AWRA Florida Section Meeting July 17-18th Key Largo, FL Murray Nelson Government Center Overseas Highway Key Largo, FL 33037

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1 June 2014 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Michael DelCharco, P.E. President Jacksonville Gary Howalt, P.W.S. Vice President Jacksonville Kristin K. Bennett, Esq. Secretary Stuart Mark C. Diblin, P.G. Treasurer Gainesville Carol Hinton Past President 2013 Gainesville Annette Carter Past-President 2012 Stuart BOARD OF DIRECTORS Ed Call Brooksville Catherine Katsikis Royal Palm Beach Joanne Chamberlain, P.E. Palatka Richard Creech, P.E., P.S.M Stuart L. Donald Duke, Ph.D., P.E. Ft. Myers Carol Howard Sebring Gregg Jones, P.G. Tampa Jeremy McBryan, P.E., CFM West Palm Beach Walt Reigner, P.E., CPESC Lakeland Krista D. Sabin Palm Beach Gardens Catherine A. Walker, P.E. Palatka Garrett Wallace West Palm Beach Shayne Wood, P.E. Jacksonville AWRA Florida Section Meeting July 17-18th Key Largo, FL Murray Nelson Government Center Overseas Highway Key Largo, FL In response to our members requests, this year s Annual Meeting the 43rd - will be back in the beautiful Florida Keys. The highlights of the agenda for the 43rd AWRA Florida Section Annual Meeting include exciting discussions on the state of water management districts with SFWMD and SWFWMD executive directors Blake Guillory and Robert Beltran, an update on RESTORE activities from Jenny Conner of The Nature Conservancy, update from David Hobbie on USACE initiatives, a presentation on Coastal Resiliency from Dr. Frederick Bloetscher, FAU and much more. The annual EcoTour is an afternoon of snorkeling with Quicksilver Catamarans and the Awards Luau will be a waterfront island feast and pig roast under the swaying palms. AWRA, Florida Section s Education Committee will once again host the very popular Silent Auction to raise funds for our educational grant and scholarship programs! So, register now for the Annual Meeting at: One of the best benefits of the AWRA Annual Meeting is the networking and technical conversation opportunities. As AWRA National always says, AWRA is about Community, Conversation and Connections and your registration and attendance at the Annual Meeting will get you up-to-speed on the complex issues facing the water community in Florida and who is leading the way AWRA, Florida Section sincerely thanks our sponsors. Without them, this and the other bi-monthly meetings would not be possible. Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 1

2 Additional Conference Information A suggested hotel for AWRA attendees is the Hampton Inn Key Largo. Located at Overseas Highway, the hotel is next door to our meeting location. Reservations can be made by calling Murray Nelson Government Center We look forward to seeing you for this power packed technical meeting! If you have questions about the conference or would like to serve as a sponsor, please contact Garrett Wallace at or To Register: Click Here or go to our website at Hampton Inn Beach view from Hampton Inn Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 2

3 AWRA Florida Section Meeting July 17 & 18, 2013 Murray Nelson Government Center Overseas Highway Key Largo, FL ADMINISTRATIVE AND TECHNICAL AGENDA Thursday, July 17th 10:00 a.m. Florida Section Board of Directors Meeting 1 All are welcome to attend as the Board of Directors handles the business of the section. 12:00 p.m. Registration Opens 1:00 p.m. Call to Order and Welcome Michael DelCharco, President, Florida Section AWRA 1:15 p.m. Update on Florida Keys Initiatives Rhonda Haag, Monroe County 1:45 p.m. Contaminants in Drinking water as a Result of Private Well Homeowner Behavior Isabella Bergonzoli Oxbridge Academy of the Palm Beaches 2:15 p.m. Break 2:45 p.m. USACE Update David Hobbie, USACE 3:30 p.m. Numeric Nutrient Criteria Be Careful What You Wish For Daniel Hammond, Senior Consultant, Cardno ENTRIX 3:30 p.m. RESTORE Update Jennifer Conner, The Nature Conservancy 4:30 p.m. Closing Remarks Friday, July 18th 8:00 a.m. Registration Opens 8:30 a.m. Call to Order Michael DelCharco, President, Florida Section AWRA 8:35 a.m. Water Management District Update Blake Guilllory, SFWMD, Robert Beltran, SWFWMD, Hans Tanzler, SJRWMD (invited) 10:00 a.m. Break 10:15 a.m. Sea Level Rise vs Coastal Resiliency Dr. Frank Bloetscher, FAU 11:00 a.m. Agricultural Water Policy Update Ray Scott, Office of Water Policy, FDACS 12:00 Noon Lunch break (on your own) Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 3

