DRAFT. TRE11U Basic Height Safety and Rescue ---- The National Access and Rescue Centre. heightec.com

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1 DRAFT TRE11U Basic Height Safety and Rescue ---- The National Access and Rescue Centre heightec.com v1

2 TRE11U Basic Height Safety and Rescue Contents Introduction to the use of personal fall protection equipment Including relevant content from the syllabus notes of the Advisory Committee for Work at Height Training - ACWAHT Introduction, key messages The Work at Height Regulations Safe Systems of Work Methods of Personal Fall Protection Inspection, Care and Maintenance Further information DRAFT The Legal Requirements for Rescue Planning for Emergencies Key Features of Rescue Systems Effect of Harness Suspension Anchor Systems for Work at Height RescuePack - Components of the Rescue System Attaching to the Casualty Lowering a Casualty Raising a Casualty Equipment for Continued Overleaf The National Access and Rescue Centre heightec.com

3 DRAFT The Legal Requirements for Rescue The National Access and Rescue Centre heightec.com

4 The legal requirement for rescue The legal requirement for rescue Why do we need to make provision for rescue? There are three main reasons why employers need to make provision for rescue arrangements when working at height: (a) (b) (c) The law says so. The casualty needs to be recovered - and quickly. No-one else will be able to do it. The law The Work at Height Regulations 2005 require employers to make specific provisions for emergency planning, as follows: Organisation and planning Regulation 4 (1) Every employer shall ensure that work at height is: properly planned appropriately supervised carried out in a manner which is so far as is reasonably practicable, safe and that its planning includes the selection of suitable work equipment (2) Planning of work includes planning for emergencies and rescue. (3) Every employer shall ensure that work at height is carried out only when the weather conditions do not jeopardise the health or safety of persons involved in the work. In addition, the following regulation requires that all activities, including rescue, must be carried out by competent persons: Competence - Regulation 5 Every employer shall ensure that no person engages in any activity, including organisation planning, and supervision, in relation to work at height or work equipment for use in such work unless he is competent to do so or, if being trained, is being supervised by a competent person. The casualty needs to be recovered quickly Motionless head up suspension can lead to what is called pre-syncope which means a condition that can lead to loss of consciousness. Symptoms include light headedness; nausea; sensations of flushing; tingling or numbness of the arms or legs; anxiety; visual disturbance; or a feeling they are about to faint. This occurs in most normal subjects within 1 hour and in a fifth within 10 minutes. When contemplating working at height, and in particular when considering the use of a fall arrest system, employers need to consider any emergency or rescue procedures that may be required and the drawing up of an emergency and rescue plan. It is not acceptable just to rely on the emergency services. The key is to get the person down safely in the shortest possible time and before the emergency service response. 62_the legal requirements for rescue_v1.doc Page 1 of 1 heightec The National Access & Rescue Centre

5 DRAFT Planning for Emergencies The National Access and Rescue Centre heightec.com

6 Planning for emergencies Planning for emergencies It is essential that there is a specific rescue plan and resources in place for each worksite and that these are regularly assessed and updated where necessary. Resources should include not only equipment but also trained personnel. When planning for rescue, consideration should be given to the type of situation from which the casualty may be recovered and the type of fall protection equipment which the casualty would be using. The following are examples of different work methods which would require individual solutions for rescue. The rescue plan should identify appropriate equipment and suitable methods of use. Some of the situations described below may create special difficulties, for example in attaching to a casualty who is suspended out of reach. Such factors should be considered when deciding on a safe system of work: Wire fall arrest block ( inertia reel ) Textile fall arrest block Vertical anchor line textile ( flexible anchor line ) Vertical anchor line wire Vertical rail ( rigid anchor line ) Horizontal anchor line wire Horizontal anchor line textile Energy-absorbing lanyard Hooped ladder All rescue planning and operations should address the following: What anchor points are available How to attach to the casualty Any particular needs of the casualty with respect to injury or pre-syncope Whether the situation dictates that the casualty should be lowered or raised Possible needs of the casualty following the rescue Special consideration should be given to available anchor points, both during the planning stage and during the rescue operation. Anchor points must be suitably positioned for the intended operation and should be unquestionably sound. If a rescue procedure requires an operator to descend to recover a casualty there may be additional loading on an anchor system, which may be required to support the load of two persons. Some special types of anchor (e.g. portable horizontal lines, portable dead-weights) may not be suitable for such applications and in the case of dead-weights the performance of the anchor may be affected by environmental consideration such as rain. Users of such systems should consult the manufacturer for guidance. In view of the above, rescue methods which do not require a rescuer to be exposed to risk are preferred. The potential for a casualty to be located over an edge should be considered. Recovery over an edge will increase the effective load in raising operations may create risks of cutting or abrasion of the anchor line. Edges may also interfere with the operation of rescue equipment which utilises pulley systems. Provision should be made to ensure that help is provided promptly to any individual who needs it or who is unable to communicate and might be in danger. 61_planning for emergencies_dt_v1.doc Page 1 of 1 heightec The National Access & Rescue Centre

