Town of Whitby Corporate Energy Management Plan

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1 Town of Whitby Corporate Energy Management Plan

2 Corporate Energy Management Plan Town of Whitby

3

4 This document was prepared for the Corporation of the Town of Whitby by IndEco Strategic Consulting Inc. For additional information about this document, please contact: IndEco Strategic Consulting Inc. 77 Mowat Avenue, Suite 412 Toronto, ON, Canada M6K 3E3 Tel: IndEco Strategic Consulting Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval s ystem, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the written permission of IndEco Strategic Consulting Inc. IndEco report B June 2014

5 Contents Executive summary v Context v Objectives and targets v Framework and scope vi Planning process viii Planning horizon and prioritization ix Implementation of the plan ix Critical actions xi Capital costs and savings xi Introduction 1 Framework and scope 2 Planning horizon and prioritization 4 Planning process 5 Implementation of the plan 7 Objectives and targets 9 Objectives 9 Targets and key performance indicators 9 Updating and reporting on the plan 12 Organizational actions 14 Technical actions 33 Capital costs and net present values 40 Renewables and alternative energy 43 Energy management systems 44 Selecting an energy management system 44 Establishing the supporting organizational capacity and processes 45 Taking advantage of utility incentives 47 Communication and engagement 48 Overview and program management 48 Employee engagement 48 Staff training 49 Behaviour change and communication 52 Conclusion 54 Appendix A. Present state 55 A.1. Utility data analysis 55 A.2. Description of existing energy initiatives, policies, and plans 57 A.3. Summary of results from All Our Ideas 62 TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN iii

6 Appendix B. Roles and responsibilities 65 Appendix C. Criteria for prioritizing actions 67 Appendix D. Utility incentives 69 Appendix E. Best practices 73 Appendix F. List of acronyms 82 iv INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

7 Executive summary Context North American municipalities are increasingly focusing on energy as a strategic priority to reduce operating costs, prepare for rising utility costs, and to demonstrate their commitment to long-term sustainability. In Ontario, the provincial government is allocating millions of dollars to energy conservation and demand management (CDM) programs, providing energy consumers with significant incentives to upgrade their facilities and equipment. The Government of Ontario has also expressed a commitment to greening public sector buildings, and developed Regulation 397/11 under the Green Energy and Green Economy Act (2009) to advance this goal. Under the regulation, all public agencies including the Town of Whitby are required to report their energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on an annual basis starting in 2013, and are required to submit 5-year energy conservation and demand management plans in The Corporate Energy Management Plan (CEMP) provides a 5- year roadmap for energy management in the Town of Whitby. It focuses on the use of electricity and natural gas in Town facilities, fuel for fleet vehicles, and technologies including streetlights. It covers the period from July 2014 to July 2019, and is designed to help the Town comply with the energy CDM planning requirements of Ontario Regulation 397/11 under the Green Energy Act (2009). Objectives and targets Energy efficiency is a valuable opportunity to reduce or avoid future costs. Investing in energy management and implementing the actions identified in the CEMP will provide valuable opportunities for the Town of Whitby. Not only will it result in energy intensity and GHG savings, but it will also provide opportunities for staff engagement, lower risk exposure, and demonstrated leadership by the Town. As such, the Town has developed the following vision statement in regards to energy management for the Corporation: The Town of Whitby will operate as an energy efficient corporation as part of a healthy and sustainable community. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN v

8 To support the vision statement, the primary objectives of the CEMP are to achieve the following: 1. The Town of Whitby will realize measureable and meaningful improvements in energy efficiency. 2. The efficient use of energy will be embedded in the day-to-day activities of all staff. 3. The Town of Whitby will demonstrate leadership in efficient energy management. For Whitby, leadership in energy management involves: Leading the Community by example; Framework and scope Exceeding the requirements of Regulation 397/11; Publicizing the Town s energy management activities and successes. The CEMP establishes the following quantitative targets to guide the Town s efforts on energy management from July 2014 to July 2019: 12-16% improvement in energy intensity 1 ; and 14-19% absolute reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. In accordance with the Regulation, the Town s CEMP addresses energy use in the Town s buildings, however the plan also goes beyond these requirements to include fleets, and technologies external to buildings, including streetlights. The CEMP further exceeds the requirements of the Regulation by completing Milestones 1, 2, and 3 of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) Partners for Climate Protection (PCP) Program at the corporate level. 1 Energy intensity is a measure of the amount of energy in kwh consumed per square foot of building area. vi INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

9 Figure 1 Framework for planning As illustrated in Figure 1 the CEMP centers on the Town s facilities, fleets, and technologies. It aims to ensure that existing and any new facilities are built and operated as efficiently and sustainably as possible. The CEMP also considers people, processes, and information by developing supporting organizational policies and processes, monitoring and tracking systems, and communication and engagement tools that will allow this to happen. To align the CEMP actions with this framework the actions contained in this plan are grouped according to the following categories: Organizational commitment actions related to policies, processes, and resources for implementation. These actions are required to enable energy management and the other actions. Many of the other actions are dependent upon getting these organizational actions in place; Existing municipal buildings and equipment actions, both technical and policy based, that impact existing buildings and equipment. These actions ensure that existing buildings and equipment are operating as efficiently as possible; New municipal buildings and equipment actions, both technical and policy based, that impact new buildings and equipment. These actions ensure that new buildings or equipment that are put in place are as TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN vii

10 efficient as possible while maintaining a balance between costs and benefits; Monitoring and tracking actions related to evaluating, monitoring, and verifying energy data. These actions ensure that the Town is accurately tracking and measuring their energy use and the energy savings achieved from the implementation of the actions including through the use of key performance indicators (KPIs); Communication and engagement actions related to encouraging behavioural modifications to save energy. These behavioural actions can produce real energy savings and can help to enable and sustain the more technical actions being implemented; Fleets actions related to Town fleet vehicles that reduce energy consumption. These actions ensure that vehicles are being operated as efficiently as possible and that the most efficient vehicles are being purchased while maintaining a balance between costs and benefits; Energy supply and procurement actions related to the procurement of energy and renewable and alternative energy technologies. These actions ensure that efficient energy supplies are purchased and utilized; and Streetlights actions related to installing more energy efficient lighting technologies. These actions ensure that energy efficient streetlight technologies are employed while maintaining a balance between costs and benefits. Planning process The plan draws on information from a number of sources: interviews, a strategic planning workshop, ASHRAE Level II audits, a review of Town policies, plans and programs, an online crowdsourcing activity for all staff (All Our Ideas), and a jurisdictional review of best practices. The first step in the process was to identify and define the preferred state / vision of energy management for the Town. This was accomplished through seven in-person interviews and a strategic planning workshop held with key Town staff. The second step involved defining the present state of energy use in the Town by reviewing the Town s energy management practices. Information was obtained through interviews with key Town staff and the review of the Town s key policies, plans, programs, and reports related to energy. viii INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

11 The third step involved developing technical and organizational actions to assist the Town in moving from its present to its preferred state of energy management. Technical actions were identified from ASHRAE Level II audits conducted at six of the Town's largest energy consuming facilities. The organizational actions, which relate to corporate processes, were identified through interviews, a strategic planning workshop, the online crowdsourcing activity, and the jurisdictional review of best practices. The actions are grouped in the CEMP according to the categories described above. Priorities were then established for each of the actions as described below. Planning horizon and prioritization Implementation of the plan The CEMP for the Town of Whitby is a 5-year plan covering the period from July 2014 to July The organizational actions contained in this plan have been prioritized into one of four time periods: Short-term actions (July 2014 July 2015) Medium-term actions (July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning actions (October 2018 July 2019). These time periods were selected to ensure compliance with the regulation and to create alignment with the term of Council. The technical actions have been prioritized into short, medium and long term actions to allow for more even distribution of capital costs across the time periods. This prioritization identifies when the actions identified in the CEMP should be implemented. Organizational actions were prioritized based on their importance and ease of implementation. Technological measures were prioritized based on their internal rate of return (IRR) with adjustments to group similar measures together for more efficient implementation. Having sufficient staff resources will be imperative to ensuring the success of the CEMP and for effectively managing energy use and GHG emissions at the Town. As a first step, the Town should assign a staff member to be responsible for implementing the CEMP. This person will be responsible for overseeing and monitoring the implementation TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN ix

12 of the CEMP. It is recommended that the Sustainability Coordinator be assigned this responsibility. Many of the actions identified in the proceeding chapters can be assigned to individual Town departments. These actions will be implemented by including the actions in each department s annual work plans and by assigning responsibility for implementation. The departments will then report back on their progress on implementing the actions to the Sustainability Coordinator. It is recommended that an Energy Management Team be established, consisting of senior staff from each department, who will act as a point person both for implementing the CEMP in their department and for reporting on progress and challenges to the Sustainability Coordinator. It is recommended that the Sustainability Coordinator review the CEMP, in conjunction with the Energy Management Team, to determine responsibilities for each department. Once the responsibilities are determined, they should be accepted by Senior Management and the CAO, and then incorporated in departmental work plans. For those actions that have a Town-wide or corporate focus, responsibility for development and implementation should be assigned to more centralized staff resources. These centralized staff resources are described below: For those Town-wide or corporate actions that are organizational or non-technical (e.g. designing and implementing the communication and behaviour change programs) responsibility should be assigned to the Sustainability Coordinator. For more technical Town-wide or corporate actions (e.g. managing the selected energy management system and taking the lead on overseeing the implementation of the technical actions) it is recommended that a new resource with technical energy experience be retained (Energy Technician). Funding is currently available to hire an Embedded Energy Manager or a Roving Energy Manager from Whitby Hydro under the Process and System Upgrade Initiatives of the OPA saveonenergy programs. Once the technical energy resource (Energy Technician) is obtained, responsibility for the Town-wide actions should be divided between the Sustainability Coordinator and the new Energy Technician. x INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

13 Critical actions Capital costs and savings There are a number of organizational actions that are critical to successfully implementing the CEMP. These actions are related to establishing the staff and financial resources, and the organizational structure required to implement the plan. These critical actions are as follows: Assign the Sustainability Coordinator responsibility for overseeing and monitoring implementation of the CEMP (Action 4). Establish and formalize the roles and responsibilities of an Energy Management Team consisting of senior staff to oversee and report on the implementation of departmental CEMP actions (Action 5). Relevant actions of the CEMP (organizational and technical) are included in the annual work plans that are created for each department (Action 6). Investigate hiring an Embedded Energy Manager (Energy Technician) responsible for implementing the technical actions of the CEMP (Action 7). Assess staff resources for managing and operating Town facilities and managing the implementation of energy efficiency projects, and hire additional resources where required (Action 8). Divide Town-wide CEMP actions between the Sustainability Coordinator and the Energy Technician (Action 9). Include energy audit recommendations in existing capital projects list (Action 15). Include an energy component on the budget decision items form to facilitate more energy efficiency projects (Action 16). These actions should be implemented immediately and simultaneously to establish the organizational structure and capacity to implement the remaining technical and organizational actions in the plan. To implement the CEMP, the Town will also need to make significant capital investments in energy efficiency over the fiveyear period. However, these investments will yield significant returns. Table 1 shows the breakdown of net capital costs and NPVs of the technical measures broken down by the plan phases. It will cost approximately $856,000-$942,000 to implement the TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN xi

14 identified measures in the six buildings that were audited as part of the planning process, as well as measures that were extrapolated to other buildings 2. If implemented according to the schedule, it will cost the Town approximately $180,000 each year over the next five years. The net present value (NPV) of implementing all the measures is $4,468,000-$4,915,000. The initial investment for the NPV was calculated using the estimated equipment cost minus the potential incentive for each selected measure in the audit reports. The cash inflows are based on the energy costs savings from implementing the measures. A discount rate of 2.5% was used for the NPV calculations. The costs listed in Table 1 below only include the capital costs associated with the technical measures in buildings identified through the audits. These costs represent project cost estimates. Project costs include the costs to purchase and install the recommended technology. They do not include costs associated with additional tasks and costs associated with implementation of the measures. Table 1 Net capital costs and present values for all technical actions Year Net capital cost (all measures) Net present value (all measures) 1 $144,000-$158,000 $3,255,000-$3,581, $367,000-$404,000 $633,000-$696, $345,000-$380,000 $580,000-$638,000 Total $856,000-$942,000 $4,468,000-$4,915,000 2 These costs represent project cost estimates. Project costs include the costs to purchase and install the recommended technology. They do not include costs associated with additional tasks associated with implementation of the measures, including developing project specifications, project management and project evaluation. The project cost estimates are developed based on Mindscape's experience from other energy audits, project cost from previously implemented projects, and quotes from suppliers that Mindscape has worked with in the past. These costs are scaled to fit the subject project at the client's site, but do not account for many of the specific and unique requirements of each client or building. ASHRAE, the regulatory body that determines the requirements for a Level II audit, states that the project costing estimate should have an accuracy of +/- 50%. This is a wide range for accuracy, and further indicates that although the energy savings analysis should be accurate, detailed project costing is not within the purview of the audit. xii INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

15 Introduction The Town of Whitby Corporate Energy Management Plan (CEMP) provides a roadmap for energy management in the Town of Whitby. The CEMP describes the energy management activities that the Town as a corporation can take over the next 5 years to increase its energy efficiency, reduce its energy consumption, and minimize its environmental footprint. It is also designed to help the Town comply with the energy conservation and demand management planning requirements of Ontario Regulation 397/11 under the Green Energy Act (2009). For the Town of Whitby, energy has strategic importance. The Town has already implemented several initiatives to reduce energy use in its facilities and street-lighting. For example, the new Brooklin Community Centre and Library was built to a LEED Silver standard, microfit solar panels have been installed at the Civic Recreation Centre, a LED street-lighting retrofit pilot project has been implemented, lighting retrofit projects have been completed throughout Town facilities, and old equipment is replaced with the most up-to-date technology. Further to this, energy is included as a key strategy in the Port Whitby Sustainable Community Plan. The plan outlines three recommendations for improving energy performance in the area of Port Whitby ensuring a higher energy performance in all new construction, developing a district heat and power system, and utilizing solar energy for electricity generation on-site. The Town has also been featured in the Business Review North America and Energy Digital magazine for its environmental and sustainability initiatives. The CEMP will build upon the Town s current energy and environmental initiatives and will provide a roadmap for continued corporate energy excellence. The CEMP is organized as follows: Section 2 Objectives and targets Section 3 Organizational actions Section 4 Technical actions Section 5 Capital costs and net present values Section 6 Renewables and alternative energy Section 7 Energy management systems Section 8 Communication and engagement Section 9 Conclusion TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 1