4 AWRA Florida Section Meeting July 17 & 18, 2013 Murray Nelson Government Center Overseas Highway Key Largo, FL SPECIAL EVENTS Thursday, July 17th All Day Silent Auction Fundraiser Have fun and place your bid on unique and interesting items! ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE FLORIDA SECTION ROSANNE CLEMENTE EDUCATION FUND. 6:00 PM President s Reception (Bay Side at the Government Center) Network with conference presenters and attendees among the swaying palms! 7:30 PM Student Networking Dinner, Sponsored by CDMSmith 1 (location TBD): All registered students are invited to join us to watch the famous Key s sunset and learn more about AWRA and how it can benefit their careers. Friday, July 18th 1:00 PM Ecotour 2 Quicksilver Snorkel, MM 100, Oceanside, next to the Courtyard by Marriott Hotel Experience the coral reefs and other sea life in the crystal blue waters of the beautiful Florida Keys! This sailing and snorkeling adventure includes professional instruction, sanitized snorkel gear, freshwater shower, free beer, wine and soft drinks. $40.00 per person transportation on your own to Ecotour. 6:00 PM Reception and Awards Dinner and Ceremony 3 (Bay Side at the Government Center) This is the annual meeting for AWRA, Florida Section members. Join us for a great pig roast as we celebrate the achievements of the previous year, pick the winners from the silent auction, and have lots of fun! 1 Invitation only event 2 Additional charge for this event. See registration form for details. 3 One dinner included for each registrant Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 4

5 Board of Directors Summary The Florida Section AWRA Board of Directors (BOD) met May 16, :00 a.m. 11:45 a.m. prior to the membership meeting. The detailed agenda and minutes will be included on the Section website following BOD approval of the minutes at the July 17 BOD meeting. Highlights of the meeting include: Treasurer: 501(c )(3) documentation filed and taxes were paid. There has been an increase in the brokerage account. Recognition to Walt Reigner and Shayne Wood for researching accounts. Education Program: Application deadline for the high school scholarship has been extended to June 15. Deadline for Storch and Young was May 15 and the deadline for Butler was May 1. Applications will be reviewed and the education committee will submit the recommendations to the Board at the July meeting. Student Support: Gregg Jones met with the USF Geology Alumni Society to discuss the AWRA and formation of a student chapter at USF. Two USF students are scheduled to attend the May meeting. Cathy Vogel volunteered to lead the effort to establish a student chapter at Daytona State College. National: Suggestion to host the Florida Section Student Poster Competition at the Ft. Myers meeting. Winner of the competition will be supported to attend the National meeting in November. The November annual meeting will be in Tysons Corner; 2015 in Denver; Specialty conferences for 2014 are in Park City and Reno. Discussions being held on how to add value to membership including educational offerings such as webinars. Upcoming Meetings: July Key Largo; September 19 Tampa area; November 21; St. Augustine Annual Meeting Key Largo: The agenda is being finalized. Speakers include executive directors from the water management districts, David Hobbie from the Army Corps of Engineers and Jennifer Connor from the Nature Conservancy and RESTORE committee. Eco-trip scheduled for Friday July 18. SILENT AUCTION scheduled for Thursday and Friday. Donations requested. Contact Rosanne Clementi. Next BOD meeting: July 17. Board meetings are open to all members of the Florida Section AWRA and their guests. Members and guests are encouraged to get involved and increase the value of their AWRA membership. Meeting Sponsors as of 06/10/14 Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 5