7 DRAFT Key Features of Rescue Systems The National Access and Rescue Centre heightec.com

8 Key features of rescue systems Key features of rescue systems To be effective, rescue equipment must be easy to use, safe and effective. 1. The rescuer should never be part of the rescue system. 2. The rope device should not operate in the case of panic by the operator ( failsafe ). 3. The system should be simple to operate and not liable to confuse the operator (e.g. should not be liable to twisting or entanglement during deployment). 4. The method of attaching to the casualty should be straightforward and reliable. 5. The rope device must not need to be reconfigured when changing from one mode to another (e.g. should not need additional parts to be added to achieve its function). The above principles are fundamental when configuring or specifying a system for rescue at height. General considerations for the casualty The longer the casualty is suspended without moving, the greater the chances are of adverse effects developing and the more serious such effects are likely to be. An injured person hanging in a harness awaiting rescue should therefore, be removed from upright suspension as quickly as possible. The aim should be to do this within 10 minutes. This is particularly important for a casualty who is motionless. A conscious casualty should be encouraged to exercise their legs gently, to stimulate circulation of the blood. Regarding the position of the casualty - during rescue, the casualty might be better off with the knees elevated. 60_key features of rescue systems_v1.doc Page 1 of 1 heightec The National Access and Rescue Centre

9 DRAFT Effect of Harness Suspension The National Access and Rescue Centre heightec.com

10 Effect of harness suspension Effect of harness suspension Harness Intolerance In the past, the term suspension trauma had been widely adopted throughout industry to describe the situation of a person falling into suspension in a harness and then becoming unconscious. Motionless head-up suspension can lead to pre-syncope (light headedness; nausea; sensations of flushing; tingling or numbness of the arms or legs; anxiety; visual disturbance; or a feeling they are about to faint) in most normal subjects within 1 hour and in a fifth within 10 minutes. In this scenario the loss of consciousness is not due to any physical injury, but rather, it is thought that orthostasis - motionless vertical suspension - is responsible. Trauma is, therefore, an inappropriate term which may be better replaced by the descriptive term syncope which is the sudden transient loss of consciousness with spontaneous recovery, as may occur with a simple faint. Until quite recently it was thought that recovery after harness suspension should be done in a sitting position. This has since been discovered not to be based on sound evidence and may prove dangerous, through prolonging the lack of blood return to the brain. However, following completion of an evidence-based review of published medical literature, HSE has now clarified guidance on the first aid management of a person falling into suspension in a harness who may develop 'suspension trauma'. The key recommendations are: No change should be made to the standard first aid guidance for the post recovery of a semiconscious or unconscious person in a horizontal position, even if the subject of prior harness suspension. No change should be made to the standard UK first aid guidance of ABC management, even if the subject of prior harness suspension. A casualty who is experiencing pre-syncopal symptoms or who is unconscious whilst suspended in a harness should be rescued as soon as is safely possible. If the rescuer is unable to immediately release a conscious casualty from a suspended position, elevation of the legs by the casualty or rescuer where safely possible may prolong tolerance of suspension. First responders to persons in harness suspension should be able to recognize the symptoms of presyncope (see above). 51_effect of harness suspension_v Page 1 of 1 heightec The National Access and Rescue Centre

