Transfer Model Curriculum (TMC) Development Guidelines. Transfer Model Curriculum (TMC) Development and Review Process

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1 Transfer Model Curriculum (TMC) Development Guidelines This document is intended to be a comprehensive guide for Faculty Discipline Review Groups (FDRGs) as they finalize TMCs in their disciplines. The TMC development process was created and implemented during Consequently, effective practices and preferred stylistic choices have emerged. The establishment of some consistency in formatting will facilitate the understanding, review, and use of TMCs by the field, as well as simplify template development by the CCC Chancellor s Office (CCCCO) for the review and approval of TMC-aligned degrees. Transfer Model Curriculum (TMC) Development and Review Process A Transfer Model Curriculum (TMC) describes the major component of a CCC associate degree. Each TMC consists of a minimum of 18 semester units that is intended to describe coursework that prepares a student for transfer into a CSU major (or majors) and consists of courses that comprise the major component of a CCC degree. Below are the steps involved in the development of a TMC. 1. The development of a TMC begins with either a Faculty Discipline Review Group (FDRG) or a Discipline Input Group (DIG) meeting. Both are groups that exist within the Course Identification Numbering System (C-ID). An FDRG is a small group of discipline faculty appointed by their respective senates, typically 3 CCC and 3 CSU faculty. A DIG is a meeting where all interested faculty in the selected discipline are asked to participate in the discussion. When possible, DIGs are convened in the north and the south within a few weeks of one another. DIGs meet to review, revise, and develop C-ID descriptors. After identifying the course descriptors to be developed and, ideally, developing draft descriptors, the DIG members discuss a possible TMC. Absent a DIG meeting, the FDRG may also be charged with developing a TMC by the Intersegmental Curriculum Workgroup (ICW; see page 4 for further explanation). 2. Any TMC that was developed by an FDRG is posted for vetting. Any TMC that was developed in a DIG is reviewed by the FDRG reconciling any differences and then it is posted for vetting. 3. At the conclusion of the vetting period, the FDRG convenes to review comments, modify the TMC as necessary, and finalize the TMC. The final product of the FDRG will consist of the following: a. TMC (the list of required courses with C-ID descriptor designations or, if a C-ID descriptor will not be developed and a course is specified, a description of the course obtained from a CCC catalog and a clarification of what articulation for that course is required). b. Report of who responded to the TMC (prepared by C-ID staff). c. Responses to comments, as deemed appropriate by the FDRG. The FDRG s response to the feedback received is critical and provides a Finalized June 16,

2 mechanism for the FDRG to explain the choices made in the TMC development and, if appropriate, to offer guidance with respect to degree development. 4. When the FDRG s work on a TMC has been completed, a subcommittee of the ICW is convened to review the work of the FDRG and to determine whether or not all processes have been followed. The subcommittee consists of 3 faculty from the CCC and 3 faculty from the CSU that are members of the ICW. Typically, the FDRG lead will attend the meeting to address questions about the finalized TMC. If it is determined that all processes were followed and all TMC criteria are met, the finalized TMC is formally accepted and the TMC development process is deemed completed. 5. Once a TMC is finalized, it is sent to the CCCCO for the development of a template to be used by colleges submitting TMC-aligned degrees. In addition, the CSU Chancellor s Office forwards the finalized TMC to CSU campuses for determination and coding of similar majors. TMC Standards and Acceptance Criteria The development of TMCs is an effort to provide a statewide response to the implementation of Senate Bill 1440 (Padilla, 2010) that has been codified in law as California Education Code TMC-aligned degrees will consist of courses that are appropriate for an AA or AS in a major and would be sufficient preparation for transfer into a given major or group of majors at the CSU. There has long been an interest in simplifying transfer such that a student could prepare for a major without having already selected a transfer destination. It is with this goal in mind that these degrees are to be developed what does an 18 unit major look like that is both appropriate for an AA in a given discipline and that adequately prepares a student for transfer in that discipline? Faculty convened for the purpose of developing TMCs are expected to: 1. Identify, ideally, a minimum of 6 units of core courses for the TMC. The core of the TMC must be consistent across all colleges that develop degrees aligned with the TMC. 2. Specify the additional components of the TMC (a minimum of 18 semester units, total, in the major are required). 3. Be sensitive to local limitations and provide options for colleges that allow for flexibility, where possible. 4. Make efforts to minimize student unit accumulation by providing an opportunity to double-count courses for the major and other requirements (i.e., general education and, where appropriate, CSU graduation requirements such as American history and institutions). Where such possibilities exist, double counting should be noted (please see the sample at the end of this document). Finalized June 16,

3 5. Include titles and C-ID designations to identify courses in the TMC. In those instances where no C-ID descriptor will be developed, sample course descriptions must be submitted when the FDRG chooses to identify specific courses. When specific courses are identified the general education or major preparation articulation that will be required must be explicitly indicated. Actual course descriptions of articulated courses from community college catalogs should be used. Note: C-ID descriptors will be developed for all the required courses in a TMC. Colleges seeking approval of TMC-aligned degrees are now required to submit their courses to C-ID. TMC Structural Notes As noted, the TMC begins with a core. After the determination of what courses should comprise the core, additional courses options are indicated to specify a degree of at least 18 semester units. Typically, this involves indicating that courses are to be selected from one or more lists. It is expected that these lists be of decreasing specificity. For example, the core might consist of three 3-unit courses. List A might be a list of three to five 3-unit courses with an indication that the degree would consist of one course from List A. List B might be a longer list of 3-unit courses that includes List A and also any course articulated at a CSU as major preparation in the discipline with an indication that the degree would consist of one course from List B. The final List C might again be a select one list and consist of courses from List A, List B, and any CSU-transferable course in the discipline. Such a structure is intended to ensure that each CCC can develop a degree that will serve their local CSU well and introduces flexibility within the TMC that will facilitate degree portability, as is encouraged by the legislation. As noted earlier, a review of existing TMCs is encouraged to see examples of what has been described. TMC Minimum Specifications 1. The TMC must describe a major that is a minimum of 18 semester units. The TMC may consist of more than 18 units, but must be designed to be a minimum of A TMC must be designed such that a TMC-aligned degree can be completed within 60 units. Without double-counting, a student would typically accumulate at least 57 units when working towards a degree with a major of 18 units (39 units for CSU GE breadth + 18 units in the major). If there are opportunities for doublecounting, the units in the TMC may exceed There is a specified core of at least 6 semester units consisting of required courses or selection from a list of courses with restricted options. 4. The 120 CSU unit limit must be considered. California Education Code (CEC) states that The California State University may require a student transferring pursuant to this article to take additional courses at the California State University so long as the student is not required to take any more than 60 additional semester units or 90 quarter units at the California State University for majors requiring 120 semester units or 180 quarter units. Faculty developing a TMC, and responding to the TMC during the vetting process, should consider Finalized June 16,

4 whether or not TMC-aligned degrees will prepare students sufficiently for the completion of the major at the CSU within an additional 60 semester units. 5. All courses in a TMC must be CSU transferable. (CEC 66746) 6. Only one course (3-4 units) may be permitted in either of the categories below: a. Unarticulated OR b. Left unspecified as a general list that does not specify articulation as preparation for the major, such as any course in the discipline or any CSU GE area D course 7. Double-counting opportunities should be considered and indicated. The above information pertains to the development of a TMC. Following the development of a draft TMC by a DIG, the FDRG is convened to reconcile any differences before the TMC is posted at for statewide vetting. Vetting is typically conducted for a period of at least one month and during periods when faculty are available (September May). FDRGs are responsible for preparing the TMC for vetting, reviewing and responding to the feedback obtained during the vetting process, and preparing the final TMC recommendation for review by a faculty subcommittee of the SB 1440 Intersegmental Curriculum Workgroup (ICW). The ICW is charged with making curricular determinations with respect to the implementation of SB A faculty sub-group of the ICW will make the final determination as to the status of the TMC based on the criteria specified in this document. This subgroup is comprised of six faculty, three appointed by the CSU academic senate and three appointed by the CCC academic senate. In preparing a TMC for review by the ICW, the FDRG will review and respond to the TMC Criteria Checklist (see page 12) and provide the following with the recommendation for acceptance: 1. The TMC with C-ID designations or sample catalog descriptions of all specified courses. 2. A list of the proposed CSU major or majors for which the TMC is designed as preparation for. 3. An overview of the vetting process. Every effort should be made to reach discipline faculty in the CCC and CSU. The FDRG lead will write a narrative explaining the efforts made. The ASCCC office will prepare a summary of the responses. 4. A narrative responding to concerns raised in the vetting process. It should be evident that identified issues were considered and handled in a manner deemed appropriate by the FDRG. 5. If the recommended TMC is a significant departure from the TMC as vetted, an explanation as to the efforts made to vet the revised version should be provided. 6. The FDRG should identify whether the degree will be an AA-T or an AS-T. An AS-T designation should be selected for majors in the sciences, mathematics and CTE fields. An AA-T designation is for all other majors. Finalized June 16,

5 Transfer Model Curriculum Worksheet CCC Major or Area of Emphasis: Proposed CSU Major or Majors: Total units (all units are semester units) Degree Type (indicate one): AA-T OR AS-T Required Core Courses: units Title (units) Description Rationale List A Select units or courses from the following: units List B Select units or courses from the following: units List C Select units or courses from the following: units Finalized June 16,

6 TMC Narrative and Stylistic Guidelines Before beginning TMC development or editing a vetted TMC, a review of already finalized and approved TMCs is encouraged. There may be an existing TMC that provides a model for a challenge that your discipline may be facing. Finalized TMCs can be viewed at One the most challenging aspects of TMC development, for some disciplines, is the unit cap. A TMC must be designed such that a TMC-aligned associate degree can be completed in no more than 60 units. A transferable GE pattern + a TMC may be less than 60 units which would be ideal to permit students some true elective choices. A given student may opt to exceed 60 units. This unit cap may result in difficult choices for some disciplines. Where a discipline must exclude courses that a student would greatly benefit from taking prior to transfer, the FDRG may include suggestions in its narrative for colleges to consider including in their catalogs. For example, the Chemistry FDRG included the following recommendation: Recommended Preparation: Students are strongly recommended to take Calculus-based Physics I & II (C-ID PHYS 205 & 210) before transfer. Contact your local transfer institution(s) for specific requirements. While degrees must be completed within 60 units, additional units can still be transferred, up to the limit allowable by CSU. In many of the highly-sequenced disciplines, hard choices may have to be made to fit in the SB 1440 framework. While SB 1440 allows for exceptions for high unit majors, these are exceptions that would be reflected in the unit cap at the CSU. High unit has been defined as bachelor's degrees that require more than 120 semester units. Another issue that frequently emerges is the question of including prerequisites. When does a prerequisite have to be included in a TMC? The community colleges have been instructed to include prerequisites in the degree requirements when ALL students are required to take them. If some students can place into the required course, then it s acceptable to note that there may be prerequisites, but it s not required to include them in the unit count for the major or in the degree. This rule applies to TMC development; local practices may vary. While a TMC may not factor in a potential prerequisite course due to the placing out option (i.e., placing into the required course), if a given community college requires a prerequisite that is CSU transferable and there is no placing out option, those units must be counted in the units that must completed to earn the degree. For example, if calculus were a required course for the major and the college had a precalculus course that was CSU transferable and placing out of that course is not an option, then the pre-calculus class and its units would need to be included in the degree. While all required courses will be identified by C-ID descriptors, the FDRG may opt to specify courses for which no C-ID descriptor will be developed. When identifying a particular course in a TMC, a descriptor reference or a catalog description must be Finalized June 16,

7 provided. In many instances disciplines have opted to allow courses to be used that meet specified articulation requirements. Some examples include the following: Any CSU transferable Administration of Justice lower division course or courses outside the Administration of Justice discipline that are articulated as lower division major preparation for the Criminal Justice or Criminology Major at any CSU. Any studio arts course that transfers as CSU GE or as major preparation for the studio arts major or similar major at the CSU. Any course articulated as CSU GE Area C2 in: A Language other than English (except ASL); Art, History, Humanities; Philosophy; Religion/Religious Studies It is important that the intent of the FDRG be clear when a TMC is reviewed. A narrative that explains the decision-making process can help inform the field as to how and why decisions were made. Units or courses may be indicated from the options provided in a TMC. The indicated units must show the minimum semester units; a range may also be indicated, if warranted. The final unit count for a TMC should reflect what is common at most community colleges. As demonstrated in the Transfer Model Curriculum Worksheet (see page 5) and the existing TMCs, each TMC begins with some sort of required core. Ideally, this consists of at least 2 courses. After that, the specificity of the TMC may diminish. Again, existing TMCs are the best guide. The required core should be designated as such. Any courses that are required should be included in this core. After that, colleges should be asked to select courses and/or units from designated list labeled List A, List B, etc. Where courses are not specified by a C-ID descriptor, the necessary articulation must be specified. It is also useful to provide a rationale for each course and note possible GE applicability. This facilitates determining the actual unit count, degree development, and template creation by the CCCCO. Finalized June 16,

8 C-ID, SB 1440, and TMCs Frequently Asked Questions Revised March 5, 2013 The TMC is an effort to respond to the creation of community college associate degree for transfer in a coordinated statewide manner. Once finalized, each TMC will delineate a curriculum that, if adopted, provides a community college with a fast-tracked approval process (community college degrees must be approved locally and by the Chancellor s Office) and also provides a structure to the degree that has been developed and vetted by intersegmental discipline faculty. SB 1440 effectively makes a community college AA-T/AS-T degree one mechanism for transferring to the CSU and an option that provides guarantees to the student. This legislation establishes a community college degree as the major preparation for transfer and prohibits the CSU from requiring students to repeat similar courses and caps the units required by the CSU at 60 semester units (all references to units are semester units, for simplicity and consistency). The community colleges provide 60 units of the baccalaureate degree; the CSU provides the finishing 60. Note that there is a stated exception for high unit majors but the details of this have not been worked out yet. What has been clarified, at this time, is that high unit will be determined by the total units required at the CSU the CCC degrees cannot exceed 60. While CCC degrees must be designed to consist of no more than 60 units, the CSU will continue to use and apply units over the required 60, as appropriate. The ASCCC will add to this list and provide additional information as it becomes available. Please see the website at for updates and new FAQs. 1. In order for a community college to adopt the TMC, must their courses align with the C-ID descriptors? Yes, when a C-ID descriptor exists. While community colleges were initially allowed to self-certify that their course matched a C-ID descriptor or to demonstrate articulation to bypass the need to self-certify, effective January 1, 2013, all AA-T and AS-T proposals submitted to the Chancellor s Office for review and approval must demonstrate that courses included in the degree have been submitted for C-ID numbers, where descriptors exist. By June 1, 2013, for any existing AA-T and AS-T degrees that included a self-certification that a course or courses matched a C-ID descriptor, colleges are required to submit those courses for C-ID approval where descriptors exist. 2. In order for a community college to create a TMC-aligned degree, must their courses be submitted to C-ID? Yes. Effective January 1, 2013, all AA-T and AS-T proposals submitted to the Chancellor s Office for review and approval must demonstrate that courses included in the degree have been submitted for C-ID numbers, where descriptors exist. 3. Why are there upper division courses listed in some of the TMC? Finalized June 16,

9 All TMCs should reflect the courses required for major preparation at a CSU. If a course has been included in an approved TMC, then it is lower division and, where a course exists at the upper and lower division level, the C-ID descriptor describes the lower division version of the course. 4. If a community college cannot offer all of the required courses in a given TMC, does this mean an SB 1440 degree can t be offered by that college? No. A college in such a circumstance could choose to develop the necessary course and delay the development of that degree until such time as the course is available. Sensitivity to local limitations has been encouraged in the development of all TMC, but there will be instances where a community college simply cannot support one or more required courses for the TMC. 5. Most community colleges offer broad areas of emphasis that allow a student to take what they need for a variety of majors. If these degrees conformed to the other elements of SB 1440, couldn t they fill the need for an associate degree for transfer? It would depend. If an area of emphasis were defined enough so as to ensure student preparation for one or more specific majors, maybe. But an area of emphasis that is so unstructured that it effectively is a unique degree for every student would not prepare a student for any given major at the CSU. SB 1440 grants a student access to a major based on the degree completed at the community college not the behavior of an individual student. This is a departure from how the system has always operated. 6. Does a CSU have to count all of the courses in an associate degree for transfer towards the CSU degree? In other words, does a CSU have to make all the courses in the TMC for a given major work in their major? No. Units in the TMC that are not counted towards the CSU major would be lower division elective units. 7. Given that units vary for some courses across our colleges, a 60 unit major at one community college might be a 62 unit major at another. Given these variations, may an SB 1440 degree exceed 60 units? No. The language in the legislation is very clear. Degrees that are developed in response to SB 1440 must not exceed 60 units. Students may, of course, take additional units beyond the required 60 and, if those units are applicable to their course of study at the CSU, they will be used. While it is certainly preferable for students in highly sequenced majors (physics and chemistry, for example) to take more units at the community college, SB 1440 degrees cannot exceed 60 units. Finalized June 16,

10 8. The units required for major preparation at the CSU vary considerably from zero to well over forty. How can requiring students to take a minimum of 18 units in a community college major be justified, given this variation? No student is obligated to complete any degree the introduction of these degrees does not prevent students from pursuing traditional transfer pathways. CCC degrees have always had a minimum unit requirement for the major component of the degree. SB 1440 reinforces the 18 unit requirement. Students who complete these degrees will be given highest priority for admission purposes and will enter the CSU with no more than 60 units to complete to earn a Bachelor s Degree. These are students who will have priority over other students who might have a higher GPA the completion of these degrees should have a minimum level of rigor to justify the benefits they confer. 9. SB 1440 degrees cap the units that can be required at the CCC at 60 units. If such degrees are created for majors where students historically have done more lower division units before transfer, such as highly sequence majors in the sciences, won t these students be ill-prepared for transfer? The Education Code sections that serve to implement SB 1440 dictate that CCC degrees created in response to SB 1440 must be of no more than 60 units. This will necessarily result in challenges for some disciplines - but this is what the law calls for. It is likely that students will pursue a degree of 60 units, as required, but then be encouraged to complete more units at the CCC. True high unit majors are being identified by the CSU and would not have the 60-unit CSU limit imposed. The ultimate consequence may be that more lower division units in some areas being completed at the CSU. 10. How will similar courses be defined? This has yet to be formally determined, but C-ID descriptors do serve as a means of defining the lower division version of a given course. Finalized June 16,

11 TMC Criteria Checklist Discipline: Questions TMC Vetting 1. Was the TMC vetted appropriately? a. CSU and CCC involvement b. Number of respondents c. Discipline d. Time 2. Were identified issues dealt with appropriately? 3. If the recommended TMC is a departure from the TMC as vetted, have the changes been adequately vetted? TMC minimum Requirements 1. Is the major a minimum of 18 units? 2. Can a TMC-aligned degree be completed within 60 units? 3. Is there a specified core of at least 6 semester units consisting of required courses or selection from a list of courses with restricted options? 4. Did the group consider the 120 CSU limit? 5. Are all courses CSU transferable? 6. Is no more than one course (3 4 units) permitted in either of these categories below? a. Unarticulated b. Left unspecified as a general list that does not specify articulation as preparation for the major, such as any course in the discipline or any CSU GE area D course Note: TMC-aligned degrees must list specific courses. 7. Were double-counting opportunities considered? 8. If a CCC opts to provide only one option in any category that course must be articulated as general education or major preparation at the CSU. Is the TMC consistent with this restriction? 9. Was there input from transfer specialists in the development of the TMC? Approval Approved by ICW the faculty subgroup: CSU: CCC: Comments/Concerns Academic Senate Office Recorded by: Date: Response Finalized June 16,

