Patient information. Using strong Opioids to control your pain

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Patient information. Using strong Opioids to control your pain"

Transcription

1 Patient information Using strong Opioids to control your pain Published: April Date for review: April 2016 Introduction This leaflet explains what strong opioids (pronounced oh-pee-oyds) e are and what you need to know about them. It will support conversations that you have with your doctor or specialist nurse. What are opioids? The words strong opioid describes a type of strong painkiller that is used to treat moderate to severe pain. Examples of strong opioids are morphine, oxycodone and fentanyl. For this leaflet we mainly discuss morphine because it is usually the first strong opioid that doctors will offer you. Why am I being prescribed morphine? Morphine is prescribed to treat moderate to severe pain. People who take morphine have usually tried a number of other painkillers like regular paracetamol or codeine. Codeine and co-codamol (codeine plus paracetamol) are preparations of weak opioid painkillers. Codeine is converted to morphine by our bodies. This means that people taking codeine are already on a low dose of morphine. However, codeine and other simple painkillers are often not strong enough to control moderate or severe pain and this is when morphine is recommended. So, what are the benefits of taking morphine? Well, pain can affect your mood and how much you re able to do. Morphine has an important role in getting pain more under control so that you feel better in yourself and are able to get on with some of the things you d like to do. But isn t morphine just used in the last stage of life? No, morphine is used to control pain at any time of life, for example morphine is often used when people are recovering from surgery. Other people, living with long-term pain, are on the same dose of morphine for many years because morphine helps them to keep pain under control so that they can live life more fully. 1

2 Will I become addicted to morphine? It is extremely rare for people with pain to become addicted to morphine. People who are addicted to a drug crave taking the drug for the feeling of wellbeing that it can give, and continue taking the drug despite the drug causing them harm. This is very different from taking a medicine as prescribed by your doctor, with the aim of controlling your pain and allowing you to do some of the things that you like to do. e If you take morphine for a long time your body can get used to morphine. If you suddenly stop taking morphine the pain may come back and you may get withdrawal symptoms. If you feel that you would like to reduce your dose or stop taking morphine this is perfectly possible, but the dose must be reduced gradually to allow your body to re-adjust. It is very important you contact your doctor or specialist nurse to make a plan together before making any changes to your dose of morphine. What are the side-effects? The most common side-effects are: Constipation: All strong opioid painkillers cause constipation. If you re taking strong painkillers, you should also take a laxative throughout your treatment. Drinking plenty of fluids, eating food that s high in fibre and keeping as active as possible can help you to open your bowels but these measures are not usually enough to overcome morphine-related constipation. It is important to keep taking your laxatives regularly (usually every day). When you open your bowels you should still take your laxatives that day and continue to take them regularly. This is because most laxatives that are taken by mouth will not act immediately but can take at least 1 day to take effect. If you only take laxatives when you are already constipated then it s a lot more difficult to treat your constipation. Sickness (or nausea and vomiting): some people feel sick or even vomit when they start taking morphine. This often goes away by itself after the first week of treatment. If you do feel sick, your doctor can offer you a medicine to stop this. Drowsiness: you may find you can t concentrate so well or feel more sleepy than usual. This often wears off after a week of taking the morphine regularly. If you do find it difficult to concentrate do not use machinery, sharp tools or drive (see section on driving below). Occasionally, when people take morphine they can feel very drowsy and can see or hear things that are not really there (hallucinate). It is important that you contact a doctor or specialist nurse if this happens because the dose or type of your opioid painkillers may need to be changed. 2

3 How and when do I take Morphine? Morphine can be taken in a number of ways, other than by mouth; these alternatives can be helpful if you can t swallow or are being sick. a However, since morphine is usually taken by mouth, that s the option we ll discuss now. Usually, people take a combination of two different forms of morphine: 1) a long-acting (or sustained-release) form. 2) a fast-acting (immediate-release) form. Long-acting morphine is taken as tablet or capsule that contains a substance to ensure that the morphine is slowly and gradually absorbed over 12 hours. This helps to prevent ongoing pain. Long acting medication is usually taken twice a day with each dose taken 12 hours apart, so for instance at 8am in the morning and 8pm at night. Fast-acting morphine can be taken as a liquid or a tablet. Liquid morphine has a bitter flavour that can be improved by mixing it with a fruit drink. a It starts working quickly, after about 20 to 30 minutes. The painkilling effect lasts for 3-4 hours. If your pain flares up, despite your taking your regular pain relief, you can take a rescue dose of fast-acting morphine to relieve this pain. Doctors and nurses may use the term breakthrough pain to describe this occasional pain that breaks through despite your taking long-acting painkillers. When you are first prescribed morphine, your doctor may suggest that you take fastacting morphine every 4 hours over a 24 hour period. This helps to see how much morphine you need in 24 hours to control your pain. Once the best starting dose for you is decided then your doctor can prescribe long-acting morphine tablets/capsules of the right strength. What are you taking? Here is a space to write down your long- and fast-acting opioid: Long-acting opioid:... Fast-acting opioid:... How many doses of rescue (also called breakthrough ) fast-acting morphine can I take in a 24 hour period? Often people need 1 or 2 doses of the fast-acting rescue doses of morphine over a 24 hour period, on top of their long-acting morphine. Rescue doses should be taken when you need them, but no more frequently than 1 dose each hour. 3

