THE FIRST YEAR SEMINAR EXPERIENCE

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1 Office of the Dean, College of Arts and Sciences THE FIRST YEAR SEMINAR EXPERIENCE Welcome to the University of Redlands! Beginning college is an exciting and, perhaps, daunting step. You are faced with many choices and opportunities. We want you to make the most of them. The University s First-year Seminar program, a requirement for all new first year students, is designed to help you through what is sometimes a challenging process. The Firstyear Seminar is your first chance to experience what it means to be in a liberal arts college, allowing you to see and understand life from various perspectives. These seminars are designed to serve as an academic bridge between high school and college and, no matter what the course content; your seminar will help you apply learning tools such as critical thinking, careful reading, successful writing, and how to participate effectively in the give and take discussion expected of you in the college classroom. The seminar to which you are assigned will begin during New Student Week and continue through your first semester. During New Student Week, you will meet your seminar professor and peer advisor, begin work in your seminar, take placement tests as needed, and register for the rest of your courses for the fall semester. Your professor will be your initial academic advisor at the University. Each professor offering a first-year seminar has selected a seasoned, friendly and helpful University of Redlands student who will serve as your peer advisor. Because the First-year Seminar will be one of your four classes in the fall, you will have regular contact with your professor, your peer advisor, and the other new students in your class. For now, I need you to carefully consider the First-year Seminars available in the fall and let me know which ones you are interested in. Selecting your First-year Seminar: The following pages contain descriptions of the First-year Seminars you have to choose from. Because of their introductory nature and purpose of opening you up to what it means to be in a liberal arts environment, please consider each of them regardless of your intended major, your background in a particular academic discipline, or any subsequent courses you might consider taking. Many of the seminars will meet at least one of the Liberal Arts Foundation requirements for graduation. The best approach to selecting a seminar is to read the descriptions carefully and with an open mind remember, the title alone may not convey the full nature of the class as envisioned by the professor. I will also ask you to choose your top three themes. The themes are described as well and reflect the breadth of the liberal arts including sustainability and the environment; social change; cross cultural perspectives, theatre, music, and visual arts; scientific and quantitative explorations; human behavior; history, politics, business, and the economy; literature and the power of words; and teaching and education. If you have been accepted into the School of Music or the Johnston program, please choose the seminars designated for these programs as your only choice. The Living/Learning First Year Communities: Students in seminars FS01 Connecting to the Wild: Wilderness Leadership and Adventure and FS02 The Science of the Sea will be assigned housing in the Environmental Consciousness Living/Learning Community in Merriam Hall to

2 encourage socialization and activism among students interested in community service, outdoor programs, and environmental issues. Students in seminars FS04 A Neanderthal in the Twenty-First Century: Culture in Today s Global Bazaar, FS05 Punk Rock: DIY (Do it Yourself) for Personal and Social Change, and FS06 The Revolution Might be Televised: Social Justice History through Music, Movies, and Multimedia will be assigned housing in the Social Justice Living/Learning Community in Fairmont Hall to better facilitate community activities and interpersonal learning. Only Music students should sign up for FS 34 The Music Seminar. Music students will be assigned housing in the Living/Learning Community in Anderson Hall. Students accepted into the School of Music should not sign up for any other seminars. Only Johnston students should sign up for FS 35 The Johnston Seminar. Johnston students will be assigned housing in the Johnston Intentional Living/Learning Community in Holt and Bekins Halls. Students accepted into the Johnston Center should not sign up for any other seminars. Important Directions on Choosing Your Seminar: 1. Please choose the top 10 seminars that you would most like to take and rank them in order of preference (1 = first choice, 2 = second choice, and so on) on the First-year Seminar Selection Form. 2. Importantly, also rank your top 3 theme preferences. Please be flexible with your choices. All of the professors chosen for the first year seminar program are eager to have you in their seminars. 3. Read each description carefully. Some seminars have weekend trips, fees, and living arrangements predetermined. If a seminar looks appealing but you know because of other commitments that you will not be able to commit to field trips, the living arrangements, or if the time of the seminar potentially might interfere with your participation in athletics or other activities, make other choices that don t conflict. 4. School of Music Students should only choose FS34 as a first choice and leave their other choices blank. Non-Music students should not choose FS34 as one of their choices. 5. Johnston Students should only choose FS35 as a first choice and leave their other choices blank. Non-Johnston students should not choose FS35 as one of their choices. 6. Because of the potential popularity of some seminars and our desire to keep seminar classes small, you may be placed in one of your lower ranked choices. 7. I will do my best to get you into one of your top seminar and/or theme choices if at all possible. Sincerely, Fredric E. Rabinowitz, Ph.D. Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences

3 FIRST YEAR SEMINAR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FS 01 CONNECTING TO THE WILD: WILDERNESS LEADERSHIP AND ADVENTURE This seminar focuses on leadership, wilderness travel and environmental stewardship. It will take place not only in the academic classroom, but also in the mountains and deserts of Southern California. We will apply the lessons we learn as leaders in a wilderness setting to our roles as leaders on campus and in the community. During the semester, there will be two weekend trips to places like the Sierra Nevada mountain range and Death Valley National Park to immerse ourselves in hands-on leadership exercises and outdoor skills. On campus, the class will get a taste of the backcountry through the experiences and writing of some of the world's renowned nature writers, explorers, and outdoor adventurers. While on our overnight trips, we'll be exploring these wild places, practicing the skills and leadership styles that we have studied and discussed in the classroom. In the field, our activities will include backpacking and hiking, rock climbing, journal writing, teambuilding initiatives, map and compass, and, last but not least, reflection on the area's natural history. Please be prepared to immerse yourself in the natural world and spend time in the backcountry. We will all face the physical, mental and emotional challenges sometimes involved in being a part of the wilderness. You will be assessed on your participation in the classroom and in the outdoor environment, as well as your academic reading, writing, and research assignments. Please choose this course only if you feel confident you don t have conflicting plans on most weekends. Please note students in this seminar, along with FS02 The Science of the Sea will be assigned housing in the Environmental Sustainability Living/Learning Community in Merriam Hall to encourage socialization and activism among students interested in sustainability and environmental issues. A course fee of $200 to cover travel and food expenses for the outdoor trips, as well as some camping/backpacking gear most equipment can be rented from Outdoor Programs on campus for free. **This course will meet on Wednesday 1:00 p.m. 2:20 p.m. Friday 1:00 p.m. 3:50 p.m. Professor: Andrew Hollis FS 02 THE SCIENCE OF THE SEA More than two-thirds of our planet is covered by water. From the 50-foot waves of Oahu s Banzai Pipeline to the 6 mile deep black smokers of the Mariana Trench, the oceans play a dominant role in shaping Earth s environment. And yet, we currently know less about our world oceans than we do about the surface of Mars. Why is it that our oceans remain an undiscovered frontier and what secrets have they yet to reveal about our planet s past and looming future? This first year seminar will tackle these questions by examining the history of oceanography from the first explorations of uncharted waters to the evolution of the field as a science. Topics will include wind-driven surface currents, storm surges, sea ice, extreme environments of the abyssal

