laws. The authority of federal, state, and local governments and their responsibility to enforce laws. (Federalism) The purpose of laws and their relationship to public policy. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, due process) The influence of public policy on financial planning for federal, state, and local governments. How individuals, interest groups and the media influence public policy CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 24 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

25 and may support or challenge laws. How conflicts over values, principles, and interests regarding certain issues of public policy have or have not been resolved. The societal consequences that result from an inability to resolve conflicts over values, principles and interests. CE.C&G.3.4 Explain how individual rights are protected by varieties of law (e.g., Bill of Rights, Supreme Court Decisions, constitutional law, criminal law, civil law, Tort, Administrative law, Statutory law and International law, etc.). Key Terminology: Public policy - Public policy is an attempt by a government to address a public issue by instituting laws, regulations, decisions, or actions pertinent to the problem at hand. The student will understand: Citizens often look to the principle of the rule of law for protection of individual rights. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) Constitutions may limit government in order to protect individual rights. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) Citizens often depend on legal systems to manage conflicts, disputes and protection of rights. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) Citizens often expect lawmakers to craft laws that balance individual rights with the common good. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 25 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

26 forth in the Bill of Rights) The student will know: The differences between civil rights and individual rights. (Individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) Why and how laws protect the rights and freedoms of individuals. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) The relationship between the various types of law and how those affect individual rights and the common good. (e.g., Constitutional, civil, and criminal). How the US Constitution and court decisions have limited or protected the rights of various groups. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, federalism, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) The procedures involved in a criminal case. The procedures involved in a civil case. The constitutional issues of Supreme Court cases - to include but not exclusive of landmark cases (if given a Supreme Court case/decision be able to explain the Constitutional issue of the case). ( excerpts or portions of decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States) CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 26 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

27 For example: Instead of memorizing court cases students will be expected to recognize the Constitutional issues the Supreme Court considers in reviewing a case (i.e., Due Process, Establishment Clause, Symbolic Speech, Supremacy, Equal Protection, Judicial Review, Federalism, etc.). Key Terminology: Categories of rights that are of particular significance in the American political system: Personal rights - The rights that a person has over their own self. These rights are distinguished from political rights, e.g., the right to privacy or the right to freedom of conscience as distinguished from the political right to peaceably assemble and petition for a redress of grievances Political rights - The rights that involve participation in the establishment or administration of a government and are usually entitle the adult citizen to the exercise of the franchise, the holding of public office, and other political activities. Permission to participate in an organized civic function that elects officials to govern and carry out the will of the social order. Economic rights The rights of an individual to make a business, acquire, own, use, transfer, and dispose of property, participate in voluntary exchange, enter into lawful contracts and the right of competition. Civil rights The rights belonging to an individual by virtue of citizenship, especially the fundamental freedoms and privileges guaranteed by the 13th and 14th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution and by subsequent acts of Congress, including civil liberties, due process, equal protection of the laws, and freedom from discrimination. These are the rights of the individual CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 27 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

28 CE.C&G.3.5 Compare jurisdictions and methods of law enforcement applied at each level of government, the consequences of noncompliance to laws at each level and how each reflects equal protection under the law (e.g., Department of Justice, Regulatory Commissions, FBI, SBI, Homeland Security, Magistrate, State troopers, Sheriff, City police, Ordinance, Statute, Regulation, Fines, Arrest, etc.). citizen to have equal treatment and equal opportunities. Scope and limits of a right - extent or range of a person s rights and the point or level beyond which those rights do not or may not extend or pass. Governments may use a variety of law enforcement practices to ensure order and justice. (rule of law, due process, equal justice under the law, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) The consequences for violations of law and order can vary based on governments, regions and local mores. (rule of law, due process) Various federal, state, and local jurisdictions enact statutes to prevent discrimination. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) The failure to ensure equal protection under the law within a jurisdiction often leads to challenges to social order and the protection of the freedom and civil rights of the people. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) The roles of various government officials in the legal process. (Structure of government, due process) The consequences for noncompliance in civil and criminal cases (correctional institutions, fines, probation, etc.). (Due process) CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 28 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

29 Differences between the responsibilities and jurisdiction of federal, state, and local law enforcement. (federalism, Structure of government) The kinds of cooperation that exist between law enforcement agencies at different levels. Types of statutes jurisdictions enact to prevent discrimination (such as housing and fair lending ordinances, school zoning, equal opportunity commissions, merit based promotion systems in public positions). (equal protection under the law, federalism, due process) Methods which citizens may use to ensure that government at all levels provide for equal protection under the law. CE.C&G.3.6 Explain ways laws have been influenced by political parties, constituents, interest groups, lobbyists, the media and public opinion (e.g., extension of suffrage, labor legislation, civil rights legislation, military policy, environmental legislation, business regulation and educational policy). Building constituencies plays an important role when trying to influence laws and policies. Laws and policies are often motivated and influenced by factors other than the public interest, common good, and the protection of individual rights. Interest groups often encourage the development of laws and policies in order to further specific agendas that reflect group priorities. Students will know how individuals and interest groups influence public policy. (Individual responsibility) How lobbyists function within and influence the legislative system at all CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 29 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