6 AWRA Florida Section Meeting Friday, May 16th Ormond Beach, FL Anderson Price Memorial Building An Historic and Cultural Perspective on the Wetlands of the Tomoka Charles DuToit, Florida State Parks Environmental Specialist (Ret.) Tomoka State Park is a lovely Florida gem nestled between U.S. Hwy 1 and the Halifax River (Intracoastal Waterway) just north of residential Ormond Beach. The park has a long history dating back to 1936 when a group of concerned citizens formed the Volusia Hammock State Park. At that time, the park was unencumbered by urbanization, and its wetlands and tributary creeks were a thing of beauty. But this sliver of natural Florida soon became popular among tourists, recreationalists and campers. And, Florida s population growth caught up to and encircled the park. Man and manatees were frequent visitors to the park, and that trend continues today. But in the 1950 s, tourists, campers and day trippers soon discovered a menacing park resident MOSQUITOS. A headline in a February 1962 edition of the Daytona Beach Morning Journal cautioned Two Million Mosquitos Expected in Tomoka. And this was probably no exaggeration as an informal study conducted by Park Environmentalist DuToit recorded a loading rate (landings on a person s body) of mosquitos per minute! So began the era of mosquito control, and the Volusia County Mosquito Control District embarked on the process of dredging mosquito control canals, draining wetlands, impounding wetlands, and disrupting the natural creek flows and configurations. Fill from such operations was deposited on the park peninsula abutting the Halifax River. So pervasive were the mosquito control operations that the State Parks Board in 1967 granted the East Volusia Mosquito Control District an airstrip license on park property to facilitate aerial spraying. But the spirit of environmental restoration caught hold, and by the early 2000 s the mosquito control district together with the Florida DEP began a program to fill in the ditches, recreate salt marshes, and revive a more natural Tomoka State Park! One of the Nation s Best! The City of Ormond Beach Hand Avenue Collector Road Upgrade Project John Noble, City Engineer, Ormond Beach and Curtis Burkett, Regional Manager, McKim & Creed What an honor when the City of Ormond Beach s Hand Avenue Project was recognized in 2013 by the Storm Water Solutions magazine as one of the nation s top ten projects of the year. Hand Avenue is at the center of an older residential neighborhood just off U.S. Highway 1 and a few minutes south of the historic Ormond Beach downtown. The neighborhood is a charming area dotted with seven lakes, sprawling oaks, small manicured landscapes and old-style Florida homes. But it suffered from inadequate roadways, lack of drainage and few pedestrian-friendly walkways. These inadequacies were highlighted by four hurricanes that impacted northeast Florida in 2004 leaving Hand Avenue and its surrounding neighborhood completely inundated. And not to be outdone by four hurricanes, in 2009 a historical rainfall event dropped 27 inches of rain on the area, again causing tremendous flooding problems along with damage to eighty-one homes. With funding support from FEMA which provided 75% of the necessary funding - the city began the Central Park Interactive Flood Control and Water Treatment Project. The project consisted of road upgrades, interconnects throughout the seven area lakes, the construction of bridges, water control structures and water treatment infrastructure to filter debris and settle out nutrients before discharging to the Halifax River. Water levels throughout the project are controlled by pumping stations so that the entire system can be lowered in anticipation of heavy rains. However, not only did this project provide advanced stormwater management and treatment, but it created a virtual city park. With the installation of massive culverts, canoeists and kayakers can now paddle along a continuous waterway of streams and lakes. Hikers and bicyclists can enjoy the pathways surrounding the waterways. In short, one of the nation s best stormwater projects in 2013 not only saved a neighborhood, but created a wonderful city park! Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 6