12 Appendix: Transfer Model Curriculum (TMC) Development Yes DIG develops draft TMC and associated C-ID descriptors FDRG reviews and reconciles DIGdeveloped draft TMC and prepares for posting No TMC is sent back to the FDRG for further refinement TMC is posted on C- ID Website Draft TMC is posted at for vetting. California higher education faculty are invited to log on to the C-ID website and provide comments and feedback. CSU Chancellor s Office sends TMC to campuses for determination of similar CCC Chancellor s Office develops template to be used by colleges in submitting TMC-aligned degrees. After a sufficient amount of time for review has passed, the FDRG reviews the comments, makes necessary edits, and finalizes the TMC. CCC faculty develop TMC-aligned degrees FDRG lead prepares supporting documents and submits TMC to the ICW faculty subgroup for review and acceptance. Definitions: DIG: Discipline Input Group FDRG: Faculty Discipline Review Group ICW: Intersegmental Curriculum Workgroup Finalized TMC is accepted by the ICW and posted for local CCC adoption. Finalized June 16,

13 Approved Language IGETC for STEM to add to the ICAS IGETC Standards Document pending approval of the Senates. 2.4 STEM Students who are eligible to use the IGETC for STEM Majors Students preparing for a major in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics are eligible to complete IGETC for STEM Majors, a separate IGETC track designed specifically for these disciplines. For certification under IGETC for STEM Majors, students must complete the following: All courses in Areas 1, 2, and 5 of the traditional IGETC; and Two courses in Area 3 and two courses in Area 4, as well as one course for UCbound students who have not satisfied 6A through proficiency One remaining lower-division general education course in Area 3, one remaining lowerdivision general education course in Area 4, and, if necessary, one remaining course in Area 6A will be completed after transfer. This general education plan will allow STEM students to concentrate on the required lower division math and science courses needed for success in the major. These deferred lower division general education courses must be replaced in coursework before transfer with calculus and/or major science courses required by the major. Students are eligible to complete the IGETC for STEM Majors option only if it would be impossible for them to complete both major/major preparation coursework and either IGETC and/or the CSU GE Breadth plan within 60 units prior to transfer, Alternatively, STEM students may complete the traditional IGETC. However, IGETC and IGETC for STEM Majors may not be appropriate for those colleges or majors which prefer that transfer students follow a more prescribed lower-division curriculum. Students transferring to the CSU should refer to degreewithaguarantee.org for details on which Associate in Science for Transfer (AS-T) degrees will allow IGETC for STEM Majors and which ones require the traditional IGETC certification. If any specific AS-T degree allows IGETC for STEM Majors as its general education pattern, the specific courses that should replace the deferred lower division general education courses may be indicated on the Transfer Model Curriculum (TMC) for that discipline. Students transferring to the UC should refer to the following website for information on colleges and majors which do not recommend IGETC or IGETC for STEM Majors: x.html STEM doc suggestions

14 Discipline Input Group Meeting ("DIGs") Materials for Meeting: Diversity Studies: Diversity Data - Gender, LGBT, and WS Ethnic Studies Research Jan 2014 Mexican Am, Chicano Studies major requirements Global Studies/International Relations C-ID Discipline Comparative Course List CSU and UC Global studies and International Studies Programs General Documents: C-ID Approved Descriptors List C-ID DIG Fall AOE DIG Overview C-ID DIG Fall SB 1440 Overview C-ID Descriptor Template TMC Development Guidelines TMC Template Additional Travel and Logistical Notes Registration for both meetings will begin at 9:30 a.m.; the meeting will begin at 10:00 a.m., and will adjourn at 2:30 p.m. A continental breakfast and lunch will be provided and parking will be hosted. Due to a limited budget to convene these meetings, C-ID is not able to provide hotel accommodations the night before the meetings or funding for travel. Please note that faculty should attend the DIG in the region closest to their home. By registering for the meetings, you are acknowledging these terms. After you register, you will receive additional information and updates via . Questions? Please contact with any questions. Past DIG Meetings: These events marked the first phase in the development of new TMCs and C-ID course descriptors to support AA-T and AS-T degrees. The goals of the DIG meetings were: 1. Review and provide feedback on existing C-ID course descriptors. 2. Review (and modify, if necessary) CSU LDTP course descriptors, which will be incorporated into C-ID. 3. Determine, and develop, additional descriptors as needed. 4. Time permitting, the discipline groups discussed the composition of the major/area of emphasis component of CCC degrees. With the passage of SB 1440 there was a need to identify the courses that would compose a CCC degree in order to best prepare a student for the major at any CSU and, hopefully, any UCs that offer a comparable major.

15 Disciplines Convened Fall 2014 (for Area of Emphasis TMC Development): Global Studies/International Relations Diversity Studies including: o African American Studies o Asian American Studies o Chicano/Latino Studies o Native American Studies o Women's Studies o Gender Studies o LGBT Studies Disciplines Convened Fall 2013: Addiction Studies Allied Health Automotive Technology Commercial Music Culinary Arts Emergency Medical Services Disciplines Convened Fall 2012: Child and Adolescent Development Exercise Science Graphic Arts/Graphic Design Health Science Hospitality/Hotel Management Nutrition/Food Science/Dietetics Environmental Science/Studies Disciplines Convened Fall 2011: Radio/Television/Film Engineering (Civil, Mechanical, Electrical) Journalism Anthropology Information Systems Spanish Philosophy Geography Nursing (Second set of DIGs held May 2012) Social Work Disciplines Convened Spring 2011:

16 Business Management Marketing Accounting Studio Art English Economics Computer Information Systems (CIS) Political Science Music Math In addition, the "liberal studies" (i.e., "teacher preparation") major was discussed and the relevant C-ID descriptors reviewed If you have any questions, please feel free to contact C-ID staff at

17 March 25, 2013 TMCs and C-ID Descriptor Development C-ID s descriptors are an established vehicle for describing the required courses in the transfer model curricula (TMCs) developed to coordinate a statewide response to the degree development mandate established by SB Not all courses in a TMC, however, are required or even specified. Furthermore, the development of descriptors began prior to the passage of SB 1440 such that descriptors were developed for some courses that were explicitly not major preparation and, therefore, not likely a component of a TMC. For most disciplines descriptors have been developed for courses in the REQUIRED core of the TMC. Required means the course is specified and there are either no options or minimal options (e.g., choosing one of 2 specified courses). In other words, lists where the TMC indicates choose X from the following are instances where courses are specified but not required. Not all specified courses will have C- ID descriptor. In the instance where a specified course is not described by a C-ID descriptor, major preparation articulation is required, unless otherwise indicated. When a specified course is articulated by 30% or more of the CSUs with the major as major preparation, a descriptor will typically be developed. Ultimately, whether or not a descriptor is to be developed is determined by the FDRG. It should be noted that while descriptors exist within a given discipline of C-ID, this does not dictate where a given course is housed at a community college. Courses are awarded a C-ID designation based on their comparability to a descriptor, not the consistency of the discipline to which they are assigned. As a consequence, a course that is in one discipline in C-ID might be in a different discipline at a given community college. Approved at 3/11/13 ICW meeting, MLP

18 Model Catalog Language Feb 22, 2012 Associate Degrees for Transfer California Community Colleges are now offering associate degrees for transfer to the CSU. These may include Associate in Arts (AA-T) or Associate in Science (AS-T) degrees. These degrees are designed to provide a clear pathway to a CSU major and baccalaureate degree. California Community College students who are awarded an AA-T or AS-T degree are guaranteed admission with junior standing somewhere in the CSU system and given priority admission consideration to their local CSU campus or to a program that is deemed similar to their community college major. This priority does not guarantee admission to specific majors or campuses. Students who have been awarded an AA-T or AS-T are able to complete their remaining requirements for the 120-unit baccalaureate degree within 60 semester or 90 quarter units. To view the most current list of [insert college name] Associate Degrees for Transfer and to find out which CSU campuses accept each degree, please go to [insert URL]. Current and prospective community college students are encouraged to meet with a counselor to review their options for transfer and to develop an educational plan that best meets their goals and needs. Course Identification Numbering System (C-ID) The Course Identification Numbering System (C-ID) is a statewide numbering system independent from the course numbers assigned by local California community colleges. A C-ID number next to a course signals that participating California colleges and universities have determined that courses offered by other California community colleges are comparable in content and scope to courses offered on their own campuses, regardless of their unique titles or local course number. Thus, if a schedule of classes or catalog lists a course bearing a C-ID number, for example COMM 110, students at that college can be assured that it will be accepted in lieu of a course bearing the C-ID COMM 110 designation at another community college. In other words, the C-ID designation can be used to identify comparable courses at different community colleges. However, students should always go to to confirm how each college s course will be accepted at a particular four-year college or university for transfer credit. The C-ID numbering system is useful for students attending more than one community college and is applied to many of the transferable courses students need as preparation for transfer. Because these course requirements may change and because courses may be modified and qualified for or deleted from the C-ID database, students should always check with a counselor to determine how C-ID designated courses fit into their educational plans for transfer. Students may consult the ASSIST database at for specific information on C-ID course designations. Counselors can always help students interpret or explain this information.

19 Instructions to colleges for displaying C-ID numbers in catalogs, schedules or other materials. In order to ensure the uniform display of C-ID numbers statewide, we ask that colleges use the format in these examples: C-ID (Please use capital letters and a hyphen whenever referring to C-ID) AJ 110 (Please use the format for descriptors found at C-ID AJ 110 Colleges may choose to list their courses that are qualified for C-ID in a schedule or catalog, or they may choose to provide a link to the latest list on their college website, or they may prefer simply to refer readers to for the latest information. Page 2

20 California State University General Education-Breadth Requirements CSU GE (39 semester or 58 quarter units) Area A. English Language Communication and Critical Thinking Communication in the English Language and Critical Thinking (at least 9 semester or quarter units required with at least one course each from Oral Communication, Written Communication and Critical Thinking) A1 - Oral Communication A2 - Written Communication A3 - Critical Thinking Area B. Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning Physical Universe and Its Life Forms (at least 9 semester or quarter units required with at least one course each from Physical Science, Life Science (at least one to contain a laboratory component) and Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning) B1 - Physical Science B2 - Life Science B3 - Laboratory Activity B4 - Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning Area C. Arts and Humanities Arts, Literature, Philosophy, and Languages Other Than English (at least 9 semester or quarter units required with at least one course each in Arts and Humanities) C1 Arts C2 Humanities Area D. Social Sciences Social, Political, and Economic Institutions (at least 9 semester or quarter units required with courses in at least 2 disciplines) D0 - Sociology and Criminology D1 - Anthropology and Archeology D2 - Economics D3 - Ethnic Studies D4 - Gender Studies D5 - Geography D6 - History D7 - Interdisciplinary Social or Behavioral Science D8 - Political Science, Government and Legal Institutions D9 - Psychology Area E. Lifelong Learning and Self-Development Lifelong Learning and Self-Development (at least 3 semester or 4-5 quarter units) E - Lifelong Learning and Self-Development Developed using ASSIST. Org & CSU Executive Order No Page 1

21 Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum General Education Requirements IGETC (37 semester or 49 quarter units) Area 1. English Communication Three courses required, one in English composition, one in critical thinking-english composition, and one in oral communication (at least 9 semester or quarter units) 1A - English Composition 1B - Critical Thinking - English Composition 1C - Oral Communication (required by CSU only) Area 2. Mathematical Concepts and Quantitative Reasoning One course (at least 3 semester or 4-5 quarter units) 2A - Math Area 3. Arts and Humanities At least three courses, with at least one from the arts and one from the humanities (at least 9 semester or quarter units) 3A - Arts 3B - Humanities Area 4. Social and Behavior Sciences At least three courses from at least two disciplines (at least 9 semester or quarter units) 4A - Anthropology and Archaeology 4B - Economics 4C - Ethnic Studies 4D - Gender Studies 4E - Geography 4F - History 4G - Interdisciplinary, Social & Behavioral Sciences 4H - Political Science, Government & Legal Institutions 4I - Psychology 4J - Sociology & Criminology Area 5. Physical and Biological Sciences Two courses, one physical science and one biological science; at least one must include a laboratory (at least 7-9 semester or 9-12 quarter units) Courses that include a lab component are underlined on ASSIST IGETC reports. 5A - Physical Science/Lab 5B - Biological Science/Lab Developed using ASSIST. Org & CSU Executive Order No Page 2

22 Some Questions and Answers about SB 1440 Associate Degrees for Transfer August 1, Exactly what is the guarantee specifically for both CCCs and CSUs? The legislation, the most recent LAO report, the terms and conditions information for the Degree with a Guarantee website, and Chancellor Jack Scott s recent memo on the implementation, all provide a detailed summary of the various aspects of the guarantee. A student who completes an Associate Degree for Transfer at a California Community College is guaranteed admission to the California State University, but not to any particular campus or program. To qualify, the student must be conferred an approved Associate Degree for Transfer (AA-T/AS-T) by a California Community College, apply for admission to California State University campuses for an open term by the published deadline, submit all requested transcripts and documents by published deadlines, meet CSU admission eligibility requirements for the program to which they have applied, and must comply with any other prescribed admission requirements. However, the only permissible supplemental admission requirement for students that complete an approved AA-T/AS-T degree will be GPA; they will not be required to take any additional courses as supplemental admission requirements. Associate Degree for Transfer graduates who are admitted to a CSU program that has been deemed similar to the Transfer Model Curriculum (TMC) for that discipline will be able to complete the Baccalaureate Degree in the similar option in the discipline within 60 semester or 90 quarter units as long as the student successfully completes each required course without repeating them or supplementing instruction with additional courses for minors or areas of emphasis. In order to finish the baccalaureate degree, students will also need to satisfy the CSU writing proficiency requirement. A few academic programs may require performance evaluations, auditions, portfolio reviews or set specific academic progress requirements to maintain enrollment in the program. To maintain the guarantee, continuous enrollment in the same academic major is required unless the student is on an approved leave of absence. After enrollment at a CSU campus begins, the guarantee is not transferable to another CSU campus. At the CCCs, students earning AA-T or AS-T degrees are not held to local CCC graduation requirements and will not be required to repeat any coursework already successfully completed at a California community college.

23 2. Regarding redirection: How is the choice of CSU to which a student is redirected made? Does the student have options? Will the policy be published? Is the student redirected to the same concentration within the major (if appropriate)? Within CSU Mentor, applicants who select impacted campuses and majors are already highly encouraged to apply to campuses and programs which are not impacted. A student who applies to multiple campuses will have more options. Currently, redirection is a highly manual process handled by the CSU campus that is unable to offer admission to the applicant to an impacted major. The campus will redirect the application to another non-impacted CSU campus which still has capacity to enroll new students with consideration for campuses that have deemed the AA-T/AS-T degree similar and offers the same option/concentration. Given the variety of options and concentrations across CSU campuses, redirection to the same concentration will be preferred, but may not be available. CSU has proposed changes to the existing CSU Mentor features for redirection which could allow the applicant to participate in the redirection process; however those changes are proposals. Once finalized, this information will be available on CSU Mentor. 3. Will SB 1440 degree students receive priority registration at all or some CSU campuses? No, neither community colleges nor CSU campuses will provide priority registration because of SB Local colleges and universities may choose to offer students earning AA-T and AS-T degrees priority registration due to local policies and practices. 4. The minimum GPA of 2.0 does not distinguish between residents and non-residents (2.4 required) or international students (2.8 required). What is the minimum GPA required? Education Code a.2 requires only a minimum GPA of 2.0 in order for students to be eligible for transfer with an AA-T or AS-T. However, due to the competitive nature of admissions at the CSU, students are advised to earn as a high a GPA as possible. 5. What will change in the spring admission process because of needing 60 units done in the summer prior to transfer? Will there be a separate process for the spring admits and conferring the degree? CSU would accept Fall completion of the degree to satisfy spring admission; however campuses may stipulate that basic skills courses be completed by the end of summer. Receiving final transcripts with the degree posted may present issues for spring reporting and advisement which CSU will resolve. The process will be reviewed after the first cohort of spring admits in 2013.

24 6. How much lee way is there for the completion date of the AA-T? What if a student is admitted to CSU not as a 1440 student, and prior to CSU advising for the next term, the student completes an AA-T or AS-T, will the student still get the benefits of the degree? Will benefits be awarded backwards? The degree could be completed up until first term of enrollment at CSU. As admission has already occurred, the only possible benefit would be reduction to what would be 60 units to finish program minus those completed. In some cases, this could still benefit the student; however in others, the student may have already enrolled in courses in the first term which would be outside the prescribed remaining 60 units. Each case would have to be individually reviewed. 7. The degree presumably is the ticket for entry and the only reason a CSU would need to drill down and examine the student s actual course choices would be if the CSU has determined that there is some course that is critical and not guaranteed in the TMC that the student may have to take in the CSU s 60, correct? CSU campuses review transcripts for ALL college courses completed in order to adjust for repeats between campuses, check for substitutions & waivers, determine transfer grade point averages, and define prerequisites. Additionally, as students often alter career choices once they transfer, there could be additional need to individually review courses. Because many TMC patterns allow great flexibility in the choice of courses, each CSU campus will continue to drill down on courses in order to develop the individual plan for the remaining 60 units. While it will be easy to identify that the lower division general education has been fulfilled in the degree audit, course by course modifications will be necessary to accurately present the major requirements and remaining units for the baccalaureate degree. Unfulfilled requirements may be identified as fulfilled by virtue of completing the Associate Degree for Transfer.