30 levels of government. (structure of government) Ways in which the media plays an important role in influencing public opinion and the direction of public policy. (Individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) Public opinion may influence the creation of laws. How business, industry, and other interest groups affect the development of laws, policies, and regulations. CE.C&G.3.7 Summarize the importance of the right to due process of law for individuals accused of crimes (e.g., habeas corpus, presumption of innocence, impartial tribunal, trial by jury, right to counsel, right against selfincrimination, protection against double jeopardy, right of appeal). Individuals have the responsibility to be aware of their rights in order to ensure fair and equal treatment under the law. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) Governments have a responsibility to ensure that citizens are aware of their rights in order to ensure fair and equal treatment under the law. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) For example: the government has an obligation to explain to individuals their right to due process and their protections under the law (i.e., Miranda, rules and procedures of the judicial system, expectations on the crafting and enforcing of contracts, etc). Citizen protections, under the law in democratic systems, are designed to prevent unreasonable, unfair, or arbitrary treatment by the government. (Rule of law, equal justice under the law, private property rights, due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 30 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

31 The constitutional and legal protections against the abuse of power by the government (such as the 8 th Amendment). The legal rights and responsibilities that citizens possess. (due process, equal justice under the law, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) The adversarial nature of the judicial process protects individuals rights and freedoms. (due process, equal justice under the law, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights) How the rights of those accused of a crime have evolved over time. (due process, individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, equal justice under the law). For example: Miranda rights, interpretation of the 4 th and 14 th Amendment Methods by which citizens can be made aware of their rights. (individual responsibility) CE.C&G.3.8 Evaluate the rights of individuals in terms of how well those rights have been upheld by democratic government in the United States. The nature of citizenship and the rights associated with it have changed over time. (Individual rights as set forth in the Bill of Rights, individual responsibility) Certain groups are sometimes excluded from civic membership in a democratic society. Individuals have the responsibility to be aware of their rights, and limits CIVICS AND ECONOMICS Unpacked Content Page 31 of 76 Current as of August 4, 2015

Civics & Economics. Last Updated: May 28, 2015, 11:49 am NORTH CAROLINA ESSENTIAL STANDARDS

Civics & Economics. Last Updated: May 28, 2015, 11:49 am NORTH CAROLINA ESSENTIAL STANDARDS Grade: High School Course: Civics and Government NCES.CE.C&G.1 - Analyze the foundations and development of American government in terms of principles and values. NCES.CE.C&G.1.1 - Explain how the tensions

More information

Appendix A: American History: The Founding Principles, Civics and Economics

Appendix A: American History: The Founding Principles, Civics and Economics Appendix A: American History: The Founding Principles, Civics and Economics This appendix contains additions made to the North Carolina s for Civics and Economics pursuant to the North Carolina General

More information

Addendum: Civics and Economics

Addendum: Civics and Economics Addendum: Civics and Economics This addendum reflects the alignment of the Civics and Economics Essential Standards to the content enumerated in The Founding Principles Act (SL 2011-273) that was passed

More information

Civics & Economics Crosswalk

Civics & Economics Crosswalk This document is designed to help North Carolina educators teach the Common Core and s (Standard Course of Study). NCDPI staff Civics & Economics Crosswalk This crosswalk document compares the 2010 K-12

More information

HEARING QUESTIONS CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT LEVEL

HEARING QUESTIONS CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT LEVEL Unit One: What Are the Philosophical and Historical Foundations of the American Political System? 1. How did both classical republicans and the natural rights philosophers influence the Founders views

More information

Civics. Social Studies Curriculum Framework. Revised 2006

Civics. Social Studies Curriculum Framework. Revised 2006 Civics Social Studies Curriculum Framework Revised 2006 Course Title: Civics Course/Unit Credit: 1 Course Number: Teacher Licensure: Secondary Social Studies Civics Civics provides a study of the structure

More information

Chapter 8 Section Review Packet

Chapter 8 Section Review Packet Name: Date: Section 8-1: The Articles of Confederation Chapter 8 Section Review Packet 1. Constitution 2. Republicanism 3. Limited government 4. Suffrage 5. Articles of Confederation 6. Ratification 7.