11 DRAFT Anchor Systems for Work at Height The National Access and Rescue Centre heightec.com

12 Anchor systems for work at height Selecting an anchor point Anchors should be unquestionably reliable. They are the ultimate point connection point of any fall protection system. Anchors for fall arrest purposes may have to take the significant load of a person falling. The minimum strength recommended is 15kN (1500kg) equivalent to the weight of a car, or 15 people. Anchors for restraint systems can have a lower strength but must be able to withstand three times the person s weight. The minimum strength required for these is, therefore, 300kg. Height and position Always use anchors which are in a position to give support from behind or above the working area (although not necessarily vertically above). The anchor point should ideally be in a safe area, i.e. away from the edge. Beware of the sling or connector sliding or moving when the system comes under load. Position anchors to avoid pendulum swings over gable ends and along edges. Anchors used to attach fall arrest systems must provide sufficient clearance to prevent the user hitting the ground or structure in the event of an energy absorber deploying. Correct (left) and incorrect (right) use of a connector on a structural anchor 1_Anchor systems for work at work_v3.28/08/2014 heightec The National Access and Rescue Centre

13 Anchor systems for work at height Permanent anchors Permanent anchors, e.g. eyebolts, fixed rails and wires, are specifically positioned and constructed for fall arrest anchorages. These anchors can be used for connecting a rope access system as long as independent anchors are used for each line. Permanent systems are expensive to install and maintain, so will only be placed in commonly used areas. These anchors are generally considered reliable, as they have been fitted and annually reinspected by a competent person. PPE Eyebolts Look at the identification disc to make sure it is within the inspection period. If it is out of date or doesn t have a disc, don t use it and advise the site owner. Carry out a pre-use check to make sure it isn t damaged or deformed and that it isn t loose. Check that the position is suitable for your use. Work below the eyebolt to minimise the fall distance. Make sure that the connector you are using will fit into the eye properly and load it in the correct plane. Typical EN795 (Type A) Eyebolt NOTE Previously referred to as Class A 1_Anchor systems for work at work_v3.28/08/2014 heightec The National Access and Rescue Centre

14 Anchor systems for work at height Fixed rail and wire systems These are fitted to commonly used areas to provide a mobile connection for a fall arrest lanyard. They can be horizontal, angled or vertical and are fixed directly to the fabric of the building or structure. Sometimes, more than one person can use these at one time. Ask the site owner for a copy of the user instruction before using. Connection is through a trolley that is usually left in place on the rail/wire. If not, check that you are using the correct type for the system and you know how to fit it. Horizontal systems allow the user to freely follow the rail/wire along its length. Ends and junctions will have special fittings to stop the trolley coming off. Inclined or vertical systems have locking trolleys that allow movement but will lock in the event of a fall. Check the system is within the inspection period before use; ask the site owner if the information is not visible. Check the system for obvious damage or looseness before use. Report any damaged or out of date systems to the site owner. 1_Anchor systems for work at work_v3.28/08/2014 heightec The National Access and Rescue Centre

15 Anchor systems for work at height Structural steelwork and masonry In the absence of purpose built artificial anchors, structural steelwork provides one of the strongest anchors available. Preferred steelwork includes substantial support beams or columns, although welded steel handrails, supports for heavy machinery and large diameter pipes may also be considered. Care should be taken to ensure that: The edges of steelwork are effectively protected. Handrails are solidly fixed in place and anchors are secured around the base to reduce leverage. Lightweight or corroded metal and cast iron is avoided. Where structural steelwork is not available, structural masonry such as reinforced concrete beams or columns may be effectively used. Care should be taken to ensure they are of adequate size and that edges are protected to prevent abrasion. Connection to these types of anchorage is usually with a wire or webbing sling. This sling is taken around the structure and clipped through the eyes using a screw-gate karabiner or other connector. Wire slings are made in various lengths of 7mm diameter galvanised wire rope fitted with plastic sleeving to improve handling, grip and durability. Webbing slings are made of a sewn loop of 25mm webbing of various lengths, they need extra protection around them if the anchorage has sharp edges. 1_Anchor systems for work at work_v3.28/08/2014 heightec The National Access and Rescue Centre