4 plain, thermohaline circulation, the physical properties of seawater, coral reefs and atolls, underwater landslides, and marine ecosystems. This course will include at least two 1-day field trips to the California Coast and Channel Islands for swimming, kayaking, and exploring the Pacific Ocean. One of these trips will involve a kayaking adventure through the Channel Islands. For this reason, an ability to swim is required and a strong interest in water activities is recommended. Previous experience kayaking will be helpful but is not a requirement for taking the course. Course fieldtrips will be scheduled around student availability, though attendance on at least one trip is a required part of the course. Please note students in this seminar, along with FS01 Connecting to the Wild: Wilderness Leadership and Adventure will be assigned housing in the Environmental Sustainability Living/Learning Community in Merriam Hall to encourage socialization and activism among students interested in sustainability and environmental issues. A course fee of $200 to cover travel, equipment and food expenses for the outdoor trips, as well as some camping/kayaking gear that can t be rented for free from Outdoor Programs on campus. **This course will meet Tuesday and Thursday 2:30-3:50 p.m. Professor: Hillary Jenkins FS 03 CLIMATE DISRUPTION AND JUSTICE Long-term droughts, killer hurricanes, melting ice caps, and record high temperatures mark the new normal as carbon emissions warm the planet and wreak havoc on our environment. Extreme weather events disproportionately impact less developed, poorer regions of the world, making climate disruption an issue of global injustice. The magnitude of the problem can escalate fears, intensify debates and give rise to paralyzing urgency. In this context, it can be hard to think clearly about the topic and what can be done to address it. This course is an introduction to the issue of climate disruption and global justice. It is designed for those who are concerned about the issue, but who have not spent much time studying it. It is also designed for students who are interested in learning more about what activists are doing to develop and promote just solutions to global climate change. The first part of the course will be devoted to developing a basic understanding of climate disruption and global injustice. What do studies, such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, tell us about the extent and nature of the situation? How does climate change and the economies built on the burning of fossil fuel contribute to inequitable outcomes in the world? As we develop an understanding of the issue, a major focus of the class will be to understand what can be done to address climate change. What strategies hold the most promise? What obstacles must be overcome? We will look at what is being done to promote local sustainable economies, to divest from fossil fuels and to develop renewable energy sources. Students will be expected to take an active, participatory role in their education. We will use writing as an important, on-going tool for thinking and deepening our understanding of complex issues. Students will also develop research and information gathering skills to extend and expand the scope of your knowledge.

5 **This course will meet on Tuesday and Thursday from 11:00 a.m. 12:20 p.m. Professor: Keith Osajima FS 04 A NEANDERTHAL IN THE 21 ST CENTURY: CULTURE IN TODAY S GLOBAL BAZAAR We throw the word culture about frequently but do we have a common understanding of what the word means? Culture is difficult to quantify; it is often invisible. Yet this invisible presence guides our behavior, beliefs and values. In this seminar, we will be peeling away the layers of culture and inspecting what we find. To discover who we are, we will be using National Geographic s Genographic Project to answer fundamental questions about where humans originated and how we came to populate the Earth. As the Genographic Project literature notes, You will discover the migration paths your ancient ancestors followed thousands of years ago, and learn the details of your ancestral makeup your branches on the human family tree. Included in the markers we will test for is a subset that scientists have recently determined to be from our hominin cousins, Neanderthals and the newly discovered Denisovans, who split from our lineage around 500,000 years ago. Once we think we know who we are, we will move to thinking about what constitutes American (U.S.) culture. This has been described variously as a melting pot, salad bowl or a mosaic. What does each model mean for the citizens of the United States? Is everyone s culture celebrated in the same way in the mosaic or salad bowl? The cultural journey will continue to the big picture that phenomenon known as world culture or global culture. Do we consider ourselves to be global citizens? At various points in this section, we will break to consider the idea of fusion cultures. One way of doing this is to participate in fusion cooking lessons the results of which will be shared with the other members of the Fairmont Catalyst community. At the end of the semester, you will create your own museum, reflecting the many ways that you are a living, breathing cultural artifact regardless of whether you are a Neanderthal or Denisovan. Classroom learning will be enriched through an integrated living-learning model. You will live with other members of this seminar, as well as students in two other seminars, as a part of the Catalyst Program in Fairmont Hall. Mandatory events and activities within Fairmont will be structured to complement classroom learning. Please note students in this seminar, along with FS05 Punk Rock: DIY (Do It Yourself) For Personal and Social Change and FS06 The Revolution Might Be Televised will be housed in Fairmont Hall. You will be a participant in the Catalyst Program, an intentional community focused on ways to change the world. Through community service, faculty interaction, frequent discussions and co-curricular programming, you will create a safe community for open dialogue and action on difficult issues. Living in this hall will include mandatory participation in community service events as well as dialogues and discussions. This hall will combine first-year students with returning students who are committed to initiating practical change for an inclusive world. **This course will meet Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m. 12:20 p.m. Professor: Leela MadhavaRau