4 If you need 3 or more rescue doses in 24 hours, do take them and contact your doctor or specialist nurse to let them know. This is because your regular morphine dose may not be sufficient and may need to be reviewed. Some people keep a diary of their rescue doses and this is really useful for the doctor or nurse looking after you. What should I do if I forget to take a dose of my LONG-acting opioid? You can take a dose of your LONG-acting opioid painkiller up to 4 hours late. However, if it s MORE than 4 hours late you should take a dose of your FAST-acting opioid instead, and take further doses of your FAST-acting opioid every 4 hours until it s time for your next dose of the LONG-acting opioid. Examples: 1) Pam usually takes her LONG-acting opioid painkillers at 7am and 7pm. One day she forgets to take her evening dose. She remembers at 10pm that she s forgotten her evening dose. As she s only 3 hours late in remembering her dose, she knows that it s safe to take her evening long-acting dose now. She then takes her morning dose at the normal time of 7am. 2) James usually takes his morning dose of LONG-acting opioid painkiller at 8am and 8pm. One day, he forgets to take his morning dose of LONG-acting opioid tablets with his breakfast. He then goes out doesn t get home until 1pm. As he is 5 hours late in taking his LONG-acting opioid tablets he knows that it is too late to take the dose now. Instead, he takes a dose of his FAST-acting opioid immediately and another dose of FAST-acting opioid at 5pm (4 hours later). He takes his evening LONG-acting opioid at the normal time of 8pm. Will the opioid painkillers become less effective as time goes on, meaning I will need more and more? It is very unusual for the painkilling effects of morphine to wear off as time goes on (this is called tolerance ). So, why does the doctor keep increasing my dose of morphine? When morphine is first started, it s common to start at a low dose and build up gradually to a dose that controls your pain. a Different people need different doses of painkillers. People vary in the type of pain they are experiencing and the way they absorb and process painkillers. It is therefore not always possible to say exactly what dose you may need from the outset. If your pain gets better or worse, the dose of your opioid painkiller can be adjusted. If the pain gets worse, you may only need a small increase in the dose to get your pain under control again, but if your pain is very bad, your doctors may increase the dose by a larger amount this is more likely to get on top of your pain than a smaller increase in the dose. a Equally, if your pain gets better the dose of morphine can be reduced slowly. Some people find that once they are on the right dose of morphine for their pain, they stay on that dose for some time. Your doctors and nurses will work with you to get the dose of opioid right. 4

5 Can I take opioids with other medication? Yes. Morphine does not usually cause problems with your other, regular medication. In fact it is often prescribed in addition to other painkillers, such as regular paracetamol or ibuprofen, because they work in different ways to help reduce your pain. If your pain is not controlled on codeine, your doctor may decide to switch to morphine and stop the codeine. Codeine works in a similar way as morphine, but has a weaker effect, so taking both morphine and codeine is not usually beneficial. Does morphine always work for pain? Although morphine is a strong painkiller, it does not work for all types of pain. If you have tried morphine and your pain has not responded to it, despite increasing the dose of morphine, your doctor can discuss other treatments and options with you. Can I drink alcohol? Alcohol and opioids together can cause sleepiness and poor concentration. c When you first start on opioids or when your dose has just been increased, you should avoid alcohol completely. c Once you are on a steady dose of opioid you should be able to drink moderate amounts of alcohol. c However, you may find that you notice the effects of alcohol after drinking a much smaller amount than usual. You should not drink alcohol if you are going to use machinery, sharp tools or drive (see below). c Is it safe for me to drive if I am taking opioids? Your ability to drive depends on many different factors and you will need to use your judgement to decide if you are safe to drive or not. Here is some advice on driving when taking strong painkillers: You should not drive for 5 days after starting or changing the dose of your strong painkiller. Sometimes you may need to wait longer before you are ready to drive again. You must not drive if you feel sleepy. You must not drive after drinking alcohol or taking strong drugs that have not been recommended by your doctor e.g. cannabis. You must not drive if you start taking other drugs that cause sleepiness, either prescribed by your doctor or bought from the chemist e.g. hay fever medicine. You must not drive on days where you have had to take extra ( breakthrough or rescue ) doses of a strong painkiller. d Restarting driving If after 5 days you are not sleepy, you may start driving. Make your first trip: Short On roads that you are familiar with At a time when the traffic is not too busy 5

6 You may find it helpful for an experienced driver to accompany you. d Your GP or a member of the Specialist Palliative Care Team will be happy to help you decide when it is safe to drive. d Drivers Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA): You do not need to inform the DVLA that you are starting a strong painkiller. However, there may be other information about your illness that the DVLA needs to know. Your doctors or the DVLA can advise you about this. d How to contact the DVLA: Telephone for licensing enquiries. Have your driving licence number available. Website address - Postal Address - DVLA, Longview Road, Morriston, Swansea, SA99 8QD. Car insurance: you may need to inform your motor insurance company about your current state of health and what medication you are taking. Each insurance company is different. It is best to discuss your circumstances with your insurance company to be sure that you are covered. d Who will keep a check on the morphine? The doctor and medical team that have first prescribed the morphine should give you information on how you will be followed-up. Ask your medical team about follow-up if you are unsure. Usually, in the initial phases of taking morphine, your medical team may see you frequently to establish the right dose for you. Your medical team might be your GP practice, an oncologist or your specialist palliative care team. It is helpful to keep a record of your key professionals, and your GP should always be informed about medication changes. What if something goes wrong outside normal working hours, when my usual team is not around? If you are in hospital, call the nurse and explain what you are experiencing. If you are at home contact your Out-of-Hours GP service. Their phone number is available locally and your GP surgery s answer-phone message should provide you with their phone number. Your doctor may also provide you with contact details for your local specialist palliative care team. If you, your family or carer(s) are worried that there is something seriously wrong, you must call 999 straight away. 6