16 The CEMP also has appendices that contain the following: Framework and scope Appendix A Present state Appendix B Roles and responsibilities Appendix C Criteria for prioritizing actions Appendix D Utility incentives Appendix E Best practices Appendix F List of acronyms In accordance with the Regulation, the Town s CEMP addresses energy use in the Town s buildings, however the plan also goes beyond these requirements to include fleets, and technologies external to buildings, including streetlights. The CEMP further exceeds the requirements of the Regulation by completing Milestones 1, 2, and 3 of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) Partners for Climate Protection (PCP) Program at the corporate level. The Town is going beyond the requirements of Regulation 397/11 as the corporation is committed to showing leadership in efficient energy management (see Objectives section). Figure 2 Framework for planning As illustrated in Figure 2, the CEMP centers on the Town s facilities, fleets, and technologies. It aims to ensure that existing and any new facilities are built and operated as efficiently and sustainably as possible. The CEMP also considers people, 2 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

17 processes, and information by developing supporting organizational policies and processes, monitoring and tracking systems, and communication and engagement tools that will allow this to happen. To align the CEMP actions with this framework the actions contained in this plan are grouped according to the following categories: Organizational commitment actions related to policies, processes, and resources for implementation. These actions are required to enable energy management and the other actions. Many of the other actions are dependent upon getting these organizational actions in place; Existing municipal buildings and equipment actions, both technical and policy based, that impact existing buildings and equipment. These actions ensure that existing buildings and equipment are operating as efficiently as possible; New municipal buildings and equipment actions, both technical and policy based, that impact new buildings and equipment. These actions ensure that new buildings or equipment that are put in place are as efficient as possible while maintaining a balance between costs and benefits; Monitoring and tracking actions related to evaluating, monitoring, and verifying energy data. These actions ensure that the Town is accurately tracking and measuring their energy use and the energy savings achieved from the implementation of the actions including through the use of key performance indicators (KPIs); Communication and engagement actions related to encouraging behavioural modifications to save energy. These behavioural actions can produce real energy savings and can help to enable and sustain the more technical actions being implemented; Fleets actions related to Town fleet vehicles that reduce energy consumption. These actions ensure that vehicles are being operated as efficiently as possible and that the most efficient vehicles are being purchased while maintaining a balance between costs and benefits; Energy supply and procurement actions related to the procurement of energy and renewable and alternative energy technologies. These actions ensure that efficient energy supplies are purchased and utilized; and TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 3

18 Streetlights actions related to installing more energy efficient lighting technologies. These actions ensure that energy efficient streetlight technologies are employed while maintaining a balance between costs and benefits. Planning horizon and prioritization In accordance with Regulation 397/11, the CEMP for the Town of Whitby is a 5-year plan covering the period from July 2014 to July The organizational actions contained in this plan have been prioritized into one of four time periods: Short-term actions (July 2014 July 2015) Medium-term actions (July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning actions (October 2018 July 2019). These time periods were selected to ensure compliance with the regulation and to create alignment with the term of Council. The technical actions have been prioritized into short, medium and long term actions to allow for more even distribution of capital costs across the time periods. This prioritization identifies when the actions identified in the CEMP should be implemented. Organizational actions were prioritized based on their importance and ease of implementation. Technological measures were prioritized based on their internal rate of return (IRR) with adjustments to group similar measures together for more efficient implementation. The short-term actions are very important, as they directly or indirectly impact the Town s energy performance. They are also easy enough to be initiated (and often completed) in the first year of the plan. The short-term actions also have the greatest dependencies with subsequent measures relying on them to be implemented. The actions that have the greatest dependencies are those related to organizational commitment and to establishing the structure and human and financial resources for implementing the CEMP. Once the short-term actions have been implemented in the first year the Town should move on to the medium-term, long-term and monitoring and reporting actions while maintaining the actions from the previous time period, where required. 4 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

19 Planning process Figure 3 depicts the major steps in the planning process that were used to develop the Town s Corporate Energy Management Plan. Inputs to the planning process included: Analysis of the Town s energy use data; Review of the Town s existing policies, plans, and past energy efficiency projects; ASHRAE Level II audits of six Town facilities; Interviews with Town staff (including Senior Management Team members, managers, and Facilities staff); A strategic planning workshop with key Town staff; An online crowdsourcing activity for all staff to provide input into the energy planning process; and Review of energy management best practices in other jurisdictions (see Appendix E for summary of the review). Figure 3 Overview of the planning process Defining the preferred state involved exploring where the Town of Whitby would like to be with respect to energy management. The elements of the preferred state were identified through interviews with staff, a review of jurisdictional best practices (Appendix E), and during the strategic planning workshop. The preferred state informed the CEMP s objectives, targets, and actions. Identifying the present state involved exploring where the Town is now with respect to energy management. Energy data analysis; interviews; six AHSRAE Level II audits; and a review of the Town s existing policies, plans, and past energy efficiency projects were among the inputs that were used to identify the present state. The audited buildings were chosen based on TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 5

20 largest consumption, archetype, and above average energy intensity to increase the likelihood of identifying a significant number of cost-effective energy efficiency measures. Separate audit reports were produced for each of the buildings. A detailed description of the present state can be found in Appendix A. Developing actions involved identifying technical measures (i.e. measures identified from the facility audits) and organizational measures (i.e. measures related to corporate processes that also produce real energy savings and help to enable the technical measures) to help the Town move towards the preferred state. Actions were identified through audits, interviews, a strategic planning session, and the jurisdictional review of best practices (Appendix E). As described above they were grouped according to the following categories: Organizational commitment Existing municipal buildings and equipment New municipal buildings and equipment Monitoring and tracking Communication and engagement Fleets Energy supply and procurement Streetlights Setting priorities involved determining the timeframe for implementation of each action in the CEMP. Organizational measures were prioritized based on their importance and ease of implementation. Technological measures were prioritized based on their internal rate of return (IRR) with adjustments to group similar measures together for more efficient implementation. As described above the organizational measures have been prioritized into one of four time periods: Short-term actions (July 2014 July 2015); Medium-term actions (July 2015 July 2017); Long-term actions (July 2017 October 2018); and Evaluation and planning actions (October 2018 July 2019). The technical actions have been prioritized into short, medium and long term actions to allow for more even distribution of capital costs across the time periods. Preparing the Draft and Final Plan involved documenting the results of the planning process. As described in the section of this report, Updating and reporting on the plan, the CEMP will be reviewed annually and updated at the end of the five years. 6 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

21 Implementation of the plan Having sufficient staff resources will be imperative to ensuring the success of the CEMP and for effectively managing energy use and GHG emissions at the Town. As a first step, the Town should assign a staff member to be responsible for overseeing and monitoring the implementing the CEMP (see Action 4). This person will be responsible for overseeing and monitoring implementation of the CEMP. It is recommended that the Sustainability Coordinator be assigned this responsibility. Many of the actions identified in the proceeding chapters can be assigned to individual Town departments. These actions will be implemented by including the actions in each department s annual work plans and by assigning responsibility for implementation. The departments will then report back on their progress on implementing the actions to the Sustainability Coordinator. It is recommended that an Energy Management Team be established, consisting of senior staff from each department 3, who will act as a point person both for implementing the CEMP in their department and for reporting on progress and challenges to the Sustainability Coordinator. It is recommended that the Sustainability Coordinator review the CEMP, in conjunction with the Energy Management Team, to determine responsibilities for each department. Once the responsibilities are determined, they should be accepted by Senior Management and the CAO, and then incorporated in departmental work plans. For those actions that have a Town-wide or corporate focus, responsibility for development and implementation should be assigned to more centralized staff resources. The responsibilities of these more centralized staff resources are further described in the following paragraphs. For those actions that are organizational or non-technical (e.g. designing and implementing the communication and behaviour change programs), responsibility should be assigned to the Sustainability Coordinator. It is our assessment that the Sustainability Coordinator does not have the capacity or expertise to develop and implement the more technical corporate actions (e.g. managing the selected energy management system, taking the lead on overseeing the implementation of the technical actions, and working with utility companies to take advantage of available incentives). 3 The Planning Department first recommended to the Planning and Development Committee in August 2010 that a Corporate Energy Management Team be established to assist with the development of the Corporate Energy Management Plan. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 7

22 Therefore, it is recommended that a new resource with technical energy experience be retained (Energy Technician). Funding is currently available to hire an Embedded Energy Manager or a Roving Energy Manager from Whitby Hydro under the Process and System Upgrade Initiatives of the OPA saveonenergy programs (see Appendix D for more details). An Embedded Energy Manager would work on a full-time contract for the Town to help the Town meet its energy management goals while striving to obtain energy savings for Whitby Hydro to help them meet their regulator-mandated targets. A Roving Energy Manager would work for the Town on a part-time contract basis and may be shared with other institutions or companies in the community. In both cases, Whitby Hydro pays up to 80% of the salary of the Embedded or Roving Energy Manager. Currently, funding is only available until the end of Ultimately, the Embedded or Roving Energy Manager is not a direct substitution for a full-time technical staff person hired to implement the technical aspects of the plan and it would be most effective to have a person dedicated to the role over the long-term; however, the Town can decide the best course of action. Other municipalities have been able to employ a full-time staff resource dedicated to managing energy. For instance, the Town of Caledon has an Energy and Environmental Officer and the City of Pickering has an Energy Management Supervisor. In addition to retaining the Energy Technician, the Town should also assess the staff resources currently available for managing and operating Town facilities and managing the implementation of energy efficiency projects. The Town should hire additional resources where required. Once the technical energy resource (Energy Technician) is obtained, responsibility for the Town-wide actions should be divided between the Sustainability Coordinator and the new Energy Technician. A breakdown of the recommended division of actions can be found in Appendix B. Final division of actions will depend on capacity and skills of the Sustainability Coordinator and Energy Technician. 8 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

23 Objectives and targets Objectives The overarching vision of the Corporation with regard to energy management is: The Town of Whitby will operate as an energy efficient corporation as part of a healthy and sustainable community. The primary objectives of the Corporate Energy Management Plan are to achieve the following: 1. The Town of Whitby will realize measureable and meaningful improvements in energy efficiency. 2. The efficient use of energy will be embedded in the day-to-day activities of all staff. 3. The Town of Whitby will demonstrate leadership in efficient energy management. For Whitby, leadership in energy management involves: Leading the Community by example; Exceeding the requirements of Regulation 397/11; Publicizing the Town s energy management activities and successes. Targets and key performance indicators Figure 4 illustrates the set of quantitative targets that should guide the Town s efforts on energy management from July 2014 to July The costs and savings associated with meeting these targets can be found in the Capital costs and net present values section. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 9

24 Figure 4 Energy intensity and GHG targets The results of the ASHRAE Level II audits suggest that a 12-16% improvement in energy intensity 4 and a 14-19% reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the existing building stock is very achievable if all the proposed measures are implemented. Due to factors outside of the Town s control (e.g. availability of energy efficiency incentives) a target range from 75% of the estimated reductions to 100% of estimated reductions has been used. Table 2 outlines the breakdown of the targets over the 5-year term of the CEMP based on the prioritization of technical actions listed in Table 5. Additional savings (typically up to 5 percent) may also be realized from policy and behavioural initiatives outlined in the organizational actions; however, these were not included in the targets breakdown as they are more difficult to accurately measure. Table 2 Breakdown of energy intensity and GHG emissions reductions targets by phase Year Energy intensity reductions (ekwh/sqft) GHG emissions reductions (kg) 1 9%-12% 12%-15% 2 to 3 4%-5% 5%-6% 4 to 5 2%-3% 2%-3% Overall 12%-16% 14%-19% The targets were calculated based on the results of the audits completed in six representative archetype buildings (Table 3). 4 Energy intensity is a measure of the amount of energy in kwh consumed per square foot of building area. 10 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

25 The percentage energy intensity and absolute GHG emissions reductions from the last reported levels (2011) for these buildings was calculated, based on all recommended measures being undertaken during the five-year period. The savings were grouped according to facility type with the assumption that similar measures and savings could be achieved in other facilities of the same type. The overall targets were derived by extrapolating the savings based on square footage by facility type to all facilities of the same type. The applicable buildings that the Town of Whitby reported for under the Ontario Green Energy Act Regulation 397/11 reporting requirements were included in the calculations. 5 Refer to Appendix A for a complete list of buildings. Refer to the accompanying audit reports for further details on the recommended energy conservation measures. Table 3 Estimated energy intensity and GHG emissions reductions from recommended measures in the facility audits Facility 2011 Energy intensity (ekwh/sqft) Energy intensity reductions 2011 GHG emissions (kg) GHG emissions reductions Civic Recreation Centre % 647, % Firehall #5 (Headquarters) Whitby Library Main Branch % 119, % % 219, % McKinney Centre % 483, % Operations Centre % 243, % Senior's Activity Centre % 46, % The buildings associated with the archetype buildings that were audited are shown in Table 4. The archetype buildings and the associated unaudited buildings have similar functions and would have similar energy consuming equipment. Because of this, it is assumed that the archetype buildings and the associated unaudited buildings would have similar energy consumption and GHG emissions per unit of floor area. Thus, the associated buildings were used to extrapolate the energy intensity and GHG emissions reduction estimates from the 5 It was deemed in conversation with Town staff that the following facilities were inappropriate for consideration for energy conservation retrofits: Ashburn Community Centre, Brock Street Activity Centre, Brooklin Community Centre and Library, Cullen Central Park, Luther Vipond Memorial Arena, Parking Enforcement, Spencer Community Centre, and Whitby Municipal Building. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 11

26 audited buildings in order to calculate reasonably achievable targets for the Town. Table 4 Audited archetype buildings and the associated unaudited buildings Archetype buildings Associated unaudited buildings Civic Recreation Centre Firehall #5 (Headquarters) Firehall #1 Firehall #5 (Headquarters) Firehall #2 Firehall #5 (Headquarters) Firehall #3 Firehall #5 (Headquarters) Firehall #4 Whitby Library Main Branch McKinney Centre Operations Centre Senior's Activity Centre Iroquois Park Sports Centre None Iroquois Park Sports Centre None Whitby Centennial Building In addition, the following buildings were included in the calculations with the assumption that the average savings from the audited buildings could be extrapolated to them based on square footage: Port Whitby Marina Clubhouse Animal Control Heydenshore Pavilion Updating and reporting on the plan The CEMP should be reviewed at least once a year. As part of the annual review, the Sustainability Coordinator assigned to oversee and monitor the implementation of the CEMP (see Action 4) should complete the following steps: Track the activities that have been implemented, based on a checklist of all of the actions included in the CEMP; Track quantitative progress towards targets, using the KPIs described in this plan; Note any updates to the CEMP, based on new audits, organizational changes, or lessons from past projects; Identify the priority actions for the upcoming year, and recommend funding and resources for their implementation; Determine, if possible, the cost savings achieved from the actions that have been implemented; Compile a short report annually describing projects implemented, progress towards targets, cost savings 12 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