25 Transfer Model Curriculum (TMC) Template for Business Administration Template # 2006 CCC Major or Area of Emphasis: Business Administration Rev. 4: 09/01/14 TOP Code: CSU Major(s): Business Administration Total Units: 23 (all units are minimum semester units) In the four columns to the right under the College Program Requirements, enter the college s course identifier, title and the number of units comparable to the course indicated for the TMC. If the course may be double-counted with either CSU-GE or IGETC, enter the GE Area to which the course is articulated. To review the GE Areas and associated unit requirements, please go to Chancellor s Office Academic Affairs page, RESOURCE section located at: or the ASSIST website: The units indicated in the template are the minimum semester units required for the prescribed course or list. All courses must be CSU transferable. All courses with an identified C-ID Descriptor must be submitted to C-ID prior to submission of the Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT) proposal to the Chancellor s Office. Where no C-ID Descriptor is indicated, discipline faculty should compare their existing course to the example course(s) provided in the TMC at: Attach the appropriate ASSIST documentation as follows: Articulation Agreement by Major (AAM) demonstrating lower division preparation in the major at a CSU; CSU Baccalaureate Level Course List by Department (BCT) for the transfer courses; and/or, CSU GE Certification Course List by Area (GECC). The acronyms AAM, BCT, and GECC will appear in C-ID Descriptor column directly next to the course to indicate which report will need to be attached to the proposal to support the course s inclusion in the transfer degree. To access ASSIST, please go to Associate in Science in Business Administration for Transfer Degree College Name: TRANSFER MODEL CURRICULUM (TMC) COLLEGE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS C-ID Course Title (units) Descriptor REQUIRED CORE: Select five (15 units) Financial Accounting (3) ACCT 110 Managerial Accounting (3) ACCT 120 Principles of Microeconomics (3) ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) ECON 202 Business Law (3) BUS 125 OR OR Legal Environment of Business (3) BUS 120 LIST A: Select one (3 units) Business Calculus (3) MATH 140 Introduction to Statistics (3) MATH 110 Finite Mathematics (3) MATH 130 Course ID Course Title Units GE Area CSU IGETC Template #: Template Date: 06/30/11 Business Administration Rev. 1: 04/11/12; Rev. 2: 08/20/12; Rev. 3: 03/01/13

26 LIST B: Select two (5-6 units) Any LIST A course not already used. Business Information Systems, Computer Information Systems (3) OR Computer Skills (2-3) Introduction to Business (3) OR Business Communication (3) BUS 140/ ITIS 120 OR AAM BUS 110 OR BUS 115 Total Units for the Major: 23 Total Units for the Major: Total Units that may be double-counted (The transfer GE Area limits must not be exceeded) General Education (CSU-GE or IGETC) Units Elective (CSU Transferable) Units Total Degree Units (maximum) 60 Template #: Template Date: 06/30/11 Business Administration Rev. 1: 04/11/12; Rev. 2: 08/20/12; Rev. 3: 03/01/13

27 Transfer Model Curriculum (TMC) Template for Biology Template # 2014 CCC Major or Area of Emphasis: Biology Rev. 2: 05/18/2015 TOP Code: CSU Major(s): Biology Total Units: 29 (all units are minimum semester units) In the four columns to the right under the College Program Requirements, enter the college s course identifier, title and the number of units comparable to the course indicated for the TMC. If the course may be double-counted with either CSU-GE or IGETC, enter the GE Area to which the course is articulated. To review the GE Areas and associated unit requirements, please go to Chancellor s Office Academic Affairs page, RESOURCE section located at: or the ASSIST website: The units indicated in the template are the minimum semester units required for the prescribed course or list. All courses must be CSU transferable. All courses with an identified C-ID Descriptor must be submitted to C-ID prior to submission of the Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT) proposal to the Chancellor s Office. Where no C-ID Descriptor is indicated, discipline faculty should compare their existing course to the example course(s) provided in the TMC at: Attach the appropriate ASSIST documentation as follows: Articulation Agreement by Major (AAM) demonstrating lower division preparation in the major at a CSU; CSU Baccalaureate Level Course List by Department (BCT) for the transfer courses; and/or, CSU GE Certification Course List by Area (GECC). The acronyms AAM, BCT, and GECC will appear in C-ID Descriptor column directly next to the course to indicate which report will need to be attached to the proposal to support the course s inclusion in the transfer degree. To access ASSIST, please go to TRANSFER MODEL CURRICULUM (TMC) C-ID Course Title (units) Descriptor REQUIRED CORE: (8-12 units) Select 1 of 2 options Option 1 Biology Sequence for Majors (8) BIOL 135S Associate in Science in Biology for Transfer Degree College Name: COLLEGE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Course ID Course Title Units GE Area CSU IGETC OR Option 2 Cell and Molecular Biology (4) AND Organismal Biology (4) OR Organismal Biology, Ecology and Evolution (8) OR Zoology/Animal Diversity and Evolution (4) Botany/Plant Diversity and Ecology (4) LIST A: (21-22 units) BIOL 190 BIOL 140 OR BIOL 130S OR BIOL 150 AND BIOL 155 Template # Template Date: 02/01/15 Biology Rev. 1: 04/01/15

28 General Chemistry for Science Majors Sequence A (10) Single Variable Calculus I Early Transcendentals (4) OR Single Variable Calculus I Late Transcendentals (4) OR Calculus for Life and Social Sciences (3) Algebra/Trigonometry-Based Physics A (4) AND Algebra/Trigonometry-Based Physics B (4) OR Calculus-Based Physics for Scientists and Engineers: A (4) AND Calculus-Based Physics for Scientists and Engineers: B (4) OR Algebra/Trigonometry-Based Physics: AB (8) LIST B: Select one (0-4 units) Any course articulated as lower division preparation in the Biology major at a CSU. CHEM 120S MATH 210 OR MATH 211 OR AAM PHYS 105 AND PHYS 110 OR PHYS 205 AND PHYS 210 OR PHYS 100S AAM Total Units for the Major: 29 Total Units for the Major: Total Double-counted Units (The transfer GE Area limits must not be exceeded) *General Education (CSU-GE or IGETC for STEM) Units Elective (CSU Transferable) Units Total Degree Units (maximum) 60 NOTES: 1. * This TMC presumes completion of IGETC or CSU-GE Breadth for STEM, allowing for completion of 6 units of non-stem GE work after transfer. 2. Required Core Options 1 and 2 represent Options 1-4 on the TMC. 3. List B Additional Major Preparation if possible based on unit limitation and required articulation exists (3-4 units). Template # Template Date: 02/01/15 Biology Rev. 1: 04/01/15

29 Transfer Model Curriculum (TMC) Template for Psychology Template # 1002 CCC Major or Area of Emphasis: Psychology Rev. 3: 09/01/14 TOP Code: CSU Major(s): Psychology Total Units: 18 (all units are minimum semester units) In the four columns to the right under the College Program Requirements, enter the college s course identifier, title and the number of units comparable to the course indicated for the TMC. If the course may be double-counted with either CSU-GE or IGETC, enter the GE Area to which the course is articulated. To review the GE Areas and associated unit requirements, please go to Chancellor s Office Academic Affairs page, RESOURCE section located at: or the ASSIST website: The units indicated in the template are the minimum semester units required for the prescribed course or list. All courses must be CSU transferable. All courses with an identified C-ID Descriptor must be submitted to C-ID prior to submission of the Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT) proposal to the Chancellor s Office. Where no C-ID Descriptor is indicated, discipline faculty should compare their existing course to the example course(s) provided in the TMC at: Attach the appropriate ASSIST documentation as follows: Articulation Agreement by Major (AAM) demonstrating lower division preparation in the major at a CSU; CSU Baccalaureate Level Course List by Department (BCT) for the transfer courses; and/or, CSU GE Certification Course List by Area (GECC). The acronyms AAM, BCT, and GECC will appear in C-ID Descriptor column directly next to the course to indicate which report will need to be attached to the proposal to support the course s inclusion in the transfer degree. To access ASSIST, please go to TRANSFER MODEL CURRICULUM (TMC) C-ID Course Title (units) Descriptor REQUIRED CORE: (9-11 units) Introduction to Statistics (3-4) MATH 110 Associate in Arts in Psychology for Transfer Degree College Name: Course ID COLLEGE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Course Title Units GE Area CSU IGETC Introductory Psychology (3) PSY 110 Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology (3) OR Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology with Lab (4) LIST A: Select one (3-4 units) Introduction to Biology (3-4) Human Biology (3-4) Introduction to Biological Psychology (3) LIST B: Select one (3 units) Any LIST A course not already used. PSY 200 OR PSY 205B AAM AAM PSY 150 Template # Template Date: 03/01/11 Psychology Rev. 1: 04/11/12; Rev. 2: 03/01/13

30 Any course articulated as lower division preparation for the Psychology major at a CSU. LIST C: Select one (3 units) Any LIST A or B course not already used. Any CSU transferable Psychology course. Any course articulated as lower division preparation for the Psychology major at a CSU in or outside of the Psychology discipline. AAM BCT AAM Total Units for the Major: 18 Total Units for the Major: Total Units that may be double-counted (The transfer GE Area limits must not be exceeded) General Education (CSU-GE or IGETC) Units Elective (CSU Transferable) Units Total Degree Units (maximum) 60 Template # Template Date: 03/01/11 Psychology Rev. 1: 04/11/12; Rev. 2: 03/01/13

31 Transfer Model Curriculum (TMC) Template for Theatre Arts Template # 1005 CCC Major or Area of Emphasis: Theatre Arts Rev. 3: 02/01/15 TOP Code: CSU Major(s): Theatre Arts; Drama Total Units: 18 (all units are minimum semester units) In the four columns to the right under the College Program Requirements, enter the college s course identifier, title and the number of units comparable to the course indicated for the TMC. If the course may be double-counted with either CSU-GE or IGETC, enter the GE Area to which the course is articulated. To review the GE Areas and associated unit requirements, please go to Chancellor s Office Academic Affairs page, RESOURCE section located at: or the ASSIST website: The units indicated in the template are the minimum semester units required for the prescribed course or list. All courses must be CSU transferable. All courses with an identified C-ID Descriptor must be submitted to C-ID prior to submission of the Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT) proposal to the Chancellor s Office. TRANSFER MODEL CURRICULUM (TMC) Associate in Arts in Theatre Arts for Transfer Degree College Name: COLLEGE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Course Title (units) C-ID Descriptor REQUIRED CORE: (9 units) Introduction to Theatre (3) THTR 111 OR OR Theatre History I (3) THTR 113 Acting I (3) THTR 151 Select (3 units maximum) Rehearsal and Performance Production (1) OR Technical Theatre in Production (1) LIST A: Select three (9 units) THTR 191 OR THTR 192 Acting II (3) THTR 152 Introduction to Design/ THTR 172 Introduction to Theatre Design (3) Introduction to Stage Lighting/ THTR 173 Lighting Design Fundamentals (3) Introduction to Stage Costume/ THTR 174 Fundamentals of Costume Design (3) Introduction to Stage Make-up/ THTR 175 Stage Make-up (3) Script Analysis (3) THTR 114 Stagecraft (3) THTR 171 Course ID Course Title Units GE Area CSU IGETC Select from the following REQUIRED CORE courses not already used (3 units maximum) Rehearsal and Performance Production (1) OR THTR 191 OR THTR 192 Template # Template Date: 05/23/11 Theatre Arts Rev. 1: 03/01/13, Rev. 2: 09/01/14

32 Technical Theatre in Production (1) Total Units for the Major: 18 Total Units for the Major: Total Units that may be double-counted (The transfer GE Area limits must not be exceeded) General Education (CSU-GE or IGETC) Units Elective (CSU Transferable) Units Total Degree Units (maximum) 60 Template # Template Date: 05/23/11 Theatre Arts Rev. 1: 03/01/13, Rev. 2: 09/01/14

33 Statewide Program Articulation Spring 2011 Pennsylvania s Statewide Program-to-Program Articulation Toolkit February 2011 Program Articulation Committees (PACs) Composition Recognizing the importance of having faculty, administrators and personnel from both two- and four-year participating institutions involved in the statewide program-to-program articulation process, the Transfer and Articulation Oversight Committee (TAOC) determined each PAC shall include 13 members representing the three sectors (community colleges, state-owned universities, opt-in institutions) and TAOC: 5 community college representatives, including 4 teaching faculty from the field of study and 1 nonteaching representative with an understanding of transfer and articulation (i.e., Transfer Counselor, Registrar, etc.) 5 representatives from universities in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) to include 4 teaching faculty from the field of study and 1 non-teaching representative with an understanding of transfer and articulation. 2 representatives from the independent or state-related institutions that have formally joined TAOC (a.k.a., Opt-Ins ) to include at least 1 teaching faculty member from the field of study and 1 additional representative (either a faculty member or a representative with an understanding of transfer and articulation.) 1 TAOC member appointed by the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE). PAC Member Criteria Effective articulation agreements are a combination of academic requirements, institutional policy and advising. For this reason, each PAC shall consist of members with a collective knowledge and experience from the various academic, administrative and operational areas of higher education: Academics related to the PAC field of study area(s) Curriculum development Transfer and articulation, such as transfer admissions, development of articulation agreements, determination of course equivalencies, etc. Advising (i.e., undergraduate student advising, transfer student advising, major-specific advising Administration (i.e., institutional policies related to the major, transfer of credits, admissions, financial aid) Pennsylvania s current statewide transfer system, including TAOC, the Transfer Credit Framework and course approval process, Curriculum Standards Subcommittees, PA TRAC website, etc. Only representatives from participating institutions with degree programs in the PAC s field of study may serve as committee members. PAC Selection Process Each higher education sector of TAOC the community colleges, PASSHE universities and Opt-In institutions determines its respective representation for each committee. The Pennsylvania Commission for Community Colleges will coordinate and appoint PAC members from the community college sector. PASSHE s Office of the Chancellor will coordinate and appoint PAC members from the state-owned universities. PDE will coordinate and appoint PAC members from the Opt-ins.

34 Statewide Program Articulation Spring 2011 PAC Leadership Each PAC will be led by co-chairs elected from its membership: One chair representing the associate-degree granting institutions. One chair representing the bachelor-degree granting institutions. The TAOC representative will assist the co-chairs with meeting facilitation and serve as the liaison between the PAC and the full TAOC. Voting PAC members at the two- and four-year institutions are equal partners in developing the statewide program-toprogram agreements. Therefore, all members have an equal vote, except for the TAOC representative who serves as a non-voting member. The final articulation agreement submitted by the PAC to TAOC for approval must be approved by member consensus. PAC Charge, Milestones & Deliverables Charge PAC members are charged with developing a statewide program-to-program articulation agreement that allows a student to transfer the full Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree in the PAC s respective field of study into a parallel bachelor degree program offered at a participating four-year institution. PAC members will work together to identify the competencies required for entry into the field of study at the juniorlevel. The resulting agreement will also build on the 30-credit Transfer Credit Framework that is the basis of the Commonwealth s college credit transfer system. The goal of statewide articulation is not to create a common associate degree program or bachelor degree program in the field of study. Rather, institutions will use the articulation agreement to ensure minimum competency requirements are met at the associate degree level and that students are academically prepared to transfer into the parallel bachelor degree program as juniors. Deliverables The PAC is expected to develop a written program-to-program articulation agreement that meets the above charge and receives TAOC approval. Milestones Each PAC will be required to achieve the following milestones: 1. Elect PAC co-chairs. 2. Develop a PAC project timeline that works within the timeline outlined by TAOC and includes completion of project milestones and the final articulation agreement. 3. Develop a draft articulation agreement. 4. Develop a final articulation agreement. 5. Obtain approval of the articulation agreement from the full TAOC. 6. Submit interim reports to PDE by the first of each month, describing progress made, milestones achieved and next steps. The TAOC member serving on the PAC is responsible for submitting the above items to PDE by the deadline indicated. All deliverables should be ed to Julie Kane, Coordinator of the Pennsylvania s college credit transfer system, at

35 Statewide Program Articulation Spring 2011 PAC Workflow & Timeline PAC Workflow Since each PAC will be limited in membership, a workflow process that incorporates an opportunity for various stakeholders from the participating institutions to comment, share information and provide input and feedback is vital. For this reason, draft agreements will be distributed to the various sectors at each participating institution before the agreements are finalized and submitted to TAOC for approval. The basic workflow process is as follows: 1. PDE requests each higher education sector identify and appoint faculty representatives to serve on each PAC. 2. PAC members attend a one-day Kick-Off Meeting hosted by PDE. At this meeting, members will learn more about their charge and expected deliverables as well as have the opportunity to begin working on their agreements. This will be the only time PAC members are required by PDE to meet in person as a group. ** All PAC members are expected to meet as a group at the Kick-Off Meeting in Harrisburg for an initial orientation to the program-to-program articulation process. At that time PAC members will receive their official charge and a list of milestones and project deliverables. For this reason, it is imperative that all members be present. Additional face-to-face committee meetings may be scheduled at the discretion of the PAC. However, every effort should be made to use electronic resources to facilitate workflow, discussion and decisionmaking and to keep travel time/expense to a minimum. 3. In accordance to the timeline and project plan determined by the PAC members, the PAC creates a draft agreement for its respective area of study and submits it to the PDE by the designated deadline. The TAOC member serving on the PAC is responsible for submitting the above items to PDE by the deadline indicated. All deliverables should be ed to Julie Kane, Coordinator of the Pennsylvania s college credit transfer system, at 4. PDE posts the draft agreement online and solicit feedback from members of all of the TAOC institutions. 5. The PAC considers the external feedback and revises the agreement, if needed. 6. PAC members vote on the agreement. Once majority consensus is reached, the agreement is submitted to PDE for full TAOC review. 7. TAOC either approves the agreement or returns it (with comment) to the PAC for revision and resubmission. Approval of the final agreement requires a majority vote by the fully-participating TAOC members. 8. Once approved by TAOC, PDE officially distributes the final document to all TAOC members and posts the agreement on the Pennsylvania Transfer and Articulation Center website (www.pacollegetransfer.com). 9. TAOC institutions then work within their institutions to meet the requirements and honor the final agreement by the deadline set by TAOC.