6 FS 05 PUNK ROCK: DIY (DO IT YOURSELF) FOR PERSONAL AND SOCIAL CHANGE The decade of was a fertile time for change in rock music and attendant youth subcultures. Along came punk rock. Arising concurrently in various locations throughout England and the United States, punk s early years begat music and participation that loudly expressed contemporary discontents as well as hopes for alternative modes of living, personally and socially. Simply put, the music changed lives. As punk s early years recede into the increasingly distant past it is the design of this course to revisit the music and the era in which it was made to see what we might learn good, bad and ugly for our own lives and time. In this course we will listen to a lot of music, view relevant films, read books and articles that address both the history and matters raised in punk and write responses to the materials we engage. While many of the class materials will logically overlap (harder, faster, louder) we will specifically address topics such as punk s forebears, the initial social differences of English and American punk, early and later punk feminism, technology and alienation, skaterock and the rise of extreme sports, self-sufficiency and DIY economics, straight-edge, and the use of humor and satire. Substantial class participation in discussions and presentations will be expected. Of course Please note students in this seminar, along with FS04 A Neanderthal in the 21 st Century and FS06 The Revolution Might be Televised will be housed in Fairmont Hall. You will be a participant in the Catalyst Program, an intentional community focused on ways to change the world. Through community service, faculty interaction, frequent discussions and co-curricular programming, you will create a safe community for open dialogue and action on difficult issues. Living in this hall will include mandatory participation in community service events as well as dialogues and discussions. This hall will combine first-year students with returning students who are committed to initiating practical change for an inclusive world. **This course will meet on Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m. 12:20 p.m. Professor: Bill Maury-Holmes FS 06 THE REVOLUTION MIGHT BE TELEVISED: SOCIAL JUSTICE HISTORY THROUGH MUSIC, MOVIES, AND MULTIMEDIA What do Jesus and 2Pac have in common? What does Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. have in common with Bob Dylan? They all envisioned a world different than the one they experienced, and utilized their words and artistry to inspire others to become social change agents. Millennials often envision a society that is more environmentally friendly, more socially conscious, and is more equitable for everyone, yet oftentimes we do not know how to create this world. Similarly, Millennials often become passionate about tweets, snaps, and Facebook posts that are rallying people for a socially conscious cause, but rarely do we understand the history behind these larger social movements, let alone how to affect change in our society. This is an action-oriented course where you will not only learn about the history of social movements in the U.S. through music, movies, and multimedia, but you will also venture out into the community to become change

7 agents. This course will begin by examining the various definitions of social justice, through philosophy and theory readings. Then we will focus on various social movements in America such as the Women s Rights Movement, the Civil Rights Movement, the Anti-War Movement, LGBT Marriage Equality Movement, the Environmental Movement, and more. Popular films and music of the time (and present), will help give us a lens into the ethos of the time, as well as understanding how the various social justice movements legacies are remembered and inform our movements today. Where appropriate, we will also interrogate multimedia such as social media, YouTube, and other Internet media to delve deeper into social movements of our time. Please note students in this seminar, along with FS04 A Neanderthal in the 21 st Century and FS05 Punk Rock DIY (Do It Yourself) For Personal and Social Change will be housed in Fairmont Hall. You will be a participant in the Catalyst Program, an intentional community focused on ways to change the world. Through community service, faculty interaction, frequent discussions and co-curricular programming, you will create a safe community for open dialogue and action on difficult issues. Living in this hall will include mandatory participation in community service events as well as dialogues and discussions. This hall will combine first-year students with returning students who are committed to initiating practical change for an inclusive world. **This course will meet Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m. 12:20 p.m. Professor: Zack Ritter FS 07 MORAL IMAGINATION: THE ART AND SOUL OF SPEAKING TRUTH TO POWER This course is intended to be an introduction to some of the major moral, ethical, and political issues of social justice in the 21st century. Although most of the topics will be seen through the eyes of an American experience, issues will also be discussed from a global perspective. We will look at poverty, racism, environmental concerns, economics, peace and justice issues, with special attention to the experiences of women and children. A major concern of this course will be the discovery of examples of the lives and experiences of individuals who have made contributions to the idea of speaking truth to power and how they made a difference on behalf of social justice. The goal of this course is to hopefully engender a strong passion about understanding our world from a moral, ethical and political perspective. It is also hoped that this passion will lead to a life of activism that helps bring closer a world of hope and possibility. The ideal will be the empowering of your own moral imagination to speak truth to power. Among the authors that we will study this fall are: Barbara Ehrenreich Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America (2001); Cornel West Hope on a Tightrope: Words and Wisdom (2008); Kate Holbrook Global Values 101 (2006); Paul Loeb The Impossible Will Take a Little While: A Citizen s Hope in a Time of Fear (2004); Arundhati Roy An Ordinary Person s Guide to Empire (2004); Howard Zinn A Power Governments Cannot Suppress (2006); Don Cheadle and John Pendergast Not On Our Watch: The Mission to End Genocide in Darfur and Beyond (2007); Dan Matthews Committed: A Rabble Rouser's Memoir (2007); Amy Goodman and David Goodman Standing Up to the Madness: Ordinary Heroes in Extraordinary Times (2008); David Batstone Not For Sale: The Return of the Global Slave Trade-and How We Can Fight It (2007); and Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace-One School at a Time (2006).