7 It is worth writing all these local contact numbers down and keeping them close to hand, ideally by your landline phone or stored in your mobile telephone. Your GP:... Your Community District Nursing Service:... GP Out-of-Hours medical provider number:... Community Palliative Care Team:... Palliative Care Out-of-Hours advice line:... Other (state who)...:... How do I store morphine? Morphine is a powerful drug and so it must be stored carefully. Here is some advice to keep you and your family safe: It is important that only you take the morphine prescribed for your pain. You should keep your morphine out-of-sight in a locked cupboard. Morphine should be kept out of the reach of children, vulnerable adults and pets. Make sure that all your medications are properly labelled. Your medicines should be kept in a dry, cool place (not in the bathroom cupboard!). Check that your medication is still in date. e 7

8 This information leaflet This information has been written as a joint venture between Wye Valley NHS Trust and St. Michael s Hospice to comply with the guidelines on the use of strong opioids in palliative care from the UK s National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). Authors: Dr Olivia Bush and Dr Sally Johnson. Correspondence to: Palliative Care Dept., Macmillan Renton Unit, Wye Valley NHS Trust, The County Hospital, Union Walk, Hereford. HR1 2ER Website: Thank you to the Specialist Palliative Care Team at Velindre Hospital NHS Trust who have allowed us to amend their comprehensive leaflet for our use in Herefordshire: M Tauber, N Pease, M Jefferson, R Owen Opioids in Palliative Care version 2.0: [Online]. Available from: [accessed January 2013] Other References: a. Macmillan Using strong painkillers for cancer pain [Online] Available from: /StrongpainkillersforcancerpainMCCC5pages.pdf [accessed January 2013] b. Macmillan Overview of painkillers for cancer pain [Online] Available from: ainkillersforcancerpainmcs6pages.pdf [accessed January 2013] c. British Pain Society Opioids for persistent pain: Information for Patients [online] Available from : [Accessed January 2013] d. N Pease Strong Painkillers and Driving [online] Available from: Hereford NHS Trust intranet, not publically available. e. Pain Relief Foundation Strong opioids for chronic pain [online] Available from: [Accessed January 2013] 8

Opioids in Palliative Care- Patient Information Manual

Opioids in Palliative Care- Patient Information Manual Version 2.0 with MST example Introduction The following pages explain what opioids are and what we think you may want to know about them. There is quite a lot of information here, most of it is based on

More information

Strong opioids (painkillers) in palliative care what you should know

Strong opioids (painkillers) in palliative care what you should know Strong opioids (painkillers) in palliative care what you should know Patient Information Author ID: JG Leaflet Number: PC 006 Version: 1 Name of Leaflet: Strong opioids (painkillers) in palliative care

More information

A Guide to pain relief medicines For patients receiving Palliative Care

A Guide to pain relief medicines For patients receiving Palliative Care A Guide to pain relief medicines For patients receiving Palliative Care 1 Which pain medicines are you taking? Contents Page No. Amitriptyline 8 Codeine 9 Co-codamol 10 Co-dydramol 11 Diclofenac (Voltarol

More information

Oxford University Hospitals. NHS Trust. Oxford Centre for Head and Neck Oncology. Pain Relief. Information for patients

Oxford University Hospitals. NHS Trust. Oxford Centre for Head and Neck Oncology. Pain Relief. Information for patients Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust Oxford Centre for Head and Neck Oncology Pain Relief Information for patients Introduction This booklet has been written to give you information about pain relief.

More information

Controlling Pain Part 2: Types of Pain Medicines for Your Prostate Cancer

Controlling Pain Part 2: Types of Pain Medicines for Your Prostate Cancer Controlling Pain Part 2: Types of Pain Medicines for Your Prostate Cancer The following information is based on the general experiences of many prostate cancer patients. Your experience may be different.

More information

Cancer Pain. Relief from PALLIATIVE CARE

Cancer Pain. Relief from PALLIATIVE CARE PALLIATIVE CARE Relief from Cancer Pain National Clinical Programme for Palliative Care For more information on the National Clinical Programme for Palliative Care, go to www.hse.ie/palliativecareprogramme

More information

Using strong painkillers for cancer pain

Using strong painkillers for cancer pain Using strong painkillers for cancer pain This information is an extract from the booklet Controlling cancer pain. You may find the full booklet helpful. We can send you a copy free see page 8. Contents

More information

Understanding Your Pain

Understanding Your Pain Toll Free: 800-462-3636 Web: www.endo.com Understanding Your Pain This brochure was developed by Margo McCaffery, RN, MS, FAAN, and Chris Pasero, RN, MS, FAAN authors of Pain: Clinical Manual (2nd ed.