27 achieved, updates to the CEMP, and priority actions for the upcoming year; and In 2019, report on implementation of the CEMP as required under Regulation 397/11. Include detail on: energy and GHG emissions for 2017; current and proposed energy conservation and demand management measures; a report of results achieved; and a revised forecast of the expected results of the current and proposed measures. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 13

28 Organizational actions This section includes all the recommended organizational actions to be implemented within the Town. These actions were established based on interviews with key Town staff and stakeholders, a strategic planning workshop, the online crowdsourcing activity, and a review of jurisdictional best practices. These actions put in place the corporate processes and policies that will guide energy management within the Town and help to enable the technical measures. They will also produce real energy savings that will help contribute to the Town reaching its energy and GHG emissions reduction targets (although they were not included in the targets breakdown as they are more difficult to accurately measure). The organizational actions were grouped into the following categories: Organizational commitment Existing municipal buildings and equipment New municipal buildings and equipment Monitoring and tracking Communication and engagement Fleets Energy supply and procurement Streetlights The actions have also been prioritized into one of four time periods: Short-term actions (July 2014 July 2015) Medium-term actions (July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning actions (October 2018 July 2019). These time periods were selected to ensure compliance with the regulation and to create alignment with the term of Council. This prioritization identifies when the actions identified in the CEMP should be implemented. Organizational actions were prioritized based on their importance and ease of implementation and feedback provided by staff including through the online crowdsourcing activity. The short-term actions are very important, as they directly or indirectly impact the Town s energy performance. They are also easy enough to be initiated (and often completed) in the first 14 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

29 year of the plan. The short-term actions also have the greatest dependencies with subsequent measures relying on them to be implemented. Once the short-term actions have been implemented in the first year the Town should move on to the medium-term, long-term, and monitoring and reporting actions while maintaining the actions from the previous time period, where required. There are a number of organizational actions that are critical to successfully implementing the CEMP. These actions are related to establishing the staff and financial resources, and the organizational structure required to implement the plan. These critical actions are as follows: Assign the Sustainability Coordinator responsibility for overseeing and monitoring implementation of the CEMP (Action 4). Establish and formalize the roles and responsibilities of an Energy Management Team consisting of senior staff to oversee and report on the implementation of departmental CEMP actions (Action 5). Relevant actions of the CEMP (organizational and technical) are included in the annual work plans that are created for each department (Action 6). Investigate hiring an Embedded Energy Manager (Energy Technician) responsible for implementing the technical actions of the CEMP (Action 7). Assess staff resources for managing and operating Town facilities and managing the implementation of energy efficiency projects, and hire additional resources where required (Action 8). Divide Town-wide CEMP actions between the Sustainability Coordinator and the Energy Technician (Action 9). Include energy audit recommendations in existing capital projects list (Action 15). Include an energy component on the budget decision items form to facilitate more energy efficiency projects (Action 16). These actions should be implemented immediately and simultaneously to establish the organizational structure and capacity to implement the remaining technical and organizational actions in the plan. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 15

30 Organizational actions Preferred state Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) KPI / Metrics Organizational commitment N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A The Town s energy management activities will be guided by ambitious yet achievable targets. 1. Formally adopt 5-year corporate targets for energy intensity and GHG emissions. 2. Formally adopt interim targets to assist in tracking progress towards 5-year goals. 26. Re-affirm commitment to targets through formal staff annual reports. 60. Re-affirm commitment to targets through formal staff annual reports. N/A Targets adopted (y/n) Interim targets adopted (y/n) Targets re-affirmed (y/n) Annual reports developed (y/n) The Town s energy management activities will be guided by an upto-date Energy Plan. 3. Develop a process for updating the CEMP in the interim and after 5 years, and ensure compliance with the Green Energy Act reporting requirements. (See Updating of the plan section for details). 27.Conduct annual review. (See Updating of the plan section for details). 61.Conduct annual review. (See Updating of the plan section for details). 81. Prepare plan update and report on results of the 5 years in compliance with Green Energy Act requirements. (See Updating of the plan section for details). Updating process developed (y/n) Annual reviews conducted (y/n) Plan update prepared (y/n) The Town will track progress towards targets. N/A 28.Track and assess progress on interim targets and Year 1 actions. 62.Track and assess progress on interim targets and Years 2-3 actions. 82. Track and assess progress on interim targets and Year 4 actions. Energy intensity (ekwh/m 2 ) Total energy use (ekwh, m 3 ) Percentage of actions implemented

31 Preferred state Dedicated staff will be available to implement the energy plan. An Energy Management Team (EMT) will be established and will play an important role in implementing the CEMP. Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) 4. Assign the Sustainability Coordinator responsibility for overseeing and monitoring implementation of the CEMP. (See Implementation of the plan section for details). 5. Establish and formalize the roles and responsibilities of an EMT consisting senior staff to oversee and report on the implementation of departmental CEMP actions. (See Implementation of the plan section for details). Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) KPI / Metrics N/A N/A N/A Staff assigned to overseeing and implementing the CEMP (y/n) Roles and responsibilities assigned (y/n) N/A N/A N/A Energy included in the roles and responsibilities of the EMT (y/n)

32 Preferred state All departments will work together on energy management. Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) 6. Relevant actions of the CEMP (organizational and technical) are included in the annual work plans that are created for each department. (See Implementation of the plan section for details). Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) KPI / Metrics N/A N/A N/A Implementation of the CEMP included in departmental business plans (y/n)

33 Preferred state The Town has the capacity and technical knowledge to implement the CEMP. Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) 7. Investigate hiring an Embedded Energy Manager (Energy Technician) responsible for implementing the technical actions of the CEMP. (See Implementation of the plan section for details). 8. Assess staff resources for managing and operating Town facilities and managing the implementation of energy efficiency projects, and hire additional resources where required. 9. Divide Town-wide CEMP actions between the Sustainability Coordinator and the Energy Technician. (See Implementation of the plan section for details). Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) KPI / Metrics N/A N/A N/A Embedded Energy Manager hired (y/n) Staff resources assessed (y/n) Number of staff hired Town-wide responsibilities divided (y/n)

34 Preferred state Energy management will be highly recognized as a strategic opportunity and priority in relevant policy and planning activities. The Town will continue to maintain its excellent working relationship with Whitby Hydro, and will take advantage of available incentives. Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) 10. All Commissioners sign-off on the CEMP to demonstrate their commitment and leadership to implementing the plan. 11. Include energy management as a strategic priority for the Town and formally adopt the corporate vision statement for the CEMP. 12.Include an energy impacts section on Council reports so that energy implications are included when staff make proposals to Council. 13. Continue to foster an excellent relationship with Whitby Hydro with regards to energy efficiency projects, including provision of usable energy data. Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) KPI / Metrics N/A N/A N/A Commissioners sign-off (y/n) 29.Develop a process for continually monitoring and applying for available incentives / grants. Energy management included as a strategic priority (y/n) Vision statement formally adopted (y/n) Energy impacts section included on Council reports (y/n) N/A N/A Number of meetings Number of projects developed Number of incentive applications submitted Monetary value ($) of incentives obtained

35 Preferred state Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) KPI / Metrics The Whitby community will strive for excellence in energy efficiency. N/A 30.Develop a community energy plan utilizing available incentives and grants (e.g. Ontario Ministry of Energy and the Federation of Canadian Municipalities). N/A 83. Apply to energy conservation awards (e.g. OPA Community Conservation Award). Grants received Community energy plan developed (y/n) Number of award applications submitted Number of awards won Existing municipal buildings and equipment N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A The Town will strategically implement cost effective energy efficiency projects in existing buildings. Cost effective energy conservation measures identified in audit reports will be prioritized and implemented. Energy efficiency projects will be considered and their implementation will be coordinated with capital projects. 14. Implement all technical short-term actions. 15. Include energy audit recommendations in existing capital projects list. 16. Include an energy component on the budget decision items form to facilitate more energy efficiency projects. 31.Implement all technical mediumterm actions. 63.Implement all technical long-term actions. N/A Technical projects implemented (y/n) ekwh and m 3 saved Money ($) saved on energy bills N/A N/A N/A Audit recommendations included in list (y/n) Number of recommendations implemented N/A N/A N/A Energy component included (y/n) Number of energy efficiency projects approved Financial savings

36 Preferred state Projects will be prioritized in a consistent way, using clear criteria and appropriate metrics, and the Town implements retrofit projects that are cost-effective over longer time periods. All buildings will operate in an energy efficient manner. Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) 17. Review the criteria and metrics for prioritizing projects. Appropriate weighting for these criteria should be developed. (See Appendix B for details). N/A Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) KPI / Metrics N/A N/A N/A Criteria and metrics reviewed (y/n) 32. Develop consistent guidelines and policies for energy management to be followed at all facilities. 33. Continue to include recommissioning of existing facilities in response to installation of new equipment. 34.Conduct an assessment of the applicability of installing Building Automation Systems (BAS) in remaining facilities. 64. Develop and implement a corporate O&M preventative maintenance program. 65.Investigate opportunities to install green or white roofs on Town facilities. N/A Criteria and metrics updated (y/n) Weighting developed (y/n) Guidelines and policies for energy management developed (y/n) Number of recommissioning assessments BAS assessment conducted (y/n) Preventative maintenance program developed and implemented (y/n) Opportunities investigated for green / white roofs (y/n) Number of green / white roofs installed

37 Preferred state New municipal buildings and equipment The Town will have specific energy and efficiency standards for new buildings that consider future operational costs. Strong, formal processes will exist to ensure that all new equipment is highly energy efficient and appropriately sized. Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) N/A N/A Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) KPI / Metrics N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 35. Develop an energy efficiency building standard for all new construction and major renovations (e.g. LEED, BOMA, etc.). 36. Investigate the development of common construction standards with other municipalities within Durham Region. 37. Identify and adopt formal energy efficient equipment standards to be followed when replacing equipment (e.g. Energy Star). N/A N/A Energy efficiency building standard developed (y/n) N/A 84. Develop a process for updating the energy efficiency standards (every 5 years). Discussion with other municipalities in Durham Region about common construction standards (y/n) Energy and financial savings associated with construction of facilities with energy efficiency standards (kwh, $) Equipment standards adopted (y/n) Process for updating the standards developed (y/n) Energy and financial savings associated with the installation of energy efficient equipment (kwh, $)

38 Preferred state Energy will be considered at all stages of new building design and development, including so the Town can add renewable energy technologies in the future. Energy performance of new buildings, major renovations, and additions to buildings will always be verified after construction. Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) N/A N/A Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) 38. Develop guidelines for considering energy at all stages of new building development (e.g. budgeting, procurement, design, construction / change management). 39. Develop a formal commissioning policy for new buildings, major renovations, and additions to buildings to verify energy performance after construction. Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) KPI / Metrics N/A N/A Energy building development guidelines developed (y/n) N/A N/A Commissioning policy developed (y/n) Number of buildings commissioned Financial savings Monitoring and tracking N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A The Town will use KPIs to track progress towards targets. 18. Formalize KPIs and tracking mechanisms to monitor and report on progress towards interim and 5-year targets. N/A N/A N/A KPIs recommended in this plan formalized (y/n) Tracking mechanisms formalized (y/n)

39 Preferred state Project evaluation, monitoring and verification (EM&V) will be simple and accurate thanks to energy data and monitoring processes. Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) 19. Develop a process for evaluating the savings achieved from energy efficiency projects 20. Develop a process for rolling out successful energy efficiency projects. Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) KPI / Metrics N/A N/A N/A Evaluation process developed (y/n) Energy and financial savings (kwh, $) Process for rolling out energy projects developed (y/n)

40 Preferred state Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) KPI / Metrics The Town will have realtime building level data for all utilities, at an appropriate level of granularity (e.g. daily) and will track and benchmark the data appropriately. 40.Investigate options for a Town-wide energy management system (EMS) to be used to track and analyze energy use at the building level. (See Energy management systems section for details). 41.Conduct an assessment of the metering needs of each building (e.g. interval meters, submeters). 42. Ensure each building or piece or equipment is appropriately metered for each utility. 43. Develop a high-level report card on the annual energy consumption of each Town facility to track changes in energy consumption. 66.Implement the EMS chosen in Years 2-3 to track and analyze energy use at the building level. 85. Identify an appropriate benchmarking system to monitor the energy performance of buildings (e.g. Energy Star) or join an existing benchmarking group (e.g. Mayor s Megawatt Challenge). EMS investigated (y/n) EMS utilized (y/n) Assessment of metering needs conducted (y/n) Number of new meters identified High-level report card developed (y/n) Benchmarking system identified (y/n) Benchmarking system utilized (y/n)

41 Preferred state The Town will have the capacity to manage, analyze, and use energy data from meters. Staff and the public will be aware of energy usage in Town facilities. Communication and engagement Energy will fall under the sustainability umbrella and the Town will relay a common and consistent message about energy and sustainability. Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) N/A N/A 67. Develop a plan for analysis and use of energy data. N/A 44.Develop / purchase an energy dashboard that provides Facilities staff with appropriate information on energy use. N/A Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) 86. Conduct an assessment to ensure that energy data needs are being met, and that staff resources are adequate to manage and collect the data. 87. Develop a plan for installing energy dashboards in Town facilities that provides the public with appropriate information on energy use in buildings. Build upon the lessons learned from the dashboard installed at Iroquois Park. KPI / Metrics Data analysis and reporting system developed (y/n) Energy data needs assessment conducted (y/n) Energy dashboard chosen for Facilities staff (y/n) Plan developed for installing energy dashboards in Town facilities for public (y/n) Number of energy dashboards installed in Town facilities N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 21. Develop a single brand for communicating about energy and sustainability. (See Communication and engagement section for details). 45.Employ brand for communicating about energy and sustainability. 68. Employ brand for communicating about energy and sustainability. N/A Brand established (y/n) Brand employed and utilized (y/n)