36 Statewide Program Articulation Spring 2011 Comprehensive PAC Timeline for Spring 2011 Task Deadline TAOC identifies fields of study areas. January 2011 TAOC sectors community colleges, PASSHE universities, opt-ins identify representation for each PAC and submit appointments to PDE. **PAC Kick-Off Meeting for Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Physical Sciences & Computer Science ONLY held at Dixon University Center in Harrisburg, PA. **PAC Kick-Off Meeting for 4-8 Education, Business, Criminal Justice, English & Communication Studies/Mass Communications ONLY held at Dixon University Center in Harrisburg, PA. No later than February 18, 2011 Friday, February 25, 2011 Monday, February 28, 2011 The PAC elects their co-chairs and submits their names to PDE. March 4, 2011 The PAC develops a project timeline that includes the project milestones and final deliverables and submits it to PDE. The project timeline should be included as part of the PAC s interim progress report. March 15, 2011 The PAC submits the FIRST interim report to PDE describing progress made, milestones achieved and next steps. The PAC provides a draft agreement to PDE. The draft agreement should be submitted as part of the SECOND interim report. April 13, 2011 The PAC submits the SECOND interim report to PDE describing progress made, milestones achieved and next steps. PDE posts the draft agreements to the PA TRAC website for feedback. April 18, 2011 Feedback on draft articulation agreements solicited from TAOC institutions. Monday, April 18 Friday, May 6, 2011 PAC submits a final articulation agreement to PDE for TAOC review. May 20, 2011 TAOC reviews the agreements and either approves or returns to the PAC for revisions. May 23-27, 2011 PAC obtains final approval of their agreements from the full TAOC. June 15, 2011 TAOC institutions begin honoring the final articulation agreement. No later than Fall 2012

37 Statewide Program Articulation Spring 2011 PAC Interim Progress Reports TAOC requires each PAC to submit an interim progress report at least twice during the duration of the articulation project. The progress report is the means by which TAOC and PDE are kept apprised of each PAC s work and ensures that the PAC is moving steadily toward completion. The PAC co-chairs are responsible for completing the Interim Progress Report (IPR) in consultation with the full PAC. The PAC s first IPR should include the preliminary project plan for the PAC, as well as the information included on the IPR Template provided below. The second IRP should include a draft agreement, as well as the information included on the IPR Template. Once complete, PAC co-chairs should share the IPR with the full PAC. The PAC s TAOC member will then submit the IPR to PDE by the designated deadline. All IPRs should be ed to PDE via Julie Kane, Coordinator of the Pennsylvania s college credit transfer system, at

38 Statewide Program Articulation Spring 2011 Program Articulation Agreement Interim Progress Report Submit electronically to Julie Kane, Coordinator of the Pennsylvania s college credit transfer system, at Date PAC Title: TAOC Member Submitting Report: Resolved Issues List issues resolved by the PAC since submitting the last report to PDE. Attach documents, if necessary. Unresolved Issues List outstanding issues that are still being discussed. Attach related documents, if necessary. Next Steps Outline the PAC s next steps in completing the agreement. Include a deadline for each step. Additional Comments

39 Statewide Program Articulation Spring 2011 Statewide Program Articulation Roles & Responsibilities The success of Pennsylvania s statewide articulation agreements is dependent upon an inclusive development process that fully utilizes the resources of the Commonwealth, the (TAOC), the colleges and universities participating in the Commonwealth s college credit transfer system and the faculty and personnel that make-up those institutions. Role of the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) PDE serves as the facilitator and coordinator of the articulation projects. The coordinator of the Commonwealth s college credit transfer system, as the chair of TAOC, assists TAOC representatives with developing the articulation process, organizing the PACs and articulation projects and ensuring that the projects meet legislative requirements. Role of TAOC PDE works with TAOC to coordinate and maintain the Commonwealth s college credit transfer system. TAOC is a representative body that consists of the following members: 1 representative from each of the participating institutions. 1 representative from the Office of the Chancellor for the PA State System of Higher Education (PASSHE). 1 representative from the Pennsylvania Commission for Community Colleges. 2 representatives from PDE, including the transfer system coordinator and the Deputy Secretary for the Office of Postsecondary and Higher Education. TAOC s role in the statewide program articulation process is as follows: Develop a system by which statewide articulation agreements are created. Review and approve articulation agreements submitted by the PACs. Outline a process and timeline by which statewide articulation agreements will be implemented by the participating institutions. Role of the TAOC Representative and the Participating Institution Each college and university participating in the college credit transfer system has a representative serving on TAOC. TAOC representatives have the following responsibilities in the articulation process: To work with their sector to appoint representatives to serve on the PACs. To communicate TAOC policies, procedures and processes to the appropriate individuals at their institutions. To review and approve articulation agreements submitted to TAOC by the PACs. To coordinate and oversee implementation of the statewide agreements by the deadline determined by TAOC. To guarantee that their institutions meet all legislative requirements as they pertain to the transfer system and statewide program-to-program articulation. Role of the PAC The Pennsylvania General Assembly and TAOC have decided that all statewide articulation agreements should be created collectively by institutional faculty and personnel. Therefore, Pennsylvania s statewide program articulation model uses Program Articulation Committees consisting of faculty, administrators and personnel from both two- and four-year participating institutions to develop the agreements. As a group, the role of the PAC is to do the following: Develop a written statewide program-to-program articulation agreement that allows a student to transfer the full Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree in the PAC s respective field of study into a parallel bachelor degree program offered at a participating four-year institution. Identify the competencies required for entry into the field of study at the junior-level. Develop an articulation agreement that builds on the 30-credit Transfer Credit Framework, the basis of the Commonwealth s college credit transfer system.

40 Statewide Program Articulation Spring 2011 Role of PAC Members In addition to the tasks assigned to the full PAC, each PAC member is also expected to do the following: Participate in PAC discussions and work with fellow PAC members to develop the final agreement. Collect data and information as needed to assist the PAC with its work. Meet all deadlines established by the PAC, TAOC and PDE. Vote on the agreement before it is submitted to PDE for TAOC review. Communicate with his/her TAOC member frequently. Assist with all other tasks as agreed upon by the PAC to make progress. Role of PAC Leaders Each PAC will be led by co-chairs elected from its membership: One chair representing the associate-degree granting institutions. One chair representing the bachelor-degree granting institutions. The PAC co-chairs are responsible for the following tasks: o Organizing the PAC. o Coordinating meetings, if needed. o Keeping PAC members to task. o Working with the PAC s TAOC representative to submit all required deliverables, including the monthly progress reports and final agreement. Role of PAC TAOC Representative PDE appoints one TAOC representative to serve on each PAC. Except for voting, the TAOC member is expected to assume the same role as the other PAC members in addition to the following tasks: Serve as the PAC s liaison with TAOC. Serve as PDE s primary point of contact for the PAC. Help the PAC with understanding the Commonwealth s college credit transfer system and TAOC s policies, procedures and processes. Provide administrative support to the PAC co-chairs and assist with meeting facilitation and coordination of the PAC and related articulation project. Submit the PAC deliverables to PDE on behalf of the PAC by the deadline indicated. Be prepared to provide a project update at TAOC meetings.

41 The 30-Credit Transfer Framework is a menu of foundation courses from which students may select up to 30 credits to transfer toward a degree at any PA TRAC college. Framework courses... Are foundation courses in English, Public Speaking, Math, Natural Science, Art and Humanities, and the Behavioral and Social Sciences that transfer seamlessly from PA TRAC college to another. Are the type of coursework that is generally completed during the first two years of a bachelor degree program. Are a good choices for students who are undecided about the major they wish to pursue or the PA TRAC college where they plan to transfer. Apply to students matriculated at participating PA TRAC colleges in Fall 2008 and beyond. By enrolling in Framework courses at PA TRAC colleges, students can earn the equivalent of one full-year of study (30 credits) and have peace of mind in knowing that when they transfer, they can take their credits with them. Using the Transfer Framework Framework courses are worth 3- or 4- credits each and are separated into six broad categories. Students should select a range of courses from all six categories according to the guidelines below. The Framework chart below shows the type of courses found in each category. Actual course titles vary by college. Use the search at the bottom of the page to find specific Framework courses offered at PA TRAC colleges. Students should consult an academic advisor prior to enrolling in more than 30-credits or exceeding the category requirements. Certain majors have specific requirements prescribed by external agencies. It is the student s responsibility to work with an advisor to select appropriate courses as they relate to the major. English Composition Public Speaking Calculus I Precalculus Elementary Statistics College Algebra Foundations of Mathmatics General Chemistry I (Majors & non-majors courses) General Chemistry II (Majors & non-majors courses) General Biology I (Majors & non-majors courses) General Biology II (Majors & non-majors courses) General Physics I (non-calculus) General Physics II (non-calculus) Category 1 (Select 1 course) Category 2 (Select 1 course) Category 3 (Select no more than 2 courses) Category 4 Must include lab (Select no more than 2 courses)

42 Anatomy & Physiology I Anatomy & Physiology II Introduction to Astronomy General Psychology Introduction to Sociology American National Government Educational Psychology History of Western Civilization II Principles of Macroeconomics Principles of Microeconomics U.S. History I U.S. History II History of Western Civilization I Contemporary Social Problems Introduction to Anthropology Human Growth & Development Child Psychology Category 5 (Select no more than 2 courses) Category 6 (Select no more than 2 courses) Introduction to Music Introduction to Philosophy Elementary Spanish I Elementary Spanish II Painting I Elementary French I Elementary French II Drawing I Ethics Introduction to Art German I German II Introduction to Literature (can also be known as Introduction to Poetry, Interpreting Literature, Reading Literature, Theses in Literature, Topics in Literature, Current Themes in Literature) Survey of American Literature Literature of the Western World World Literature American Literature American Literature Introduction to Theatre

43 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 PENNSYLVANIA STATEWIDE PROGRAM-TO-PROGRAM ARTICULATION AGREEMENT IN BIOLOGY Overview In accordance with Act 50 of 2009, institutions participating in Pennsylvania s statewide college credit transfer system agree to the following policies governing the transfer of credits from a participating associate-degree granting institution into a participating four-year college or university. This agreement specifically ensures that a student who successfully completes an Associate of Arts (AA) or Associate of Science (AS) degree in Biology or any AA or AS degree that incorporates the required competencies at a participating institution can transfer the full degree into a parallel bachelor degree program in Biology at a participating four-year institution. In order for students to transfer the full associate degree into a parallel bachelor degree program at a participating four-year institution, all of the following criteria must be met: Successful completion of at least 30 credits of foundation courses from the Transfer Credit Framework. Successful completion of an associate s degree that includes at least 60 credits and all of the required major-specific content area competencies identified in this Agreement. Successful completion of four Chemistry courses with laboratories and at least four Biology courses with laboratories. The associate s degree must include a minimum of 14 and a maximum of 17 credits of Biology-specific coursework as outlined under Required Major-Specific Content Areas in this Agreement. See Appendix A: Program-to-Program Articulation Model for Biology. It is therefore understood that students meeting these requirements will be considered by both the associate degree granting institution and the receiving four-year institution to possess the knowledge, skills and abilities necessary for entry as a junior into a parallel bachelor degree program in Biology. References to courses in all agreements designate competencies and are not to be construed as making a reference to a specific course at a specific institution. Course titles in the agreements are presented for guidance in advising students as to which coursework they should take even though the course at the student s college may not have the specific title mentioned in the agreement. 1 REQUIRED Major-Specific Content Areas Under this Agreement, a fully-transferable associate degree in the field of Biology must include competencies from three primary content areas: 1. Biology - 14 credits minimum (17 credits maximum) A. Principles of Biology - 8 credits Students must meet competencies, acquired through both lecture and rigorous laboratory/field experiences, in two courses covering the Principles of Biology. See Appendix B: Competencies for Preparation in the Principles of Biology B. Program-Specific Content Areas 6 to 9 credits Students must meet competencies, acquired through both lecture and rigorous laboratory/field experiences, in at least two, but not more than three, of the following areas: a. Botany b. Genetics c. Microbiology d. Ecology e. Research Methods 1 Adopted by TAOC and added to the agreement on April 11,

44 Approved by TAOC on June 16, Chemistry 16 credits A. General Chemistry 8 credits Students must meet competencies, acquired through both lecture and rigorous laboratory/field experiences, in two courses of General Chemistry. Students will fulfill this requirement by completing General Chemistry I for science majors and General Chemistry II for science majors within Category 4 of the 30 credit Transfer Credit Framework. See Appendix A: Program to Program Articulation Model for Biology, and Appendix J: Transfer Credit Framework. B. Organic Chemistry 8 credits Students must meet competencies, acquired through both lecture and rigorous laboratory/field experiences, in two courses of Organic Chemistry. See Appendix H: Competencies for Preparation in Organic Chemistry, and Appendix I: Competencies for Preparation in Organic Chemistry Laboratory. 3. Mathematics - 6 to 8 credits Students must meet competencies in two courses of Mathematics. At least one of the courses must be Pre-calculus or Calculus. Students will fulfill this requirement by taking two math courses within Category 3 of the 30 credit Transfer Credit Framework, provided that at least one of the courses is Precalculus or Calculus. See Appendix A: Program to Program Articulation Model for Biology, and Appendix J: Transfer Credit Framework. 1. Biology 14 to 17 credits A. Principles of Biology Competencies 8 credits Biology as a science is involved in a course of change that is quite remarkable. An information explosion has occurred that has created a challenge for the biology student who must fully understand universal concepts and principles. Thus, the growing complexity in the biological sciences makes it essential that the student be provided with fundamental principles and basic information that will serve as the basis for an understanding and appreciation of the many and varied sub-disciplines of biology. It is necessary that the student have an understanding of processes and interactions that occur at the molecular, cellular, organismal and population levels of organization. Students must also be prepared to appreciate the different aspects of plant and animal diversity, as well as the special adaptations and evolutionary relationships of these organisms. Competencies in the following content areas within the Principles of Biology have been identified as essential for comparable preparation toward a Bachelor s Degree in Biology. Competency area 1: Scientific Investigation Competency area 2: Scientific literature Competency area 3: Cell structure and function Competency area 4: Energy transfer within biological systems Competency area 5: Introduction to molecular genetics Competency area 6: Basic principles of inheritance Competency area 7: Evolution and natural selection Competency area 8: Hierarchical organization of life Competency area 9: Basic biochemistry Competency area 10: Laboratory experiences Competency area 11: Zoology See Appendix B: Competencies for Preparation in the Principles of Biology. 2

45 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 B. Program-Specific Content Areas 6 to a maximum of 9 credits In addition to the required competencies listed above, students transferring into a bachelor degree program in Biology must also acquire competencies, acquired through both lecture and rigorous laboratory/field experiences, in at least TWO but not more than three of the following content areas: a. Botany b. Genetics c. Microbiology d. Ecology e. Research Methods a. Botany Competencies An introductory understanding of botany is necessary for all students majoring in biology. These competencies provide students with the basic concepts of plant biology and a survey of the major groups of plants and plant-like organisms. It expands on many of the biological concepts introduced in Principles of Biology within the context of plants. These competencies, acquired through both lecture and rigorous laboratory/field experiences, also are intended to provide students with the fundamentals necessary to support upper level courses with a botanical content. See Appendix C: Competencies for Preparation in Botany b. Genetics Competencies Organisms can be fully understood only by knowing how the hereditary material orchestrates the organism s development and behavior. Moreover, populations and species can be fully understood only by knowing how the hereditary material is recombined and transmitted through the generations. Thus genetics, the study of the hereditary material, is fundamental to all of biology, and few biologists, regardless of the scales of time and size at which they work, can do their work without knowing and applying genetics. These competencies, acquired through both lecture and rigorous laboratory/field experiences, are intended to provide students majoring in the life sciences with the thorough introduction to genetics that they will need for more advanced work in biology. See Appendix D: Competencies for Preparation in Genetics c. Microbiology Competencies An introduction to microbiology is essential to provide knowledge about prokaryotic and other single celled organisms to students in the Biology major, the Environmental Science major, and the Medical Technology major. These competencies, acquired through both lecture and rigorous laboratory/field experiences, examine the structure and metabolism of microbes and emphasize the strategies employed by these organisms in their evolutionary successes. See Appendix E: Competencies for Preparation in Microbiology d. Ecology Competencies Ecology is the study of the interaction of organisms with their environment. An introduction to ecology will provide students with a sense of how organisms respond to both living and non-living aspects of their environments. Knowledge of ecological principles, acquired through both lecture and rigorous laboratory/field experiences, will be useful to students by broadening their awareness of the richness and diversity by which organisms interact with and respond to natural environments. See Appendix F: Competencies for Preparation in Ecology 3

46 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 e. Research Methods Competencies A hands-on introduction to biological research is absolutely essential for the education of biological science majors. Students must learn about the process by which scientific knowledge is acquired while conducting their own research projects. Through both lecture and rigorous laboratory/field experiences, they must acquire the skills that are essential to the successful design and execution of biological research. See Appendix G: Competencies for Preparation in Research Methods 2. Chemistry 16 credits A. General Chemistry 8 credits An understanding of general chemistry is essential for forming the basis for education in organic chemistry and biology. Students must meet competencies, acquired through both lecture and rigorous laboratory/field experiences, in two courses of General Chemistry. Students will fulfill this requirement by completing General Chemistry I for science majors and General Chemistry II for science majors within Category 4 of the 30 credit Transfer Credit Framework. See Appendix A: Program to Program Articulation Model for Biology, and Appendix J: Transfer Credit Framework. B. Organic Chemistry 8 credits An understanding of organic chemistry is essential for a thorough education in biology. Living things are carbon-based and their biochemistry as well as their physiology and environmental interactions all rely at least in part on the chemistry of organic molecules. Organic Chemistry is the study and application of reactions involving carbon-based molecules. The ACS classifies the first semester of Organic Chemistry as a foundation course and the second semester as an in-depth course. As such, Organic chemistry should include the fundamentals of nomenclature, reactions, mechanisms, and related concepts. The following competencies have been identified as essential for a background in Organic Chemistry. Please note that the competencies do not need to be introduced in the order listed. Competency area 1: Bonding Competency area 2: Structure and Function Competency area 3: Acid-Base Reactions Competency area 4: Stereochemistry Competency area 5: Nomenclature Competency area 6: Spectroscopy Competency area 7: Organic Reactions Competency area 8: Organic Synthesis Competency area 9: Macromolecules See Appendix H: Competencies for Preparation in Organic Chemistry. Organic Chemical reactions involve specialty glassware, equipment, and instrumentation that is different from many fields in Chemistry and Biology. Emphasis in the Organic Laboratory is on the synthesis and purification of compounds followed by the application of instrumentation in the analysis and identification of the products. Like all laboratories, safety practices, the keeping of a laboratory notebook, and report writing should also be incorporated. The competencies are based on the guidelines recommended by the American Chemical Society. Also, note that a wide variety of experiments satisfy these competencies. All laboratories are required to be taught hands-on, with physical (not virtual) equipment in a laboratory setting. 4

47 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 The following competencies have been identified as essential for a background in Organic Chemistry Laboratory. Please note that the competencies do not need to be introduced in the order listed. Competency area 1: Laboratory Safety and Laboratory Notebook Competency area 2: Purification Techniques Competency area 3: Spectroscopy Competency area 4: Functional Group Interconversion Competency area 5: Chromatography Competency area 6: Statistical Analysis Competency area 7: Computational See Appendix I: Competencies for Preparation in Organic Chemistry Laboratory. 5

48 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Appendix A: Program-to-Program Articulation Model for Biology Major-Specific Content Areas REQUIRED Transfer Criteria Principles of Biology Successful completion of courses addressing the required competencies specified in this Agreement for Principles of Biology. Program-Specific Content Areas Students must meet competencies in two, but not more than three, of the following areas: a. Botany b. Genetics c. Microbiology d. Ecology e. Research Methods Organic Chemistry Successful completion of at least two, but not more than three, courses addressing the required competencies specified in this Agreement for Botany, Genetics, Microbiology, Ecology, and Research Methods. Successful completion of courses addressing the required competencies specified in this Agreement for Organic Chemistry. Category 1 Transfer Credit Framework* REQUIRED Framework Courses for Students Transferring under this Agreement 1 course to be selected by the student with the assistance of an advisor Category 2 1 course to be selected by the student with the assistance of an advisor Category 3 2 courses, at least one course must be Pre-Calculus or Calculus. Category 4 2 courses: General Chemistry I for science majors General Chemistry II for science majors Category 5 2 courses to be selected by the student with the assistance of an advisor Category 6 2 courses to be selected by the student with the assistance of an advisor *See Appendix J: Transfer Credit Framework 6