16 DRAFT ScaffPack - Components of the Rescue System The National Access and Rescue Centre

17 RescuePack Components of the rescue system RescuePack Components of the rescue system Connecting hook, with patented anti-roll out adaptor 2. Extendable pole 3. Raising pulley attachment 4. Casualty release shears 5. Anchor sling 6. Quadra rope control device 177_RescuePack_Components of the Page 1 of 1 heightec The National Access and Rescue Centre rescue system_v3.doc

18 DRAFT Attaching to the Casualty The National Access and Rescue Centre

19 Attaching to the casualty Attaching to the casualty Step 1 Above and right: Casualty is suspended a considerable distance below the rescuer. Note: Step 2 A fully deployed energy absorber would add approximately 1.5m to this distance. Step 3 Step 4 Hook attaches to D-ring of harness. If absolutely necessary (e.g. moving casualty, wind, etc), a shoulder strap could be hooked. Pole detaches from hook by pulling upwards. The slack is taken in and the casualty is ready for lowering, or for raising back to the work platform by attaching the hauler (shown). 178_Attaching to the casualty_v Page 1 of 2 heightec - The National Access and Rescue Centre

20 Attaching to the casualty Operating a remote rescue pole Open the locking tabs in turn and extend the pole to the casualty. Clip the small karabiner on the cord to your harness so you don t drop the pole. Clip into the D-ring of the harness positively before releasing the pole. If the D-ring cannot be clipped it is possible to attach to a shoulder strap of the casualty's harness. Pull the tail rope to remove the slack from the rope leading to the casualty. Note: Pad the edge if required. Lock off the Quadra rescue device securely with a turn of the rope. 178_Attaching to the casualty_v Page 2 of 2 heightec - The National Access and Rescue Centre

21 DRAFT Lowering a Casualty The National Access and Rescue Centre

22 Considerations for lowering a casualty Because the lowering system is under tension it is very prone to damage from abrasion and sharp edges. Risk assessment may indicate the use of an additional safety line. Remember When operating the lowering device it is essential that the tail rope (e.g. the end opposite to the load) is held at all times. Some rope devices (e.g. Stop, I D) require additional friction to be added via the use of an additional karabiner at the anchor point (Quadra does not require this). Always refer to the manufacturer's user instructions. Anchor position Always use anchors which are in a position to give support above the required suspension point. The anchor point should ideally be in a safe area, i.e. away from the edge. The anchor should also put the lowering device in a position where it can be operated easily. It may be preferable to site the rope device away from the edge and then use a deviation to align the rope correctly. Edges Edges cause two problems, abrasion of the rope and a possible increase in the fall factor. If possible, arrange the anchor point or deviation high up so that the rope does not contact the edge. If this cannot be done (e.g. on top of a building) then the edge must be padded with canvas sheets or similar, and extra care must be taken when lowering over the edge. Communication The person being lowered must be in communication with the person controlling the rope device to prevent them being lowered into a potentially dangerous situation. Communication may be verbal, by sight or by radio. Speed Maintain a steady lowering rate. A constant speed is important to allow proper control of the Quadra. Tag lines A guy line or tag line may be attached to the casualty to pull them away from any obstructions. Harness suspension Research has highlighted the dangers of hanging motionless in a harness even for a short period. Make efforts to move a suspended casualty s legs to aid circulation of blood back to the heart. General procedure for lowering persons 1 Identify proper position from which to carry out the operation. 2 Identify proper anchorage points. 3 Install edge protection under the rope. 4 Pay rope out of lowering device. 5 Lower steadily and carefully. It is important to ensure there are no obstructions in the anticipated path of the casualty. 175_Lowering a casualty_v2.29/08/2014 Page 1 of 3 heightec - The National Access and Rescue Centre