42 Preferred state Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) KPI / Metrics Energy and energy efficiency will be effectively communicated across the corporation and to the public, and changes and successes will be publicized. 22. Develop a plan for communicating about energy to staff, including communicating the results of energy initiatives. (See Communication and engagement section for details). 46.Implement the staff energy communication plan developed in Year Develop standardized education and communication tools (e.g. poster boards, brochures) for retrofit projects (e.g. lighting retrofit) and/or changes in building comfort levels for staff and the public. 69. Continue to implement the staff energy communication plan. 88. Prepare an annual corporate energy management report for staff and the public that highlights energy activities and successes of the Town. 89. Make energy management related information available on the Town s Internet and Intranet websites so that staff and the community are aware of Town s energy initiatives. (See Communication and engagement section for details). Communication plan developed (y/n) Number of successful initiatives communicated to staff Standardized communication tools deployed (y/n) Changes in attitudes and behaviours Annual energy report prepared (y/n) Energy information on Town websites (y/n) Number of people visiting energy page All staff will be aware of energy conservation and the actions they can take to save energy within the Town facilities. N/A 48.Develop and implement a corporate Town-wide energy and sustainability behaviour change program for all staff. (See Communication and engagement section for details). 70.Continue to implement the corporate-wide energy and sustainability behaviour change program for all staff. N/A Behaviour change program developed (y/n) Changes in attitudes and behaviours

43 Preferred state Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) KPI / Metrics Appropriate staff will be trained and understand energy saving opportunities. N/A 49.Implement general training on energy and energy efficiency for all Facilities staff. 50.Ensure that all Facilities staff are appropriately trained on energy efficiency in their specific buildings. 51.Continue to implement project specific training for staff as needed (e.g. new technology, new piece of equipment). (See Communication and engagement section for details). 71.Include general training on energy and energy efficiency in the training process for all new hires. 72.Include general training on energy and energy efficiency for staff in the Procurement Division and Finance Division to help them understand the impact of this plan on their work. (See Communication and engagement section for details). N/A Training investigated / developed (y/n) Number of existing staff trained General training included in existing training for all new hires (y/n) Number of new hires trained Number of staff in Procurement and Finance trained Staff will have the tools and training to identify energy management opportunities and will be actively engaged in submitting ideas. N/A 52.Develop and implement an employee engagement process for all Facilities staff. (See Communication and engagement section for details). 73.Develop an employee engagement process for all staff based on the pilot program implemented in Years 2-3 for Facilities staff. N/A Employee engagement process developed (y/n) Changes in attitudes and behaviours

44 Preferred state Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) KPI / Metrics The Town s Facilities staff will work together with other municipalities and public agencies to share technologies and best practices. 23. Continue to send Facilities staff to conferences and trade shows for information sharing. 53.Continue to send staff to conferences and trade shows for information sharing. 54.Set up regular site visits and meetings with Facilities staff from other municipalities and other public agencies to share information and tour facilities. 55.Examine opportunities to developing strategic partnerships with local institutions and businesses related to energy and energy efficiency. 74.Continue to send staff to conferences and trade shows for information sharing. 75.Continue to set up regular site visits and meetings with Facilities staff from other municipalities and other public agencies to share information and tour facilities. 76.Maintain and develop new strategic partnerships with local institutions and businesses related to energy and energy efficiency. Number of site visits set-up Number of staff attending site visits Number of staff attending conferences / seminars, etc. Number of partnerships with local institutions and businesses

45 Preferred state Energy supply and procurement The Town s policies and procedures will enable the adoption of state-ofthe-art energy management technologies. The Town will work toward becoming carbon neutral. Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) KPI / Metrics N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 24. Work with the Purchasing division to develop green procurement standards that consider energy efficiency and sustainability. Standards should include energy efficient vehicles and alternative fuel purchases. N/A N/A N/A N/A Green procurement standards developed (y/n) 56. Develop a process for identifying, evaluating, and developing renewable and alternative energy projects (e.g. wind, solar, geothermal, deep lake water cooling). 57.Continue to work with Whitby Hydro on opportunities for renewable energy projects. 77. Develop a process for continually investigating new emerging technologies related to alternative energy sources. N/A Process developed for identifying, evaluating, and developing renewable energy projects (y/n) Number of projects identified Number of projects implemented Process developed for continually investigating new technologies for renewables (y/n)

46 Preferred state The Town will show leadership in reducing its peak load. Short-term actions (Year 1, July 2014 July 2015) Medium-term actions (Years 2-3, July 2015 July 2017) Long-term actions (Year 4, July 2017 October 2018) N/A N/A 78. Work with Whitby Hydro to assess the feasibility of reducing the Town s peak load by storing energy. Evaluation and planning (Year 5, October 2018 July 2019) N/A KPI / Metrics Feasibility study conducted (y/n) Reduction in peak load Fleets N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A All fleet vehicles will be operated in the most energy efficient manner while meeting the needs of their intended use. N/A 58. Develop a formal policy for purchasing the right-sized vehicles that includes considerations other than cost (e.g. lifecycle costs, operational costs). 79.Develop guidelines to operate vehicles in the most energy efficient manner (e.g. anti-idling). 80. Include energy efficiency in the drivertraining program (e.g. Shuttle Challenge). (See Communication and engagement section for details). N/A Policy for purchasing right-sized vehicles developed (y/n) Guidelines developed (y/n) Number of drivers trained Reduction in annual fuel consumption per vehicle-km Streetlights N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A All Town streetlights will be LED. 25.Develop a phased plan for replacing and updating Town streetlights. 59. Develop and design construction standards to ensure that new sub-divisions are equipped with LED streetlights and signals. N/A N/A LED replacement plan formalized (y/n) Energy and financial savings (kwh, $) LED construction standards developed (y/n)

47 Technical actions Table 5 includes the recommended technical actions for retrofitting the Town s existing buildings. These actions have been determined to be most cost effective for the Town to implement during the 5 years of the plan. The technical actions have been prioritized into short-term (Year 1), medium-term (Years 2 and 3) and long-term (Years 4 and 5) actions to allow for even distribution of capital costs across the time periods. The technical actions are prioritized based on IRR of the component measures and ease of implementation. Measures with higher IRR values were prioritized earlier in the plan, as these measures offer a better rate of return. The technical actions were based on audits conducted on six Town facilities of a variety of archetypes and then extrapolated by square footage across all appropriate Town buildings (refer to the complete list of buildings in Appendix A). Please refer to the individual audit reports for a more detailed description of the measures and their estimated costs and savings. Within each time period, the technical actions were grouped together based on the type of measure so that a single tender could be issued to implement a group of actions in order to reduce cost and administrative burden. For example, the auditors recommended undertaking air sealing for Firehall #5 and for the generator room at the Operations Centre. These measures were grouped together and extrapolated to include air sealing in all applicable buildings. All applicable buildings refers to buildings where the measures were identified in the audits, in addition to buildings that were not audited where the same or similar measures may be undertaken. The estimated cost for each measure was based on the project costs and incentives listed in the audit reports 6 as well as cost estimates provided by the Town. A range of costs was developed for inclusion in the plan due to uncertainty associated with estimating the project costs and due to additional (but difficult to estimate) costs to the Town beyond 6 These costs represent project cost estimates. Project costs include the costs to purchase and install the recommended technology. They do not include costs associated with additional tasks associated with implementation of the measures including developing project specifications, project management and project evaluation. The project cost estimates are developed based on Mindscape's experience from other energy audits, project cost from previously implemented projects, and quotes from suppliers that Mindscape has worked with in the past. These costs are scaled to fit the subject project at the client's site, but do not account for many of the specific and unique requirements of each client or building. ASHRAE, the regulatory body that determines the requirements for a Level 2 audit, states that the project costing estimate should have an accuracy of +/- 50%. This is a wide range for accuracy, and further indicates that although the energy savings analysis should be accurate, detailed project costing is not within the purview of the audit. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 33

48 the purchase and installation of the measures. For a detailed description of the estimated costs please see the Capital costs and net present values section of this plan. This cost range was developed by rounding the cost estimates to the nearest hundred-dollar amount and a range value of +10% (also rounded to the nearest $100) was provided to reflect the uncertainty of these estimates. The internal rate of return (IRR) and net present value (NPV) 7 for each measure were calculated from the estimated costs and reduced utility costs. The projected costs and NPV for each group of measures was based on extrapolating the measures in the group for all audited buildings to the applicable Town buildings. For a detailed description of the potential savings associated with these measures please see the Capital costs and net present values section of this plan. Further details on the criteria used for the IRR and NPV calculations can be found in Appendix G. Table 5 Technical actions for implementation in existing buildings Measures Buildings Projected cost (including incentives estimate) Projected Net Present Value Internal Rate of Return Year 1 VFDs As listed (not extrapolated) $27,300- $30,100 $167,600- $184,400 VFD Controller on Wading Pool Filter Pump Civic Recreation Centre $5,500- $6,100 $27,700- $30,500 79% VFD on Hot Water Circulation Pumps Civic Recreation Centre $10,000- $11,000 $126,300- $138, % VFD on Pool Pump Whitby Library Main Branch $11,800- $13,000 $13,600- $15,000 24% 7 The utility rates used to calculate the IRR and NPV were based on the average utility costs from the utility analysis in the audit reports. The electricity rate was adjusted based on the Industrial Price Forecast on page 8 of Ontario s Long-Term Energy Plan ( The natural gas rate was adjusted based on the natural gas price reference projections in Natural Resource Canada s report on Canada s Energy Future: Energy Supply and Demand Projections to Energy Market Assessment ( A discount rate of 2.5% was used in calculating the NPV. 34 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

49 Measures Buildings Projected cost (including incentives estimate) Projected Net Present Value Internal Rate of Return HVAC controls All applicable facilities $14,100- $15,600 $2,340,300- $2,574,300 Control system on tube heaters and unitary fan-coil heaters Firehall #5 (Headquarters) $3,300- $3,600 $29,300- $32,300 89% Reduce Excessive Fresh Air Makeup Whitby Library Main Branch $0 $687,500- $756,300 N/A Controller for Fireplace Exhaust Fans Whitby Library Main Branch $1,300- $1,400 $104,000- $114, % Controls for the Makeup Units Senior's Activity Centre $1,300- $1,400 $138,300- $152, % HVAC controls All applicable unaudited facilities $8,400- $9,200 $1,381,200- $1,519,300 N/A HVAC controls - fire halls All fire halls $200-$400 $50,100- $55,100 Controller on Hose Tower Exhaust Fan Firehall #5 (Headquarters) $100-$200 $22,600- $24, % HVAC controls - fire halls All unaudited fire halls $100-$200 $27,500- $30,200 N/A Measures specific to the Operations Centre Operations Centre $33,300- $36,600 $463,200- $509,500 Dock Heater Controllers Operations Centre $1,300- $1,400 $253,800- $279, % TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 35

50 Measures Lighting Retrofits Exhaust Fan Controllers - Vehicle Storage O&M on Hotsy Pressure Washers Compressed Air Audit Lighting controls Washroom Occupancy Sensors Photocell Controllers for Lights Occupancy sensor in washrooms for exhaust fan and lights Lighting controls Computer energy efficiency Energy Savings for Computers Computer energy efficiency Buildings Operations Centre Operations Centre Operations Centre Operations Centre All applicable facilities Firehall #5 (Headquarters) Whitby Library Main Branch Senior's Activity Centre All applicable unaudited facilities All applicable facilities Whitby Library Main Branch All applicable unaudited facilities Projected cost (including incentives estimate) $29,600- $32,500 $2,500- $2,800 $0 Projected Net Present Value $136,500- $150,100 $23,300- $25,600 $45,000- $49,500 Internal Rate of Return 42% 93% N/A $0 $4,700-$5,100 N/A $24,900- $27,400 $2,600- $2,900 $6,100- $6,800 $1,500- $1,600 $14,700- $16,200 $0 $159,200- $175,100 $41,900- $46,100 $13,900- $15,300 $9,400- $10,400 $94,000- $103,400 $10,500- $11, % 42% 67% N/A $0 $4,300-$4,800 N/A $0 $6,200-$6,800 N/A 36 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

51 Measures Water heating controls Timer on Domestic Hot Water Circulation Pump Water heating controls Lighting retrofit LED Fixtures in the Front Lobby Lighting retrofit Air sealing Air Sealing for the Building Air-Seal Generator Room Air sealing VFD Controller on Condenser Fan motor and Condenser Pump. Totals for Year 1 Buildings All applicable facilities McKinney Centre All applicable unaudited facilities All applicable facilities Senior's Activity Centre All applicable unaudited facilities All applicable facilities Firehall #5 (Headquarters) Operations Centre All applicable unaudited facilities McKinney Centre Projected cost (including incentives estimate) Projected Net Present Value $500-$700 $7,300-$8,000 $200-$300 $3,000-$3,300 90% $300-$400 $4,300-$4,700 N/A $4,000- $4,400 $1,700- $1,800 $2,400- $2,600 $16,800- $18,500 $4,800- $5,300 $2,100- $2,300 $9,900- $10,900 $22,700- $24,900 $144,000- $158,000 $4,100-$4,500 $1,700-$1,800 52% $2,400-$2,600 N/A $42,000- $46,200 $13,000- $14,300 Internal Rate of Return 48% $4,200-$4,700 27% $24,800- $27,300 $11,000- $12,000 $3,255,000- $3,581,000 N/A 13% TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 37

52 Measures Buildings Projected cost (including incentives estimate) Projected Net Present Value Internal Rate of Return Years 2-3 Lighting retrofit - recreation facilities All recreation facilities $142,200- $156,400 $490,000- $539,000 LED Lighting in the Pool Area Civic Recreation Centre $100,000- $110,000 $64,900- $71,400 15% Lighting retrofit - recreation facilities All unaudited recreation facilities $42,200- $46,400 $425,100- $467,600 N/A HRVs As listed (not extrapolated) $225,000- $247,500 $143,000- $157,300 Heat Recovery Ventilator McKinney Centre $52,000- $57,200 $100,600- $110,600 33% HRVs Iroquois Park Sports Centre (estimated) $173,000- $190,300 $42,400- $46,600 N/A Totals for Years 2-3 $367,000- $404,000 $633,000- $696, INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

53 Measures Buildings Projected cost (including incentives estimate) Projected Net Present Value Internal Rate of Return Years 4-5 HVAC retrofit As listed (not extrapolated) $145,000- $159,500 $209,200- $230,100 Replace Boilers with High- Efficiency Natural Gas Boilers Civic Recreation Centre $80,000- $88,000 $131,200- $144,300 23% Replace Electrically Heated Rooftop Unit Civic Recreation Centre $65,000- $71,500 $78,000- $85,800 18% Lighting retrofit - arenas All arenas $200,000- $220,000 $370,400- $407,500 Lighting Retrofit McKinney Centre $133,200- $146,600 $114,300- $125,700 12% Lighting retrofit - arenas All unaudited arenas $66,800- $73,400 $256,200- $281,800 N/A Totals for Years 4-5 $345,000- $380,000 $580,000- $638,000 NOTES: Some capital costs were adjusted from the estimates in the audit reports based on the experience of the Town. Some measures were deemed inappropriate for extrapolation to other facilities beyond those audited TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 39