7 Flagler County, Florida Hurricane and Storm Damage Reduction Study Marty Durkin, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Jacksonville District The town of Flagler Beach has a serious problem: beach erosion that is undermining the integrity of State Road A1A, the beautiful Scenic Highway that parallels the Atlantic Ocean along Florida s east coast. Hurricanes, nor easters and strong storms have eaten away at the beach dunes and the subsurface of A1A, requiring the FDOT to harden a key stretch of the beach just south of Flagler s famous fishing pier with large boulders. In response to these worsening conditions, the town of Flagler Beach turned to the USA COE to address stormrelated impacts. A Corps study was authorized in 2002, and from the Corps Jacksonville District completed a Reconnaissance Report, Draft Feasibility Study and Environmental Assessment. The Corps acknowledged the severe erosion which damaged coastal structures and threatened evacuation along A1A. Additional problems included loss of beach habitat and threats to recreation and tourism. The Corps undertook to address these issues. Four reaches of beach from the town of Painter s Hill north of Flagler Beach south to the Volusia County line were studied. The Reaches included: A) unarmored single family homes; B) unarmored open beachfront; C) armored beachfront; and D) unarmored beach front. Absent a Damage Reduction project, there remains the threat of severe erosion in Reaches A and C. However, Reach A does not qualify for federal support insofar as it lacks public access. The Corps further determined that beach renourishment in Reaches B & D is not economically justified. Thus, the Corps is focusing on Reach C 2.6 miles of beachfront extending from just south of the Flagler pier. Under the selected Corps plan, this stretch of beach would have 10-foot dune extensions built up with material from a borrow area seven miles offshore. The restoration of the dunes, which will result in an equilibriated beach profile, meets Corps project criteria, and this project will involve a 50-year partnership between the Corps and the local sponsor with the Corps paying for 65% of the initial project construction and thereafter 50% of periodic renourishment which is estimated to be required four times during the 50-year life of the project. The total cost of the project during its life span is estimated at $43,465,000. However, the expense is well worth it. The project will meet its objectives to reduce the damage of erosion, it is environmentally acceptable, and in fact will restore nesting habitat and shore biodiversity. Pending congressional authorization and federal appropriations, the project construction may begin in What Happened in Water during the 2014 Legislative Session? Eric T. Olsen, Hopping Green Sams Law Firm, Tallahassee The 2014 legislative session saw a whirlwind of controversial issues expanded casino-style gambling, major tax cuts, gun rights, legalization of medical marijuana, revamping the state s employee pension program, allowing in-state college tuition for children brought into the country illegally, and increasing the speed limit on certain state highways. And of course, all of this was overshadowed by the fact that 2014 is an election year! Of 1,811 bills that were introduced, only a meager 264 passed. However, the legislature passed the largest state budget on record - $77 billion! In terms of what happened in water, 2014 may well be remembered as the what didn t happen in water session. The major issue of debate was the plight of Florida s magnificent springs and what the legislature could do to address water quality and quantity issues plaguing these resources. Led by the Senate, and a Gang of Five that was appointed by Senate President Gaetz to prepare legislation for consideration, the gang Sens. Dean, Simpson, Simmons, Hays and Montford presented SB 1576, which, after many revisions was voted unanimously out of the Senate. However, the bill died in the House where it was never taken up. It should be noted that this came as no surprise insofar as House Speaker Weatherford had announced early in the session that his chamber did not intend to address any major water policy issues until his successor, Incoming Speaker Crisafulli, takes up the gavel. Although the springs legislation failed, here are some of its highlights: It targeted all first magnitude springs as well as DeLeon, Poe, Peacock, Rock, Wekiwa and Gemini Springs as Outstanding Florida Springs (OFS). Water management districts were directed to adopt MFLs for these springs by 7/1/15, and for DEP-needed MFLs, by 7/1/17. Recovery strategies must be adopted for those springs where MFLs are being violated. A new MFL standard for OFS MFLS was defined as harm not significant harm which is the existing statutory standard. Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 7

8 DEP was directed to adopt springs protection and management zones by 7/1/15. TMDLs and BMAPS for impaired OFS must be initiated by 7/1/14. BMAPs must achieve prescribed load reductions within 15 years. Local governments were directed to adopt fertilizer ordinances within OFS protection zones. Local governments must adopt plans to require treatment upgrades or connections to central sewerage for onsite treatment systems. Wastewater utilities within OFS protection zones must achieve a 3 mg/l standard for nitrogen. Funding originally proposed to be $378 million annually from documentary stamp tax receipts was later reduced to a one-year proposed appropriation of $10 million. Ultimately, the legislature appropriated $25 million for the DEP and $5 million for the DACS to address springs in FY 2014/15. In addition to springs legislation, HB 703 a wide-ranging regulatory bill that would have provided 50-year consumptive use permits (CUPs) for landowners engaged in dispersed water storage, 30-year CUPs for DRIs in rural areas of critical economic concern and the inclusion of DRI demands in water management district regional water supply plans failed. Several water-related bills that passed include: SB 536 a study of the beneficial uses of reclaimed water and constraints to expanding and permitting it use; HB 7171 exempting the MFLs for the Santa Fe and Itchnetucknee Rivers and Priority Springs from ratification by the legislature; HB 7091 which provides property owners that participate in dispersed water storage to retain their agricultural land assessment classifications; and HB 7093 that appropriated $1.5 million to the Southwest Florida Water Management District for land purchases in Pasco County to address flood mitigation and stormwater retention. In all, $80 million was also appropriated by the 2014 legislature for local water resource projects. Stay tuned 2015 will be the Year of Water!! Scotts Miracle-Gro Commitment to Florida Water Quality Mark Slavens, Ph.D., Scotts Miracle-Gro The controversy surrounding fertilizer has been raging in the halls of Tallahassee and in commission chambers throughout the state for some years now. Basically, the issue comes down to the degree to which residential fertilizer-rich runoff pollutes area waterways. And, the fertilizer battle pits local government control of fertilizer sales and usage against the landscape and lawn maintenance professionals as well as local homeowners. Recently, Scotts Miracle-Gro announced a three-year, $5 million Florida Water Quality initiative that will combine research with public education. Green space is vitally important to economic, environmental and social well-being. Yet, here in Florida, many local governments have responded to worsening water quality conditions by imposing increased regulations on the use of fertilizer. To date, fourteen counties have adopted a scientific-based model Florida Friendly Fertilizer ordinance developed by the DEP in conjunction with UF s IFAS. Eight counties have imposed seasonal bans on the use of fertilizer, incredibly prohibiting the application of fertilizer during the summer growing seasons when turf grasses and plants are most able to absorb the fertilizer and affiliated nutrients (in the summer, there is a documented 90% uptake of fertilizer by grasses and plants compared to a 16% uptake rate during the winter). Six counties are considering the adoption of ordinances. Clearly, there is a need on a case-by-case basis to identify the sources of point and non-point pollution and develop approaches to mitigate these problems. Factors impacting water/nutrient/pollution movement from the urban environment include plant density and type, site slope, soil type, percentage of impervious surfaces, rainfall duration and intensity and soil compaction. Even various turf grasses differ in terms of their contribution to runoff. Interestingly, 50% of homeowners in Florida report no extra lawn maintenance fertilizer care. Of those who do fertilize, 82% do two or fewer applications a year. In fact, residential fertilizer use accounts for only 3.5% of fertilizer use in the state. Studies have documented the value of managing and maintaining green space for economic, environmental and social benefits. In fact, in an EPA study on the Chesapeake Bay, it was concluded that a dense vegetative cover of turf grass reduces pollution and nutrients in the bay. Scott s Florida Water Quality Initiative has invested in a three-year grant to the Ocean Research & Conservation Association to determine the point and non-point sources of pollution in the Indian River Lagoon. The study is being overseen by an independent research oversight committee. In addition, Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 8