23 Method for lowering the casualty: 1. Check the path is clear for lowering and there is enough rope to reach safe ground. 2. Check the gates of all karabiners are closed securely. 3. If you cannot raise the person to unload their system, use a safety knife or cutters to carefully cut the lanyard of the casualty, taking care to cut away from the rescue rope. 4. Unlock the securing loop around the lowering device. 5. Hold the tail rope with one hand and control the lower with the other hand. 6. Squeeze the Quadra handle slowly to ensure a smooth controlled descent. 175_Lowering a casualty_v2.29/08/2014 Page 2 of 3 heightec - The National Access and Rescue Centre

24 Procedure for lowering a casualty Persons should be connected to a fall protection system if they are required to be in any position where a fall could occur, for example near an edge. Wear a suitable harness and attach this to a fall protection system before getting near to the edge. 1. Check the area around the casualty is safe to enter, the reason for the fall may not be apparent. Do not put yourself in danger to rescue others! 2. Decide whether you are going to lower or raise the casualty to a safe area. 3. Ensure you have enough equipment to effect the rescue. 4. Choose an anchor point that can hold at least 1.5 tonnes to attach the rescue system to. Ensure that it is positioned to allow safe access and egress for the operator and casualty. 5. Connect the pre-assembled rope device to the anchor point. 6. Lower the clip to the casualty, or use an extension pole to reach the casualty remotely. Clip into the D ring of the harness positively before continuing with the rescue. 7. Pull the tailrope to remove the slack from the rope leading to the casualty. Pad the edge if required. 8. Configure the lowering device so it can not operate. 9. Check the path is clear for lowering and there is enough rope to reach safe ground and check the gates of all karabiners are closed securely. 10. Using a safety knife or metal cutters, the casualty from their suspension method, taking care to cut away from the rescue rope. 11. Lower the casualty carefully to the ground in a controlled manner. When the casualty has reached the ground, take steps to guard against the effects of harness suspension. Medical assistance should be requested at the beginning of the rescue. It is advisable for the casualty to visit hospital. 175_Lowering a casualty_v2.29/08/2014 Page 3 of 3 heightec - The National Access and Rescue Centre

25 DRAFT Raising a Casualty The National Access and Rescue Centre

26 Raising a casualty Raising a Casualty Considerations for Raising Situations that may require raising should be identified up during the risk assessment. In these circumstances enough free space must be available for fitting the hauling pulley and operating it successfully. There must be a means of reducing the friction over any edges or banking to make the haul and recovery easier either by using padding, edge rollers or a deviation pulley. The first priority is to identify suitable anchorages to allow for any problems that may occur. Remember that if you are using a deviation to reduce the edge friction this may take up to twice the casualty's weight during hauling so the anchorage must be unquestionably reliable. The raising method is a modification of the lowering procedure. Always lock the rope device into the safe mode before taking further action. Lock the device first and then fit the rope grab and pulley to the hauling rope. Two persons for hauling are ideal, but it is possible for one person to haul in emergencies. Unlock the device and haul steadily and carefully so as not to distress the casualty and use a sentry to ensure the path is clear of obstructions. Take in on the lifeline system (if one is being used). Keep sliding the rope grab along the hauling rope to gain more height. On reaching the top the rescuer/casualty may need to be man-handled over the edge. Take care here as any loose karabiner gates may become undone on the edge. Only unfasten the rescue system when the casualty is completely safe. 176_Raising a casualty_v Page 1 of 2 heightec - The National Access and Rescue Centre

27 Raising a casualty Method for raising the casualty Consider how you are going to get the casualty over the edge, how many people will need to help you, and that the rescuers will be protected from falls during this period. Ensure you have at least a metre of space between the anchorage and the edge to assemble the hauling system. Attach the RescueHauler to the rope between the anchorage and edge. Do not try to haul with the pulley over an edge. Check all connections to ensure they are secure. Fully unlock the Quadra, whilst still holding the tail rope. Pull on the tail rope to haul the casualty up steadily and carefully, keep sliding the hauler down the rope as it comes up to the top. On reaching the top the casualty may need to be manhandled over the edge. Take care here to only disconnect them when they are in a safe area. Note: A combination of both lowering and raising may be used to release a casualty if required, especially if they are suspended on a wire based fall arrest system. 176_Raising a casualty_v Page 2 of 2 heightec - The National Access and Rescue Centre

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