8 This course is intended as a step toward a more systematic, comparative study of social justice and the social movements that have grown from the ideas and dreams expressed in the imagination of the Political Literature of Social Justice. We will survey a number of recent political and social movements for social change and examine their practices and methods. This should lead to an energetic and lively debate on many of these ideas. There will be little space for observers or spectators. Ultimately, it would be my hope that some of the ideas raised in this course and many of the ideas debated in class will lead to life-changing experiences for many of you. **This course will meet on Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m. 12:20 p.m. Professor: John Walsh FS 08 BODY POLITICS The human body is not merely flesh and bones; it is also a cultural construct. For most societies throughout the world, the body is considered to be an object that can be manipulated and controlled. We might not think of it, but every day we do things to alter our bodies according to social and cultural norms. This course will challenge the idea that the body is exclusively a physical and unchanging biological entity by examining how bodies interact with society, culture, and historical contexts. We will consider the body from a variety of perspectives the history of science and medicine, the reproductive body, questions of sex and gender norms, including social construction of sexed bodies, and issues related to sexuality and gender identity. We will also read about and discuss contemporary controversies around topics such as body image, sexual violence, and reproductive politics. Other topics covered will include the effects of racism, poverty, sexism, violence, and inhumane conditions on bodies; the limitations and meanings of sexual choice; sexual pleasure and desire; and how women and men make meaning of their health experiences. Course readings will include historical, autobiographical, sociological, political and religious discussions of sexuality, reproductive health, and rights to bodily integrity. As a reading and writing intensive course, students should be prepared to delve into complex and at times challenging material. Students will be introduced to a college-seminar style classroom with emphasis on lively and engaged discussion and debate among students. Expression through writing process and revision will be emphasized. ** This course will meet Monday and Wednesday 2:30 p.m. 3:50 p.m. Professor: Jennifer Nelson FS 09 WHO ARE THE CHINESE? China s significance in today s world is enormous. More than one fifth of the world s population lives in China, and as China s economy develops rapidly its impact will only continue to grow in importance. Americans cannot afford to ignore China in the 21 st Century. But who are the Chinese? How do they live? How do they understand life and the world? What does their yin/yang symbol mean? How does Chinese Medicine work? What is fengshui? What

9 are Chinese martial arts? What drives so many Chinese kids to study so hard in school? Who were China s Romeo and Juliet? Who were China s best beloved heroes and heroines? Don t you want to find out? By finding out the answers to those questions, this course will invite you to learn about Chinese people and the core ideas of Chinese civilization. Various types of readings will be used for the class. They will introduce the main aspects of Chinese culture, including Chinese philosophy, religions, politics, literature, art, and customs, in a vivid way that you may never forget. No prior acquaintance with China, its language, its literature, or its philosophy, will be presupposed. ** This course will meet Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m. 12:20 p.m. Professor: Xinyan Jiang FS 10 LEADERS: ARE THEY BORN OR MADE? In our seminar, we will develop ways to define leadership, discuss the important elements of successful leadership, and assist each other to develop a clear understanding of our leadership capabilities. We will work together to develop leadership skills, confidence, and competencies. The seminar will help us understand how our thinking about gender and ethnicity intersects with successful leadership. We will investigate how art and music help us see and listen both important in effective leadership. We will explore the difference between transactional and transformational leadership. Expect that our seminar will be demanding, but supportive at the same time. If you have in the past been hesitant to engage in class discussions, you ll get over this quickly by depending upon the material from assigned texts as well as your own ideas. Your own writing will also provide a strong basis for what we talk about in class. To support your introduction to college, you will work together with classmates, building a strong network of colleague peers you can depend on when needed. This Leaders seminar will be held on Monday evenings and include two Sunday trips to be arranged at times convenient for all seminar students. ** This course will meet Monday 6:00 p.m. 8:50 p.m. Professor: Jim Appleton FS 11 CREATIVE LEADERSHIP: FROM AUTHENTICITY TO INNOVATION What is creative leadership? In this seminar we will examine creativity, authenticity, and how these traits lead to innovative and engaging leadership. This seminar will question the traditional paradigms of leadership and will argue for a more inclusive and inspired approach. We will spend time studying leaders from a variety of backgrounds including vulnerability researcher, Dr. Brene Brown. This course is also designed to coincide with Eat, Pray, Love author Elizabeth

10 Gilbert s campus visit in October to discuss her newest book, Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear. Our approach will be interdisciplinary in nature, with a focus on contemplative pedagogy and the psychology of leadership. It will also include hands-on, practical applications of leadership for social and organizational change. Students will be encouraged to examine their inner-selves in an attempt to produce more engaged, creative, and conscious leaders. This course will prove that not only the extroverts can be leaders, but rather anyone who is willing to dare greatly. As a class, we will create an intentional and welcoming space in which to explore leadership potential for anyone who is interested, regardless of past experience. ** This course will meet Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m. 12:20 p.m. Professor: Denise Davis FS 12 A BRAND CALLED YOU This seminar is an interactive and experiential exploration of the person you are now and the one who you hope to be in your future. This writing-intensive experience focuses on a combination of reflective exercises, career and leadership assessments, and library and interview research to guide you toward success in school, work, and life. Readings will emphasize leadership development, professional preparation, and career exploration. You will examine your personal values, skills, strengths, and personality traits through self-assessments. All of this will help you choose potential majors and careers and identify those aspects of your personal leadership qualities that you hope to enhance during your time at the University. By the end of the seminar, it is expected that you will be aware of necessary career and leadership attributes you will need to develop, a broader and more comprehensive knowledge of the world of work, a sense of the personal qualities you want to show to the world, and a mapped out plan for your academic future. As the title implies, each seminar participant s created personal brand identity will act as a guide for success as a person, student, and contributor to society. **This course will meet on Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 p.m. 3:50 p.m. Professor: Leslie Krafft FS 13 FINDING YOUR PASSION: A JOURNEY INTO YOUR FUTURE This is a seminar for students looking for guidance in deciding an educational goal/major and/or a career path. We will approach the following topics as a part of our seminar journey: personal values clarification, interests and abilities, problem-solving and self-management skills, adult development theory and the changes that occur over the life span. We will use self- assessment to identify skills, strengths, and good personality matches with potential work environments. The seminar will also assist with career exploration, goal setting, and job search strategies, as well as resume writing and interviewing skills. In addition we will learn about leadership, with an emphasis in the seminar on strategies and goal setting. Each student will be expected to develop his or her own personal philosophy in order to