49 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Appendix B: Competencies for Preparation in the Principles of Biology Competency Area 1: Scientific Investigation Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to 1.1 Define, describe, and implement the scientific method. 1.2 Describe implications of scientific or technological developments on ethical questions in biology. Competency Area 2: Scientific literature Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to 2.1 Locate and critically evaluate scientific information. 2.2 Write literature reviews and lab reports. Competency Area 3: Cell structure and function Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to 3.1 Describe the basic structure of a cell and define the functions of the organelles. 3.2 Describe the fluid mosaic model structure of biological membranes and the relationships between the membranes, the cytoskeleton, and the extracellular matrix. 3.3 Describe the functions of biological membranes, including transport, signal transduction, cell-cell recognition, enzymatic activity, and intercellular joining. 3.4 Explain the biochemistry of and factors involved in membrane transport. 3.5 Describe the transfer of information within a cell and between cells. 3.6 Describe the difference between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure. 3.7 Describe the structure and function of chromosomes and their role in cell division. 3.8 Explain the concept of the cell cycle, how it is controlled, and how it relates to cell division. 3.9 Describe and differentiate between the mechanisms of mitosis and meiosis Explain the concepts of independent assortment, crossing over, and random fertilization, and relate these to the production of genetic variation within a population. Competency Area 4: Energy transfer within biological systems Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to 4.1 Explain the first and second laws of thermodynamics. 4.2 Explain the concept of free energy. 4.3 Define chemical reaction and contrast exergonic and endergonic reactions. 4.4 Explain the concepts of oxidation and reduction. 4.5 Describe the structure of ATP and explain how it powers cellular work. 4.6 Describe the process of photosynthesis. 4.7 Describe the processes of glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, and electron transport. 4.8 Describe the processes of anaerobic respiration/fermentation Competency Area 5: Introduction to molecular genetics Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to 5.1 Explain the processes controlling gene expression: gene regulation, transcription, and translation. 5.2 Describe the process of DNA replication in eukaryotes and bacteria. 5.3 Describe the concept of mutation and explain the various kinds of mutations. 7

50 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Competency Area 6: Basic principles of inheritance Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to 6.1 Explain Mendelian genetics and the expression of traits through the solution of simple monohybrid and dihybrid genetics problems. 6.2 Explain the concepts of complete dominance, incomplete dominance, and codominance, multiple alleles, pleiotropy, epistasis, and polygenic inheritance. Competency Area 7: Evolution and natural selection Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to 7.1 Describe the sources of genetic variation within a population and explain why variation is essential for evolution. 7.2 Define evolution and natural selection, mutation, sexual selection, gene flow and genetic drift. 7.3 Explain the basic principles of population genetics. 7.4 Discuss the biological species concept, reproductive isolation mechanisms, and the process of speciation. 7.5 Explain some of the mechanisms behind different scientific hypotheses concerning the origin of life forms. 7.6 Explain endosymbiosis and the origin of eukaryotic cells. 7.7 Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of multicellularity. 7.8 Describe the various lines of evidence for evolution including DNA and other molecular data, morphology and anatomy, developmental biology, biogeography, fossils, and radiometric dating. Competency Area 8: Hierarchical organization of life Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to 8.1 Describe the methods used in the classification of organisms. 8.2 Explain how phylogenetic trees are constructed. 8.3 Describe the principal characteristics of the major taxa such as Domains/Kingdoms. 8.4 Describe basic ecological concepts in regards to the hierarchical organization of life. Competency Area 9: Basic biochemistry Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to 9.1 Describe the fundamental properties of water in biological systems. 9.2 Describe the four major biomolecules: carbohydrate, lipid, nucleic acid, and protein; and explain their functions and importance in biological systems. 9.3 Draw and describe basic synthesis and degradation reactions of the four major biomolecules. 9.4 Describe basic enzyme structure and function. 9.5 Describe how biological systems are constrained by chemical and physical processes. Competency Area 10: Laboratory experiences Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to 10.1 Develop, implement and evaluate an experimental problem through data collection and analysis Properly use a microscope, balance, pipette, micropipettes, and other basic laboratory equipment Demonstrate the use of basic computer applications such as excel for creating graphs and running simple statistical analyses Demonstrate the proper technique for weighing and measuring materials using the metric system Calculate concentrations and convert units Demonstrate familiarity with basic biochemical analysis for organic molecule identification Demonstrate the use of spectrophotometric assay for various applications. 8

51 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Competency Area 11: Zoology Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to 11.1 Integrate the theory of evolution by natural selection into the phylogeny of the protists and the Kingdom Animalia Distinguish, by comparative biology, the following: a) the protists from the metazoa; b) the radiate animals from the bilateral animals; c) acoelomate, pseudocoelomate and coelomate animals; d) the invertebrates from the vertebrates List the distinguishing characteristics of selected groups of protists, and explain why protists are no longer recognized as a valid kingdom List the distinguishing characteristics of the Kingdom Animalia and be able to compare the phyla Porifera, Cnidaria, Platyhelminthes, Nematoda, Mollusca, Annelida, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, and Chordata Describe the basic characteristics and comparative biology of the major vertebrate classes Describe the physiology of organisms in each of the major phyletic groups Demonstrate the skills required of microscopic examination of animal tissues and gross animal dissection Identify and discuss issues relating to evolutionary events surrounding the rise of gross animal architecture Identify and discuss issues relating to the evolution of the main lines of animal phylogeny. 9

52 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Appendix C: Competencies for Preparation in Botany Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to 1. Explain the importance of botany as a past, present, and future science. 2. Describe and recognize plant cellular and subcellular structures. 3. Describe basic comparative plant anatomy and morphology. Describe and recognize the distinguishing characteristics of simple and complex tissues. Describe the characteristics and roles of primary and secondary meristems. Describe and recognize distinguishing characteristics of typical monocot and dicot roots, stems, and leaves, and flowers. Describe and recognize major types of fleshy and dry fruits. 4. Demonstrate the skills required for microscopic examination of plant cells, subcellular structures, and tissues. 5. Identify representative trees and shrubs of Pennsylvania. 6. Describe the mechanism and pathways involved in the transport of water, minerals, and nutrients in plants. 7. Describe basic soil characteristics and plant mineral nutrition. 8. Explain the basics of plant metabolism with an emphasis on photosynthesis. Describe the differences in structure and function of photosynthetic pigments. Describe the roles of photosystems I and II in the light reactions of photosynthesis. Describe and understand the process of chemiosmosis and ATP synthesis in chloroplasts. Describe the role and importance of the Calvin cycle. Describe the impacts of photorespiration on productivity. Describe C4 and CAM photosynthesis. Review the process of aerobic cellular respiration as it relates to plant metabolism. 9. Describe the basic developmental processes in plants and the roles of plant hormones in growth and development. 10. Describe the roles of phytochrome in plants, photoperiodism, representative plant movements, and the effect of temperature on developmental processes. 11. Explain the basic concepts of plant biotechnology and plant genetic engineering. 12. Describe and recognize the distinguishing characteristics of diverse groups within the Plant Kingdom including bryophytes, ferns and fern allies, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. 13. Describe and recognize the distinguishing characteristics of non-plant but plant-like organisms such as some members of the Domain Bacteria, some protists, and some members of the Kingdom Fungi. 14. Discuss the major evolutionary advances in plant form and function. 15. Describe life cycles of representative algae, fungi, bryophytes, ferns and fern allies, gymnosperms, and angiosperms and relate to major evolutionary advances in plants and related organisms. 16. Discuss various anatomical and physiological adaptations of plants to diverse environments. 17. Explain the basic concepts of economic and medical botany. 18. Describe the distinguishing characteristics of representative plant families. 19. Explain concepts of plant ecology including pollination ecology, various symbioses, primary and secondary succession, biomes, nutrient cycling in ecosystems, human impacts on ecosystems, impacts of invasive species, and interactions between plants and other organisms. 20. Apply investigatory skills to develop, implement and evaluate experimental problems through data collection, analysis, and report writing. 10

53 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Appendix D: Competencies for Preparation in Genetics Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to 1. Explain the most important genetic principles, including those related to Mendelian genetics, chromosomal genetics, gene interactions, mutation, microbial genetics, molecular genetics, and evolutionary genetics. 2. Use current terminology to explain the modern understanding of eukaryotic chromosome structure. 3. Apply an understanding of genetic principles to the analysis of genetic problems and systems. 4. Apply basic probability theory and statistical hypothesis testing techniques to the analysis of genetic problems including linkage analysis. 5. Explain and discuss the importance of genetics to Biology as a whole and to certain human concerns such as medical and technological innovations including recombinant DNA technology, genetic engineering, and genetic testing. 6. Discuss how genes and the environment interact to produce a specific phenotype. 7. Explain the cellular activities of mitosis and meiosis as they relate to genetics. 8. Apply investigative laboratory skills relevant to basic genetics, including the production and analysis of genetic crosses, the microscopic study of chromosomes, electrophoresis, DNA isolation, the handling and genetic analysis of microbes, basic recombinant DNA techniques such as restriction digests and bacterial transformation, and the use of computers to access information from online databases, in data analysis and in the simulation of biological systems. 9. Design, conduct, statistically evaluate, and interpret the results of a genetic experiment, expanding on one, or more, of the laboratory techniques listed in the previous objective. 10. Explain evolution in terms of molecular genetics and population genetics. 11. Demonstrate understanding of population statistics, including Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. 12. Explain perturbations to and deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibria and what they mean for the evolution of species. 13. Demonstrate an understanding of current applications in biotechnology, such as recombinant and transgenic methods in plants, animals, and microorganisms. 14. Demonstrate an understanding of genomics, including genome mapping strategies such as cytogenic, linkage, and physical mapping. Describe possible applications for data gained through genome projects. 11

54 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Appendix E: Competencies for Preparation in Microbiology Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to Microbe classification 1. Describe the characteristics of the various groups of microbes including bacteria, archaea, fungi, protozoa, helminthes, viruses, prions and viroids. 2. Describe the criteria and techniques used to classify microbes and the challenges involved. Prokaryotic structure 3. Describe the function of the cellular structures found in prokaryotes. Growth, physiology and metabolism 4. Draw a typical growth curve and discuss factors that influence the growth of microorganisms. 5. Describe methods of microbial reproduction including binary fission and budding. 6. Describe metabolic pathways used by prokaryotes including the glycolytic pathway, the pentosephosphate shunt, the Entner-Douderoff pathway, fermentations, and alternative strategies to electron transport and photosynthesis. Bacterial genetics 7. Describe gene regulation and expression using the lac operon. 8. Differentiate the strategies used for genetic exchange by prokaryotes. 9. Describe DNA structure, organization and replication in prokaryotes. Population biology 10. Describe the interactions microbes have with other organisms including mutualistic, parasitic, and commensal interactions. Evolution 11. Describe and explain the major steps in the evolution of life on Earth, including symbioses that involved both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and discuss an approximate time line for these events using ultrastructural, biochemical, molecular and fossil evidence as examples. 12. Describe how several factors, including: mutation, horizontal gene transfer mechanisms, large population sizes, short generation times cause rapid evolution of microbial populations. Importance of microbes 13. Describe the principles involved in common types of applied microbiology. 14. Describe in general terms, microbial roles in each of the following: decomposition/nutrient cycling, O2 production, production of industrial, commercial, and medical products. 15. Discuss the principles of antimicrobial chemotherapy. Laboratory experiences 16. Demonstrate familiarity with different types of media (selective, differential, etc.) and their uses. 17. Use standard methods to enumerate and identify bacteria. 18. Use laboratory techniques to successfully identify an unknown organism. 19. Demonstrate safe laboratory practices and know how to aseptically handle and dispose of live microbes. 20. Demonstrate the basic principles of microscopy and the use of stains to enhance contrast in cells. 12

55 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Appendix F: Competencies for Preparation in Ecology Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to Importance 1. Explain the historical importance of ecology and technology to human society. Evolution 2. Explain how speciation occurs. 3. Explain how coevolution occurs and what its effects are. 4. Explain and describe the importance of the environment to evolution, natural selection and the maintenance of biodiversity. Physiological ecology 5. Describe the physical, biological, and behavioral factors that influence an organism s ability to grow and reproduce in its habitat. Population ecology 6. Explain and apply principles of population growth, population regulation, and population dynamics. Community ecology 7. Describe the principles of community ecology. 8. Compare and contrast intraspecific and interspecific competition. 9. Explain the principle of character displacement and its relationship to competition. 10. Explain what predation and herbivory are, and how they influence populations. 11. Explain the concepts of parasitism, mutualism, and commensalism. 12. Describe succession. 13. Recognize similarities among ecological communities inhabiting similar types of environments, and the diverse evolutionary adaptations that influence a species range, dispersal, and ability to survive in its environment. Ecosystem ecology 14. Describe the major biotic and abiotic ecological characteristics that identify a given ecosystem. 15. Describe the biogeochemistry of an ecosystem and explain the cycles of nitrogen, carbon, phosphorous, and water. 16. Explain energy flow in ecosystems, photosynthesis, trophic levels, and biomass pyramids from an ecological perspective. 17. Discuss diverse adaptations for nutrient acquisition in ecosystems, the conversion of these nutrients into biologically useful forms, cycling of nutrients, and the indispensable roles of producers and decomposers. 18. Evaluate the impact of human behavior on earth s ecosystems, particularly as it relates to biological diversity, global climate change, and the ability of ecosystems to sustain life. 19. Recognize the continually changing nature of ecosystems, and discuss factors that impact ecosystems and the evolution of resident species through natural selection. Environmental biology 20. Describe and explain the causes and consequences of pollution on the biosphere and the survival of all organisms. 21. Analyze a variety of timely environmental issues in light of their ecological, social, economic, ethical, or cultural implications. Lab/Field experiences 22. Collect data and formulate valid scientific conclusions of an ecological nature. 23. Work as part of a team in field and laboratory investigations of ecological phenomena. 24. Collect ecological data and apply basic statistical skills for analyzing quantitative and qualitative data to formulate conclusions. 13

56 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Appendix G: Competencies for Preparation in Research Methods Behavioral Objectives: To obtain competency in this area, students should be able to 1. Describe the steps of the scientific method and discuss how the scientific method is used. 2. Distinguish between non-manipulative studies and experiments. 3. Identify flaws in experimental design. 4. Explain basic statistical concepts including Type I error, p-value, test statistic, null hypothesis. 5. Distinguish between descriptive and inferential statistics. 6. Distinguish between parametric and nonparametric statistics and explain the advantages and disadvantages of each. 7. Conduct effective and comprehensive scientific literature searches. 8. Read, understand and critique primary scientific journal articles. 9. Explain the process involved in getting scientific research published in a journal 10. Identify an original scientific research project to work on. 11. Write a scientific research project proposal. 12. Design and conduct a research project that will test a hypothesis or answer a given biological question 13. Determine which statistical test is appropriate for a given situation or set of data. 14. Draw a graph that clearly summarizes a particular data set. 15. Write a scientific paper, similar in scope and style to papers published in the scientific literature, based on original scientific research. 16. Present results of a scientific study in the form of an oral presentation and/or a poster presentation. 14

57 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Appendix H: Competencies for Preparation in Organic Chemistry Competency area 1: Bonding. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, students should be able to: 1.1 Understand topics in chemical bonding and the relationship between chemical structures and their reactivity. 1.2 Understand the concept of resonance. 1.3 Understand the concept of hybridization. Competency area 2: Structure and Function. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, students should be able to: 2.1 Identify functional groups. 2.2 Correlate chemical structure with reactivity and function. 2.3 Understand how the behavior and properties of molecules depend on electronic, orbital and steric interactions. 2.4 Understand the importance of environmental context (solution phase, pure gas, liquid or solid) on predicting the structure and reactivity of organic molecules. Competency area 3: Acid-Base Reactions. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, students should be able to: 3.1 Make predictions of behavior attributable to Lewis acid-base principles, and Bronsted-Lowry acid-base principles. 3.2 Understand the concept of pka. Competency area 4: Stereochemistry. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, students should be able to: 4.1 Understand all stereochemical principles (cis, trans, R, S, exo, endo) and their identification/relationships. 4.2 Make predictions regarding stability and reactivity of stereochemical molecules from conformational analysis. 4.3 Understand the importance of stereochemistry in specific reactions. Competency area 5: Nomenclature. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, students should be able to: 5.1 Name alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amides, halides and amines. 5.2 Incorporate stereochemistry in nomenclature. Competency area 6: Spectroscopy. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, students should be able to: 6.1 Analyze and interpret structural data obtained from laboratory experiments, spectroscopic analysis, and computational methods. 6.2 Understand the theory and analysis of Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (NMR). Competency area 7: Organic Reactions. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, students should be able to: 7.1 Understand the concept of reaction mechanism in organic chemistry. 7.2 Predict reaction outcomes based on mechanistic principles, in the areas of addition, substitution, elimination and rearrangement chemistry. 7.3 Recognize and understand the significance of reactive intermediates such as carbocations, radicals, carbanions and carbenes. 7.4 Understand how reaction rate, kinetics, and energy diagrams apply to organic reactions. 15

58 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Competency area 8: Organic Synthesis. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, students should be able to: 8.1 Understand the design of organic syntheses. 8.2 Understand the synthesis and reactions of the major classes of organic molecules: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, esters, amides, halides and amines. 8.3 Plan organic syntheses through the application of retrosynthetic analysis principles. Competency area 9: Macromolecules. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, students should be able to: 9.1 Recognize the organic functionality of macromolecules. 9.2 Understand the synthesis of, and the structure-based behavior of, macromolecular species such as proteins, lipids, (mono- and) polysaccharides, and synthetic polymers. 16

59 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Appendix I: Competencies for Preparation in Organic Chemistry Laboratory Competency area 1: Laboratory Safety and Laboratory Notebook. Behavioral Objectives: This competency applies to all laboratory competencies. Students should be instructed in: safe laboratory practices at the institutional level, safety protocols mandated by OSHA, proper use of equipment, proper practices in the acquisition of reagents for all experiments and proper disposal of waste. In addition, students should be instructed on how to keep a laboratory notebook for their experiments. Competency area 2: Purification Techniques. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, students should be able to: Isolate and purify organic materials; methods should include simple and fractional distillation of liquids, recrystallization of solids, column chromatography, and extraction of solutes in immiscible solvents. Identification of purified products by melting point, boiling point, refractive index (or polarimetry), or by spectroscopic analysis should be included. Competency area 3: Spectroscopy. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, students should be able to: Develop competence in the spectroscopic analysis of organic starting materials and synthetic products. Methods should include, at the very least, interpretation of IR and NMR spectra. It is recommended that GC/MS should also be included. Students should develop facility in deducing structures from spectra and be able to provide answers to questions involving data provided from unavailable spectroscopic or computational sources. Competency area 4: Functional Group Interconversion. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, students should be able to: Correctly plan and carry out a broad variety of organic reactions based on functional group interconversions. Competency area 5: Chromatography. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, students should be able to: Perform an experiment that utilizes thin layer chromatography (TLC) and/or gas chromatography (GC). Examples include monitoring a reaction by observing both reactants and products and/or comparison of standards to unknowns. Competency area 6: Statistical Analysis. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, students should be able to: Perform a laboratory that applies statistical methods to the analysis of experimental data, real or simulated (this competency is recommended by the ACS but not required by the Chemistry or the Biology Articulation Agreement). Competency area 7: Computational. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, students should be able to: Understand the value of, and the limitations associated with, computational methods (this competency is recommended by the ACS but not required by the Chemistry or the Biology Articulation Agreement). 17