54 Capital costs and net present values This section summarizes the extrapolated capital costs and NPVs associated with implementing all of the technical actions recommended in the six audited buildings and the equivalent measures in the appropriate unaudited buildings. The groups of technical actions were allocated across the five years of the plan in order to facilitate an annual net capital cost of approximately $180,000 in each year for budgeting purposes. Table 6 shows the breakdown of net capital costs and NPVs of the technical measures broken down by the plan phases. This shows that the Town will realize a total NPV of up to $4.9 million by investing an average of roughly $180,000 each year over the next five years, for a total of approximately $856,000-$942,000. It is estimated that the Town will be able to access approximately $105,000 in incentives for implementing all of the technical actions. The net capital costs listed have taken these incentives into account. Further details on incentive opportunities that the Town should pursue can be found in Appendix D. Table 6 Net capital costs and present values for all technical actions Year Net capital cost (all measures) Net present value (all measures) 1 $144,000-$158,000 $3,255,000-$3,581, $367,000-$404,000 $633,000-$696, $345,000-$380,000 $580,000-$638,000 Total $856,000-$942,000 $4,468,000-$4,915,000 The projected capital cost, energy cost savings, payback, and NPV numbers are estimates based on industry average data, research and analysis; they may not match actual costs and savings. NPV is defined as the sum of the present values of the individual incoming and outgoing cash flows over a period of time. It measures the excess or shortfall of cash flows, in present value terms, above the cost of funds, taking inflation and the rate of return into account. The rate of return is what could be earned on an investment in the financial markets with similar risk. In assessing a particular project, if the NPV is a positive value, the project has a positive cash inflow and if the NPV is a negative value, the project has a negative cash 40 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

55 outflow. A project with a positive NPV is deemed acceptable, assuming there is an appropriate level of risk involved. The initial investment for the NPV was calculated using the estimated equipment cost minus the potential incentive for each selected measure in the audit reports. The cash inflows are based on the energy costs savings from implementing the measures. A discount rate of 2.5% was used for the NPV calculations. Further details on the criteria used for the NPV calculations can be found in Appendix G. The costs listed in Table 6 only include the capital costs associated with the technical measures in buildings identified through the audits. These costs were reviewed by senior Town facilities staff. These costs represent project cost estimates. Project costs include the costs to purchase and install the recommended technology. They do not include costs associated with additional tasks and costs associated with implementation of the measures including: Researching and developing project specifications; Project management; Preparing technical specifications and drawings; Examining operational impact and scheduling to minimize program disruption; Preparing procurement documents and permit applications; Receiving and reviewing competitive bids to prepare recommendation reports for awarding contracts; In-house and contracted labour costs; Commissioning of equipment, establishing maintenance protocols, training operating staff and users, monitoring equipment performance and completing warranty follow up; Lifting equipment and aerial devices, if applicable for larger projects; Disposal and freight charges; Decommissioning services; Designated substance abatement services; and Project evaluation. 8 8 The project cost estimates are developed based on Mindscape's experience from other energy audits, project cost from previously implemented projects, and quotes from suppliers that Mindscape has worked with in the past. These costs are scaled to fit the subject project at the client's site, but do not account for many of the specific and unique requirements of each client or building. ASHRAE, the regulatory body that determines the requirements for a Level II audit, states that the project costing estimate should have an accuracy of +/- 50%. This is a wide range for accuracy, and further indicates that although the energy savings analysis should be accurate, detailed project costing is not within the purview of the audit. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 41

56 Some of these additional tasks and costs are only applicable for larger, more complicated projects. Additional costs will also be required to implement some of the organizational measures, which may include: hiring third party contractors (e.g. to implement training programs and communication and engagement activities), auditing additional facilities, sending staff to conferences, and installing LED streetlights. Other costs associated with organizational actions will be mainly in the form of staff time (e.g. full-time equivalents (FTEs)). 42 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

57 Renewables and alternative energy The Town of Whitby installed a 10kW rooftop photovoltaic (PV) system at the Whitby Civic Recreation Complex in May The project received approval from the OPA as a microfit rooftop solar PV project within the Feed-In Tariff Program, and also received approval for connection to the grid by Whitby Hydro. The PV system is estimated to generate 11,660 kwh annually and $6,400 annually in revenue for the Town. Over the 20-year agreement, the total revenue generated is estimated to be $128,000. The Town of Whitby does not have current plans for any future renewable projects. As the OPA continues to downgrade the incentives for renewables, it becomes less appealing to submit applications for the installation of solar projects. Actions described in the CEMP that relate to renewable and alternative energy are listed below in Table 7. Table 7 Actions related to renewable and alternative energy Action number Action description Develop a process for identifying, evaluating, and developing renewable and alternative energy projects (e.g. wind, solar, geothermal, deep lake water cooling). Continue to work with Whitby Hydro on opportunities for renewable energy projects. Develop a process for continually investigating new emerging technologies related to alternative energy sources. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 43

58 Energy management systems As a medium-term action (Action 40) it is recommended that the Town investigate options for an energy management system (EMS) to be used to track and analyze energy use at the building level. There are a range of EMS software available on the market. The selection of a particular system will depend on the specific features being sought, as well as the compatibility with existing IT systems. This section provides a high level overview of the system characteristics the Town should be considering, as well as the supporting organizational capacity and processes the Town will need to implement the system. Selecting an energy management system System characteristics. The Town should look for the following capabilities in an EMS: Centralized data logging Data normalization User-friendly data reporting (automatic and customized report generation for diverse audiences) Near real-time display options (for individual buildings and for aggregated buildings) Dashboard summary options for Town-wide/public display Tracking of actual energy performance against expected performance Immediate notifications/alerts when monitored systems deviate from usual patterns Project evaluation, monitoring and verification capabilities Compatibility with the Town's IT systems. The Town may also want to seek the following additional capabilities: Electrical load shedding Verification of monthly bills Prediction of future bills There are three major types of energy management systems: 1. In-house hardware and software solutions. With this option, the Town would have more control over how the suite of programs is used, but would have to provide permanent staff or 44 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

59 assign person-hours to generate and review energy reporting, and to maintain hardware and software systems. 2. Energy accounting as a service. A third party contractor collects and analyzes energy information from the Town s metres and sub-metres, and then delivers the information to the Town via a web-portal. This option typically involves higher monthly cost and less control over the outputs (usually, though a high degree of customization is available); however, minimal organizational capacity required. 3. Externally hosted and maintained software solution with a web interface. The software maintenance is outsourced, while monitoring tasks remain in-house. The Town is still responsible for making sense of the data and reports. Before going to tender, the Town should consider which of the three types of systems it would prefer. Based on our understanding of the Town s goals and capacity, energy accounting as a service (option 2) is recommended. Evaluation criteria. Once the Town has decided which of the three approaches it prefers, the specific EMS can be selected based on: Functionality (inclusion of all desired capabilities) Ease of use Cost (capital and operational/maintenance) Staffing requirements Integration with other Town systems Security and redundancy of information/backups Current use by other municipalities. Next steps. Within Years 2-3 (medium-term), the Town can solicit proposals from different vendors for an EMS. The Town can then select and implement the preferred EMS. Establishing the supporting organizational capacity and processes Selecting and purchasing an EMS is one step; however, ensuring the appropriate resources are in place to use and manage the EMS is equally, if not more, important. The Town may need additional staff capacity to make use of the information from the EMS. The Town will also need new organizational processes to ensure that: The right information reaches the right people in a timely way; and TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 45

60 These people can use the information to take action on energy efficiency. Data and information. As part of the selection and implementation of the EMS, the Town will need to develop a reporting system for energy data (energy use, demand, costs, savings, progress, etc.). This reporting system should consider who will be reviewing the data, what they will be looking for, and what user interfaces are needed. For example: What information is relevant to staff responsible for operating and maintaining buildings? What analysis / statistical techniques are needed to transform the data into the information desired? What format can best convey this information to staff responsible for operating and maintaining buildings? How will the outputs be made available to staff (paper copy, e- mail reporting, web-based reporting)? How often should staff responsible for operating and maintaining buildings receive this information? What information is relevant to management staff? What format can best convey this information? How often should management staff receive this information? It is recommended that the Town start with a more limited and manageable set of outputs and reports. Then, as staff become more familiar with the EMS, the Town can look to add additional features, based on staff input about what is most useful. Implementation. The Town will also need to develop a system for acting on the problems and opportunities identified from the data. This system will enable staff to use the outputs of the EMS to improve energy efficiency. For example: How should staff responsible for operating and maintaining buildings respond to alerts about deviations from normal energy use patterns? How should staff report on the causes of the alert and any remedial action taken to address problems? Who should be responsible for analyzing weekly/monthly reports? How can they investigate any irregularities in the data? How can they pursue opportunities identified by the data? How should actions taken as a result of information from the energy management system be tracked on an ongoing basis? All relevant staff should be trained to understand energy management systems. They should also be trained to analyze 46 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

61 information from the EMS, and to take action as a result of this information. Next steps. Within Year 4 (long-term), the Town should determine the desired outputs and reports, and secure the staff resources required to manage the EMS. Alongside deployment of the EMS, the Town can develop a system for translating data and analysis into action (including training for staff). Once the EMS is deployed, the Town can use it to develop oneyear baselines for each building and each utility. These will be the basis for ongoing monitoring and tracking. Taking advantage of utility incentives As part of the Fixed Retrofit and Custom Retrofit Incentives program, Enbridge Gas provides incentives for the installation of an energy management system (up to $100,000, not exceeding 50% of the project s capital cost). Whitby Hydro also offers an Energy Management and Monitoring program under the Process and System Upgrade program. This program offers two types of incentives one for an Embedded Energy Manager and one for a monitoring and targeting system. For more details on incentives offered by Enbridge Gas and Whitby Hydro see Appendix D. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 47

62 Communication and engagement This section complements and expands on the high level communication and engagement actions identified in the Organizational actions table. These programs should be incorporated into the Town s Corporate Sustainability Plan that is currently being developed. Overview and program management The communication and engagement section will focus on three areas: Employee engagement Staff training Behaviour change and communication Each area is expanded upon in more detail below. Employee engagement In Years 2 and 3 (medium-term) of the CEMP, the Town should develop a pilot employee engagement program that encourages all Facilities staff to identify energy efficiency opportunities across the Town facilities (Action 52). Based on the success of this program, the Town should roll out the program to all staff within Year 4 (long-term) of the CEMP (Action 73). The program would establish a formal process for all Facilities staff to submit ideas based on their daily activities in Town facilities, and staff would receive recognition for their ideas. For example, staff might identify opportunities related to: Operational inefficiencies (e.g. buildings where night-time setbacks are not in place); Equipment maintenance needs (e.g. air handling units requiring maintenance); Equipment upgrades (e.g. buildings that would benefit from occupancy sensors); and Policy and business process changes. Staff that submit ideas would be rewarded for their contributions. This would encourage them to identify additional opportunities and submit additional ideas. Ideas from the employee engagement program would be reviewed and implemented wherever possible, along with reporting on the results. Ideas for the specific components of the employee engagement program include: 48 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

63 Staff training A system for staff to submit ideas. The Town should develop a new system for staff to submit ideas for energy efficiency opportunities. For example, creating a process where staff fill out a specific energy opportunities form (online or on paper) to give to their supervisors, who then submit the form for review. The form would include criteria such as: payback, life-cycle costing, ease of implementation, achievable energy savings, available incentives, occupant comfort, regulatory requirements, and contribution to demonstrating leadership. A system for recognizing staff contributions. Recognition / rewards for staff that contribute ideas should be designed based on culture of the organization. Particularly at the outset, the recognition and rewards system should convey that any idea is a good idea. The system could involve public recognition of individuals that submit ideas (e.g. contributing staff get their name in newsletter, their picture on the wall, and are eligible for the opportunity spotter of the month award). Or, it could involve rewards for group achievement (e.g. pizza lunches each month where over 25 ideas are submitted). Tools for communicating about the program. Particularly at the outset, the employee engagement program should be continuously promoted (e.g. reminders in meetings, advertised on posters, updates on progress visible on the wall) to encourage staff to submit ideas. Staff should also receive feedback about the implementation of their ideas, to realize that they are making a difference. Based on the success of the pilot, the program can be implemented more broadly across all staff at the Town in Year 4 (long-term). Implementing an employee engagement program has many benefits, including: providing a formal system for staff to submit ideas, allowing for opportunities to be captured and not missed, and encouraging Facilities staff responsible for operating and maintaining buildings to share their ideas and knowledge. This section provides further information on six types of training identified as actions in the Organizational actions section. General training on energy efficiency for all Facilities staff (Action 49); TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 49

64 Facility specific energy training for Facilities staff responsible for operating and maintaining specific buildings (Action 50); Project specific training for Facilities staff, as needed (e.g. new technology, new piece of equipment, etc.) (Action 51); General energy efficiency training for all new hires (Action 71); General energy efficiency training for staff who work in the Procurement Division and the Finance Division (Action 72); and Energy efficiency training for fleet drivers (Action 80). Facilities staff training General energy training should be provided to all Facilities staff to ensure that they have the knowledge and skills to contribute to efficient energy management within the Town. Training options should be developed and implemented in Years 2 to 3 (medium- term). The training could be provided as a half-day or full-day workshop, or through multiple weekly / monthly sessions. Training may address: Energy basics (cost of energy, how and where energy is used); Lighting and mechanical equipment basics; Building automation systems and re-commissioning; Metering, monitoring, and the energy management system; How to spot energy saving opportunities; The Town s building policies, preventative maintenance program, and re-commissioning plan; and The Town s employee engagement program (including how to submit ideas and what types of ideas can be submitted). Facilities staff should receive an internal certificate upon completion of the training, recognizing that they have gained important knowledge and skills. The Town should provide general energy management training to all Facilities staff every two to three years (or more often, if staff turnover is high). The content of the training can be updated to reflect state of the art knowledge about energy management, and to reflect changes in the Town s buildings, equipment, and practices. 50 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