9 Scotts Miracle-Gro is educating homeowners through advertising with stewardship tips and digital consumer communications. The company has teamed up with Tampa Bay Watch and its Grasses in Classes program, assisting in the volunteer effort which planted 80,000 plants this year. Scotts also has begun a Community Green Spaces program with gardens grants. To date, grants have funded community gardens in Tallahassee, Miramar and central Florida. The program aims to establish community gardens in each of Florida 67 counties with grants per year. In short, when it comes to water pollution, we all contribute to the problem. Scotts Miracle-Gro hopes it can help educate Floridians on how to minimize their impact on the state s water resources. Northern Coastal Basins Halifax River Paul J. Haydt, St. Johns River Water Management District A major project to restore the salt marshes on the eastern shores of the Halifax River in northern Volusia County has been underway for many years at the St. Johns River Water Management District. These estuary marshes have been disturbed, filled in, ditched and impounded over the years to make way for development, enhance navigation and provide mosquito control. More than 1,900 acres of estuary marsh have been filled in this stretch of the Halifax, with dredged material coming from the construction of the intracoastal waterway. Aerial photos from the 1870 s and the 1940 s demonstrate the massive expansion of the filled areas, and the volume of such fill has been calculated using LIDAR. One salt marsh restoration project at Gamble Rogers State Recreation Area demonstrated the rapid pace of habitat regrowth. A similar project at the North Peninsula State Park in northern Volusia County involved the restoration of 87 acres out of 110 filled acres of marsh. This project is ongoing and has been funded by NOAA, FDOT mitigation, and the Southeast Aquatic Partnership. In the case of disturbed marshes, the SJRWMD identified 4,300 acres of salt marsh that has been impacted from dragline ditching for mosquito control. (This equals 30% of the salt marsh habitat from Volusia to St. Johns counties). The district conducted a pilot project at Canaveral National Seashore to demonstrate the restoration potential of filling in the ditches. As a result, the district took the lead in restoring significant areas of ditched marsh throughout the region. Partners in this effort included the US Fish & Wildlife Service, Volusia County Mosquito Control, the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission, and the Florida DEP at the Mosquito Lagoon Aquatic Preserve and the Tomoka Basin State Park. Historic aerial photos show the impounding of marshes along the Halifax. Efforts are underway to undike these marshes and partners along with the water management district include NOAA, US Fish & Wildlife Service, Florida DEP, NASA, the National Park Service and the Florida Resource Conservation & Development Council. Finally, there are large areas of disturbed shoreline along the river. This is caused by erosion along natural shorelines and deteriorating seawalls in residential areas. The district has been working to restore the shoreline habitat through stabilization and replanting. In all of these cases, the St. Johns Water Management District has shown how quickly salt water marshes can be restored to more natural conditions. In the future, the Northeast Estuary Restoration Team (NERT) will undertake a variety of projects including reconnections of impounded marshes, a demonstration project to restore subsided marshes, continued restoration efforts at the North Peninsula State Park, a salt marsh restoration and plant nursery in New Smyrna Beach, and an oyster shell recycling program with area restaurants District Water Supply Plan Joanne Chamberlain, St. Johns River Water Management District Mark Middlebrook, St. Johns River Alliance As required by state law, in 2013 the St. Johns District began a five-year update of its regional water supply plan. A draft of the plan, which is designed to meet water demand needs through the year 2035, was released to the public and not surprisingly, has generated considerable attention and public input. The draft plan evaluates the water resources of a large portion of the district and identifies sustainable withdrawals from surface and groundwater to meet projected demands. As of the year 2010, the population of the region neared 5 million. During the period of , water supply demands leveled off at approximately 1.2 billion gallons a day. Demand projections to the year 2035 show those demands increasing to 1.5 billion gallons a day. The St. Johns district has identified four water supply planning regions: the North Region Water Supply Partnership in conjunction with the Suwannee River Water Management District, the DEP, local officials and stakeholders; the Central Region where the district is coordinating with the Southwest Florida Water Management District and the Withlacoochee Water Supply Authority; Region 3 the Central Florida Water Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 9