More information

Academic Standards for Civics and Government

Academic Standards for Civics and Government Academic Standards for June 1, 2009 FINAL Elementary Standards Grades 3-8 Pennsylvania Department of Education These standards are offered as a voluntary resource for Pennsylvania s schools and await action

More information

Academic Standards for Civics and Government

Academic Standards for Civics and Government Academic Standards for Civics and Government June 1, 2009 FINAL Secondary Standards Pennsylvania Department of Education These standards are offered as a voluntary resource for Pennsylvania s schools and

More information

CHAPTER 2: The Constitution

CHAPTER 2: The Constitution Name Due: Thursday, August 14, 2014 CHAPTER 2: The Constitution CHAPTER OUTLINE I. Politics in Action: Amending the Constitution (pp. 31 32) A. Flag desecration and Gregory Johnson B. A constitution is

More information

DRAFT SOCIAL STUDIES Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE) American Government/Civics

DRAFT SOCIAL STUDIES Georgia Standards of Excellence (GSE) American Government/Civics DRAFT SOCIAL STUDIES American Government/Civics American Government/Civics The government course provides students with a background in the philosophy, functions, and structure of the United States government.

More information

State of Nature v. Government

State of Nature v. Government State of Nature v. Government Overview In this lesson, students will discuss what they think life would be like in a state of nature and examine reasons why there is a need for government. They will explore

More information

CONSTITUTION REVIEW. 3. Supreme Court 2. House of Representatives

CONSTITUTION REVIEW. 3. Supreme Court 2. House of Representatives CONSTITUTION REVIEW 1. The authors of the United States Constitution believed that the voice of the people should be heard frequently. Which part of the Government was instituted to respond most directly

More information

SEVEN PRINCIPLES OF THE UNITED STATES AND TEXAS CONSTITUTIONS

SEVEN PRINCIPLES OF THE UNITED STATES AND TEXAS CONSTITUTIONS Popular Sovereignty Ultimate power and final authority rest with we the people or all the citizens The Preamble to the U. S. Constitution states: We the People of the United States. do ordain and establish

More information

Academic Standards for Civics and Government

Academic Standards for Civics and Government Academic Standards for March 2012 Elementary Standards Grades Pre-K - 3 Pennsylvania Department of Education DRAFT XIII. TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction.. XIV. THE ACADEMIC STANDARDS Principles and Documents

More information

GRADE 7 SOCIAL STUDIES. History

GRADE 7 SOCIAL STUDIES. History GRADE 7 SOCIAL STUDIES History Standard 1 Historical Thinking Skills Students use information and concepts to interpret, analyze, and draw conclusions about United States history from 1763 1877. 7.1.1

More information

U.S. History Homework Packet The Constitution Ms. Peckham 10/22-11/06

U.S. History Homework Packet The Constitution Ms. Peckham 10/22-11/06 U.S. History Homework Packet The Constitution Ms. Peckham 10/22-11/06 Tuesday (10/23): Read Chapter 2, Section 1, The Delegates Meet in Philadelphia Wednesday (10/24): Read Chapter 2, Section 2, Convention

More information

Ohio s State Tests ITEM RELEASE SPRING 2016 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

Ohio s State Tests ITEM RELEASE SPRING 2016 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Ohio s State Tests ITEM RELEASE SPRING 2016 AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Table of Contents Questions 1 17: Content Summary and Answer Key.... iii Question 1: Question and Scoring Guidelines...1 Question 1: Sample

More information

Academic Standards for Civics and Government Pennsylvania Department of Education

Academic Standards for Civics and Government Pennsylvania Department of Education Academic Standards for Civics and Government Pennsylvania Department of Education 22 Pa. Code, Chapter 4, Appendix C (#006-275) Final Form-Annex A July 18, 2002 XIII. TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction.. XIV.

More information

1.2.4 Compare and contrast direct and representative democracy. (See USHG F1.1; F1.2)

1.2.4 Compare and contrast direct and representative democracy. (See USHG F1.1; F1.2) Content Expectation High School Civics Content Expectations I Can statement 1.1 Nature of Civic Life, Politics, and Government Explain the meaning of civic life, politics, and government through the investigation

More information

CONFEDERATION TO CONSTITUTION CHAPTER 8

CONFEDERATION TO CONSTITUTION CHAPTER 8 CONFEDERATION TO CONSTITUTION CHAPTER 8 SHAYS REBELLION (1786-1787) Farmers rebellion against unfair taxes in MA MA state militia stopped the rebellion Caused leaders of the new country to realize they

More information

MINNESOTA CIVICS TEST

MINNESOTA CIVICS TEST MINNESOTA CIVICS TEST The following 50 questions which serve as the Minnesota's civics test were selected from the 100 questions used for the naturalization test administered by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration

More information

1. Knowledge of the principles expressed in documents shaping constitutional democracy in the United States

1. Knowledge of the principles expressed in documents shaping constitutional democracy in the United States Social Studies Grades 9-12 Ohio Missouri United States GOVERNMENT 2006 STANDARDS Principles of Constitutional Democracy 1. Knowledge of the principles expressed in documents shaping constitutional democracy

More information

Social Studies Grade 5

Social Studies Grade 5 Social Studies Grade 5 UNIT 1: Colonial America Geography Students will use geographic concepts and processes to examine the role of culture, technology, and the environment in the location and distribution