60 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Appendix J: Transfer Credit Framework 2 Students who successfully complete courses from the approved categories below can have their credits transferred and counted towards graduation at any of the participating PA TRAC colleges and universities. Please be aware that certain majors may have specific requirements prescribed by external agencies. It is the student s responsibility to work with an advisor to select appropriate courses as they relate to the major. Category 1 (3-4 credits total) English Composition Category 2 (3-4 credits total) Public Speaking Category 3 (min. 3-4 credits; max. 6-8 credits) Foundations of Mathematics College Algebra Elementary Statistics Precalculus Calculus I Category 4 Must include lab (min. 3-4 credits; max. 6-8 credits) General Chemistry I (majors & non-majors courses) General Chemistry II (majors & non-majors courses) General Biology I (majors & non-majors courses) General Biology II (majors & non-majors courses) General Physics I (non-calculus) General Physics II (non-calculus) Anatomy & Physiology I* Category 5 (min. 3-4 credits; max. 6-8 credits) General Psychology Introduction to Sociology American National Government Educational Psychology History of Western Civilization II Principles of Macroeconomics Principles of Microeconomics Category 6 (min. 3-4 credits; max. 6-8 credits) Introduction to Music Introduction to Philosophy Elementary Spanish I Elementary Spanish II Painting I Elementary French I Elementary French II Anatomy & Physiology II* U.S. History I Drawing I Introduction to Astronomy U.S. History II Ethics History of Western Introduction to Art Civilization I Contemporary Social Problems German I Introduction to Anthropology Child Growth & Development Child Psychology * Biology students are advised that Anatomy & Physiology I & II in Category 4 will not meet the requirements for separate anatomy and physiology courses required in most Bachelor's Degree programs. German II Introduction to Literature (may also be known as Introduction to Poetry, Interpreting Literature, Reading Literature, Theses in Literature, Topics in Literature, Current Themes in Literature) Survey of American Literature Literature of the Western World World Literature American Literature Survey of English Literature Introduction to Theatre 2 Framework chart amended on April 11, 2012 to include Child Growth & Development and Child Psychology under Category 5. 18

61 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 ADDENDUM GENERAL STATEWIDE PROGRAM-TO-PROGRAM ARTICULATION in PENNSYLVANIA (Revised April 11, 2012) WHEREAS, the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania enacted Act 114 of 2006, which added to the Public School Code of 1949, Article XX-C entitled Transfers of Credits Between Institutions of Higher Education (referred to in this Agreement as the Statewide Transfer System ); WHEREAS, Act 114 of 2006 requires all community colleges in Pennsylvania and Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) universities to participate in the Statewide Transfer System; WHEREAS, Act 114 of 2006 permits independent and state-related institutions of higher education in Pennsylvania, as each is defined in Article XX-C, to elect to participate in the Statewide Transfer System; WHEREAS, the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania enacted Act 50 of 2009, which requires institutions participating in the Statewide Transfer System to accept the transfer of Associate of Arts and Associate Science degrees into parallel baccalaureate programs and recognize all competencies attained within the associate degree program; WHEREAS, Act 50 of 2009 defines an Associate of Arts (AA) or Associate of Science (AS) degree containing a minimum of 60 college-level credits and designed primarily for transfer to a baccalaureate institution; WHEREAS, Act 50 of 2009 requires the Transfer Articulation Oversight Committee (TAOC), as established in section 2004-C of the Public School Code of 1949, to identify Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degree programs for transfer with full junior standing into parallel baccalaureate degrees annually; and, WHEREAS, Act 50 of 2009 requires members of the Transfer Articulation Oversight Committee established in section 2004-C of the Public School Code of 1949, to identify modifications that may be required in existing associate or baccalaureate degrees to satisfy external accreditation or licensure requirement; All Institutions participating in the Statewide Transfer System enter into this Articulation Agreement and mutually agree as follows: 1. The statewide program-to-program articulation agreement ensures that students who complete an AA or AS degree from a participating institution will have their coursework and credits transfer into a parallel baccalaureate program with full junior standing and without the need for course-by-course equivalency. 2. Students are subject to the admissions and transfer credit policies of the participating institutions. The admissions and transfer credit policies for all of the institutions participating in Pennsylvania s college credit transfer system can be found at 3. The AA or AS degree must include a minimum of 60 college-level credits designed and acceptable for transfer, not including developmental or remedial courses or career, technical or applied courses. 4. The transfer of coursework with a grade less than a C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) in the AA or AS will be consistent with the policies of native students at the participating college or university. 5. Students and institutional personnel will be able to find out which institutions offer articulated programs by accessing a searchable database located at PDE will maintain this database through program information provided to TAOC by the individual participating institutions. 6. References to courses in all agreements designate competencies and are not to be construed as making a reference to a specific course at a specific institution. Course titles in the agreements are presented for guidance in advising students 19

62 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 as to which coursework they should take even though the course at the student s college may not have the specific title mentioned in the agreement Responsibilities of Associate Degree Institutions a. The AA or AS degree leading to a parallel bachelor degree will include the minimum number of credits and competencies of major-specific coursework as defined by the Agreement. b. Any remaining AA or AS degree requirements will be accepted from arts and sciences electives designed and acceptable for transfer, not including developmental, remedial, career, technical or applied courses. c. By awarding the AA or AS, the Associate Degree Institution is validating that the student has met the competency requirements outlined in the Agreement. 8. Responsibilities of Bachelor Degree Institutions a. The Bachelor Degree Institution will recognize all competencies attained within the AA or AS degree and accept a transfer student who has earned the associate degree with full junior standing into a parallel baccalaureate degree program. b. All decisions made with respect to the transfer process shall be based on the principle of equivalence of expectations and requirements for native and transfer students. c. A transfer student s admission into the parallel baccalaureate degree will be subject to the Bachelor Degree Institution s specific requirements for admission to that major and be consistent with such requirements for native students. 9. Agreement Revision and Assessment a. Once a statewide program-to-program articulation agreement has been approved by TAOC, no amendments to the agreement can be offered by any party within the initial six (6) months of the agreement. After that time, a TAOC member with a proposed amendment to an approved agreement should submit the change to PDE. Amendments that are offered as clarifying or technical but do not alter the substantive portions or intent of the agreement must be forwarded to TAOC. TAOC representatives will have at least thirty (30) days to review, comment and approve or deny the proposed amendments. Amendments that seek to alter the substantive nature or intent of the agreement in any part must be forwarded to the appropriate PAC for review and consideration. The PAC will then make a recommendation to the TAOC, and TAOC shall approve or deny the proposed amendments. 4 b. PDE and TAOC will exercise responsibility for monitoring the effectiveness of the Agreement and its implementation. c. PDE shall collect data annually from the participating institutions that will enable the Department and TAOC to assess the effectiveness of the implementation of the Agreement in fostering a seamless transfer process and the academic success of transfer students at the senior institutions. 10. Transfer Appeal Process a. In accordance with Pennsylvania s Statewide Transfer System, each Bachelor Degree Institution shall have a procedure through which a transfer student can appeal a decision that he/she believes is not consistent with this Agreement. 3 Adopted by TAOC and added to the agreement on April 11, Approved by TAOC and added to agreement on August 18,

63 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 b. The Transfer Appeal Process shall be published, at minimum, in the institution s catalog and posted to the Commonwealth s official website of the Statewide Transfer System, 11. Institutional Resolution of Disputes a. In the event that an Associate Degree Institution considers the decision of a Bachelor Degree Institution to be inconsistent with this Agreement, the Associate Degree Institution shall consult directly with the Bachelor Degree Institution and attempt to resolve the matter. b. If the institutions are unable to resolve the issue, the Associate Degree Institution may submit their concern to PDE for consideration by the TAOC Dispute Resolution Committee. The Dispute Resolution Subcommittee will act according to the policies and procedures developed by TAOC as part of the Statewide Transfer System. The determination made by the Dispute Resolution Subcommittee will be binding upon the parties. 12. Implementation Date and Applicability Having fulfilled the requirements outlined in the Program-to-Program Articulation Agreement, students transferring with an AA or AS degree from a participating institution will be considered by the receiving baccalaureate degree institution to have received adequate preparation in the field of study at the foundation level and therefore eligible to transfer as a junior into advanced major coursework. Participating institutions will enact the Agreement in accordance to the timeline outlined by the TAOC, but no later Fall Continuation of the agreement remains in effect until such time as all cooperating institutions of the Statewide Transfer System formally approve any revisions. GLOSSARY OF TERMS Articulation: The aligning of curriculum between institutions of higher education to ensure the efficient and effective movement of students among those institutions. Associate of Arts (AA) and Associate of Science (AS) Degree: A degree consisting of at least 60 college-level credits and designed for transfer into a baccalaureate degree program. Foundation Coursework: Courses at a level of comprehension usually associated with freshman and sophomore students and typically offered during the first half of a baccalaureate degree program. Such coursework typically does not have course prerequisites. Native Student: A student who entered a given college or university without first matriculating at another college. Parallel Baccalaureate Degree: A bachelor degree program in a comparable field of study and with similar foundation-level major-specific competencies as an associate degree program. Receiving Institution: The college or university where a transfer student plans to enroll and to apply previously earned credit toward a degree program. Transfer Credit: The credit granted by a college or university for college-level courses or other academic work completed at another institution. Transfer Student: A student who enters a participating college or university after earning college-level credit at another college or university. 5 Agreements approved by TAOC prior to August 31, 2011 must be implemented by the institutions by Fall Agreements approved by TAOC after August 31, 2011 but before May 1, 2012 must be implemented by the institutions by Fall

64 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Transfer: The process by which a student moves from one postsecondary institution to another. Also refers to the mechanics of credit, course and curriculum exchange between institutions. Advanced Coursework: Courses with advanced depth of content knowledge in the field of study and carry the expectation of more complex competencies identified in the expected student learning outcomes is referred to as advanced coursework. These courses often have prerequisites and are usually beyond the Introduction to or Foundation of level. 22

65 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 PENNSYLVANIA STATEWIDE PROGRAM-TO-PROGRAM ARTICULATION AGREEMENT IN BUSINESS In accordance with Act 50 of 2009, this Agreement ensures that a student who successfully completes an Associate of Arts (AA) or Associate of Science (AS) degree at an institution participating in the Commonwealth s statewide college credit transfer system can transfer the full degree into a parallel bachelor degree program in Business at another participating college or university. Full junior-standing will be granted to students who have successfully completed an AA or AS degree provided that: The associate degree includes all of the required major competencies identified in this Agreement. The associate degree includes at least 24 credits of Major-Specific Content and at least 6 credits of Major-Related Coursework as detailed in this Agreement. See Appendix A: Major Requirements for Program-to-Program Articulation in Business. Students meeting these criteria will be considered by participating bachelor degree granting institutions to have received adequate preparation for transfer with junior standing into a parallel bachelor degree in Business and to be eligible to enter advanced coursework in the field of study. References to courses in all agreements designate competencies and are not to be construed as making a reference to a specific course at a specific institution. Course titles in the agreements are presented for guidance in advising students as to which coursework they should take even though the course at the student s college may not have the specific title mentioned in the agreement. 1 OVERVIEW Accreditation in higher education is not a new concept. In fact, accreditation has been around for more than a century in many parts of the world. Accreditation is a voluntary, non-governmental process that includes an external review of a school s ability to provide quality programs. It is helpful in many aspects, from ensuring that students are learning relevant material to allowing a school access to funding. Accreditation reviews include self-evaluations, peer-reviews, committee-reviews, and the development of in-depth strategic plans. They also include reviews of a school s mission, faculty qualifications, and curricula. The Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) (www.chea.org) recognizes AACSB International The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business as the accrediting entity for collegiate programs of Business Administration and Accounting. AACSB provides colleges and universities with a set of common standards for developing undergraduate and graduate-level degree programs in Business Administration and Accounting to address the special needs of the profession. The AACSB Accreditation Standards are used as the basis to evaluate an institution s mission, operations, faculty qualifications and contributions, programs, and other critical areas. The AACSB Accreditation Standards were first adopted in Throughout the years, the standards have continued to be revised to ensure quality and continuous improvement in collegiate business education. In 2010, the AACSB Accreditation Standards were again revised, as well as the surrounding processes and documentation requirements. 1 Adopted by TAOC and added to the agreement on April 11,

66 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 AACSB considers the following as "traditional business subjects": Accounting, Business Law, Decision Sciences, Finance (including Insurance, Real Estate, and Banking), Human Resources, Management, Management Information Systems, Management Science, Marketing, Operations Management, Organizational Behavior, Organizational Development, Strategic Management, Supply Chain Management (including Transportation and Logistics), and Technology Management. This list is not intended to be exhaustive. Normally, extensions of the "traditional business subjects", including interdisciplinary, integrated courses, majors, programs, concentrations, or areas of emphasis, will be included in the scope of AACSB accreditation as well. The CHEA also recognizes ACBSP Accreditation Council for Business Schools and Programs as another accrediting entity for collegiate programs of Business Administration and Accounting. ACBSP accreditation standards are modeled on the Baldrige National Quality Program, the same standards as those used by businesses, health care providers, and others to recognize excellence and commitment for continuous improvement. The association embraces the virtues of teaching excellence and emphasizes to students that it is essential to learn how to learn (www.acbsp.org). Standards adopted by ACBSP that are required for initial accreditation and reaffirmation assure that students who transfer would be provided a level of education that would be comparable to the same courses taught at a four year institution. The third accreditation body recognized by the CHEA is: International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education (IACBE). Similar to the other two accreditation agencies, IACBE provide[s] external assurance of quality in an institution s business programs. The concept of continuous quality improvement is central to the IACBE accreditation process. Philosophically, the accreditation process of IACBE is governed by its mission-driven and outcomes-based focus, where the assurance of academic quality is based on the results of the assessment of educational outcomes rather than prescriptive input standards. Student learning is the central activity of higher education. Definition of learning expectations and assurance that graduates achieve learning expectations are key features of any academic program. The learning expectations derive from a balance of internal and external contributions to the definition of educational goals. Members of the business community, students, and faculty members each contribute valuable perspectives on the needs of graduates. Learning goals should be set and revised at a level that encourages continuous improvement in educational programs. Colleges and universities use a variety of structures and approaches to provide learning experiences for students. Programs exist at a variety of academic levels and for a variety of purposes. AACSB uses the following general definition to describe learning expectations at the undergraduate bachelor degree level. Undergraduate degree programs (bachelor s level) in business educate students in a broad range of knowledge and skills as a basis for careers in business. Learning expectations build on the students' pre-collegiate educations to prepare students to enter and sustain careers in the business world and to contribute positively in the larger society. Students achieve knowledge and skills for successful performance in a complex environment requiring intellectual ability to organize work, make and communicate sound decisions, and react successfully to unanticipated events. Students develop learning abilities suitable to continue higher-level intellectual development. Many bachelor-degree granting institutions in Pennsylvania s college credit transfer system have AACSB and/or ACBSP accredited programs. Therefore, the following Agreement has been designed to provide students with the foundation-level knowledge in the field of study while also respecting the accreditation standards of the bachelor degree programs offered at many of the colleges and universities where the students will transfer. 2

67 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 REQUIRED MAJOR-SPECIFIC CONTENT An associate degree transferable under this Agreement must include at least 24 credits of Major-Specific coursework that incorporates all of the competencies identified in the following six broad content areas. 1. Computer Literacy 3 credits 2. Accounting 6 credits o Financial Accounting 3 credits o Managerial Accounting 3 credits 3. Legal Environment and Business 3 credits 4. Principles of Management 3 credits 5. Principles of Marketing 3 credits 6. Principles of Economics 6 credits See Appendix A: Major Requirements for Program-to-Program Articulation in Business. This agreement acknowledges that, depending upon how an institution chooses to deliver the content competencies, an institution may offer an associate degree that includes more than the minimum 24 credits. For example, one institution may embed required competencies in Financial Accounting in a 3- credit course, while another institution may embed those competencies in a 4-credit course. The specific course structure is not as important as making sure that upon completion of the associate s degree, the student has achieved the competencies included in this agreement and is prepared to enter advanced coursework as a junior in the parallel major at a participating bachelor-degree institution. 1. Computer Literacy 3 credits Coursework in this content area will develop a student s knowledge of: 1. Microcomputer components, selected application software, an operating system, and electronic communication techniques. 2. Word processing software for document development for college and workplace requirements. 3. Spreadsheet software for worksheet development for college and workplace requirements. 4. Database software for data organization, retrieval, and reporting. 5. World Wide Web for information retrieval and communication for college and workplace requirements. Upon successfully completing this coursework, students will be able to: 1. Login to a network and use Windows graphical user interface to access computer resources. 2. Create an organized structure of folders and manage documents, saving them to an electronic medium using a previously created directory structure. 3. Use to: login to account, create and send , receive, read, save a message in a folder, attach a file, and create a personal signature. 4. Review and perform basic text enhancing with Microsoft Word. 5. Perform document formatting options with Microsoft Word: margins, orientation, page breaks, page numbers, headers and footers, cover page, find & replace, spelling and grammar, save, save as, print. 6. Perform advanced formatting with Microsoft Word: paragraph line spacing, indents, tabs, borders, lists, columns; styles; tables of contents and indexing. 7. Create, format, and use tables and graphics with Microsoft Word. 8. Use Microsoft Word to collaborate, create a bibliography, add reference resources, and merge files. 9. Design, create, edit, format, and print spreadsheets using Microsoft Excel. 10. Create formulas and use functions for calculation of cell contents in Microsoft Excel spreadsheets. 11. Define and use relative and absolute cell references. 12. Define, create, and print graphs that include titles, legends, borders, color. 13. Sort, filter, and subtotal data converted to data tables in Microsoft Excel. 3

68 Approved by TAOC on June 16, Use a Microsoft Word document as the basis for copying and pasting objects from Microsoft Excel. 15. Create a database to store data. 16. Construct queries and report forms to extract specific information from a database. 2. Accounting Total of 6 credits as defined below a. Financial Accounting 3 credits Students who complete coursework in this content area will be able to: 1. Describe a chart of accounts and its use in the accounting process. 2. Record business events using the accounting equation. 3. Make year- end adjustments to recognize accrued and deferred revenues and expenses. 4. Discuss the primary components of corporate governance. 5. Record and report on inventory transactions using a perpetual and periodic inventory system. 6. Explain how gains and losses differ from revenues and expenses. 7. Compare and contrast single and multi-step income statements. 8. Determine the amount of net sales and net purchases (discounts, returns, and allowances). 9. Determine the amount of cost of goods sold and ending inventory using the FIFO, LIFO, weighted average, and specific identification cost flow methods. 10. Apply the lower- of- cost- or- market rule to inventory valuation. 11. Use the gross margin method to estimate ending inventory. 12. Identify the key elements of a strong system of internal control and special internal controls for cash. 13. Prepare a bank reconciliation. 14. Explain the use of a petty cash fund. 15. Explain the allowance method of accounting for uncollectible accounts and how the method affects financial statements. 16. Estimate uncollectible accounts expense using the percent of revenue method and the percent of receivables method. 17. Show how the direct write- off method of accounting for uncollectible accounts affects financial statements. 18. Account for notes receivable, notes payable and accrued interest. 19. Explain how accounting for credit card sales affects financial statements. 20. Determine how to record the acquisition and the allocation of costs of long- term operational assets. 21. Determine book value and explain how gains and losses on disposals of long- term operational assets affect financial statements. 22. Show how revising estimates and continuing expenditures for operational assets affect financial statements. 23. Explain how expense recognition for natural resources (depletion) and intangible assets (amortization) affects financial statements. 24. Illustrate how warranty obligations affect financial statements. 25. Determine payroll taxes and explain how they affect financial statements. 26. Describe bond features and show how the issuance of bonds effect financial statements. 27. Use the straight- line and effective interest methods to amortize bond discounts and premiums. 28. Identify the primary characteristics of sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations. 29. Explain different types of capital stock and show how the stock affects financial statements. 30. Explain how dividends, stock splits, stock dividends, and appropriations affect financial statements. 31. Prepare a financial statement analysis including horizontal and vertical analyses and ratios to assess a company s liquidity, solvency, management s effectiveness, and a company s position in the stock market. 32. Record transactions using the general journal format and show their effect on financial statements. 4