More information

How to take your Opioid Pain Medication

How to take your Opioid Pain Medication How to take your Opioid Pain Medication Today your doctor gave you a prescription for medication to help relieve your pain. The pain medication is called an opioid or narcotic. Taking pain medication,

More information

Getting the best result from Opioid medicine. in the management of chronic pain

Getting the best result from Opioid medicine. in the management of chronic pain Getting the best result from Opioid medicine in the management of chronic pain Your doctor has prescribed you opioid medicine to help you manage your chronic pain. This patient information leaflet gives

More information

Questions about your pain medicines

Questions about your pain medicines Questions about your pain medicines This information is an extract from the booklet Controlling cancer pain. You may find the full booklet helpful. We can send you a free copy see page 6. Contents Common

More information

Your A-Z of Pain Relief A guide to pain relief medicines. We care, we discover, we teach

Your A-Z of Pain Relief A guide to pain relief medicines. We care, we discover, we teach Your A-Z of Pain Relief A guide to pain relief medicines We care, we discover, we teach Which pain medicines are you taking? Abstral (see Fentanyl Instant Tablets) Amitriptyline 5 Brufen (see Ibuprofen)

More information

Horton Day Case Unit. Information and advice after a surgical procedure under a general anaesthetic

Horton Day Case Unit. Information and advice after a surgical procedure under a general anaesthetic Horton Day Case Unit Information and advice after a surgical procedure under a general anaesthetic Information for patients 2 Driving Anaesthetic drugs remain the body for up to 48 hours and gradually

More information

Information on driving whilst taking strong painkillers

Information on driving whilst taking strong painkillers Information on driving whilst taking strong painkillers Patient Information Author ID: JB Leaflet Number: PC 007 Version: 1 Name of Leaflet: Information on driving whilst taking strong painkillers Date

More information

Pain and problem drug use

Pain and problem drug use Pain and problem drug use Information for patients Prepared by the British Pain Society in consultation with the Royal College of Psychiatrists, the Royal College of General Practitioners and the Advisory

More information

Pharmaceutical care of people requiring palliative care Course activities

Pharmaceutical care of people requiring palliative care Course activities Pharmaceutical care of people requiring palliative care Course activities Case Study 1 Mrs Green, a 70 year-old lady, has metastatic carcinoma of the breast (breast cancer with spread to other areas).

More information

OPIOIDS FOR PERSISTENT PAIN

OPIOIDS FOR PERSISTENT PAIN OPIOIDS FOR PERSISTENT PAIN Information Leaflet Your Health. Our Priority. Page 2 of 10 Introduction Pain that doesn t go away can cause problems in your life in a number of ways. The Pain team can work

More information

Questions and answers on breast cancer Guideline 10: The management of persistent pain after breast cancer treatment

Questions and answers on breast cancer Guideline 10: The management of persistent pain after breast cancer treatment Questions and answers on breast cancer Guideline 10: The management of persistent pain after breast cancer treatment I ve had breast cancer treatment, and now I m having pain. Does this mean the cancer

More information

Following minor gynaecological surgery

Following minor gynaecological surgery Following minor gynaecological surgery Exceptional healthcare, personally delivered n Following your operation you should have an adult to take you home and remain with you overnight. Transport home should

More information

What you should know about treating your pain with opioids. Important information on the safe use of opioid pain medicine.

What you should know about treating your pain with opioids. Important information on the safe use of opioid pain medicine. What you should know about treating your pain with opioids Important information on the safe use of opioid pain medicine. If your healthcare provider has determined that opioid therapy is right for you,

More information

Memantine (Ebixa) Drug treatment for Alzheimer s disease

Memantine (Ebixa) Drug treatment for Alzheimer s disease IS 20 October 2011 Information sheet Memantine (Ebixa) Drug treatment for Alzheimer s disease Introduction... 1 How does Ebixa work?... 1 Who might benefit?... 2 What effect might Ebixa have?... 2 How

More information

Secondary liver cancer Patient Information Booklet

Secondary liver cancer Patient Information Booklet Secondary liver cancer Patient Information Booklet Delivering the best in care UHB is a no smoking Trust To see all of our current patient information leaflets please visit www.uhb.nhs.uk/patient-information-leaflets.htm

More information

The Horton General Hospital, Day Case Unit After a laparoscopic cholecystectomy Information for patients

The Horton General Hospital, Day Case Unit After a laparoscopic cholecystectomy Information for patients The Horton General Hospital, Day Case Unit After a laparoscopic cholecystectomy Information for patients Today you have had a procedure called laparoscopic cholecystectomy. This means that your gall bladder

More information

Pain relief at home. Information for adult patients

Pain relief at home. Information for adult patients Pain relief at home Information for adult patients 3 Contents Page 3 Page 3 Page 5 Page 7 Page 8 Introduction to pain relief Common pain relief medicines and their side effects More information about pain

More information

Weaning off your pain medicine

Weaning off your pain medicine Weaning off your pain medicine UHN Information for patients taking opioid pain medicines Read this booklet to learn about: why you need to wean off your pain medicine how to wean off slowly how to control

More information

Helping you to make a speedy recovery after a groin hernia repair

Helping you to make a speedy recovery after a groin hernia repair Helping you to make a speedy recovery after a groin hernia repair Groin hernia repair Contents Who this leaflet is for 2 What to expect after the operation 3 Things that will help you recover more quickly