10 Initiative among the St. Johns River, the Southwest and the South Florida Water Management Districts as well as the DEP, the DACS, and area utilities; and Region 4, the southern portion of the St. Johns District where it is working in coordination with the South Florida District. In its assessment of fresh groundwater resources, the regional water supply draft plan identifies deteriorating water quality, as well as impacts to wetlands, spring flows and MFLs. If current trends continue, groundwater availability will be exceeded by 250 million gallons a day, resulting in elevated chlorides, lake levels and spring flows falling below established MFLs. As a result of these unacceptable impacts, the draft plan proposes significant steps to promote water conservation through cooperative funding with water users, mobile irrigation labs, restrictions on landscape irrigation, and the promotion of Florida Friendly Landscaping and the district s Florida Water Star program. Other water supply options identified in the plan include the expansion of reuse and alternative water supply sources including withdrawals from the St. Johns River. Extensive studies and modeling have shown that up to 155 million gallons of additional water can be withdrawn from the river without negative impacts to downstream users or estuaries. Not surprisingly, the proposal to withdraw additional water for consumptive uses from the St. Johns River has been met with controversy and threats of litigation. Mark Middlebrook, executive director of the St. Johns River Alliance, stressed that his organization believes in communication and cooperation rather than legal action. The Alliance includes representatives from twelve of the thirteen counties bordering the St. Johns River. Fifty percent of its 30-member board of directors is made up of local elected officials. The Alliance was established to bring these counties and stakeholders together in an effort to find solutions to the need for increased water supply. Middlebrook noted that presently, there are a number of utilities in the region that are permitted to withdraw from the river; however the district s proposal to allow for increased withdrawals has put the bordering counties at odds with each other. (Ironically, as Middlebrook noted, those utilities with the largest permitted withdrawals are complaining the loudest.) One thing that all the members of the Alliance can agree on is the need for stepped up conservation. To this end, the Alliance is planning to institute a Water Academy for newly elected officials to educate them on the issues surrounding the river, the water supply challenges that face the region and the need to make a strong commitment to conservation. Institute of Marine and Environmental Studies Prof. Debra Woodall, Daytona State College A marine science program was begun at Daytona State College in 2008 with the Introduction to Oceanography course. Less than two years later, that course grew into a full-fledged marine and environmental studies degree program. The college s Institute of Marine and Environmental Studies (IMES) offers two tracks: an Associate Degree in Environmental Science Technology for students who plan to enter the work force, and four Associate Degree transfer tracks for students who wish to pursue a four-year degree. The transfer tracks include marine science, marine biology, environmental science and ocean engineering. Student enrollment in the IMES is over 200 and growing. To support the Institute, in 2010 the college provided a 21-foot boat to facilitate field studies. Just last year, the college opened a new $250 thousand dollar water lab. Five faculty make up the Institute with specializations in oceanography, meteorology, wetlands ecology, environmental energy, geology, environmental and atmospheric chemistry and student internships. The IMES is also proud of its technical advisory board comprised of representatives from the area s business community. In the spring of 2014, the IMES celebrated the graduation of its first two students, one of whom has interned at the Natural Resource Conservation Service and another at the Smithsonian Research Station. Both students have been offered positions with these organizations. Daytona State College is centrally located for those students in the IMES AA transfer track who will enroll in other four-year universities such as the University of Florida, the University of Central Florida, the University of North Florida, and Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. A key goal of the transfer track is not only to teach science skills but to instill confidence in students, making them competitive for transfer to a four-year university. Dr. Woodall is committed to increasing retention in the field of marine and environmental sciences, as too often students enter a field of study such as this only to discover they really don t want to pursue a career in the marine science arena. To make sure her students know what they are getting into, Woodall s program has intensive field work, required individual research projects, and the practical use of field and lab instruments. Mentoring partnerships have been established with NASA, NOAA, the Marine Discovery Center, the Marine Science Center and the St. Johns River Water Management District. Students enrolled in the IMES say the program is engaging, inspiring and empowering! Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 10