65 New hires More specific training on energy management and energy efficiency should be provided to all Facilities staff responsible for operating and maintaining specific buildings. This training would be catered toward specific features of the operator s building, allowing the operator to manage energy more effectively within individual buildings. Additionally, project specific training on energy should be provided to operators, as needed, when new equipment or a new piece of technology is installed. This includes any updates to the building and its systems. The program(s) may be designed and delivered by in-house staff, trainers may be hired from outside the organization and/or staff could be sent to more generic training (e.g. Natural Resource Canada s Dollars to $ense Energy Management Workshops). The Town should also investigate working with Durham College and / or the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT) to develop these training programs. Training for energy management should be built into the existing training and orientation process for all new hires. General training on energy efficiency should be provided for all new staff (see Action 71) while more specific training on energy efficiency should be provided to new staff that will be operating and maintaining buildings. Training could be more or less formal, as appropriate given current training and orientation practices. Procurement and Finance staff training Training on energy efficiency should also be provided to staff who work in the Procurement Division and the Finance Division. Staff should be made aware of and understand why energy should be taken into consideration when purchasing equipment, reviewing proposals, and making budgetary decisions. Implementing energy initiatives do not just involve capital costs investments in energy efficiency can produce real savings that will benefit the Town either immediately or over time. Fleet driver training All staff that drive Town vehicles should be trained to operate vehicles in a more fuel-efficient manner. Fuel-efficient driving will not only reduce GHG emissions and other pollutants, but it will also reduce fuel costs and save the Town money. Energy efficiency training could be incorporated into an existing training program, or could be provided as a half-day or full-day TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 51

66 workshop or as an online course with different modules. The driver-training program should be implemented in Year 4 (longterm) of the CEMP. Driver training should include information regarding: Vehicle maintenance Idling reduction Routing optimization Vehicle right-sizing Driving habits (speeds, gear changing, braking, etc.) Determining and evaluating fuel saving options Analyzing performance All staff who complete the training should receive a certificate upon completion, recognizing that they have gained important knowledge and skills. Training could be designed and delivered by in-house staff, trainers may be hired from outside the organization, and/or staff could be sent to more generic training (e.g. Natural Resource Canada s Fuel Management 101 Workshop). Natural Resources Canada also has an Auto$mart Driver Education program that could be purchased by the Town and incorporated into a workshop delivered by in-house staff. Another option for the Town could be to sign up for a challenge such as the Shuttle Challenge 9. This challenge involves measuring the baseline fuel usage and impact, taking the free online Eco driver training course, and then pledging to improve fuel impact by 10% over the next two weeks. Behaviour change and communication Communicating about the CEMP and encouraging staff to think about energy efficiency in their day-to-day activities is one of the objectives of this plan and is fundamental to improving the management of energy within the Town. Behaviour change programs are important for raising staff awareness about energy management. They provide information to staff about opportunities they can take to save energy and reduce consumption. Change in behaviour may also lead to up to five percent in energy intensity savings. A behaviour change program and communication strategy should be developed. This strategy should involve a combination of tools and 9 For more information on the Shuttle Challenge, refer to: 52 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

67 initiatives to communicate and engage the staff. These could include: Using a consistent set of high impact tools for corporate Town-wide communication. These may include: visual displays in the lobbies of facilities, dashboard tools on the Town s intranet, e-newsletters, brochures, YouTube videos, event calendars, etc. Developing an energy brand (e.g. logo) to promote awareness of energy initiatives. The branding could easily be used to communicate about other related initiatives such as greening and sustainability. Developing building-specific poster boards and educational materials discussing the building s energy efficient features, technologies, retrofits, etc. Promoting the spot the energy efficiency opportunities program for staff outlined above in the Employee engagement section. This will help encourage staff to think about energy management in their day-to-day activities, and change their behaviours to include energy efficiency. Implementing a friendly competition between departments focusing on energy efficiency and energy reduction. Progress on the CEMP should also be communicated to the community so they are aware of the energy initiatives being undertaken by the Corporation. The sustainability page on the Town of Whitby website is very informative and already has a lot of information about sustainability initiatives that have been undertaken by the Town. Updates on the CEMP and energy efficiency initiatives should also be included on this website. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 53

68 Conclusion There are very significant opportunities for the Town of Whitby to improve the energy efficiency of its buildings, to reduce utility costs, and to minimize its environmental footprint. From 2014 to 2019, the Town will work to reduce its energy intensity by 12-16% and to reduce GHG emissions by 14-19%. The Town of Whitby can take advantage of these opportunities by implementing the organizational and technological actions of the Corporate Energy Management Plan, including: Assigning appropriate staff resources to implement both the organizational and technical actions recommended in the CEMP, and establishing an Energy Management Team to oversee and report on the implementation departmental CEMP actions; Developing an energy strategy that is communicated to all Town staff; Systematically and strategically implementing the recommended retrofits in existing buildings; Developing a rigorous and effective monitoring and tracking system through an EMS and supporting organizational capacity; Implementing the education, communication, engagement and training initiatives for staff; and Developing organizational policies and processes for implementing the CEMP, tracking progress, and updating the CEMP. The Town of Whitby has the motivation and expertise to implement all of the actions in the CEMP. The Town s investments in energy efficiency will yield significant returns, in the traditional economic sense, and will allow the Town to reduce its GHG emissions. Finally, they will help the Town of Whitby to manage energy efficiently and ensure it is part of the day-to-day activities of Town staff. 54 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

69 Appendix A. Present state This section provides an overview of the present state of energy use in the Town of Whitby facilities, including the Town s 2013 utility energy data, and a description of existing policies and plans. A.1. Utility data analysis Table 8 shows the energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions reporting template for 2012 for the Town of Whitby, including the utility data, GHG emissions, and energy intensity for the Town of Whitby buildings that are required to be reported to the Ministry of Energy under Regulation 397/11 of the Green Energy Act. Table 8 Energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions reporting template for 2012 for the Town of Whitby TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 55

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71 A.2. Description of existing energy initiatives, policies, and plans For the Town of Whitby, energy has strategic importance. Well before undertaking the Corporate Energy Management Plan, the Town has been actively implementing and exploring energy conservation and sustainability opportunities. In addition, several Town plans and strategies support energy conservation and GHG emissions reduction. These reports demonstrate the Town s commitment to the environment, energy, and sustainability. They establish relevant goals for the Town, as a community and as a corporation. These plans and strategies are briefly described in more detail below. The Natural Step: Sustainability & Whitby: The Road Forward The Natural Step: Sustainability & Whitby: The Road Forward is an eight-step Road Map detailing a recommended process for the Town to follow in order to develop a Corporate Sustainability Plan. The report was prepared by consultant, The Natural Step Canada, who were retained by the Town in 2012 to complete sustainability training for select staff, assess the organization, and develop recommendations for how the Town should proceed with incorporating and embedding sustainability into the corporate culture. Corporate Sustainability Plan Based on the recommendations from the Natural Step, the Town is currently developing a Corporate Sustainability Plan. The plan will utilize the concepts of sustainability and integrate them into the day-to-day activities of staff, as well as the longterm planning within each department. The plan is meant to help balance the Town s economic, social, cultural and environmental responsibilities, and demonstrate to the broader community the Town s leadership and commitment to sustainability. It aims to guide the Corporation s actions, provide a process for implementing plans, and consider new sustainability initiatives in the short, medium and long term. Port Whitby Sustainable Community Plan The Port Whitby Sustainable Community Plan is a high level, strategic plan, published in 2011 that examines how Port Whitby can grow and develop in a sustainable manner over time. Six key strategies are outlined in the Plan, one of which is energy. Within this category, three areas for improving energy performance in the area of Port Whitby are recommended: 1. Ensuring a higher energy performance in all new construction; TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 57

72 2. Developing a district heat and power system; and 3. Utilizing solar energy for electricity generation on-site. The implementation of the plan is not tied to a specific timeline. Some of the recommended strategies can be implemented immediately, while others will be undertaken further in the future. The intent of the Port Whitby Sustainable Community Plan is to set a bold yet achievable plan for the long-term sustainability of Port Whitby. Whitby Community Strategic Plan Official Plan This plan was developed in 2002 and reflects the collective visions, goals and values of the Whitby community. Six objectives are identified in the plan that strive to help meet the vision of Whitby being the Community of Choice for family and business, embracing the future while respecting our proud heritage and natural environment, and promoting our strong sense of community identity. While the plan does not specifically address energy conservation, it does speak to new development and managing growth in an environmentally responsible manner, including: revitalizing the downtown core to entice more people to live and work in the area, and protecting, preserving and enhancing Whitby s natural environment and green spaces. The current Whitby Official Plan was adopted by Whitby Council in 1994 and has since been subject to numerous amendments. It provides goals, objectives, and policies for the coordinated growth and development of the Town. The Plan demonstrates the Town s commitment to energy conservation by including policies that encompass energy under the Urban Design section of the Plan. These policies are listed below: Section : Development which minimizes energy consumption while maximizing energy efficiency, and emphasizes the use of renewable energy sources shall be encouraged. In this regard, Council shall: a) Promote an orderly and transit supportive pattern of urban growth in development of transit oriented urban design; b) Encourage infilling, reuse and redevelopment; c) Encourage, where practical, mixed use developments to reduce the need for trips to diverse locations in the Municipality, hence conserving energy; 58 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

73 d) Encourage new residential, commercial and industrial subdivisions to be designed for proper building orientation in relation to sun and wind, using passive solar energy planning principles; e) Ensure the use of appropriately selected and located vegetation that will reduce the energy consumption of buildings; f) Endeavour to ensure access to direct sunlight during winter daylight hours for all south-facing glass and potential solar collector panels on existing and future buildings; and g) Encourage energy-efficient construction and space heating techniques in new development and renovations. Section : Council shall maximize opportunities for the use of energy efficient modes of travel while reducing energy consumption for automobile travel within the municipality. In this regard, Council shall: a) Encourage greater use of the public transit system; b) Promote building design and circulation systems such as sidewalks and bicycle paths which facilitate pedestrian movement, the use of public transit and travel by bicycle; c) Design road systems and traffic controls to minimize unnecessary stops, idling, starts and turns, and to decrease travel time; d) Encourage, where appropriate, the development of central and common parking areas; e) Promote ride sharing programs such as car pooling; and f) Distribute housing, schools, parks, employment and commercial areas in a manner that reduces travel distance and vehicle trips. Intensification Strategy and Official Plan Amendment 90 The Town of Whitby Intensification Strategy was developed in 2009 and 2010 as a component to the Whitby Official Plan Review. The Intensification Strategy explores different types and forms of intensification, identifies locations in the Town most suitable for intensification, and establishes criteria for assessing intensification development proposals. Recommendations that relate to energy are outlined below: Update to the criteria to be considered when intensification proposals are submitted TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 59

74 All lighting shall be internally oriented so as not to cause glare on adjacent properties or public roads. Outdoor lighting fixtures that reduce energy consumption and direct light away from the night sky shall be encouraged. Update to the long-term vision for the Port Whitby / Whitby GO Intensification Area Create a model of environmental sustainability, including buildings that meet the highest standards of energy and water use efficiency. Update to the section on low-density intensification on lands outside of intensification areas New buildings will have a complementary design relationship with existing buildings, while accommodating a diversity of architectural styles, building materials and colours, energy conservation techniques and innovative built forms. The recommendations from the strategy were incorporated into the Official Plan Amendment 90, which was adopted by Council in 2010 and further amended in Official Plan Amendment 90 has been appealed to the Ontario Municipal Board. Official Plan Review The Official Plan Review also involves proposed amendments to other parts of the Official Plan. In April 2013, a public meeting was held to consider a Proposed Draft Amendment, which includes a new section in the Official Plan called Sustainable Community Planning. The draft amendment includes policies, which are overarching principles and objectives, and proposes changes to the policy framework for sustainable community planning, economic prosperity, growth management, and cultural heritage protection. Following public and agency review, it is expected that those, and other policies, will be revised and considered for adoption by Council in the future. Transportation Master Plan Whitby s Transportation Master Plan was completed in 2010 and identifies a multi-modal strategy for the Town that includes optimizing and expanding the existing roadway network, as well as promoting the use of public transit and expanding the active transportation system. The plan sets a target of reducing automobile usage in the Town by 15%, which will help to reduce GHG emissions and improve air quality. Overall, the plan aims to identify an integrated and diversified transportation framework that supports long-term growth, as well as providing 60 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

75 for the efficient movement of people and goods to areas within and to / from the Town. Corporate Sustainability Team In 2008, Council approved the establishment of a Corporate Sustainability Team to enhance the sustainability practices of the Town of Whitby. The Team consists of representatives from each department within the Town, who meet regularly throughout the year to discuss corporate policies and projects that will further enhance the sustainability practices within the Corporation and to review and monitor those efforts. The objectives of the Team are to: Provide input and identify opportunities for consideration of programs, policies and plans that promote principles of sustainability; Review policies and provide advice, as requested, to the Senior Management Team and Council; Communicate and promote the principles of sustainability; Identify potential targets within an established framework for sustainability and monitor and report annually on the Town s progress to the corporation and the community; and Assist in the preparation and review of Terms of Reference for Town-initiated projects, where requested, to facilitate embedding sustainability within the corporate culture. Whitby Sustainability Advisory Committee The Whitby Sustainability Advisory Committee was established in 2013 to serve as an advisory committee to Council. The role of the Committee is to promote sustainability, support environmental management, and response to climate change by: Providing advice, support, and guidance to Council regarding sustainability, climate change, and environmental management issues; Supporting education, awareness, and stewardship in the community through engagement, outreach, and advocacy; and Assisting the Corporation and the community to identify, develop, and implement plans, programs, policies, strategies, and actions. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 61

76 Other initiatives Other energy-related initiatives that have been implemented within the Town include: Building the new Brooklin Community Centre and Library to a LEED Silver standard; Installing photovoltaic solar panels at the Civic Recreation Centre under the microfit program; Implementing a LED street lighting retrofit pilot project; Completing lighting retrofit projects throughout Town facilities; Replacing old equipment with the most up-to-date technology. A.3. Summary of results from All Our Ideas As part of the CEMP planning process, Town staff were invited to provide their input into the preparation of the plan by participating in an online crowdsourcing activity (All Our Ideas). The purpose of the activity was to gather input from Town staff to prioritize the recommended organizational actions in the plan and to determine what actions were seen as most important for managing the Town's corporate energy use. The results of this activity were taken into consideration when preparing and prioritizing the organizational actions in the CEMP (taking into account that some of the top voted actions can only be put in place after the corporate structure is established to facilitate these actions). In order to provide their input, staff were directed to a website where they were able to see two of the recommended actions on the screen. Staff then had to choose which action they thought was most important by clicking on one of the boxes. The website would then randomly generate two more actions to choose between, and staff could continue choosing actions for as long as they wanted. Staff also had the option of adding their own ideas by providing additional actions at the bottom of the screen. In total, 96 staff participated in the crowdsourcing activity and provided 2530 votes. The top ten actions are listed below in order of most votes: 1. Implement cost effective, energy efficiency projects in existing buildings. 2. Develop a formal policy to check that new Town-owned buildings are operating efficiently after construction. 62 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