More information

Using strong opioids to manage pain

Using strong opioids to manage pain Using strong opioids to manage pain Q1. What is an opioid? A. Opioids are strong pain killers. Strong opioids commonly prescribed by doctors include: Oramorph (contains morphine), MST (contains morphine),

More information

Opioid Analgesic Medication Information

Opioid Analgesic Medication Information Opioid Analgesic Medication Information This handout provides information about treating pain with opioid analgesics or narcotics. Please read this entire handout. We want to be sure that you understand

More information

Radiotherapy for a mesothelioma

Radiotherapy for a mesothelioma Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust The Radiotherapy Department Radiotherapy for a mesothelioma Information for patients Introduction This leaflet is for people who have been recommended treatment with

More information

Day Case Unit, Horton General Hospital Information and advice following a surgical procedure under spinal anaesthetic

Day Case Unit, Horton General Hospital Information and advice following a surgical procedure under spinal anaesthetic Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust Day Case Unit, Horton General Hospital Information and advice following a surgical procedure under spinal anaesthetic What is a spinal anaesthetic? Spinal anaesthesia

More information

medicineupdate Tramadol for pain Asking the right questions about new medicines Page Section 1: What tramadol is 1 Section 2: What tramadol is for 1

medicineupdate Tramadol for pain Asking the right questions about new medicines Page Section 1: What tramadol is 1 Section 2: What tramadol is for 1 medicineupdate Asking the right questions about new medicines Tramadol for pain Page Section 1: What tramadol is 1 Section 2: What tramadol is for 1 Section 3: Who can take tramadol 2 Section 4: What does

More information

Ever wish you could... Quit using heroin? Protect yourself from HIV infection? Get healthier?

Ever wish you could... Quit using heroin? Protect yourself from HIV infection? Get healthier? Ever wish you could... Quit using heroin? Protect yourself from HIV infection? Get healthier? Good News: Medical treatments called opioid (oh-pee-oyd) maintenance can help you! Injecting heroin puts you

More information

GUIDELINES ON THE MANAGEMENT OF PAIN DUE TO CANCER IN ADULTS

GUIDELINES ON THE MANAGEMENT OF PAIN DUE TO CANCER IN ADULTS GUIDELINES ON THE MANAGEMENT OF PAIN DUE TO CANCER IN ADULTS Bristol Palliative Care Collaborative Contact Numbers: Hospital Specialist Palliative Care Teams: Frenchay 0117 340 6692 Southmead 0117 323

More information

Methadone treatment Information for service users Page

Methadone treatment Information for service users Page South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust Methadone treatment Information for service users Page What can happen if I stop using heroin? If you are addicted to or dependent on heroin, you develop

More information

Palliative Care The Relief You Need When You re Experiencing the Symptoms of Serious Illness

Palliative Care The Relief You Need When You re Experiencing the Symptoms of Serious Illness Palliative Care The Relief You Need When You re Experiencing the Symptoms of Serious Illness Dealing with the symptoms of any painful or serious illness is difficult. However, special care is available

More information

Pain Handbook for Cancer Patients. A Guide for Management of Pain and Side Effects

Pain Handbook for Cancer Patients. A Guide for Management of Pain and Side Effects Pain Handbook for Cancer Patients A Guide for Management of Pain and Side Effects Relief of Pain Is Important There is no benefit from suffering with pain. Pain can actually be harmful to you. It can:

More information

Headache after an epidural or spinal injection What you need to know. Patient information Leaflet

Headache after an epidural or spinal injection What you need to know. Patient information Leaflet Headache after an epidural or spinal injection What you need to know Patient information Leaflet April 2015 We have produced this leaflet to give you general information about the headache that may develop

More information

ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS RIVAROXABAN (XARELTO) FOR PULMONARY EMBOLISM (PE)

ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS RIVAROXABAN (XARELTO) FOR PULMONARY EMBOLISM (PE) ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS RIVAROXABAN (XARELTO) FOR PULMONARY EMBOLISM (PE) Information Leaflet Your Health. Our Priority. Page 2 of 6 What Are Anticoagulants And What Do They Do? This information leaflet has

More information

Chemotherapy for lung cancer

Chemotherapy for lung cancer This information is an extract from the booklet Understanding lung cancer. You may find the full booklet helpful. We can send you a free copy see page 8. Contents Chemoradiation Small cell lung cancer

More information

Pain Medication What you need to know about opioid analgesics

Pain Medication What you need to know about opioid analgesics Pain Medication What you need to know about opioid analgesics Pain Medication What you need to know about opioid analgesics Developed for the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) by the Task Force for

More information

Buprenorphine/Naloxone Maintenance Treatment for Opioid Dependence

Buprenorphine/Naloxone Maintenance Treatment for Opioid Dependence Buprenorphine/Naloxone Maintenance Treatment for Opioid Dependence Information for Family Members Family members of patients who have been prescribed buprenorphine/naloxone for treatment of opioid addiction

More information

Helping you to make a speedy recovery after a thyroidectomy

Helping you to make a speedy recovery after a thyroidectomy Helping you to make a speedy recovery after a thyroidectomy Thyroidectomy Contents Who this leaflet is for 2 What to expect after the operation 3 Things that will help you recover more quickly 4 Returning