11 be an effective leader, passionate student, and engaged member of society. Expect a good deal of reading, reflective writing, and hands on activities. **This course will meet on Tuesday and Thursday 2:30 p.m. 3: 50 p.m. Professor: Courtney Carter FS 14 BRAVE (THE) NEW WORLD: HARNESSING THE POWER OF DIGITAL IMAGING Have you ever been captivated by the stunning images of a well-designed magazine advertisement, a lead-in presentation for a major sporting event, or the flash-dazzle of a computer adventure game? Probably so. And perhaps you have also wondered how these riveting images and designs were crafted. And, again, perhaps you have wished to try your own hand at this absorbing activity. This seminar can help you do that. We will spend a significant amount of time exploring the features of Photoshop CS6, an amazing tool for image creation, correction, and optimization. Then we will fashion our own designs, navigating this exciting world of color and imagery. We will discover even more sophisticated features of Photoshop creating 3D images and panoramas, using photos we have taken with a digital camera. We will also combine images to make unique collages. In all of these projects, there will be an emphasis on sharing ideas, offering suggestions, and working with others. Since creative pieces can easily fall flat without a design plan and the wise use of type, we will learn some basic principles of the graphic arts and look at how we could design with letters. The seminar meets in a multimedia classroom equipped with a projector, a document camera, and high-end Macintosh or PC computers. The professor will give you instruction in how to use this equipment. Hands-on will be the primary mode of learning. Participants will have many opportunities for creative expression. One of our goals is to acquaint you with the tools that will give your creations life and interest. It will also afford you the opportunity to transition to college life. Your instructor, your peer advisor, and your fellow students will all play a significant role in helping you adjust to your new environment. Students with little experience in using the tools of digital imaging are especially encouraged to consider this seminar. Want to know more? the instructor at A course fee of $ will cover your textbooks (distributed at first class meeting), a binder with some basic tools, high-quality paper for printing, DVDs, and other course materials. You will also be asked to purchase a thumb drive with at least 8GB of memory. This course requires that you own or have access to a digital camera for the duration of the semester. **This class will meet Monday and Wednesday 1:00 p.m. 2:20 p.m. Professor: Barbara Pflanz

12 FS 15 PSYCHOLOGY OF SOUTH PARK South Park has become one of the most popular animated series on television while achieving critical acclaim with primetime Emmy nominations and wins for Outstanding Animated Program over the past 15 years. It has become notorious for its irreverent approach to a variety of topics from religion to politics as well as the trials and tribulations of childhood/adolescence. Love it or hate it, most people recognize the main characters and are familiar with its basic format. Of course, all successful television shows and characters tap into the basic concerns and motivations shared by all people. It is this aspect of South Park, its explorations of human nature that will be the focus of this seminar. This course will pair episodes of South Park that focus on specific themes of interest to psychologists with readings from the psychological literature that cover research on these topics. Through the readings, in-class discussion, and written assignments, we will examine the accuracy of South Park s depiction of psychology and aspects of human nature and compare it to other media representations as well as the evidence provided by psychological research. While South Park might often be written off as juvenile entertainment, it often presents an accurate (though not always) view of our understanding of many topics of concern that psychology can inform us about. Such topics include: politics, immigration, aging, sex education, adolescence, bullying, substance use/abuse, sexual orientation, prejudice, and political correctness. As you can see, some of these topics are controversial. We will examine the research evidence as well as consider the ways in which humor can be used to facilitate dialogue on sensitive topics. **This course will meet on Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m. 12:20 p.m. Professor: Catherine Salmon FS 16 MUSIC OF THE HEMISPHERES We will examine the connection between music and the brain. We will learn some basic neuroscience and about the psychology of music while exploring topics such as what are the physical features of music, how does the brain discern what is music, how do we come to like a piece of music, how do we categorize music, and how are music and emotions related. As we explore these and other topics, we will try to answer specific questions such as: Why are football players more likely to listen to songs like Welcome To The Jungle, Lose Yourself, and Ride of the Valkyries instead of Pop Goes The Weasel, Here Comes the Sun, and Moonlight Sonata before a game? Why do you come to dislike music that you once loved and why, after some time passes without listening to that music, you come to like it again? What are earworms and why do people get them? Do music critics influence the music we listen to? What is the importance of novelty vs. familiarity in our liking of music? Do laboratory pigeons prefer Metallica or Mozart, and why? When is a pigeon s favorite music white noise and what does that tell us about someone s favorite music? What is the relationship between music and math? We will read and discuss Nick Hornby s Songbook and Daniel Levitin s This is your brain on

13 music: The science of a human obsession. We will bring these books to life by listening to music discussed in them as part of our class discussions. Fair warning: Although Levitin s book covers a broad range of music, Hornby s book focus on pop and rock music over the past 40 years; therefore, to a large extent, the focus of our discussions and listening will be on these genres of music over this time period. We will also watch and discuss DVDs about music and the brain, watch concert videos and documentaries, and read selected articles and chapters about research related to the psychology of music. **This course will meet on Tuesday and Thursday 9:30 a.m. 10:50 p.m. Professor: Francisco Silva FS 17 DRONES To many people, the term drones has sinister connotations: Unmanned and unseen aircraft bristling with weapons and piloted by technicians comfortably located thousands of miles from targets Privacy-destroying spy copters flown by police, federal authorities, paparazzi, and stalkers And, life- and property- endangering projectiles operated by unskilled or reckless hobbyists. To others, drones have a bright future. Also known as remotely piloted aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles, or simply UAVs, drones have great potential for revolutionizing how Earth, ocean, and environmental science is conducted; defense and emergency response operations are managed; and commerce is handled. For instance, UAVs can be used to conduct aerial surveys of sensitive ecological areas, wild animal populations, and delicate archaeological sites. In combat and counterterrorism operations, UAVs can explore potentially dangerous buildings and neighborhoods before human personnel are brought in. Amazon and other businesses have plans to deliver packages and even pizzas. In this seminar, we will explore UAVs from a variety of perspectives, including computing science, ethics, engineering, geographic information science, history, imaging science, literature, law, philosophy, physics, and popular culture. In addition to discussing, reading, writing, and watching videos about UAVs, we will build one or more UAVs for use in research and instruction at the University of Redlands. In the process of building UAVs, we will integrate what we understand and how we feel about these emerging technological tools. This seminar will include classroom and laboratory sessions. Reading, writing, discussions, and group construction of UAVs will be integral parts of the seminar experience. Students will be required to prepare in advance and actively engage in seminar activities. An introduction to seminar etiquette and periodic evaluations of student seminar participation will be included in the course. **This course will meet on Friday 1:00 p.m. 3:50 p.m. Professor: Steven Moore FS 18 THE FUTURE OF THE PLANET: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT This course will introduce you to a series of scientific and technological developments that are very likely to change the nature of our relations with one another and with the planet on which