More information

Tooele County School District Civics Test Study Guide

Tooele County School District Civics Test Study Guide Tooele County School District Civics Test Study Guide American Civics Education Initiative, S.B.60, was passed in the Utah legislative session of 2015. This law requires the successful passage of a basic

More information

Lesson Title: Democracy on the Home Front during WWI Inquiry Lesson

Lesson Title: Democracy on the Home Front during WWI Inquiry Lesson Lesson Title: Democracy on the Home Front during WWI Inquiry Lesson Standards: NCSS Themes: I. Culture II. Time, Continuity, and Change V. Individuals, Groups, and Institutions VI. Power, Authority, and

More information

3. To provide a forum for informed political debate and discussion.

3. To provide a forum for informed political debate and discussion. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT AND LAW CURRICULUM DESCRIPTION OF COURSE This course is designed to provide an in-depth look at the American Political System, along with an overview of the American legal system. Students

More information

You ve Got Rights! STEP BY STEP

You ve Got Rights! STEP BY STEP Teacher s Guide You ve Got Rights! Time Needed: One class period Materials Needed: Student worksheets Scissors, glue (optional) Copy Instructions: Anticipation Activity (half-sheet; class set) Reading

More information

Fundamental Principles of American Democracy

Fundamental Principles of American Democracy Fundamental Principles of American Democracy Standard: 12.1 Students explain the fundamental principles and moral values of American democracy as expressed in the U.S. Constitution and other essential

More information

CORRELATION SUNSHINE STATE STANDARDS. 1 SE = Student Edition TE = Teacher Edition TR = Teacher Resources TECH = Technology

CORRELATION SUNSHINE STATE STANDARDS. 1 SE = Student Edition TE = Teacher Edition TR = Teacher Resources TECH = Technology CORRELATION SUNSHINE STATE STANDARDS SUBJECT: Social Studies SUBMISSION TITLE: Prentice Hall Civics: Government and Economics In Action 2005 PUBLISHER: Pearson Prentice Hall GRADE: Grade 6-8 M/J Civics/

More information

Colorado and U.S. Constitutions

Colorado and U.S. Constitutions Courts in the Community Colorado Judicial Branch Office of the State Court Administrator Lesson: Objective: Activities: Outcomes: Colorado and U.S. Constitutions Students understand similarities and differences

More information

4. There are three qualifications from becoming a member of the House of Representatives

4. There are three qualifications from becoming a member of the House of Representatives Article I Legislative Branch 1. The job of the legislative branch is to Make laws Name Period Federal Constitution Study Guide 2. The legislative branch is divided into two parts or two houses which are

More information

Crete-Monee Middle School U.S. Constitution Test Study Guide Answers 2010-2011

Crete-Monee Middle School U.S. Constitution Test Study Guide Answers 2010-2011 Crete-Monee Middle School U.S. Constitution Test Study Guide Answers 2010-2011 1. What is the more common name for the first ten amendments to the constitution? Bill of Rights 2. The introduction to the

More information

FRQ PACKET. In this packet are all of the FRQs that the College Board has asked during the May AP Government & Politics Exam.

FRQ PACKET. In this packet are all of the FRQs that the College Board has asked during the May AP Government & Politics Exam. AP United States Government and Politics FRQ PACKET In this packet are all of the FRQs that the College Board has asked during the May AP Government & Politics Exam. There is also a table of contents on

More information

The Constitution: A More Perfect Union

The Constitution: A More Perfect Union The Constitution: A More Perfect Union 9.1 Introduction When the delegates left Independence Hall in September 1787, they each carried a copy of the Constitution. Their task now was to convince their states

More information

Background on the First Amendment

Background on the First Amendment Background on the First Amendment Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press, or the

More information

New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990

New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 Reprint as at 1 July 2013 New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 Public Act 1990 No 109 Date of assent 28 August 1990 Commencement see section 1(2) Contents Page Title 2 1 Short Title and commencement 3 Part

More information

Addendum: American History I: The Founding Principles

Addendum: American History I: The Founding Principles Addendum: American History I: The Founding Principles On June 23, 2011, the North Carolina General Assembly passed The Founding (SL 2011-273). This act calls for local boards of education to require, as

More information

Wording of Section 33 Section 33 contains five clauses. The wording of each clause is as follows:

Wording of Section 33 Section 33 contains five clauses. The wording of each clause is as follows: What is the Notwithstanding Clause? 33 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms permits governments (including the federal Parliament, and/or provincial/territorial legislatures) to override certain and freedoms

More information

Creating a New Nation

Creating a New Nation 1 Creating a New Nation Overview: At the end of the Revolutionary War, the new nation was faced with another extremely difficult task creating a single, unified country out of a loose association of states,