More information

Cambridgeshire Community Services NHS Trust: delivering excellence in drug services across Luton as part of the ResoLUTiONs Pathway

Cambridgeshire Community Services NHS Trust: delivering excellence in drug services across Luton as part of the ResoLUTiONs Pathway Respite House Alcohol Detox Client Information Sheet Cambridgeshire Community Services NHS Trust: delivering excellence in drug services across Luton as part of the ResoLUTiONs Pathway Respite House client

More information

Stapedectomy / Stapedotomy / Surgery for Otosclerosis

Stapedectomy / Stapedotomy / Surgery for Otosclerosis Patient information Stapedectomy / Stapedotomy / Surgery for Otosclerosis Ear, Nose and Throat Directorate PIF 230 V6 Your Consultant / Doctor has advised you to have a Stapedectomy / Stapedotomy / Surgery

More information

Palliative Medicine, Pain Management, and Hospice. Devon Neale, MD Assistant Professor Dept of Internal Medicine UNM School of Medicine

Palliative Medicine, Pain Management, and Hospice. Devon Neale, MD Assistant Professor Dept of Internal Medicine UNM School of Medicine Palliative Medicine, Pain Management, and Hospice Devon Neale, MD Assistant Professor Dept of Internal Medicine UNM School of Medicine Pall-i- What??? Objectives: Provide information about Palliative Medicine

More information

Lithium Therapy. Important information for patients COLLEGE CENTRE FOR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

Lithium Therapy. Important information for patients COLLEGE CENTRE FOR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT Lithium Therapy Important information for patients COLLEGE CENTRE FOR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT National Patient Safety Agency National Patient Safety Agency Your information Your name: Address: Postcode: Home

More information

Basic End of Life Drugs for Qualified Nurses

Basic End of Life Drugs for Qualified Nurses Basic End of Life Drugs for Qualified Nurses (Please note that this booklet is intended as a training resource and therefore the information contained within it should not replace the medical advice of

More information

Patient Information Leaflet

Patient Information Leaflet Patient Information Leaflet METHOTREXATE We hope this fact sheet will provide you with some information about Methotrexate and answer some of the questions you may have. Methotrexate is available in tablet

More information

Life after treatment for Lung Cancer

Life after treatment for Lung Cancer Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust Life after treatment for Lung Cancer A guide for patients and their carers Introduction Treatment for Lung Cancer can be very varied depending on the stage and type

More information

Common medicines given to neurosurgery patients on discharge from hospital

Common medicines given to neurosurgery patients on discharge from hospital Common medicines given to neurosurgery patients on discharge from hospital This leaflet contains brief information about some of the medicines we commonly supply on discharge to patients who have been

More information

What you need for Your to know Safety about longterm. opioid pain care. What you need to know about long-term opioid

What you need for Your to know Safety about longterm. opioid pain care. What you need to know about long-term opioid What you need to know about longterm opioid pain care. What you need to know about long-term opioid and the Safety of Others pain care. TAKING What you OPIOIDS need to know about long-term RESPONSIBLY

More information

Breast Cancer Surgery and Pain

Breast Cancer Surgery and Pain Breast Cancer Surgery and Pain Princess Margaret Information for women who have had breast surgery Read this pamphlet to learn about: Pain after surgery What you need to know about pain What you need to

More information

ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS - RIVAROXABAN (XARELTO) FOR DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS (DVT)

ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS - RIVAROXABAN (XARELTO) FOR DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS (DVT) ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS - RIVAROXABAN (XARELTO) FOR DEEP VEIN THROMBOSIS (DVT) Information Leaflet Your Health. Our Priority. Page 2 of 6 What Are Anticoagulants And What Do They Do? This information leaflet

More information

It can be devastating to be diagnosed with a cancer like multiple myeloma. But there are treatments that can help you live longer and feel better.

It can be devastating to be diagnosed with a cancer like multiple myeloma. But there are treatments that can help you live longer and feel better. Patient information from the BMJ Group It can be devastating to be diagnosed with a cancer like multiple myeloma. But there are treatments that can help you live longer and feel better. What is multiple

More information

Studies tell us the pain will be gone or improved significantly in ¾ of patients in 4 weeks and 9/10ths of patients in 6 weeks.

Studies tell us the pain will be gone or improved significantly in ¾ of patients in 4 weeks and 9/10ths of patients in 6 weeks. Back pain is common and ranges from mild to severe pain. Most episodes soon ease within 4 weeks and are not due to serious illness. Keeping active is the most important message along with painkillers if

More information

Your admission for day surgery

Your admission for day surgery Royal Berkshire NHS Foundation Trust London Road Reading Berkshire RG1 5AN 0118 322 5111 (switchboard) West Berkshire Community Hospital London Road, Benham Hill Thatcham Berkshire RG18 3AS 01635 273300

More information

Donepezil hydrochloride (Aricept) Drug treatment for Alzheimer s disease

Donepezil hydrochloride (Aricept) Drug treatment for Alzheimer s disease IS 11 October 2011 Information sheet Donepezil hydrochloride (Aricept) Drug treatment for Alzheimer s disease Introduction... 1 How does Aricept work?... 1 Who might benefit from Aricept?... 2 What effect

More information

Medically assisted withdrawal from alcohol at home: A guide for you and your carer. Patient information leaflet