69 Approved by TAOC on June 16, Identify and prepare 1) an unadjusted trial balance, 2) an adjusted trial balance, and 3) a postclosing trial balance and explain how they are used to prepare financial statements. 34. Use general ledger account information to prepare and interpret the balance sheet, income statement, statement of changes in owners equity, and the statement of cash flow (indirect and direct methods). b. Managerial Accounting 3 credits Students who complete coursework in this content area will be able to: 1. Distinguish between managerial and financial accounting. 2. Identify the cost components of a product made by a manufacturing company: the cost of materials, labor, and overhead. 3. Show how just- in- time inventory can increase profitability. 4. Identify the key components of corporate governance. 5. Identify and describe fixed, variable, and mixed cost behavior. 6. Demonstrate the effects of operating leverage on profitability. 7. Prepare an income statement using the contribution margin approach. 8. Demonstrate how the relevant range and decision context affect cost behavior. 9. Use the high- low method, scatter graphs, and regression analysis to estimate fixed and variable costs. 10. Use the equation method, the contribution margin per unit, and contribution margin ratio methods to determine the break- even point. 11. Set selling prices by using cost- plus, prestige, and target costing. 12. Explain cost- volume- profit relationships and draw and interpret a cost- volume- profit graph. 13. Calculate and interpret the margin of safety. 14. Identify cost objects and cost drivers. 15. Select appropriate cost drivers and demonstrate the allocation of indirect costs. 16. Explain the benefits and detriments of allocating pooled costs. 17. Allocate joint product costs. 18. Allocate service department costs to operating departments. 19. Use activity- based costing to calculate costs of products and services. 20. Identify the components of quality costs; prepare and interpret quality cost reports. 21. Identify the characteristics of relevant information. 22. Distinguish between unit- level, batch- level, product- level, and facility- level costs and understand how these costs affect decision making. 23. Make appropriate special order and outsourcing decisions. 24. Make appropriate segment elimination and asset replacement decisions. 25. Prepare a sales budget and related schedule of cash receipts. 26. Prepare a schedule of cash payments for inventory purchases budget and selling and administrative expense budget. 27. Prepare a cash budget. 28. Prepare a pro forma income statement, balance sheet, and statement of cash flows. 29. Describe flexible and static budgets. 30. Classify variances as being favorable or unfavorable. 31. Compute and interpret sales and variable cost volume variances. 32. Compute and interpret flexible budget variances, fixed cost variances, and price and usage variances. 33. Describe the differences among cost, profit, and investment centers. 34. Relate management by exception to responsibility reports. 35. Determine and interpret the net present value and the internal rate of return of an investment opportunity. 36. Evaluate capital investment opportunities using cash payback and unadjusted rate of return alternatives. 37. Demonstrate the flow of materials, labor costs, and estimated overhead costs for inventory and cost of goods sold for a manufacturing company. 5

70 Approved by TAOC on June 16, Prepare a schedule of cost of goods manufactured and sold. 39. Prepare financial statements for a manufacturing company. 40. Distinguish between absorption, variable costing, and job- order and process costing systems and identify documentation used for each system. 3. Legal Environment and Business 3 credits Coursework in this content area will develop a student s knowledge of specific areas of the law including, but not limited to: 1. Contracts, Constitutional law, Criminal Law, Court structure, Negligence, Torts, Product and Strict Liability, Intellectual property and Technology law, Employment law, Ethics and Social responsibility, 2. How to analyze those areas of law to make viable business decisions. 3. The use and application of those areas of law to the various functional units within the business paradigm including, marketing, human resources, finance, accounting, and Information systems. 4. The use and application of those areas of law with respect to its impact on individual decision making. Upon successfully completing this coursework, students will be able to: 1. Identify the requirements for a valid contract; identify the remedies available for breach of a contract. 2. Demonstrate their understanding of contract law by creating a contract to solve a problem in their lives using the fundamental contract construction rules. 3. Identify the Constitutional protections offered to the individual and demonstrate such protections through case analysis 4. Identify the court structure and system of jurisprudence within the United States and demonstrate through exam questions the notions of Stare Decisis and Federalism. 5. Identify the elements of negligence, torts, strict liability, intellectual property, employment law and ethics and be able to demonstrate such understanding through case analysis. 6. Analyze current events through the legal framework we established in class by viewing and discussing as cases that are currently in the news and are working their way through the courts. 4. Principles of Management 3 credits Coursework in this content area will develop a student s knowledge of specific areas of management including, but not limited to: 1. The basic activities and functions of managers in an organizational setting; 2. The influence of business functions and the behavioral sciences on the practice of management; 3. Socially sensitive tenets for working with people of different cultures; 4. Corporate social responsibility and ethics; 5. The social legal, political, economic, technological and global influences on organizations; 6. Theories and frameworks pertaining to leadership and team work; and 7. The application of leadership and teamwork theories and frameworks. Upon successfully completing this coursework, students will be able to: 1. Define management and describe the skills managers need; 2. Describe how the following trends are impacting management practices: globalization, workforce diversity, information technology, continual learning, total quality management, ethics and trust; 3. Define organizational culture and explain how an organization s culture reflects a certain personality; 4. Explain the importance of viewing management from a global perspective; 5. Explain social responsibility and values-based management; 6. Explain what the greening of management is and how organizations are going green ; 7. Describe the decision-making process and conditions of certainty, risk and uncertainty; 6

71 Approved by TAOC on June 16, Define planning and explain why objectives are important to planning; 9. Explain the importance of strategic planning and the differences between corporate-level, business-level and functional-level strategies; 10. Define organization structure and describe bureaucracy and its strengths, as well as, team-based structures; 11. Describe the human resource management (HRM) process and how HRM practices can facilitate workforce diversity; 12. Explain the characteristics of effective teams; 13. Summarize how goals motivate people and identify the characteristics that high achievers seek in a job; and 14. Describe early theories and modern views of leadership. 5. Principles of Marketing 3 credits Coursework in this content area will develop a student s knowledge of specific areas of marketing including, but not limited to: 1. The dynamics of business functions and processes in a marketplace setting. 2. The influences of the social, economic, technological, competitive, and global environment on organizations. 3. The various value creation and delivery facets of marketing as a business function. 4. The integral role of marketing in contemporary business enterprise. 5. The basic activities and functions of marketing personnel in an organizational setting. 6. The cross-functional perspectives of marketing processes within the business. 7. The aspects of corporate social responsibility and ethics for marketing decisions. Upon successfully completing this coursework, students will be able to: 1. Understand and appreciate the role of marketing as an integral business function. 2. Understand the cross-functional perspectives of marketing processes within the business. 3. Assess the influences of the social, economic, technological, competitive, regulatory, and global environment on organizations. 4. Identify the role of marketing, marketing information and research in the management of a firm and the individual consumer. 5. Compare and contrast the similarities and nuances between consumer marketing and business marketing based on perspectives of supply, demand, competition, procurement, and such other aspects of both the transactional and relational components of exchange. 6. Analyze consumer markets and business markets for effective segmentation, targeting and positioning strategies. 7. Analyze the strengths and weaknesses of a company s marketing activities as well as opportunities and threats faced by the company from the business environment in order to devise appropriate marketing mix. 8. Recognize the impact of the four P s (Product, Place, Price, and Promotion) of marketing and their managerial applications in designing a marketing strategy for an organization. 9. Gain an in-depth understanding of the four elements of the marketing mix in terms of the firm s strategic/tactical planning, implementation, evaluation and control of its suited frameworks pertaining to its offerings portfolios (products/services/branding), pricing components/ variables/determinants, marketing channels/distribution/logistics layouts, and promotions/advertising/sales considerations. 10. Analyze business and organizational issues in the context of marketing in a global setting with international influences. 11. Analyze and evaluate ethical and corporate social responsibility issues confronting businesses for marketing decisions. 7

72 Approved by TAOC on June 16, Principles of Economics 6 credits Students will meet this requirement by completing the following approved coursework from Category 5 of the Transfer Credit Framework; (See Appendix B: Transfer Credit Framework) Foundation-level Macroeconomics 3 credits Foundation-level Microeconomics 3 credits REQUIRED RELATED COURSEWORK IN MATHEMATICS In addition to the above major-specific content, students transferring with an associate degree into a bachelor degree in Business must also successfully complete a minimum of 6 credits in the following coursework in Mathematics: 1. Statistics 3 credits 2. Calculus 3 credits 1. Statistics 3 credits The following competencies have been identified as essential for comparable preparation in this content area: Competency 1: Define basic terminologies and concepts in statistics. Competency 2: Use descriptive statics to grasp the essentials of a given dataset. Competency 3: Solve decision-making problems using probability theories. Competency 4: Make inferences using sample statistics and hypotheses testing. Competency 5: Explain the theory, terminology, and notation related to the ANOVA (completely randomized design) procedure. Competency 6: Explain the theory, terminology, and notation related to the chi-square, goodness-of-fit procedure. Competency 7: Explain the theory, terminology, and notation related to simple linear regression and correlation analysis. See Appendix C: Competencies for Preparation in Statistics for further details. Examples of course titles that might include such competencies are Business Statistics, Probability and Statistics, Introduction to Statistics, Statistics I, etc. 2. Calculus 3 credits The world around us is constantly changing. Calculus is the branch of mathematics that has been developed to study changes. Therefore, the competencies acquired through the successful study of applied business calculus provide business professionals the tools for understanding the changes that occur in the business discipline disciplines which, in turn, enables them to solve business problems as appropriate. The following competencies have been identified as essential for comparable preparation in this content area: Competency 1: Utilize the concept of limit. Competency 2: Differentiate functions. Competency 3: Use differential calculus to sketch curves and to solve applied problems. Competency 4: Integrate functions by approximation and by use of anti-derivatives. Competency 5: Use integral calculus to determine area and to solve applied problems. Competency 6: Differentiate and integrate using transcendental functions. Examples of course titles that might include such competencies are Business Calculus, Applied Business Calculus, Applied Calculus, Calculus I, etc. See Appendix D: Competencies for Preparation in Calculus for further details. 8

73 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Appendix A: Major Requirements for Program-to-Program Articulation in Business This articulation agreement defines a total of 30 credits of Major-Specific and Major-Related Content areas. In accordance to institutional policy, two-year institutions determine the remaining credits needed to award the associate degree. REQUIRED Major-Specific Content Areas TRANSFER CRITERIA Computer Literacy 3 credits Financial Accounting 3 credits Managerial Accounting 3 credits Legal Environment and Business 3 credits Principles of Management 3 credits Students will meet the Principle of Economics requirement by completing 3 credits of approved foundation-level Macroeconomics and 3 credits of foundation-level Microeconomics from Category 5 of the Transfer Credit Framework. Principles of Marketing 3 credits Principles of Economics 6 credits REQUIRED Related Coursework in Mathematics TRANSFER CRITERIA Statistics 3 credits See Appendix C for the required competencies. Calculus 3 credits See Appendix D for the required competencies. 9

74 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Appendix B: Transfer Credit Framework 2 Students who successfully complete courses from the approved categories below can have their credits transferred and counted towards graduation at any of the participating PA TRAC colleges and universities. Please be aware that certain majors may have specific requirements prescribed by external agencies. It is the student s responsibility to work with an advisor to select appropriate courses as they relate to the major. Category 1 (3-4 credits total) English Composition Category 2 (3-4 credits total) Public Speaking Category 3 (min. 3-4 credits; max. 6-8 credits) Foundations of Mathematics College Algebra Elementary Statistics Precalculus Calculus I Category 4 Must include lab (min. 3-4 credits; max. 6-8 credits) General Chemistry I (majors & non-majors courses) General Chemistry II (majors & non-majors courses) General Biology I (majors & non-majors courses) General Biology II (majors & non-majors courses) General Physics I (non-calculus) General Physics II (non-calculus) Anatomy & Physiology I* Category 5 (min. 3-4 credits; max. 6-8 credits) General Psychology Introduction to Sociology American National Government Educational Psychology History of Western Civilization II Principles of Macroeconomics Principles of Microeconomics Category 6 (min. 3-4 credits; max. 6-8 credits) Introduction to Music Introduction to Philosophy Elementary Spanish I Elementary Spanish II Painting I Elementary French I Elementary French II Anatomy & Physiology II* U.S. History I Drawing I Introduction to Astronomy U.S. History II Ethics History of Western Civilization I Contemporary Social Problems Introduction to Art German I Introduction to Anthropology Child Growth & Development Child Psychology German II Introduction to Literature (may also be known as Introduction to Poetry, Interpreting Literature, Reading Literature, Theses in Literature, Topics in Literature, Current Themes in Literature) Survey of American Literature Literature of the Western World World Literature American Literature Survey of English Literature 2 Framework chart amended on April 11, 2012 to include Child Growth & Development and Child Psychology under Category 5. 10

75 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Appendix C: Competencies for Preparation in Statistics Here are the basic competencies for most statistics courses: 1. Define basic statistical terminology and concepts, including descriptive and inferential statistics, population, sample, statistical inference, reliability of inferences. 2. Use basic statistical notation. 3. List the different data types and explain the various rationales for classification of data into each typology. 4. Group data, construct, and explain frequency distribution tables, frequency histograms, frequency polygons, and ogives. 5. Calculate and explain the use of quantitative descriptors of ungrouped data. 6. Explain basic probability theory, terminology, and notation. 7. Calculate the solutions to problems that use the additive and multiplicative rules for probability. 8. Calculate the solutions to problems involving discrete random variables based on the binomial and Poisson probability distributions. 9. Calculate the solutions to problems involving continuous random variables based on the normal, uniform, and exponential probability distributions. 10. Explain basic inferential statistical theory, terminology, and notation related to sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing. 11. Construct "t" and "z" confidence intervals for the estimation of the population mean. 12. Perform one-sample and two-sample hypothesis tests for the population mean and for the difference between two population means. 13. Explain the theory, terminology, and notation related to the ANOVA (completely randomized design) procedure. 14. Explain the theory, terminology, and notation related to the chi-square, goodness-of-fit procedure. 15. Explain the theory, terminology, and notation related to simple linear regression and correlation analysis. TOPICAL COURSE OUTLINE Introduction Descriptive Graphs and Descriptive Measures Probability Concepts Discrete Probability Distributions Continuous Probability Distributions Statistical Inference Sampling and Sampling Distribution Hypothesis Testing for the Mean of a Population Inference Procedures for the Comparison of Two Populations Analysis of Variance Chi-Square Tests Statistic Simple Linear Regression and Correlation 11

76 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Appendix D: Competencies for Preparation in Calculus Competency 1: Utilize the concept of limit. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, the student should be able to: 1.1. determine limits using a table of values or graph evaluate limits of polynomial, and rational functions by direct substitution where substitution yields an indeterminate form, find limits by cancellation and rationalization techniques or by the use of identities evaluate limits using the Squeeze Theorem use limit theorems involving sums, differences, products, and quotients of functions indicate whether a function is continuous or discontinuous; if discontinuous, give all points of discontinuity determine limits at infinity. Competency 2: Differentiate functions. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, the student should be able to: 2.1. define and interpret the derivative of a function compute derivatives of functions using the definition obtain the derivatives of sums, products, quotients, and powers of polynomial and exponential functions using the general formulas for differentiation use the chain rule to differentiate the composition of functions find differentials differentiate implicitly find higher order derivatives evaluate derivatives. Competency 3: Use differential calculus to sketch curves and to solve applied problems. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, the student should be able to: 3.1. find the intervals on which a function is increasing or decreasing and the intervals on which a function is concave upward or concave downward determine relative minima, relative maxima, and points of inflection, if any, and sketch the graph of a function find the equations of lines tangent and normal to a curve at a given point find the point(s) on a curve where the tangent line has a given slope use differentials to approximate values of non-linear functions solve applied related rate problems solve applied maximum-minimum problems apply the Extreme Value Theorem to a function. Competency 4: Integrate functions by approximation and by use of antiderivatives. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, the student should be able to: 4.1. define the indefinite and definite integral of a function find antiderivatives by using the power rule and substitution integrate algebraic functions determine the constant of integration given sufficient conditions use the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to evaluate definite integrals. Competency 5: Use integral calculus to determine area and to solve applied problems. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, the student should be able to: 5.1. find the area of a region bounded by the graphs of given equations find the length of a plane curve calculate the average value of a function and use the Mean-Value Theorem for Integrals 12

77 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Competency 6: Differentiate and integrate using transcendental functions. Behavioral Objectives: In order to attain this competency, the student should be able to: 6.1. find derivatives of functions involving the natural logarithmic function differentiate and integrate natural exponential functions differentiate and integrate exponential functions that have bases other than e solve growth and decay problems. 13

78 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 ADDENDUM GENERAL STATEWIDE PROGRAM-TO-PROGRAM ARTICULATION in PENNSYLVANIA (Revised April 11, 2012) WHEREAS, the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania enacted Act 114 of 2006, which added to the Public School Code of 1949, Article XX-C entitled Transfers of Credits Between Institutions of Higher Education (referred to in this Agreement as the Statewide Transfer System ); WHEREAS, Act 114 of 2006 requires all community colleges in Pennsylvania and Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (PASSHE) universities to participate in the Statewide Transfer System; WHEREAS, Act 114 of 2006 permits independent and state-related institutions of higher education in Pennsylvania, as each is defined in Article XX-C, to elect to participate in the Statewide Transfer System; WHEREAS, the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania enacted Act 50 of 2009, which requires institutions participating in the Statewide Transfer System to accept the transfer of Associate of Arts and Associate Science degrees into parallel baccalaureate programs and recognize all competencies attained within the associate degree program; WHEREAS, Act 50 of 2009 defines an Associate of Arts (AA) or Associate of Science (AS) degree containing a minimum of 60 college-level credits and designed primarily for transfer to a baccalaureate institution; WHEREAS, Act 50 of 2009 requires the Transfer Articulation Oversight Committee (TAOC), as established in section 2004-C of the Public School Code of 1949, to identify Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degree programs for transfer with full junior standing into parallel baccalaureate degrees annually; and, WHEREAS, Act 50 of 2009 requires members of the Transfer Articulation Oversight Committee established in section 2004-C of the Public School Code of 1949, to identify modifications that may be required in existing associate or baccalaureate degrees to satisfy external accreditation or licensure requirement; All Institutions participating in the Statewide Transfer System enter into this Articulation Agreement and mutually agree as follows: 1. The statewide program-to-program articulation agreement ensures that students who complete an AA or AS degree from a participating institution will have their coursework and credits transfer into a parallel baccalaureate program with full junior standing and without the need for course-by-course equivalency. 2. Students are subject to the admissions and transfer credit policies of the participating institutions. The admissions and transfer credit policies for all of the institutions participating in Pennsylvania s college credit transfer system can be found at 3. The AA or AS degree must include a minimum of 60 college-level credits designed and acceptable for transfer, not including developmental or remedial courses or career, technical or applied courses. 4. The transfer of coursework with a grade less than a C (2.0 on a 4.0 scale) in the AA or AS will be consistent with the policies of native students at the participating college or university. 5. Students and institutional personnel will be able to find out which institutions offer articulated programs by accessing a searchable database located at PDE will maintain this database through program information provided to TAOC by the individual participating institutions. 14