14 we live. In particular, the course will consider the implications of these developments for current and future global environmental problems and their solutions. The course presumes only a high school level background and will be taught for the intelligent non-scientist. The course is likely to be of particular interest to students planning careers in the natural or social sciences or in business. The global environmental issues examined will include global climate change, tropical deforestation, species extinction, water security, renewable resources, energy, poverty and development. We shall examine the roles played by science, high technology, economics, politics, business, law, government, international organizations, the media, and pressure groups of various kinds. You will view many recent documentaries on global environmental issues and on the latest technical developments, visit the Redlands headquarters of Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), one of the leading technical organizations in the world, and rely especially on the Internet for up to the minute information. The course will often be taught out of the day s headlines. The uses of a wide range of environmentally relevant technologies will be explained, including aerial photography, satellite remote sensing, image and photo interpretation, image processing, unmanned aerial vehicles, autonomous underwater vehicles, GPS, computer modeling and geographic information systems (GIS). The implications of recent high technology developments for society and the environment will be considered; these will include robotics, nanotechnology, high speed/broadband communications networks (the Internet, Internet2, Lambda Rail and Cyber infrastructure), the Open Science movement and Virtual Science. Progress in instrumenting the global environment will include consideration of both the instrumentation and several observatory networks (including NEPTUNE, NEON, GLEON and CREON), the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) and the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). For more than 40 years Dr. Smith has been a consultant to ESRI and others, on more than a hundred national and international environmental projects, for clients including the US Fish and Wildlife Service, United Nations agencies, NASA, DOD and EPA. This course will meet the M1 science requirement. **This course will meet Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m. 12:20 p.m. Lab: Thursday 1:00 p.m. 3:50 p.m. Professor: Lowell Kent Smith FS 19 SOAP, ROPE, AND DOPE: PLANTS IN OUR WORLD What is fair-trade coffee and how much would you pay for it? Are herbal remedies as safe and effective as conventional Western medicines? What kinds of wood make the best violin bow, or baseball bat, or cutting board? Why is it illegal to grow fiber hemp in the U.S.? What is high fructose corn syrup and is it bad for you? Can ethanol and palm oil be eco-friendly alternatives to gasoline? Is growing genetically-engineered insect-resistant crops better or worse than spraying insecticides? These questions illustrate how plants are part of many aspects of our daily lives and cultures. In this seminar we will explore aspects of plants in the classroom, lab, and field. We will present

15 on diverse topics where plants play a central role in the story or debate. At the same time we ll be learning all kinds of useful skills and knowledge for academic success in college. This seminar has three learning objectives: understand how biologists think and learn about the natural world, communicate multidisciplinary knowledge and appreciation of plants, and develop and strengthen academic skills that will help you in college and beyond. Scientific process includes developing questions and hypotheses, designing and conducting experiments, analyzing data, and sharing new knowledge. Multidisciplinary plant content includes fundamentals of plant biology; connections to fields such as economics, medicine, arts and crafts, politics, and sports; and environmental challenges and solutions. College skills include taking notes; working in groups; finding, evaluating, using, and citing sources of information; finding resources and support for academic and personal challenges; speaking and writing skills; multidisciplinary thinking; and leading and contributing to discussions and other activities. This course will meet the M1 Science requirement. **This course will meet on Tuesday and Thursday 9:30 a.m. 10:50 p.m. Lab: Thursday 1:00 3:50 p.m. Professor: Jim Blauth FS 20 THE PHYSICS OF IMAGINEERING Have you ever gone to Disneyland and wondered, How did they do that? The Disney Company coined the term Imagineering to describe the combination of imagination and science that they use when designing theme park rides and attractions. We will explore the physical phenomena of optics, electricity, gravity, motion, and energy. Through discussions, calculations, laboratory experiments, and computer programs, we will investigate these topics and how they explain: How does Randall appear and disappear in Monster s Inc.: Mike and Sully to the rescue? How do they get the apple to appear and disappear on Snow White s Scary Adventure? How do the Haunted Mansion statues follow you as you move? Why does the drop on Tower of Terror make your stomach turn? Why do the teacups push you into the back of your seat? How can California Screamin get you up a hill without a roller coaster chain? How does Toy Story Midway Mania figure out if you ve hit a target? Requirements: Proficiency in high school math (algebra, pre-calculus, calculus preferred), ability to travel to Disneyland at least 4-5 times during the semester, willingness to ride all rides at Disneyland. This course will meet the M3 science requirement. A course fee of $ includes a limited year-long pass to Disneyland and there will be no book required for the class since Disneyland will be our book! **This course will meet Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m. 12:20 p.m. Professor: Julie Rathbun