Medically assisted withdrawal from alcohol at home: A guide for you and your carer. Patient information leaflet Medically assisted withdrawal from alcohol at home: A guide for you and your carer Patient information leaflet What is medically assisted withdrawal from alcohol, and what is involved? For some people

More information

Your A-Z of coping with nausea and vomiting A guide for patients and their carers. We care, we discover, we teach

Your A-Z of coping with nausea and vomiting A guide for patients and their carers. We care, we discover, we teach Your A-Z of coping with nausea and vomiting A guide for patients and their carers We care, we discover, we teach Contents What is this guide about?.... 1 What causes nausea and vomiting?... 1 Some common

More information

Depression in children and adolescents

Depression in children and adolescents Patient information from the BMJ Group Depression in children and adolescents Depression is an illness that affects people of all ages, including children and teenagers. It can stop a child or teenager

More information

Recovery plan: radical cystectomy Information for patients

Recovery plan: radical cystectomy Information for patients Recovery plan: radical cystectomy Information for patients Help for you following a bereavement 5 This leaflet will help you know what to expect during your time with us. Please take some time to read

More information

Pain Management after Surgery Patient Information Booklet

Pain Management after Surgery Patient Information Booklet Pain Management after Surgery Patient Information Booklet PATS 509-15-05 Your Health Care Be Involved Be involved in your healthcare. Speak up if you have questions or concerns about your care. Tell a

More information

Sofosbuvir, Pegylated Interferon and Ribavirin for the Treatment of Hepatitis C

Sofosbuvir, Pegylated Interferon and Ribavirin for the Treatment of Hepatitis C Sofosbuvir, Pegylated Interferon and Ribavirin for the Treatment of Hepatitis C Department of Hepatology Digestive Diseases Centre Patient Information This leaflet is designed to give you important information

More information

Children s Cancer Pain Can Be Relieved A Guide for Parents and Families

Children s Cancer Pain Can Be Relieved A Guide for Parents and Families Children s Cancer Pain Can Be Relieved A Guide for Parents and Families This booklet is dedicated to Shaney Banks and all other children with cancer. Wisconsin Cancer Pain Initiative 1989 This booklet

More information

Temozolomide (oral) with concurrent radiotherapy to the brain

Temozolomide (oral) with concurrent radiotherapy to the brain Temozolomide (oral) with concurrent radiotherapy to the brain Temozolomide (oral) with concurrent radiotherapy to the brain This leaflet is offered as a guide to you and your family. You will find it useful

More information

Undergoing an Oesophageal Endoscopic Resection (ER)

Undergoing an Oesophageal Endoscopic Resection (ER) Contact Information If you have an enquiry about your appointment time/date please contact the Booking Office on 0300 422 6350. For medication enquiries please call 0300 422 8232, this is an answer machine

More information

Abstral Prescriber and Pharmacist Guide

Abstral Prescriber and Pharmacist Guide Abstral Prescriber and Pharmacist Guide fentanyl citrate sublingual tablets Introduction The Abstral Prescriber and Pharmacist Guide is designed to support healthcare professionals in the diagnosis of

More information

Coping With Alcohol Withdrawal

Coping With Alcohol Withdrawal Coping With Alcohol Withdrawal Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust Addictions Services Alcohol withdrawal When a person is dependent on alcohol and suddenly stops drinking there are certain

More information

Records for Keeping Track of Your Care

Records for Keeping Track of Your Care Records for Keeping Track of Your Care A pain diary is an indispensable tool for making sure your pain is being adequately assessed and for helping your medical team optimize your treatment. This article

More information

Elective Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

Elective Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy General Surgery Elective Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy This information aims to explain what will happen before, during and after your surgery to remove your gallbladder. It includes information about the

More information

Alcohol and Dependence

Alcohol and Dependence The facts about... Alcohol and Dependence Five key things you need to know A glass of wine with dinner, a beer after work, a cocktail in the sunshine on holiday. Alcohol makes an appearance in so many

More information

Epidural Continuous Infusion. Patient information Leaflet

Epidural Continuous Infusion. Patient information Leaflet Epidural Continuous Infusion Patient information Leaflet April 2015 Introduction You may already know that epidural s are often used to treat pain during childbirth. This same technique can also used as

More information

Alcohol. Problems with drinking alcohol

Alcohol. Problems with drinking alcohol Alcohol Alcoholism is a word which many people use to mean alcohol dependence (alcohol addiction). Some people are problem drinkers without being dependent on alcohol. If you are alcohol- dependent then

More information

A Patient s Guide to PAIN MANAGEMENT. After Surgery

A Patient s Guide to PAIN MANAGEMENT. After Surgery A Patient s Guide to PAIN MANAGEMENT After Surgery C o m p a s s i o n a n d C o m m i t m e n t A Patient s Guide to Pain Management After Surgery If you re facing an upcoming surgery, it s natural to

More information

Helping you to make a speedy recovery after catarat surgery

Helping you to make a speedy recovery after catarat surgery Helping you to make a speedy recovery after catarat surgery Catarat Surgery Contents Who this leaflet is for 2 What to expect after the operation 3 Things that will help you recover more quickly 4 Returning

More information

ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS - RIVAROXABAN (XARELTO) FOR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS - RIVAROXABAN (XARELTO) FOR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS - RIVAROXABAN (XARELTO) FOR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION Information Leaflet Your Health. Our Priority. Page 2 of 6 What Are Anticoagulants And What Do They Do? This information leaflet has