77 3. Develop a process for identifying, evaluating, and developing renewable and alterative energy projects (e.g. wind, solar, geothermal, deep lake cooling). 4. Identify and adopt formal energy efficient equipment standards to be followed when replacing equipment (e.g. Energy Star). 5. Develop an energy efficiency building standard for new construction and major renovations (e.g. LEED, BOMA, etc.). 6. Develop consistent guidelines and policies for energy management to be followed at all facilities. 7. Develop guidelines for considering energy when constructing new Town-owned buildings. 8. Develop and implement a corporate Town-wide energy and sustainability behaviour change program for all staff. 9. Develop and design construction standards to ensure that new sub-divisions are equipped with LED streetlights. 10. Implement general training on energy and energy efficiency for all Facilities staff. Several additional actions were also suggested by staff, including: Install LED lighting in facilities. Install metal roofing instead of asphalt (50 year lifespan vs. 10 year lifespan). Install battery isolators and a second battery in Works vehicles to power the beacon lights so the vehicle can be turned of when on the road. Install natural lighting and solar hot water heaters. Install power inverters for work trucks instead of generators. Replace appliances in staff lounge with Energy Star models (i.e. dishwasher, stove and fridges). Include baseline performance targets for major procurements (i.e. vehicles, HVAC equipment, buildings). Utilize energy efficient criteria in all purchase considerations. Upgrade to energy saving devices, such as motion sensor lighting. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 63

78 Conserve energy costs at Town Hall by installing Plexiglas panels to enclose all departments and maintain the open concept. Through this innovative outreach activity, staff were not only able to get a sense of the recommended organizational actions and prioritize them, but it also ensured that the CEMP was informed by a range of perspectives from all levels within the organization. This broad engagement was a first step for setting the stage for future energy management awareness, education and behaviour change initiatives that will be carried out within the Town over the next 5 years. 64 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

79 Appendix B. Roles and responsibilities Several of the organizational actions identify the need for dedicated staff resources to implement the CEMP. Having sufficient resources will be imperative to ensuring the success of the Plan and for effectively managing energy use and GHG emissions at the Town. The following table outlines the key actions related to staff resources and identifies the recommended roles and responsibilities for these positions. Table 9 Staff roles and responsibilities for implementing the CEMP Role Dedicated staff to implement CEMP (Sustainability Coordinator) Energy Technician Responsibilities Taking the lead on overseeing and monitoring the implementation of the CEMP and implementing the organizational actions. Responsibilities include: Ensuring actions are implemented and progress is tracked yearly; Preparing annual CEMP reviews and plan update; Designing and implementing the communication, employee engagement, and behaviour change programs for all staff; Working closely with the Energy Management Team; Working closely with the Energy Technician. Acting as a central energy resource and contact for all Facilities staff. Responsibilities include: Managing the selected EMS; Developing training programs and employee engagement for Facilities staff; Taking the lead on overseeing the implementation of the technical actions; Working with utility companies to take advantage of available incentives; Working closely with the Sustainability Coordinator. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 65

80 Role Energy Management Team Responsibilities Acting as the liaison between departments and the Sustainability Coordinator. Responsibilities include: Implementing departmental CEMP actions; Reporting back to the Sustainability Coordinator on CEMP progress. Facilities staff Dealing with energy on a day-to-day basis. Responsibilities include: Identifying and implementing energy saving opportunities at facilities; Participating in training programs. 66 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

81 Appendix C. Criteria for prioritizing actions The Town of Whitby can evaluate and prioritize energy management actions identified in the future (e.g. from future Level II audits, staff ideas, and renewable/alternative energy feasibility studies), based on the following criteria: Cost-effectiveness: Is the action cost-effective over its lifespan? The Town should employ a lifecycle approach to determine the cost effectiveness of proposed actions. Two criteria employed in this plan and that can used to evaluate capital and operating costs and savings over the lifespan of future actions are the internal rate of return (IRR) and net present value (NPV). IRR captures lifetime energy savings and conveys that projects with high capital costs (and long paybacks), but long effective lives are a good investment. The net present value (NPV) of an action is also a useful calculation, as it provides a measure of the estimated net financial benefit of each action To be true lifecycle costs the Town should also take into account the maintenance and disposal costs and savings associated with implementing an action. Contribution to day-to-day energy efficiency: Does the action make energy management visible at Town facilities, change the behaviour of staff, help the Town to publicize its successes, and contribute to the Town s reputation? Leadership: Does the action help the Town become a leader in energy management? Does it demonstrate the Town s commitment to improving its energy performance? The Town should implement projects that are not cost-effective if they have high visibility, demonstrate new or emerging technologies, are an established best practice, etc.). These criteria align with the objectives presented in the Objectives and targets section: 1. The Town of Whitby will realize measureable and meaningful improvements in energy efficiency. 2. The efficient use of energy will be embedded in the dayto-day activities of all staff. 3. The Town of Whitby will demonstrate leadership in efficient energy management. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 67

82 In addition, the Town can consider the following criteria: Annual energy savings: For projects with good NPV, the Town should prioritize actions with the highest annual energy savings. Though these larger projects will likely have high capital costs, they will have the most significant impact on the Town s overall energy performance. They will also yield the highest returns per hour of Town staff time devoted to implementation. Ease of implementation: Projects may be accelerated (or decelerated) based on ease of implementation. For example, a project with a lower IRR should be scheduled for immediate implementation if renovations in the building make it very easy to implement and staff resources are available. A project with a higher IRR should be delayed if implementation is currently very difficult, if staff resources are not available, and if planned renovations (or other changes) will make it significantly easier in the future. Occupant comfort and regulatory requirements: Projects that increase comfort, address occupant concerns, or address regulatory requirements will improve the overall experience of Town staff, enhance the Town s reputation, or contribute to the culture of effective energy use. Availability of incentives: The Town should also accelerate implementation of projects that are eligible for funding from electric and gas utilities, or from provincial or federal governments. This is particularly important where incentives are likely to be discontinued in the near future (e.g. in 2015 for current saveonenergy programs). 68 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

83 Appendix D. Utility incentives This section describes incentives and services that are currently available from the Town s electricity and natural gas utilities. The Town of Whitby can take advantage of these incentives to implement some of the technical measures identified. For the most part, the applicable incentive program for the majority of technical measures related to electricity would fall under the Equipment Replacement Incentives Initiative (ERII) from Whitby Hydro. For natural gas, all applicable technical measures would fall under the Fixed Retrofit and Custom Retrofit Incentives program from Enbridge Gas. For specific recommendations on incentives for each of the technical measures please refer to the audit reports. For metering measures, the Process and System Upgrade Initiative would be applicable on the electricity side, and the Custom Retrofit Incentives program would be applicable for natural gas. Whitby Hydro / Ontario Power Authority saveonenergy Programs Full details are available at: Demand Response (DR3) Program The OPA s Demand Response 3 (DR3) Program offers rebates to voluntary participants in the commercial and industrial sector, of 50 kw or greater, to reduce the amount of power being used during certain periods of the year. Participants are scheduled to be on standby approximately 1,600 hours per calendar year and are notified to reduce their load up to 100 to 200 hours within the year depending on the contract. Payments are made to participants based on their actual energy reduction during the demand response event. Alternatively, participating organizations can sign a contract with an aggregator to reduce the risk of not meeting required load reductions. Process and System Upgrade Initiatives (PSUI) The process and systems upgrade program provides support for facilities to identify major energy saving opportunities and continue to take advantage of these savings. Organizations can receive up to 70 percent funding for major energy-saving upgrade projects. TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 69

84 The program offers two types of services: 1. Energy efficiency upgrades includes a three-step feasibility and upgrade process (preliminary engineering study, detailed engineering study and capital incentives). 2. Energy management and monitoring provides long-term support to increase savings (includes an Embedded Energy Manager and/or a monitoring and targeting plan). An Embedded Energy Manager can be obtained through the PSUI program where the utility company will fund up to 80% of the Embedded Manager s annual salary. The Embedded Energy Manager must: Be hired by the municipality; Implement 0.3MW of peak demand savings and 0.3MW x Facility Load Factor x 8,760 hours of energy savings each year; Enrol in energy management related training programs; Develop an energy management plan and provide quarterly reporting; and Commit to implementing projects with a less than oneyear payback. Another option is to hire a Roving Energy Manager if hiring a full time Embedded Energy Manager is not warranted. A Roving Energy Manager is shared between multiple municipalities and is available for a short-term stay. For further information, contact Whitby Hydro. Equipment Replacement Incentive Initiative (ERII) This program offers incentives to non-residential customers to reduce electritown demand and consumption by upgrading to more energy-efficient equipment for uses such as, lighting, space cooling, ventilation, elevators, and sub-metering. Upgrades are subject to project measurement and verification (M&V) to confirm the new equipment achieves energy and demand savings. Successful participants are eligible to receive between $10,000 and $25,000 for basic upgrades, and more than $25,000 for enhanced upgrades. High Performance New Construction program The Ontario Power Authority supports up to 100% of the cost of modeling a new energy efficient building (up to $10,000). Approved projects are also eligible for incentives for energy savings through a prescriptive path, an engineered path, or a custom path with incentives based on modelled energy performance. There is no cap on the incentives for energy savings. 70 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

85 Audit funding program Businesses can receive up to 50% of the cost of an energy audit, or up to a certain dollar amount (whichever is less based on the size of the facility and complexity of the audit). Energy audits can identify ways to save energy through equipment replacement, operational procedures, or participation in Demand Response initiatives. Existing Building Commissioning The program provides incentives for large buildings (>50,000ft 2 ) with chiller water plants. Incentives cover: hiring an expert to analyze the Chilled Water System and make recommendations for increasing its energy efficiency; buying and installing metering equipment; and implementing the recommended upgrades. The participant incentives are broken down into four project phases: 1. Scoping Study: amount charged, to a maximum of $2, Investigation Phase: up to $30, Implementation Phase: up to $5,000 plus up to 50% of purchasing and installing equipment costs. 4. Completion Phase: amount charged, to a maximum of $2,500. Enbridge Gas Energy Management Programs Full details are available at: Fixed Retrofit and Custom Retrofit Incentives Fixed commercial retrofit incentives are offered for condensing boilers, high efficiency boilers, air doors, infrared heaters, energy and heat recovery ventilators, condensing make-up air systems, ozone laundry systems, low-flow showerheads, and dishwashers. Qualifying custom projects may include: improving boiler or ventilation controls, installing energy or heat recovery systems, installing energy management systems or other automated controls, insulation upgrades, installing reflective panels on radiators, or high extraction washers. Implementing any number of energy-saving measures could result in a savings of $0.10 per m³ of gas saved, up to $100,000 per facility or project, not exceeding 50% of the project s capital cost (before tax). TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 71

86 Energy Compass This is a free diagnostic service that evaluates the operating efficiency of buildings to identify energy efficiency improvement opportunities along with applicable financial incentives. 72 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

87 Appendix E. Best practices The following table outlines energy and environmental best practices that are being followed in five leading jurisdictions: the City of Markham, the Town of Oakville, the City of Guelph, the City of Vancouver, and the City of Copenhagen. These best practices are meant to act as a guide for the Town of Whitby, and provide insight into what successful initiatives are being developed and followed in other jurisdictions, both at the corporate level and within the community. At a minimum, they represent ideas or concepts that can be adjusted and modified to contribute to the energy savings and GHG emission reductions in the Town of Whitby. These ideas are applicable to both the Corporate Energy Management Plan and the Corporate Action Plan, as well as the Town s future community energy plan. Table 1 Energy conservation and GHG best practices in five leading municipalities Targets Initiatives Relevance to the Town of Whitby City of Markham (population 301,709) Net zero energy, water and waste emissions by N/A Leader in renewable energy, generating over $300,000 of non-tax revenue annually through its large system of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations 1. Live online energy dashboard that tracks solar energy generated. Commitment by the City to championing renewable energy opportunities. Developed the Markham Energy Conservation Office (MECO) in 2005 with funding support from the City of Markham and PowerStream to lead, develop and N/A Investing in renewable energy sources will decrease the amount of energy the Town must purchase, reduce its carbon footprint, and will demonstrate leadership in energy management. Having buy-in and commitment from Senior Management and Council is essential for the successful implementation of the CEMP. Engaging employees and making staff aware of how they can conserve energy at work not only reduces the Town s energy 1 The City boasts two of the largest rooftop solar generation systems in York Region located on Thornhill and Mount Joy Community Centres, as well as a 10kW solar PV system on the roof of the Civic Centre. (

88 Targets Initiatives Relevance to the Town of Whitby - implement energy conservation programs. In 2009, MECO was joined with the Sustainability Office. Employee awareness program of energy conservation for City staff. Operation of two district energy systems one in Markham Centre providing thermal energy for the heating and cooling of six million square feet of building space; and one in Cornell Centre serving the hospital, community centre and library, fire station, and other surrounding buildings. Development of Markham s Greenprint Sustainability Plan in 2011, which outlines 14 actions related to energy and climate 2. Development of the Markham Environmental and Sustainability Fund that provides financial resources for community environmental projects. To-date, 45 community projects have been completed 3. consumption, but it also helps to embed energy within the corporate culture and the day-to-day activities of staff. People want to live in communities that are forward thinking and focused on improving the well being of its residents. The Town should consider creating a fund to help the community implement more sustainability, energy and environment-related initiatives as part of their community energy plan. Town of Oakville (population 182,520) 20% reduction in corporate operations GHG emissions below 2004 levels by N/A Partnering with Seneca College to implement an operation and training program for all operators and staff that work in Town facilities (~150 employees). N/A Energy efficiency training will allow for a consistent approach to energy management and ensure all operators and staff have the appropriate knowledge and 2 The plan can be found at: 3 More information on the Markham Environmental and Sustainability Fund can be found at:

89 Targets Initiatives Relevance to the Town of Whitby 6% reduction in Sustainable Green Fleet Guide to assist understanding. community GHG with the Town s GHG emission reduction Driving training will teach staff how they emissions below 2004 goals, reduce the use of non-renewable can contribute to reducing emissions and levels by resources, and improve fuel efficiency. become more aware of fuel efficiency. Drive Smart campaign for all staff, and energy efficiency driver-training program for staff that drive Town vehicles. Online database of all Town policies and procedures 4. Zero Waste Procedure that lays out specific zero waste goals and actions 5. Smog, heat, and extreme weather protocols on days when the local air quality and weather may impact health 6. Having one centralized location to look up policies and procedures allows for easy access and reference. It also allows for policies and procedures to remain in place when staff turnover. Developing a zero waste program will demonstrate Town leadership in waste management, reduce the amount of waste going to the landfill, and reduce costs associated with waste pick up and disposal. Developing a smog, heat, and extreme weather protocol will demonstrate the Town s leadership and commitment to ensuring the health and well-being of its residents and employees. 4 The development of the policy and procedure database is the responsibility of the Clerks department. More information can be found here: 5 Example initiatives include: bottled-water phase-out, zero waste approach to all events in Town facilities, three stream waste diversion system (including compost), and no individual garbage cans at staff desks (there are only centralized garbage bins within Town buildings). The procedure has resulted in a 70 percent waste diversion rate. 6 Protocols include: notification s, posting local air quality information within facilities, and suspending duties such as road surfacing, the use of non-essential equipment (e.g. lawn mowers), and permitted pesticides, paints, solvents and cleaners, among others. This protocol is supplemented by the Town s Clean Air Strategy that outlines year-round actions to improve air quality.