16 FS 21 THE SHAPE OF THE UNIVERSE As we all know, the surface of the Earth is shaped like a sphere. One consequence of this fact is that if you were to head directly east and continue on a sufficiently long journey, you would eventually return from the west to your point of departure. What would it be like if we lived on the surface of a doughnut, and how could we tell that we were not on a sphere without being able to look down on our world from above? For that matter, what about the shape of the universe as a whole? If we had a rocket that was sufficiently fast, and we headed out into space keeping our direction fixed, would we just go on forever, or would we eventually return to the Earth from another direction? That is to say, does space bend around? And if it does, in what way? In this course, we shall investigate the properties of different kinds of shapes, beginning with knots. Some of the most interesting shapes arise from the mathematical study of knots. In addition, we will see that mathematics gives us the power to tell if two knots are really the same or not. Then we will move on and explore the fascinating world of surfaces, including such exotic beasts as the Mobius strip, the projective plane, and the Klein bottle. We will read the classic book Flatland, about a two-dimensional world and how one of its inhabitants tries to grapple with what a third dimension might look like. We will play tic-tac-toe on a torus (the surface of a doughnut), where the game is suddenly very interesting, unlike the standard version. We will learn about coloring maps with as few colors as possible. And we will see how it is possible to turn a sphere inside-out. Take this class if you like to explore new worlds in the imagination and want to see new and wonderful areas of mathematics. **This course will meet on Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m. 12:20 p.m. Professor: Sandy Koonce FS 22 CITIZEN SCIENCE: HOW DO WE KNOW WHAT WE KNOW? The measles vaccine causes autism. Acai berries promote weight loss. Climate change doesn t exist. The moon landing was faked for TV. Evolution never happened. Echinacea cures the common cold. Whether listening to the radio, surfing the web, or watching television, you cannot escape the media translations of science. Why do ordinary citizens respond to science claims simply with we don t believe you? How do we know what we know? In this seminar, a series of readings followed by debates, discussions, and writing will be used to examine critically how science plays a role in society today. We will discover through analysis of current media stories, and through simple statistics, how to make better inferences by being detectives who can spot the embedded bias. From the medicalization of marijuana, to the role of big pharma, to pandemics, we will correct misconceptions about science and medicine and discover ways to humanize science through the contextual interpretation of the facts to develop into informed citizens. Today, however, we find ourselves in a situation where science is as inaccessible to the public as if it were written in classical Latin. The citizenry is largely cut off from the primary activity of

17 science and at best gets secondhand translations from an interposed media... Then there are all those thorny ethical issues that keep bubbling up from science -- stem cell research, end of life definitions, health care expenses, nuclear power, climate change, biotech agriculture, genetic testing -- just part of a list that promises to continue growing in the future. - Stuart Firestein, neurobiologist (We Need a Crash Course in Citizen Science, **This course will meet on Monday 6:00 p.m. 8:50 p.m. Professor: Ralph Kuncl FS 23 WHY PEOPLE BELIEVE WEIRD THINGS Your birthday predicts your personality. UFO s abduct people in the middle of the night. Nostradamus predicted the rise of Adolf Hitler. Crystals can heal disease. Many of these claims seem to be supported by evidence, and by well-known politicians, military officers, or celebrities people who didn t become successful by being crazy or stupid. So how do we evaluate extraordinary claims? Who is an expert? How do we sort out fact from fiction? In this class, we ll tackle a range of case studies ghosts, ESP, psychics and more in an attempt to understand how we know what we know. Along the way we ll explore the logical mistakes and psychological tricks that encourage us to believe weird things. Understanding where knowledge comes from and how to evaluate it is a life skill, something that will help you navigate the world throughout your life. It may be the single most important ability you take away from college. **This class will meet on Monday 1:00 p.m. 3:50 p.m. Professor: Wes Bernardini FS 24 THE KENNEDYS: PROFILES IN COURAGE? Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country! Few are those Americans beyond the sixth grade who could not attribute this rhetorically pleasing challenge to the Inaugural Address of our country s 35th President, John F. Kennedy. Similarly, most Americans who grew up in the 1960 s, like myself, are able to tell you precisely where they were and what they were doing on that fateful day fifty years ago when they learned that the 45 year old President had been assassinated. However, it is not just John F. Kennedy that captures our attention in this seminar; it is a study of one of the most extraordinary families in American History. We will journey from Joseph P. Kennedy, the patriarch who molded the dynasty, to the offspring and extended family who continue to interest, intrigue, and provoke us. And what a family it is: success in business begat political appetites left unfilled with an ambassadorship, three United States Senators, an Attorney General, and even a President. While all the key Kennedy family members will be studied, there will be an emphasis on how and why the family has emerged as it has, and what it currently represents in both a realistic and symbolic sense. There have been more books written and movies made about the Kennedys than any other American family. It is only appropriate that the family that catapulted itself into the national

18 psyche did so by being the first to employ television. Few American families have been more public or captured more interest than the Kennedys. Whether it be their heroic achievements, their personal indiscretions, or their family tragedies, a study of the Kennedys will tell us a great deal about our country and possibly things about ourselves. **This course will meet on Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m. 12:20 p.m. Professor: Bill Southworth FS 25 FOR THE SOUL OF AMERICA: UNITED STATES LEGAL HISTORY, PUBLIC POLICY, AND THE ORIGINS OF THE CULTURE WAR For several decades, American politics has become increasingly fractious, contentious, and bitter. By 2015, nearly every issue that confronts the American polity seemingly has repercussions in the great ideological divide over the meaning of the nation s history, its identity, and its purpose the soul of America. Insofar as these debates comprise a culture war, the battlegrounds contest the ability of a majority to enact a particular moral vision using state power and the levers of constitutional authority. We will look at two such debates in depth voting rights and gay rights and three other issues more briefly history education, sex education and sex discrimination laws. We will examine the historical roots of these issues, still playing out in the courtrooms and legislative chambers of the present day. **This course will meet Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m. 12:20 p.m. Professor: John Master FS 26 GLOBAL ISSUES FOR AMERICAN BUSINESS This seminar focuses on the major issues facing American corporations conducting business beyond our borders. The issues of conducting business in the European Union, Japan, China, India and South America are explored and contrasted. One of the keys to the seminar will be understanding how governments and businesses, outside the United States, interact and cooperate to further national agendas and what issues U.S. companies face when they enter various national markets. We will explore what U.S. government resources are available to U.S. national companies before and while conducting business abroad. The roles of the U.S. Department of Commerce, The U.S. Foreign Service, The Overseas Private Investment Corporation, The Agency for International Development and the U.S. Trade Representative, are each explored. How do U.S. firms work cooperatively with host national governments and host regional governments? What sort of business partnerships do U.S. firms develop with companies from other nations? The seminar includes an overview of major world institutions, which relate, at least in part, to the conduct of business e.g. the International Monetary Fund, The World Bank, The World Trade Organization and the European Union. We will examine the pros and cons of each of these organizations and how their practices impact the domestic health of nations and also what issues emerge for U.S. Businesses. Case studies are used to examine successful and failed business strategies, undertaken by U.S. companies, in each of the nations/regions noted above. Representative cases include: Boeing versus Airbus (EADS) worldwide, General Electric and Honeywells attempted merger/acquisition, Google in China, Kraft s acquisition of Cadbury, and