More information

The Road to Change. From the Declaration of Independence to the Constitution

The Road to Change. From the Declaration of Independence to the Constitution The Road to Change From the Declaration of Independence to the Constitution From the Declaration of Independence to the Constitution 1776: Colonists sign the Declaration of Independence 1783: Colonists

More information

Lesson 1: The Constitution and Governance

Lesson 1: The Constitution and Governance Lesson 1: The Constitution and Governance OVERVIEW In this lesson, students explore constitutional government. First, students read and discuss an introductory reading about the origin and principles of

More information

Forming a More Perfect Union

Forming a More Perfect Union 27 Lesson Two Forming a More Perfect Union Introduction By 1786, it was apparent that the weaknesses inherent in the Articles of Confederation had to be addressed. A Constitutional Convention was convened

More information

State and Local Government

State and Local Government State and Local Government a. Explain the basic structure of the Georgia state constitution. b. Explain the concepts of separation of powers and checks and balances. c. Describe the rights and responsibilities

More information

1965 Alabama Literacy Test

1965 Alabama Literacy Test 1965 Alabama Literacy Test 1. Which of the following is a right guaranteed by the Bill of Rights? Public Education Employment Trial by Jury Voting 2. The federal census of population is taken every five

More information

Welcome to the Department of Defense Constitution Day

Welcome to the Department of Defense Constitution Day Welcome to the Department of Defense Constitution Day Knowing what is in the U.S. Constitution and why the Constitution is relevant to us today is fundamental to our being able to defend it. As federal

More information

American Government/Civics

American Government/Civics American Government/Civics The government course provides students with a background in the philosophy, functions, and structure of the United States government. Students examine the philosophical foundations

More information

Chapter 8: The Bill of Rights. Amendment : a formal change to a bill or constitution

Chapter 8: The Bill of Rights. Amendment : a formal change to a bill or constitution Chapter 8: The Bill of Rights Amendment : a formal change to a bill or constitution Bill of Rights : a formal summary of the rights the government agrees a group of people will have The First Amendment

More information

Page 1. 3. What is federalism?

Page 1. 3. What is federalism? North arolina Testing Program 1. How did the Stamp ct, the Tea ct, and the Intolerable cts encourage merican colonists to consider revolution against ritish rule? EO ivics and Economics Sample Items 3.

More information

DAPTO HIGH SCHOOL. YEAR 11 LEGAL STUDIES Preliminary Mid-Course Examination 2009

DAPTO HIGH SCHOOL. YEAR 11 LEGAL STUDIES Preliminary Mid-Course Examination 2009 DAPTO HIGH SCHOOL YEAR 11 LEGAL STUDIES Preliminary Mid-Course Examination 2009 General Instructions: Reading time 5 minutes Working time 1 ½ hours Write using blue or black pen Write your Student Number/Name

More information

Vocabulary Builder Activity. netw rks. A. Content Vocabulary. The Bill of Rights

Vocabulary Builder Activity. netw rks. A. Content Vocabulary. The Bill of Rights A. Content Vocabulary Directions: Fill in the Crossword Puzzle with content vocabulary words from Chapter 4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 18 1 A. Content Vocabulary, Cont. Across 5.

More information

ASSESSMENT DATA BANK

ASSESSMENT DATA BANK ASSESSMENT DATA BANK Assessing Constitutional Knowledge Traditionally, states and schools have measured student knowledge of the U.S. Constitution using a written test on objective facts and principles.

More information

Criminal Law. Month Content Skills August. Define the term jurisprudence. Introduction to law. What is law? Explain several reasons for having laws.

Criminal Law. Month Content Skills August. Define the term jurisprudence. Introduction to law. What is law? Explain several reasons for having laws. Criminal Law Month Content Skills August Introduction to law Define the term jurisprudence. What is law? Explain several reasons for having laws. Discuss the relationship between laws and values. Give

More information

Constitutions. It is a brief sketch of the structure of government. It limits government by setting boundaries.

Constitutions. It is a brief sketch of the structure of government. It limits government by setting boundaries. Constitutions What is a constitution? A constitution is the fundamental law of a state by which a system of government is created and from which it derives its power and authority. The fundamental law

More information

OVERVIEW: The following "game" is a review activity that classes have used to prepare for semester exams.

OVERVIEW: The following game is a review activity that classes have used to prepare for semester exams. Civics Jeopardy AUTHOR: Janice Steib, Jefferson Parish; Marrero, LA GRADE LEVEL: Appropriate for high school 9-12. OVERVIEW: The following "game" is a review activity that classes have used to prepare

More information

U. S. Constitution [8th grade]

U. S. Constitution [8th grade] Trinity University Digital Commons @ Trinity Understanding by Design: Complete Collection Understanding by Design 6-15-2006 U. S. Constitution [8th grade] Ben Altman Trinity University Follow this and

More information

17. WHO BECOMES PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES IF THE PRESIDENT SHOULD DIE? 22. HOW MANY CHANGES OR AMENDMENTS ARE THERE TO THE CONSTITUTION?