79 Approved by TAOC on June 16, References to courses in all agreements designate competencies and are not to be construed as making a reference to a specific course at a specific institution. Course titles in the agreements are presented for guidance in advising students as to which coursework they should take even though the course at the student s college may not have the specific title mentioned in the agreement Responsibilities of Associate Degree Institutions a. The AA or AS degree leading to a parallel bachelor degree will include the minimum number of credits and competencies of major-specific coursework as defined by the Agreement. b. Any remaining AA or AS degree requirements will be accepted from arts and sciences electives designed and acceptable for transfer, not including developmental, remedial, career, technical or applied courses. c. By awarding the AA or AS, the Associate Degree Institution is validating that the student has met the competency requirements outlined in the Agreement. 8. Responsibilities of Bachelor Degree Institutions a. The Bachelor Degree Institution will recognize all competencies attained within the AA or AS degree and accept a transfer student who has earned the associate degree with full junior standing into a parallel baccalaureate degree program. b. All decisions made with respect to the transfer process shall be based on the principle of equivalence of expectations and requirements for native and transfer students. c. A transfer student s admission into the parallel baccalaureate degree will be subject to the Bachelor Degree Institution s specific requirements for admission to that major and be consistent with such requirements for native students. 9. Agreement Revision and Assessment a. Once a statewide program-to-program articulation agreement has been approved by TAOC, no amendments to the agreement can be offered by any party within the initial six (6) months of the agreement. After that time, a TAOC member with a proposed amendment to an approved agreement should submit the change to PDE. Amendments that are offered as clarifying or technical but do not alter the substantive portions or intent of the agreement must be forwarded to TAOC. TAOC representatives will have at least thirty (30) days to review, comment and approve or deny the proposed amendments. Amendments that seek to alter the substantive nature or intent of the agreement in any part must be forwarded to the appropriate PAC for review and consideration. The PAC will then make a recommendation to the TAOC, and TAOC shall approve or deny the proposed amendments. 4 b. PDE and TAOC will exercise responsibility for monitoring the effectiveness of the Agreement and its implementation. c. PDE shall collect data annually from the participating institutions that will enable the Department and TAOC to assess the effectiveness of the implementation of the Agreement in fostering a seamless transfer process and the academic success of transfer students at the senior institutions. 3 Adopted by TAOC and added to the agreement on April 11, Approved by TAOC and added to agreement on August 18,

80 Approved by TAOC on June 16, Transfer Appeal Process a. In accordance with Pennsylvania s Statewide Transfer System, each Bachelor Degree Institution shall have a procedure through which a transfer student can appeal a decision that he/she believes is not consistent with this Agreement. b. The Transfer Appeal Process shall be published, at minimum, in the institution s catalog and posted to the Commonwealth s official website of the Statewide Transfer System, 11. Institutional Resolution of Disputes a. In the event that an Associate Degree Institution considers the decision of a Bachelor Degree Institution to be inconsistent with this Agreement, the Associate Degree Institution shall consult directly with the Bachelor Degree Institution and attempt to resolve the matter. b. If the institutions are unable to resolve the issue, the Associate Degree Institution may submit their concern to PDE for consideration by the TAOC Dispute Resolution Committee. The Dispute Resolution Subcommittee will act according to the policies and procedures developed by TAOC as part of the Statewide Transfer System. The determination made by the Dispute Resolution Subcommittee will be binding upon the parties. 12. Implementation Date and Applicability Having fulfilled the requirements outlined in the Program-to-Program Articulation Agreement, students transferring with an AA or AS degree from a participating institution will be considered by the receiving baccalaureate degree institution to have received adequate preparation in the field of study at the foundation level and therefore eligible to transfer as a junior into advanced major coursework. Participating institutions will enact the Agreement in accordance to the timeline outlined by the TAOC, but no later Fall Continuation of the agreement remains in effect until such time as all cooperating institutions of the Statewide Transfer System formally approve any revisions. GLOSSARY OF TERMS Articulation: The aligning of curriculum between institutions of higher education to ensure the efficient and effective movement of students among those institutions. Associate of Arts (AA) and Associate of Science (AS) Degree: A degree consisting of at least 60 college-level credits and designed for transfer into a baccalaureate degree program. Foundation Coursework: Courses at a level of comprehension usually associated with freshman and sophomore students and typically offered during the first half of a baccalaureate degree program. Such coursework typically does not have course prerequisites. Native Student: A student who entered a given college or university without first matriculating at another college. Parallel Baccalaureate Degree: A bachelor degree program in a comparable field of study and with similar foundation-level major-specific competencies as an associate degree program. Receiving Institution: The college or university where a transfer student plans to enroll and to apply previously earned credit toward a degree program. 5 Agreements approved by TAOC prior to August 31, 2011 must be implemented by the institutions by Fall Agreements approved by TAOC after August 31, 2011 but before May 1, 2012 must be implemented by the institutions by Fall

81 Approved by TAOC on June 16, 2011 Transfer Credit: The credit granted by a college or university for college-level courses or other academic work completed at another institution. Transfer Student: A student who enters a participating college or university after earning college-level credit at another college or university. Transfer: The process by which a student moves from one postsecondary institution to another. Also refers to the mechanics of credit, course and curriculum exchange between institutions. Advanced Coursework: Courses with advanced depth of content knowledge in the field of study and carry the expectation of more complex competencies identified in the expected student learning outcomes is referred to as advanced coursework. These courses often have prerequisites and are usually beyond the Introduction to or Foundation of level. 17

82 Approved by TAOC on November 22, 2010 PENNSYLVANIA STATEWIDE PROGRAM-TO-PROGRAM ARTICULATION AGREEMENT IN PSYCHOLOGY In accordance with Act 50 of 2009, institutions participating in Pennsylvania s statewide college credit transfer system agree to the following policies governing the transfer of credit earned at a participating associate degree granting institution into a Psychology degree program offered at participating four-year colleges and universities with parallel bachelor degrees in Psychology. Specifically, this Agreement ensures that a student who successfully completes an Associate of Arts (AA) or Associate of Science (AS) degree at a participating institution can transfer the full degree into a parallel Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree program in Psychology at a participating four-year college or university. Full junior-standing will be granted to students who have successfully completed an AA or AS degree provided that: The associate s degree includes, at minimum, 15 credits of major-specific coursework as outlined under Major Requirements in this Agreement; The maximum number of major-specific coursework in the associate s degree does not exceed 50% of the major-specific coursework required by the parallel bachelor degree program offered by the four-year institution; Students meeting these criteria will be considered by the four-year institutions to have received adequate preparation in the first two years of the parallel bachelor degree and to be eligible to transfer into advanced coursework in Psychology. References to courses in all agreements designate competencies and are not to be construed as making a reference to a specific course at a specific institution. Course titles in the agreements are presented for guidance in advising students as to which coursework they should take even though the course at the student s college may not have the specific title mentioned in the agreement. 1 Overview Psychology as a discipline has a number of diverse specialty areas. Despite this Agreement, the lack of a common curricular foundation for the major poses a challenge when coordinating curricula across a large number of independent institutions of higher education. Save for a very few areas of study (e.g., introductory coursework that exposes students to the major theoretical perspectives, coursework in research design and analysis, etc.), no other topics in the field are universally agreed upon as required coursework for the major. What is agreed upon, however, is that at the undergraduate level the curriculum for a Psychology major should be a balance between exposure to a broad range of content areas and in-depth exploration of a small number of content areas or even a single content area. The American Psychological Association (APA) has published Guidelines for the Undergraduate Psychology Major (APA, 2007). In these guidelines APA addresses this balance of both breadth and 1 Adopted by TAOC and added to the agreement on April 11, 2012.

83 Approved by TAOC on November 22, 2010 depth of knowledge. This articulation Agreement proposes a general structure based on the APA Guidelines that will provide a common baseline to allow students at associate degree granting institutions covered by this Agreement to transfer their associate degree programs easily to the participating four-year institutions. At the same time, this model provides four-year institutions the flexibility to identify the remaining requirements for the parallel bachelor degree programs at their individual campuses. Critical to this model is an understanding that APA has identified three levels of competency within any given content area: Beginning, Developing and Advanced. See Appendix A. APA defines these areas as follows: Basic-level Competencies include skills that students should acquire in introductory-level psychology courses such as general psychology and psychology of adjustment. Developing-level Competencies are marked by skills that should emerge as students progress through lower- and upper-division courses in an undergraduate psychology curriculum. Advanced-level Competencies are skill levels expected of students completing capstone educational experiences and nearing the end of a psychology major. To further clarify: basic represents retention and comprehension, developing represents application and analysis and advanced is associated with evaluation and creation. (APA, 2008, p. 9.) By completing an associate s degree that contains a minimum of 15 credits as defined in this Agreement, in combination with at least 30 credits of foundation-level coursework from the Transfer Credit Framework (see Appendix B), students will possess the knowledge, skills and abilities required to enter a parallel bachelor degree program as a junior at a participating four-year institution. Using the model provided by APA, students transferring under this Agreement will be expected to have earned an associate s degree that includes a minimum of 15 credits in the content categories defined below: 1. General Survey of Psychology 3 credits 2. Major Content Categories 6 credits in at least two of four Major Content Categories a. Human Development b. Individual Processes c. Learning and Cognition d. Biological Basis of Behavior and Mental Process 3. Research Design and Analysis 6-9 credits Major-Specific Competency Requirements 1. General Survey of Psychology 3 credits Students shall attain Basic-level competency across all major subfields of Psychology. Comparable coursework will include, at minimum, the following content areas: Survey of the major principles of psychology Research results Applications of contemporary psychology

84 Approved by TAOC on November 22, Major Content Categories 6 Credits Students shall attain Developing-level competencies in at least two of the four Major Content Categories as defined by APA. While the specific content may vary from one category to another, the following competencies have been identified as essential for Developing-level competency in a general content domain: Apply and analyze concepts, theories, and research in the general content domains; Describe the general experimental and/or non-experimental paradigms used to investigate behavior in the general content domain; Analyze how psychological research reflects scientific principles; Identify antecedents and consequences of behavior and mental processes; Predict likely patterns of behavior from context; Compare and contrast historical perspectives; Compare and contrast the assumptions, methods, and other elements of the major contemporary perspectives (Behavioral, Biological, Cognitive, Evolutionary, Humanistic, Psychodynamic, Sociocultural) in the specific subfield of study; Apply the overarching themes of Psychology to explain specific behaviors; o Interaction of heredity and environment o Variability and continuity of behavioral and mental processes within and across species o Free-will vs. determinism o Subjectivism vs. objectivism o Interaction of mind and body o Applicability of theories and measures across societal and cultural groups Debate the merits of each side of the overarching themes of Psychology; Apply relevant ethical principles, as addressed by the APA code of ethics; Detect and reject claims arising from myths, stereotypes, common fallacies, and poorly supported assertions regarding behavior; and, Apply a psychological principle to facilitate positive change in a personal, social or organizational behavior. The four Major Content Categories are defined as follows: a. Human Development The study of Human Development is the study of continuity and/or change in psychological phenomena across the life-span. Within the broader field of Psychology, the study of human development has its own history, includes a specific set of methodologies, traditions, and perspectives, and approaches the study of any psychological phenomenon with a focus on understanding the ongoing interactions between an individual and his/her world. The study of Human Development involves the examination and comparison of multiple theories (both within and across developmental time periods) and a focus on mutually influential (i.e., bidirectional) relationships between biological and ecological (e.g., cultural, historical, and environmental, both physical and social) factors. Coursework in this category is linked not by specific content but by a focus on understanding the ongoing interactions between an individual and his/her world and the role of those interactions in the continuing development of the individual.

85 Approved by TAOC on November 22, 2010 Coursework might focus on specific developmental time periods (e.g., childhood, adolescence, adulthood, etc.) or on specific areas of human development (e.g., cognitive development across the lifespan, social and emotional development). b. Individual and Sociocultural Differences Coursework in this area focuses on how the Person, Situation, or Person-in-Situation factors contribute to human behavior, cognitions and/or emotions. This includes coursework that focus on the broader social and cultural context of behavior. Individual differences can also include an examination of Psychopathology, its etiology, classification, and treatment. Examples of courses that might include such competencies are Personality, Psychometrics, Social Psychology, Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Abnormal Psychology and Cross- Cultural Psychology. c. Learning and Cognition Study in the areas of learning and cognition focuses on understanding the methodologies, traditions and perspectives within the traditional behavioral approach (classical and operant conditioning), and/or cognitive approaches to understanding learning, memory, higher-order memory processes (for example, problem solving and decision-making), and behavior. Coursework in these areas will generally highlight the experimental underpinnings of the relevant theories and related research including the translation to practical applications and experiences. Examples of courses that might include such competencies are Learning, Memory, Cognition and Introduction to Behavioral Analysis. d. Biological Basis of Behavior and Mental Processes Study in the area of biological psychology focuses on how biological events (such as physiology, genetics, and evolution) affect behavior and mental processes. Coursework in this area would highlight the relationship between the biological and psychological processes by examining nerve system anatomy and physiology as it relates to problems of emotion, motivation, cognition, perception and mental illness. Other topics typically addressed within this area would include the sensory systems, motor systems, memory and language. Examples of courses that might include such competencies are Physiological Psychology, Biological Psychology, Behavioral Neuroscience and Sensation and Perception.

86 Approved by TAOC on November 22, Research Design and Analysis 6-9 credits Students shall attain Basic- and Developing-level competency in Research Design and Analysis. The competencies described below are divided into two content areas: a. Statistics b. Research Methods Institutions are at liberty to embed competencies from these two areas into the associate degree program however they choose. For example, one institution may develop two or more individual courses that meet the competencies outlined in each area. Another institution may decide to embed the statistical competencies in a statistics course taught by a faculty member in the Math Department and to embed the research methods competencies into a course(s) taught by a member of the Psychology Department. The specific course structures are not as important as making sure that upon completion of the associate s degree, a student has achieved the competencies listed below and is prepared to enter junior-level coursework in the parallel bachelor degree program at the four-year institution. a. Statistics The following competencies have been identified as essential for comparable coursework in this content area: Understanding the relationship between samples and populations Identification of levels of measurement Using frequency distributions to summarize data Identification and computation of appropriate measures of central tendency Identification and computation of appropriate measures of dispersion Computation and interpretation of z-scores Understanding and uses of the standard normal curve Identification, computation, and interpretation of appropriate correlation coefficients Interpretation of the proportion of variance accounted for Basic understanding of elementary probability Understanding of The Null and Alternative Hypotheses and hypothesis testing Computation and interpretation of the z-test Identification and understanding of Type I and Type II Error Computation and interpretation of the single sample t-test Computation and interpretation of the independent samples t-test Computation and interpretation of the related samples t-test Computation and interpretation of effect size Graphing results of experiments Using Statistical Software Packages (e.g. SPSS, SAS, Excel) to analyze data Computation and interpretation of the One-Way Within Subjects ANOVA Computation and interpretation of the One-Way Between Subjects ANOVA Computation and interpretation of the post-hoc tests Computation and interpretation of the chi-square tests for nominal data Computation and interpretation of non-parametric tests for ordinal data

87 Approved by TAOC on November 22, 2010 b. Research Methods The following competencies have been identified as essential for comparable coursework in this content area: Experience conducting a literature review Experience generating ideas and hypotheses for research Understanding of the assumptions of scientific research Identification and understanding of descriptive designs (e.g. case studies, surveys, naturalistic observation) Definition and understanding of correlational studies Understanding the difference between correlation and causation when drawing conclusions from research Understanding the difference between experimental and quasi-experimental designs (e.g. time series, non-equivalent control group) Definition and understanding of the experimental research approach Identification and understanding of Single IV Designs Identification and understanding of Basic Factorial Designs Identification and understanding of Single Case Designs Understanding construct validity and how to establish it in research Understanding external validity and how to establish it in research Understanding internal validity and avoiding threats to internal validity Understanding of research ethics/irb Knowledge of various methods for manipulating the independent variable Understanding techniques for maintaining experimental control (e.g. randomization, matching, double-blind techniques) Understanding the difference between random and systematic error and the implications of each Knowledge of various methods for measuring the dependent variable Understanding the reliability of measures and how to establish it in research Experience running live participants Experience conducting a post-experimental interview (debriefing) Knowledge of and experience with writing a research proposal Knowledge of and experience with writing a research report/apa format Transfer Credit Framework In accordance to Article XX-C of the Public School Code of 1949, the Commonwealth s statewide college credit transfer system includes an advising tool called the Transfer Credit Framework. The Framework allows students to transfer up to 30 credits of foundation courses from one participating college or university to another and have those courses count toward graduation. The Framework consists of six categories which include courses in English, public speaking, math, science, art, humanities, history and the behavioral and social sciences. To fully benefit from the Framework, students are advised to select a range of courses from all six categories as designated in the Transfer Credit Framework Policy noted in Appendix B.

88 Approved by TAOC on November 22, 2010 Recommended Framework Courses for Students Majoring in Psychology All of the participating institutions require students to earn credits outside of their major area of study. This coursework is often referred to as the General Education Curriculum or Distribution Requirements. Through the Transfer Credit Framework, the commonwealth s Transfer and Articulation Oversight Committee has identified six categories of foundation-level coursework that is common among the participating institutions. Each category consists of multiple course options. However, some Framework courses are more relevant to the field of psychology than others. A list of highly recommended courses in each category is included below. These courses are recommendations only. They are not required as part of the major or the articulation Agreement. Students will not be penalized for not completing the recommended courses prior to transferring. The courses listed are merely suggestions that could enhance a student s academic frame of reference as a Psychology major. With the assistance of an academic advisor, students are recommended to select the following Framework courses as part of their transferable associate degree program: Framework Category Framework Requires Students to Take * Psychology Majors Are RECOMMENDED to Take Category 1 1 course (3-4 credits) 1. English Composition Category 2 1 course (3-4 credits) 1. Public Speaking Category 3 2 courses (6-8 credits) 1. College Algebra or higher math 2. One additional math course Category 4 2 courses (6-8 credits) 1. At least one biology course w/ a lab that focuses on human/animal biology 2. One additional science course w/ lab Category 5 2 courses (6-8 credits) 1. One course outside of the area of Psychology 2. A second course outside of the area of Psychology Category 6 2 courses (6-8 credits) 1. Ethics 2. One additional course *Students are advised not to exceed the credit number indicated in each Framework Category. Credit requirements are presented as a range since actual credit number may vary by specific course and institution. References American Psychological Association. (2007). APA guidelines for the undergraduate psychology major. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from American Psychological Association. (2008). Teaching, learning, and assessing in a developmentally coherent curriculum. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, Board of Educational Affairs. Retrieved from

89 Approved by TAOC on November 22, 2010

90 Approved by TAOC on November 22, 2010

91 Approved by TAOC on November 22, 2010

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