19 Goldman Sachs in China, among others. Students will be expected to read about current events and current business issues. This demanding seminar will have high expectations in terms of the quality of daily oral contributions and frequent writing assignments. The ability of our companies to compete in overseas markets is essential to the continued success of our economy and a meaningful examination of the many nuances impacting U.S. firms is important to an understanding of the future of the United States and its contribution to the world economy. **This course will meet Monday and Wednesday 2:30 p.m. 3:50 p.m. Professor: Jack Osborn FS 27 INEQUALITY AND ITS (DIS) CONTENTS Income, wealth, gender, race, class, education, healthcare, political, resource, and global are just some of the modifiers used with this term, inequality. It s THE topic. Everyone from political leaders like Barak Obama, Elizabeth Warren, Rand Paul, and John Boehner to economists like Thomas Piketty and Joseph Stiglitz to comedians like John Stewart and Stephen Colbert and to the people in the Occupy Wall Street movement have weighed in on what it is and why it s so important. So, why are all these people so moved by what seems like a no big deal topic? After all, don t we think that difference, not sameness, is important? Isn t diversity a strength? In this course, we ll draw on films, TV shows, and podcasts as well as the writings of economists, politicians, policymakers, and public intellectuals to determine what they mean by inequality and why so many people think it is so deleterious to our American Dream, our vision who we are, and what we stand for as Americans. Some of the topics we ll discuss include: Inequality and Democracy The Vanishing Middle Class Class Warfare Achievement Gaps in Education Student Debt Race and Gender Wage Differences Global Inequality Class discussions rather than lectures will form the core of this course. Students will be expected to come to class prepared so that we can discuss in class the important points, themes, and controversies brought out in the course materials. **This course will meet on Tuesday and Thursday 11:30 a.m. 12:50 p.m. Professor: Dorene Isenberg FS 28 SECRETS AND SLEUTHS: A STUDY OF SECRET MESSAGS IN HISTORY, LITERATURE AND CULTURE What do Sherlock Holmes, George Washington, Casanova, Benjamin Gates, and Alan Turing all have in common? They were all interested in secret messages! In some cases they were

20 interesting in designing secret messages that could not be read by others. In other cases they wanted to be able to read intercepted messages that were not intended for them. How did they do it? What methods did they use to hide their messages? What techniques did they use to reveal hidden messages and crack the codes? In this seminar we will study a variety of historical techniques for sending secret message and which methods have weakness that allow sleuths and code breakers to read the hidden messages. Many of these code-breaking techniques use interesting mathematics, so we will also study some exciting applications of mathematics. While code making and breaking has an important role in history, it also fascinating to many people and occurs often in popular culture. We will compare historical accounts of code breaking with fictional (or fictionalized) accounts in popular literature, television and films. Could Sherlock Holmes really have cracked the cipher of The Dancing Men? Is there an invisible ink that could be revealed by lemon juice and heat as in National Treasure 1? Does Imitation Game accurately portray the work done by Alan Turing and his fellow Bletchley Park associates to crack the German Enigma ciphers? Did George Washington s spy ring really send secret messages as portrayed in the AMC television show Turn? We ll discover the answer to all of these questions and more in this seminar. Do you have what it takes to be a code breaker? VLJQ XS IRU WKLV VHPLQDU DQG ILQG RXW! **This course will meet on Tuesday and Thursday 11:00 a.m. 12:20 p.m. and Wednesday 6:00 p.m. 7:50 p.m. Professor: Tamara Veenstra FS 29 GOSSIP! GENDER, MEDIA, U.S. HISTORY Rumor, hearsay, scuttlebutt, scandal, dirt: from colonial Virginia churchyards to the earlytwentieth-first-century blogosphere and in many places and times in between gossip has been called many things. This seminar will provide a historical overview of gossip s definition, form, and function over the last four centuries of American history. From New England s witchcraft crisis of the 1690s to contemporary celebrity culture, in print, on film, and online, we will identify significant continuities as well as changes in the definition, form, and function of gossip. We will explore gossip as information that might be positive or negative, accurate or not, which can be distributed in many ways: via face-to-face talk from the bedroom to the boardroom; via print culture and the modern mass media. The in-person exchanges that predominated in the colonial period persist even as mass-media and digital platforms have grown dramatically over the last century. Indeed, mass media gossipists like Perez Hilton and the late Joan Rivers have been greatly empowered and enriched. Gossip can provide personal enlightenment, pleasure, and pain; it can serve as a tool of the powerful, the disenfranchised and everyone in between. Gossip can celebrate or condemn; it can include or exclude; it can build or undermine community. And it can promote all manner of things. We will use church records, legal testimony, private correspondence, newspapers, Supreme Court decisions, diplomatic records, Hollywood film, television shows, FBI files, celebrity magazines and culture, and vlogs as well as scholarly works to understand the complex cultural work of gossip. We will work on critical reading, writing, speaking, and thinking skills through

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