17. WHO BECOMES PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES IF THE PRESIDENT SHOULD DIE? 22. HOW MANY CHANGES OR AMENDMENTS ARE THERE TO THE CONSTITUTION? DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Immigration & Naturalization Service 100 Typical Questions 1. WHAT ARE THE COLORS OF OUR FLAG? 2. HOW MANY STARS ARE THERE IN OUR FLAG? 3. WHAT COLOR ARE THE STARS ON OUR FLAG? 4.

More information

AP United States Government and Politics Miss Samuel Email: msamuel@cvusd.k12.ca.us

AP United States Government and Politics Miss Samuel Email: msamuel@cvusd.k12.ca.us Course Overview/Description AP United States Government and Politics Miss Samuel Email: msamuel@cvusd.k12.ca.us AP government and Politics is a semester long course that examines the formal and informal

More information

Annex 1 Primary sources for international standards

Annex 1 Primary sources for international standards Annex 1 Primary sources for international standards 1. The United Nations The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights Article 20 1. Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association.

More information

8. How many states are there in the Union (the United States)? 10. Independence Day celebrates independence from whom?

8. How many states are there in the Union (the United States)? 10. Independence Day celebrates independence from whom? The following are sample U.S. History and Government Questions that may be asked during the Naturalization Exam. Typical Questions 1. What are the colors of our flag? 2. What do the stars on the flag mean?

More information

***CURRENT NATURALIZATION TEST*** Sample U.S. History and Government Questions for the Current Naturalization Test

***CURRENT NATURALIZATION TEST*** Sample U.S. History and Government Questions for the Current Naturalization Test ***CURRENT NATURALIZATION TEST*** Sample U.S. History and Government Questions for the Current Naturalization Test USCIS will begin administering a redesigned (new) naturalization test on October 1, 2008.

More information

1. Title: The Organizational Structure and Powers of the Federal Government as Defined in Articles I, II, and III of the U.S. Constitution Grade 5

1. Title: The Organizational Structure and Powers of the Federal Government as Defined in Articles I, II, and III of the U.S. Constitution Grade 5 Teacher s Name: Employee Number: School: SS.5.C.3.1 Describe the organizational structure (legislative, executive, judicial branches) and powers of the federal government as defined in Articles I, II,

More information

The American Revolution

The American Revolution Main Idea The American Revolution Enlightenment ideas led to revolution, independence, and a new government for the United States. Content Statement 6/Learning Goal Describe how Enlightenment thinkers

More information

The Judiciary Quiz. A) I and IV B) II and III C) I and II D) I, II, and III E) I, II, III, and IV

The Judiciary Quiz. A) I and IV B) II and III C) I and II D) I, II, and III E) I, II, III, and IV The Judiciary Quiz 1) Why did the Framers include life tenure for federal judges? A) To attract candidates for the positions B) To make it more difficult for the president and Congress to agree on good

More information

WOMEN WHO SHAPED THE CONSTITUTION

WOMEN WHO SHAPED THE CONSTITUTION Grade 11 SBA REVIEW WOMEN WHO SHAPED THE CONSTITUTION MAIN IDEA AUTHOR S POINT OF VIEW CONTEXT CLUES* INFERENCE* SYNTHESIS Women Who Shaped the Constitution BY ROSALYNN CARTER REVOLUTIONARIES When the

More information

Revolution and Independence d Life in colonial America Seven Years (French and Indian) War, 1756-6363 British demand for higher taxes to pay war debt

Revolution and Independence d Life in colonial America Seven Years (French and Indian) War, 1756-6363 British demand for higher taxes to pay war debt The Constitution I. Revolution and Independence d II. Articles of Confederation III. Constitutional Convention IV. Constitutional Basics V. Ratification VI. Constitutional Change Revolution and Independence

More information

Decision Making: Hamilton s Economic Policies Part 1: The Debt PROBLEM

Decision Making: Hamilton s Economic Policies Part 1: The Debt PROBLEM Decision Making: Hamilton s Economic Policies Part 1: The Debt PROBLEM The year is 1790, and George Washington has been President under the new national government, The Constitution, for about a year.

More information

CONSTITUTION OF THE REPUBLIC OF SENEGAL Adopted on 7 January 2001

CONSTITUTION OF THE REPUBLIC OF SENEGAL Adopted on 7 January 2001 CONSTITUTION OF THE REPUBLIC OF SENEGAL Adopted on 7 January 2001 The sovereign people of Senegal, PREAMBLE Deeply attached to their fundamental cultural values which constitute the cement of national

More information

Citizenship. Programme of study for key stage 3 and attainment target (This is an extract from The National Curriculum 2007)

Citizenship. Programme of study for key stage 3 and attainment target (This is an extract from The National Curriculum 2007) Citizenship Programme of study for key stage 3 and attainment target (This is an extract from The National Curriculum 2007) Crown copyright 2007 Qualifications and Curriculum Authority 2007 Curriculum