90 Targets Initiatives Relevance to the Town of Whitby City of Guelph (population 128,668) Produce 50% less GHG emissions per capita by 2031, using 2005 as the benchmark year 7. Consume 50% less energy per capita by 2031, using 2005 as the benchmark year. 50 percent of heating and cooling needs of the City to be supplied through the district energy system over the next 30 years. 25% of total energy sourced from renewable sources within 15 years. Reduce energy consumption of the transportation sector by 25% before 2031, using 2005 as the benchmark year. N/A First North American City to establish a District Energy Strategic Plan to develop a district energy network across its entire city 8. Award winning Community Energy Initiative (formally called the Community Energy Plan). 190 solar installations on City buildings, businesses, churches, and individual homes, which have a solar generating capacity of 5.5 megawatts. Development and update to the Water Conservation and Efficiency Strategy, which identifies programs, policies, and resource requirements. Development of the Bicycle-Friendly Guelph Cycling Master Plan. Ridership of 7 million people on Guelph transit in Energy audits completed at 13 City facilities that identified $3.3 million in energy conservation projects that will result in annual savings of more than N/A Building smart communities is the way of the future. In areas with higher population densities, district energy can be more energy efficient and reduce carbon emissions compared to other energy generation options. A community energy plan will allow energy to be viewed and generated within the Town in a holistic manner. It will help the Town assess the potential for local generation, renewable energy opportunities, the utilization of smart grid technology, and the implications of future growth and development. The Town of Whitby should investigate options for more solar and other renewable energy installations on Town facilities, and lead by example to encourage the community of Whitby to also install renewable energy technologies. 7 Source: 8 The first district energy facility opened at the end of 2013 at the Sleeman Centre, which is Guelph s main sports and enterta inment venue. The next step is to develop a district energy network in the 675-acre Hanlon Creek Business Park. Eight other areas within the City have also been identified for initial district energy projects. Sources: and

91 Targets Initiatives Relevance to the Town of Whitby Reduction in water use of 8,773 m 3 /day by $400,000 per year. Opened a waste diversion education centre where visitors can learn about how the City collects and processes waste. City of Vancouver (population 603,502) Reduce community-based GHG emissions by 33% from 2007 levels by Reduce energy use and GHG emissions in existing buildings by 20% over 2007 levels by Require all buildings constructed from 2020 onward to be carbon neutral in operations. Reduce total solid waste going to the landfill or incinerator by 50% from 2008 levels - - N/A The City of Vancouver wants to become the greenest city in the world by 2020 and has developed the Greenest City 2020 Action Plan to help meet its goal. Along with this, the City prepares biennial implementation update reports to track and report on progress made. Council commitment and support to lowering City energy consumption and taking action toward the Greenest City goals. The City understands they must walk the talk and be a leader for the community. All new municipal buildings are to be built to LEED Gold 9. Upgrades to City facility lighting, building automation systems, and heating systems have resulted in significant energy savings and a reduction in GHG emissions by 22% over 1990 levels 10. Biodiesel fuel made from canola oil in all N/A Gaining the support and buy-in from Council and Senior Management is essential for moving plans, policies, and initiatives forward. The Whitby community looks to the Town for leadership and guidance if the Town as a corporation is progressive in energy and sustainability, the community will be more inclined to follow suit. There are many benefits and costs to LEED certification. The Town already has one LEED Silver building, and should work toward developing energy efficiency building standards that go beyond LEED. Energy efficiency vehicle operation practices will teach staff to drive more efficiently and will result in annual reductions in fuel consumption. - 9 Some features of Vancouver s LEED buildings include: high-efficiency glazing to prevent heat loss, geothermal heating and cooling, light sensors, dual-flush toilets, radiant floor heating, light tubes to provide natural daylight, geo-exchange heating, and solar panels. 10 Further information on specific facility upgrades are available at:

92 Targets Initiatives Relevance to the Town of Whitby City diesel-powered vehicles. Three electric fleet vehicles (Mitsubishi imiev, Toyota Prius, and Nissan LEAF). Efficient driving practices including: driver training and staff education, idle-free signs, idle cut-offs to three minutes, a complete no air conditioning policy, and cab heaters to allow staff to keep warm without idling 11. Sustainable commuting program that offers incentives to City employees to encourage them to walk, bike or car pool to work all funded through charging employees for parking 12. Hiring of a Corporate Zero Waste Officer in 2012 to implement a more comprehensive waste diversion program in City facilities. Updated Building Bylaw, which requires new residential homes to meet stricter energy efficiency requirements, and existing buildings under renovation to complete energy audits and minor upgrades. Community district heating systems throughout the City. The Southeast False Creek Neighbourhood Energy Utility (SEFC NEU) district heating system captures waste heat from a municipal sewer line. The City owns a landfill and captures and More information on how the City is greening its fleet can be found at: 12 More information on the City s sustainable commuting policy can be found at:

93 Targets Initiatives Relevance to the Town of Whitby -- converts the methane gas produced to energy. The electricity is used to heat local greenhouses and is also sold to BC Hydro. - City of Copenhagen (population 550,887) Reduce CO 2 emissions by 20% between 2005 and Decrease dependence on carbon-based energy sources to achieve 75% of total CO 2 reduction goal. Be first carbon neutral capital in the world by Put climate focus on all construction and renovation projects to achieve 10% of total CO 2 reduction goal. By 2015, 85% of the municipality s own vehicles will be electric, hydrogen, or hybrid powered. N/A Conduct annual accounting of City facility energy use. Undertake all energy saving measures that have a 10-year (or less) payback in municipal buildings; consider longer-term paybacks for bigger renovation projects. Complete all climate upgrade projects with payback less than 5-years in public buildings within 5 years of receiving national energy label 14. Restoration of street lights with environmental friendly light sources including LEDs. Construction of new windmills that deliver equivalent of entire municipal government s electricity use. Increased heating with geothermal energy six-fold by expanding a demonstration geothermal facility. Modernized district-heating network to reduce heat losses from pipes. Nighty- N/A District heating is one of the most carbon efficient and flexible ways to produce and supply energy locally, cutting out much of the emissions associated with centralized power generation. By integrating renewable energy to replace fossil fuels in the system, further reductions of emissions can be achieved. Energy considerations should be included in all phases of new development, including considering future operational costs during the construction stage. This will allow for future energy savings to be identified early on in process in order to overcome the initial expenses of building low-energy buildings. Several municipalities are switching to LED streetlights and traffic signals in order to save money on electricity bills and to reduce energy consumption. As LED technologies continue to advance, this option becomes more affordable and 13 From 2,500,000 tonnes to 2,000,000 tonnes CO 2 14 All buildings must undergo national energy labelling if they are to be sold or leased. The building s energy consumption, as well as an overview of all energy-related improvements that are cost-effective (includes their objective, implementation costs, and subsequent utility savings) is reported. Source: Danish Energy Agency website.

94 Targets Initiatives Relevance to the Town of Whitby eight percent of the City is heated through reliable. the district heating. Continuously take leadership in ensuring that national goals are met and that new, ambitious goals are adopted. Base all new construction and municipally financed construction projects on low energy principles, including establishing partnerships with developers to build lowenergy buildings that take into consideration construction costs along with operational costs. Fast-track all LEED-certified and energy efficient building construction projects Designated all new city development areas low energy areas with the toughest lowenergy standards, and enforce compliance. Established an energy fund so that savings from climate upgrading projects are used to finance future energy efficiency and renewables projects. In 2012, the municipal fleet consisted of 62 electric vehicles (15% of all vehicles) with technical specifications and the infrastructure under development to increase the number to 85% by Provide training on CO 2 reduction opportunities for building owners, renters, Purchasing electric vehicles and vehicles that use alternative fuel for the Town fleet will demonstrate to the community that the Town is taking action and is committed to reducing GHG emissions More information about electric vehicles and the framework in Copenhagen can be found at: Copenhagen/Solutions/More-Electric-Vehicles-in-Copenhagen

95 Targets Initiatives Relevance to the Town of Whitby -- crafts workers and consultants. - Added hot-mapping function on municipality s homepage to inform inhabitants and businesses of their building s heat losses. Working towards establishing and developing solar cell solutions through partnerships and a heightened information campaign. Installed motion sensors and timed lighting in all City-owned buildings. Investigated conversion of steam loop to natural gas for all City-owned buildings.

96 Appendix F. List of acronyms ASHRAE American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers BAS Building automation system CDM Conservation and demand management CEMP Corporate Energy Management Plan CO 2 eq Carbon dioxide equivalent CST Corporate Sustainability Team EM&V Evaluation, monitoring and verification EMS Energy management system FCM Federation of Canadian Municipalities FTE Full-time equivalent GHG Greenhouse gas HVAC Heating, ventilation and air conditioning IRR Internal rate of return IT Information technology KPI Key performance indicator LED Light-emitting diode NPV Net present value O&M Operations and maintenance OPA Ontario Power Authority PCP Partners for Climate Protection UOIT University of Ontario Institute of Technology VFD Variable frequency drive 82 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

97 Appendix G. Criteria used for IRR and NPV calculations A number of criteria were used for the internal rate of return (IRR) and net present value (NPV) calculations in this plan. These criteria include value of utility savings, the period, and the discount rate (for NPV calculations). For both IRR and NPV calculations, the initial investment was based on the capital cost of each of the energy conservation measures, including estimated incentives. The capital cost values were taken from the audit reports and extrapolated to all applicable buildings. The return on investment values were based on the estimated utility cost savings for each energy conservation measure. The electricity and natural gas savings for each measure were taken from the audit reports and multiplied by the average electricity and natural gas rates calculated as part of the energy analysis conducted by the auditing team. These base current utility rates can be found in Table 10. Table 10 Utility rates for audited buildings Audited building Electricity cost ($/kwh) Gas cost ($/m3) Civic Recreation Centre $0.13 $0.35 Firehall #5 (Headquarters) $0.14 $0.28 Whitby Library Main Branch $0.14 $0.26 McKinney Centre $0.12 $0.35 Operations Centre $0.13 $0.17 Senior's Activity Centre $0.15 $0.35 NOTE: There is an additional $1.75/kW electricity demand cost for the McKinney Centre that was not included in the IRR and NPV calculations. Based on electricity and natural gas price forecasts, the base utility rates used in the IRR and NPV calculations were adjusted for the time period of Table 11 shows the 10 The electricity rate was adjusted based on the Industrial Price Forecast on page 8 of Ontario s Long-Term Energy Plan ( The natural gas rate was adjusted based on the natural gas price reference projections in Natural Resource Canada s report on TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 83

98 cumulative adjustment applied to the electricity and natural gas costs. Table 11 Cumulative forecasted changes in electricity and natural gas prices Year Cumulative % change in electricity prices % 2% % 5% % 7% % 10% % 13% % 15% % 18% % 21% % 24% % 27% % 30% % 33% % 37% % 40% % 43% % 47% % 50% % 54% % 58% % 62% % 65% Cumulative % change in natural gas prices The period used for each of the IRR and NPV calculations was based on the lifespan for each energy conservation measure provided by MindScape, the auditor. The lifespans of the measures are based on industry standards and can be found in Table 12. Table 12 Lifespans for energy conservation measures Measure Lifespan (years) VFD Controller on Wading Pool Filter Pump 8 VFD on Hot Water Circulation Pumps 8 VFD on Pool Pump 8 Canada s Energy Future: Energy Supply and Demand Projections to Energy Market Assessment ( 84 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

99 Measure Lifespan (years) Control system on tube heaters and unitary fan-coil heaters 12 Reduce Excessive Fresh Air Makeup 12 Controller for Fireplace Exhaust Fans 12 Controls for the Makeup Units 12 Controller on Hose Tower Exhaust Fan 12 Dock Heater Controllers 12 Lighting Retrofits 15 Exhaust Fan Controllers - Vehicle Storage 12 O&M on Hotsy Pressure Washers 8 Compressed Air Audit 4 Washroom Occupancy Sensors 12 Photocell Controllers for Lights 8 Occupancy sensor in washrooms for exhaust fan and lights 12 Energy Savings for Computers 5 Timer on Domestic Hot Water Circulation Pump 20 LED Fixtures in the Front Lobby 15 Air Sealing for the Building 8 Air-Seal Generator Room 12 VFD Controller on Condenser Fan motor and Condenser Pump. 8 Heat Recovery Ventilator 12 LED Lighting in the Pool Area 15 Replace Boilers with High-Efficiency Natural Gas Boilers 12 Replace Electrically Heated Rooftop Unit 12 TOWN OF WHITBY CORPORATE ENERGY MANAGEMENT PLAN 85

100 Measure Lifespan (years) Lighting Retrofit 15 A discount rate of 2.5% was used for the NPV calculations. 86 INDECO STRATEGIC CONSULTING INC.

101

102 providing environmental and energy consulting to private, public and non-governmental organizations IndEco Strategic Consulting Inc 77 Mowat Avenue Suite 412 Toronto ON M6K 3E INDECO

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