11 American Water s Phosphorus Removal Pilot Study Using Native Limestone for Inducing Phosphorus Removal in Large-Scale Applications Bob Higgins, Higgins Engineering, Inc. This phosphorus removal project is located within a 2,241 acre site in the southwest corner of Martin County, due east of Lake Okeechobee. Considering the water resource challenges in this location high discharges from Lake Okeechobee, concerns about the St. Lucie Canal and downstream impacts to the Indian River Lagoon as well as the water demands for south Florida, this location is well-suited to provide wet weather water capture, diversion of estuary influent, and the use of native limestone to reduce phosphorus levels. Given the requirements of the Everglades Forever Act, the Everglades Restoration Project and the recently adopted numeric nutrient criteria, a project like this holds great promise for achieving multiple water quality and water quantity objectives in the region. Construction of the project took place from December 2011 to January 2013 and consisted of a three-foot high perimeter berm, an internal surface area of 100 by 20, an impermeable geomembrane liner, 12 inches of layed limestone, and an overflow berm at the project outlet together with a collector ditch. The six-month pilot test initially studied the results of flow through the limestone bed; ultimately the study also looked at the effectiveness of submerging the limestone completely. Influent to the project was supplied by pumped water, and discharge was controlled by a weir. Effluent from the project was measured by depth at the weir, and there was negligible water loss through the system. Fifty-eight samples were tested in the flow through operation. The average influent showed a phosphorus concentration of mg/l. Average effluent showed a concentration of mg/l or an 83% reduction in phosphorus. Eight samples were analyzed from the flooded/submerged operation. Influent in these samples averaged mg/l and effluent averaged mg/l a 42% reduction in phosphorus concentration. These results were compared to the effectiveness of STAs, which average a 50% reduction in phosphorus. In other words, given a surface area ten times smaller than an STA, the phosphorus reduction is more effective. Conclusions from the pilot study demonstrate, among other things, that: Limestone rock gardens are a viable alternative to vegetated STAs in terms of reducing P. A non-submerged operation is most effective. The pilot test did not stress the system to the limit of performance, so perhaps higher loading rates are possible. The longevity of the phosphorus contactor effectiveness is not known. However the six-month study demonstrated satisfactory results. Long-term maintenance requirements of the system are unknown. Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 11

12 The Hope everyone is having a great year, hard to believe 2014 is half way over! I know I am already enjoying summer having the kids home and spending time out on the water. Nothing better than boating or surfing with the family to make you appreciate your job as a water resource professional, eh? Speaking of enjoying time on the water be sure to get registered for our July Annual Meeting and enjoy some time on the Key Largo waterfront! Garrett Wallace has put together a great venue that will include more of the key s laid-back style (and prices) than we ve seen in a long time! The annual meetings in Key West, many years ago, are what convinced me to get involved in AWRA. I d never seen such a great group of professionals passionate about their jobs AND having fun. It has been a very rewarding 13 years getting to know people, projects, and locations around the state. If you aren t a member, you should be! While you will find lots of information about out July meeting here are the rest of our meetings lined up for 2014: September 19 in Tampa Board member Walt Reigner and his crew at AMEC have setup a great meeting at the Rusty Pelican on the Courtney Campbell Causeway in Tampa! November 21 in St. Augustine - Board member Shayne Wood and SJRWMD s Michael Cullum are lining up a winner that will include great technical presentations and a look into the history of St. Augustine as we help celebrate the 450th anniversary of the City. It feels like I am writing a bad script in a bad soap opera when I talk about the field trip to Cuba! But, thanks to Cathy Vogel who did a fantastic job at our Ormond Beach meeting we have another shot at getting down to the big island just south of the Keys. We would likely go in early 2015 for a trip that would include some time meeting with water resources professionals in Havana and site seeing. Cost would be roughly $3,500 including airfare from Miami. If you are interested, we need to get a head count soon so please me your interest at Be sure to register on-line for our May meeting at Hope to see you at a meeting soon! Michael DelCharco, P.E. Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 12