More information

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Universal Declaration of Human Rights Universal Declaration of Human Rights Preamble Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice

More information

SUN PRAIRIE AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT COURSE SYLLABUS. Curriculum Area: Social Studies Course Length: Semester

SUN PRAIRIE AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT COURSE SYLLABUS. Curriculum Area: Social Studies Course Length: Semester SUN PRAIRIE AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT COURSE SYLLABUS Course Title: Legal Studies Curriculum Area: Social Studies Course Length: Semester Credit Status: Elective Date submitted: 2/07 District Adopted Texts/Materials/Resources:

More information

Lecture Notes, Chapter 7 1

Lecture Notes, Chapter 7 1 What kind of democracy? Pure democracy Greeks Republican in form NOT Republican Party representative White Males only landowning Left door open to non-landowning later States Drafting of State Constitutions

More information

Basic Timeline 1776 Declaration of Independence 1781 Articles of Confederation 1787 U.S. Constitution 1861-1865 Civil War 1865-1877 Reconstruction

Basic Timeline 1776 Declaration of Independence 1781 Articles of Confederation 1787 U.S. Constitution 1861-1865 Civil War 1865-1877 Reconstruction Basic Timeline 1781 Articles of Confederation 1776 Declaration of Independence 1861-1865 Civil War 1787 U.S. Constitution 1865-1877 Reconstruction Historical Context: The Revolution The American Revolution

More information

Test - Social Studies Grade 8 Unit 03: American Revolution

Test - Social Studies Grade 8 Unit 03: American Revolution Test - Social Studies Grade 8 Unit 03: American Revolution 2013-2014 A. I 1. In 1776, thirteen colonies in North America did which of the following? A. established the United States of America B. ratified

More information

CONSTITUTIONFACTS.COM

CONSTITUTIONFACTS.COM 1. The length of term of members of the House of Representatives is: b. 6 years c. 4 years d. 5 years 2. The Constitutional Convention met in: a. New York b. Philadelphia c. Washington, D.C. d. Boston

More information

Each Canton shall, in carrying out its responsibilities as described in Articles III.2 and 4 of this Constitution:

Each Canton shall, in carrying out its responsibilities as described in Articles III.2 and 4 of this Constitution: CONSTITUTION OF THE FEDERATION OF BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA [PART 3] V. THE CANTONAL GOVERNMENTS 1. General Provisions Article 1 Each Canton shall, in carrying out its responsibilities as described in Articles

More information

AP Government Free Response Questions 1988 2006

AP Government Free Response Questions 1988 2006 AP Government Free Response Questions 1988 2006 1988 The Bureaucracy, Political Parties 1. To what extent does the United States federal bureaucracy stand above politics and administer impartially the

More information

The students will learn the key points of the Declaration of Independence.

The students will learn the key points of the Declaration of Independence. Lesson Description As the students learn about the steps leading to the American Revolution, they will receive an assignment to distribute a petition to friends and adults asking their viewpoint on five

More information

NORTHERN IOWA STUDENT GOVERNMENT CONSTITUTION PREAMBLE ARTICLE I: DEFINITION OF NORTHERN IOWA STUDENT GOVERNMENT

NORTHERN IOWA STUDENT GOVERNMENT CONSTITUTION PREAMBLE ARTICLE I: DEFINITION OF NORTHERN IOWA STUDENT GOVERNMENT NORTHERN IOWA STUDENT GOVERNMENT CONSTITUTION PREAMBLE We, the students of the University of Northern Iowa, exist not only as individuals, but also as a community. The purpose of this Constitution is to

More information

Patrimoine canadien. Canadian. Heritage. The. Canadian. Charter of Rights and Freedoms

Patrimoine canadien. Canadian. Heritage. The. Canadian. Charter of Rights and Freedoms Canadian Heritage Patrimoine canadien The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms Whereas Canada is founded upon principles that recognize the supremacy of God

More information

Zanesville Middle School 8 th Grade Social Studies Curriculum Map

Zanesville Middle School 8 th Grade Social Studies Curriculum Map First Quarter History 2. North America, originally inhabited by American Indians, was explored and colonized for economic and religious reasons. I can explain how some groups in Europe were treated badly

More information

Amendments to the Constitution

Amendments to the Constitution 1 Amendments to the Constitution Freedom of Religion Freedom of Speech Freedom of Assembly Freedom of the Press Freedom to Petition the Government for redress of grievances Right to Bear Arms Right of

More information

Presentation Pro. American Government CHAPTER 3 The Constitution

Presentation Pro. American Government CHAPTER 3 The Constitution Presentation Pro 1 American Government CHAPTER 3 The Constitution 1 1 CHAPTER 3 The Constitution 2 SECTION 1 The Six Basic Principles SECTION 2 Formal Amendment SECTION 3 Informal Amendment 1 2 3 Chapter

More information

The Constitutional Convention

The Constitutional Convention The Constitutional Convention Overview The American Revolution ended with the Treaty of Paris in 1783 but the nation s problems were not solved by a long way. The first government, created by the Articles

More information

4.19: Judicial Activism /Judicial Restraint AP U. S. GOVERNMENT

4.19: Judicial Activism /Judicial Restraint AP U. S. GOVERNMENT 4.19: Judicial Activism /Judicial Restraint AP U. S. GOVERNMENT Shaping Public Policy The justices must interpret the Constitution in regards to the issue They must decide what the language means of an

More information

Office of the Attorney General Washington, D.C. 20530

Office of the Attorney General Washington, D.C. 20530 Office of the Attorney General Washington, D.C. 20530 DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE POLICY ON INDIAN SOVEREIGNTY AND GOVERNMENT-TO-GOVERNMENT RELATIONS WITH INDIAN TRIBES PURPOSE: To reaffirm the Department's

More information

Unit I- Constitutional Underpinnings of the U.S. Government

Unit I- Constitutional Underpinnings of the U.S. Government Unit I- Constitutional Underpinnings of the U.S. Government I) Concepts of American Democracy A) In a democracy, ordinary citi8zens wield the power to government. The U.S. is a hybrid combining many different

More information

Political. The colonists were strongly influence by Hobbes and Locke (Social Contract theory on how/why government originated).

Political. The colonists were strongly influence by Hobbes and Locke (Social Contract theory on how/why government originated). Political When the English colonists came to North America, they brought the tools for creating a government important ideals that had formed the basis of government in England, such as limited government

More information

Constitution Study Guide

Constitution Study Guide Constitution Study Guide of the United States and the State of Illinois Published by the Illinois Community College Board Table of Contents Part One: The Declaration of Independence 1 Declaring Independence

More information

Monarchy. Rule by One Powers are inherited Ex: Queen/King, Emperor Absolute - Constitutional - Confederal. Unitary

Monarchy. Rule by One Powers are inherited Ex: Queen/King, Emperor Absolute - Constitutional - Confederal. Unitary 1. Tree Map of Forms of Govt: Democracy Monarchy Oligarchy/Theocracy rule by the people Direct - Representative - Rule by One Powers are inherited Ex: Queen/King, Emperor Absolute - Constitutional - Rule

More information

The Role of Government

The Role of Government The Role of Government Imagine for a moment living under a government that possessed unlimited and undefined powers, such as Communist China or Nazi Germany. What rights do you have now that you think

More information

THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS

THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS For every child Health, Education, Equality, Protection ADVANCE HUMANITY THE UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS TABLE OF CONTENTS 2 Preamble 3 Articles 1 2

More information

Citizenship. (This is an extract from The National Curriculum 2007) Crown copyright 2007 Qualifications and Curriculum Authority 2007

Citizenship. (This is an extract from The National Curriculum 2007) Crown copyright 2007 Qualifications and Curriculum Authority 2007 Citizenship Programme of study for key stage 4 (This is an extract from The National Curriculum 2007) Crown copyright 2007 Qualifications and Curriculum Authority 2007 Curriculum aims Learning and undertaking

More information

AP U.S. Government and Politics Syllabus

AP U.S. Government and Politics Syllabus AP U.S. Government and Politics Syllabus Course Description: AP Government and Politics is an introduction course designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the principles of government

More information

The Literature of the Revolution. The American Testament

The Literature of the Revolution. The American Testament The Literature of the Revolution The American Testament The American Testament What is America? Every nation has its saga of its origin The settlers of Jamestown and Plymouth; the War of Independence;

More information

North Carolina Essential Standards Eighth Grade Social Studies

North Carolina Essential Standards Eighth Grade Social Studies North Carolina s Eighth Grade Social Studies North Carolina and the United States: Creation and Development of the State and Nation Historical study connects students to the enduring themes and issues

More information

OHIO S NEW LEARNING STANDARDS: AMERICAN GOVERNMENT - Quick Reference for Learning Targets + Item Specifications for State Summative Exams

OHIO S NEW LEARNING STANDARDS: AMERICAN GOVERNMENT - Quick Reference for Learning Targets + Item Specifications for State Summative Exams CS1 The content encompassed by this will not be assessed. N/A Stimulus Attributes N/A N/A Civic Involvement 1 Opportunities for civic engagement with the structures of government are made possible through

More information

The Structure of the National Government

The Structure of the National Government The Structure of the National Government The first national framework of the United States government, the Articles of Confederation, took effect in 1781 and established only one branch of government.

More information

Course Principles of GPA. Unit III Implementation of the Three Branches of Government

Course Principles of GPA. Unit III Implementation of the Three Branches of Government Course Principles of GPA Unit III Implementation of the Three Branches of Government Essential Question What are the structure and functions of the executive branch of the government, including the constitutional

More information