13 Membership Our Section continues to grow. Please welcome some of our newest members and take a few minutes to introduce yourself at an upcoming meeting. Alice Alonso University of Florida Sierra Branch Florida Gulf Coast University Robert Cadle Hazen and Sawyer, P.C. David Christian St. Johns River Water Management District Charlie Faulkner Faulker & Associates Jason Goodrich City of Sanibel James Ink ASCE Florida Section, Southwest Branch Alexis Johnson University of Florida Tania Leung Florida Atlantic University Reed Putnall University of South Florida Courtney Steele University of South Florida Emily Taylor University of Florida William Tredik St. Johns River Water Management District Natalie Watt Student Yilin Zhuang University of Florida, IFAS You can renew your membership, change the level of your membership, and update your contact information from our website - Our online application is located on the Membership page, which is under Get Involved. If it is your first time logging in to our website, have problems logging in, or do not know your password, please contact me at or Thank you for your participation! Joanne Chamberlain Membership Services Coordinator Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 13

14 A Message from the Education Committee The Rosanne Clementi Education Program Education Committee: Rosanne Clementi, Clementi Environmental Consulting; Kristin Bennett, Tetra Tech, Inc.; Sara Caldwell, P.A., The Law Offices of Sara Caldwell, P.A.; Mike Copeland, WRS Compass; Mark Diblin, AMEC; Jeremy McBryan, SFWMD; Anne Murray, Martin County In 2013, the AWRA Florida Section funded over $16,000 in student grants, awards, scholarships, student chapter support and travel stipends. We were able to cover registration fees, lodging and a portion of air fare for 9 students, including 2 high school students, to attend the National AWRA meeting in Portland, OR in November Seven of the students presented. We provided financial assistance for students to attend our bimonthly meetings also. The tradition will continue win The section funded students to attend each of our meetings this year and are prepared to support students to attend the National meeting in Tysons Corner in November. The recipients of the J.B. Butler Science Grant, Sanford N. Young Scholarship, William V. Storch Award and the high school scholarship will be announced at the July meeting and included in the August newsletter. SILENT AUCTION 2014 We will once again be hosting the very popular Silent Auction in conjunction with our summer meeting. Proceeds from the silent auction enable us to provide the funding for the students. You can contribute to this effort by donating items for the silent auction and by bidding! If you want to make a donation of an item, or a financial contribution and an item will be purchased and donated in your name, please contact Rosanne Clementi at Rosanne Clementi Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 14

15 Give Springs A Break 2014 Summary A UF AWRA Educational Outreach & Fundraiser Event Some of the students enjoying Ginnie Springs From April , the UF Chapter of American Water Resources Association, in partnership with the Florida Springs Institute and the Ginnie Springs Outdoors, LLC, hosted Give Springs A Break, an event for undergraduate and graduate students interested in water resources. Over 50 students from nine different colleges and universities across Florida attended the event. Students participated in various springs-focused activities including camping and swimming at the springs, learning about the springs during a speaker series featuring well-known scientists and cave divers, and networking with students and professionals invested in the protection of springs. For some students this was the first time they had ever seen a spring or gone camping. All proceeds from this event were donated to the non-profit Howard T. Odum Florida Springs Institute and over $2000 was raised. Due to the success of the event, UF AWRA and the Florida Springs Institute are planning to host it again next year. Feedback from the students who participated was very positive and the students actually asked for even more presentations! Overall, it was a very successful weekend that allowed students to learn about and experience one of Florida s most precious water resource. Springs Speaker Series Roasting s mores by the campfire The Give Springs A Break boxed waters that were provided in the goodie bags given to participants Cave Diver Tom Morris giving his presentation: Cave-diving 101 Our Santa Fe River Tie Dye Exhibit Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 15

16 the Watershed Editor: Gregg Jones, Technical Director/V.P. Cardno ENTRIX 3905 Crescent Park Dr. Riverview, FL Phone (813) Fax (813) the Watershed is assembled and published by Cardno ENTRIX, a proud sponsor of the Florida Section of AWRA. VISIT THE FLORIDA SECTION WEBSITE AT: Contact Upcoming Meeting Chairs Regarding Sponsorship or Assistance Page Layout and Design by Michael B. Tyson Key Largo July 17th and 18th Tampa September 19th St. Augustine November 21st Florida Section American Water Resource Association Page 16

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