More information

A patient guide to mild traumatic brain injury

A patient guide to mild traumatic brain injury A patient guide to mild traumatic brain injury Delivering the best in care UHB is a no smoking Trust To see all of our current patient information leaflets please visit www.uhb.nhs.uk/patient-information-leaflets.htm

More information

Secondary Liver Cancer Information for patients with bowel cancer which has spread to the liver

Secondary Liver Cancer Information for patients with bowel cancer which has spread to the liver Secondary Liver Cancer Information for patients with bowel cancer which has spread to the liver Patient Information Introduction This booklet contains information about secondary liver cancer. It is written

More information

Drug treatments for neuropathic pain

Drug treatments for neuropathic pain Understanding NICE guidance Information for people who use NHS services Drug treatments for neuropathic pain NICE clinical guidelines advise the NHS on caring for people with specific conditions or diseases

More information

University College Hospital. Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer. Radiotherapy Department Patient information series

University College Hospital. Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer. Radiotherapy Department Patient information series University College Hospital Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer Radiotherapy Department Patient information series 39 2 If you need a large print, audio or translated copy of

More information

Amitriptyline. Drug information Amitriptyline

Amitriptyline. Drug information Amitriptyline Drug information Amitriptyline Amitriptyline This leaflet provides information on amitriptyline and will answer any questions you have about the treatment. Arthritis Research UK produce and print our booklets

More information

Medication for Overactive Bladder

Medication for Overactive Bladder Saint Mary s Hospital Gynaecology Service Warrell Unit Medication for Overactive Bladder Information for Patients What medication is available for overactive bladder? There are two types of medication

More information

Sick Day Management of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes. CONSUMER RESOURCE December 2014

Sick Day Management of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes. CONSUMER RESOURCE December 2014 Sick Day Management of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes CONSUMER RESOURCE December 2014 Acknowledgement The 2014 Sick Day Management of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Consumer resource is develop based on the

More information

Opioid toxicity and alternative opioids. Palliative care fixed resource session

Opioid toxicity and alternative opioids. Palliative care fixed resource session Opioid toxicity and alternative opioids Palliative care fixed resource session Opioid toxicity and alternative opioids - aims Know the symptoms of opioid toxicity Understand which patients are at higher

More information

Medicines and You: A Guide for Older Adults

Medicines and You: A Guide for Older Adults Medicines and You: A Guide for Older Adults Council on Family Health Provided in cooperation with U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Food and Drug Administration and the Administration on Aging

More information

A Guide to Alcoholism and Problem Drinking

A Guide to Alcoholism and Problem Drinking A Guide to Alcoholism and Problem Drinking Alcoholism is a word which many people use to mean alcohol dependence (alcohol addiction). Some people are problem drinkers without being dependent on alcohol.

More information

Alcoholism and Problem Drinking

Alcoholism and Problem Drinking Page 1 of 5 Alcoholism and Problem Drinking Alcoholism is a word which many people use to mean 'alcohol dependence' (alcohol addiction). Some people are 'problem drinkers' without being dependent on alcohol.

More information

Cholangiocarcinoma (Bile Duct Cancer) Patient Information Booklet

Cholangiocarcinoma (Bile Duct Cancer) Patient Information Booklet Cholangiocarcinoma (Bile Duct Cancer) Patient Information Booklet Delivering the best in care UHB is a no smoking Trust To see all of our current patient information leaflets please visit www.uhb.nhs.uk/patient-information-leaflets.htm

More information

Elective Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

Elective Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy General Surgery Elective Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy This information aims to explain what will happen before, during and after your surgery to remove your gallbladder. It includes information about the

More information

What is hospice care? Answering questions about hospice care

What is hospice care? Answering questions about hospice care What is hospice care? Answering questions about hospice care Introduction If you, or someone close to you, have a life-limiting or terminal illness, you may have questions about the care you can get and

More information

Guide for patients. Medication. in connection with surgery

Guide for patients. Medication. in connection with surgery Guide for patients uk Medication in connection with surgery This folder describes the drugs most frequently prescribed in connection with surgery at Aleris-Hamlet Hospitals. The nursing staff will advise

More information

Chemotherapy Side Effects Worksheet

Chemotherapy Side Effects Worksheet Page 1 of 6 Chemotherapy Side Effects Worksheet Medicines or drugs that destroy cancer cells are called cancer chemotherapy. It is sometimes the first choice for treating many cancers. Chemotherapy differs

More information

Alcohol detoxification

Alcohol detoxification Alcohol detoxification A guide to alcohol detoxification for service users and families. Stockton Treatment Alcohol and Recovery Service Alcohol dependence If you are dependent on alcohol then you will

More information

Rivaroxaban for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE)

Rivaroxaban for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) Rivaroxaban for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) This leaflet aims to answer your questions about rivaroxaban that may be prescribed for you when you are diagnosed

More information

Controlling symptoms of mesothelioma

Controlling symptoms of mesothelioma Controlling symptoms of mesothelioma This information is an extract from the booklet Understanding mesothelioma. You may find the full booklet helpful. We can send you a free copy see page 9. Contents

More information

Insulin Dependent Diabetes Trust

Insulin Dependent Diabetes Trust Insulin Dependent Diabetes Trust Type 2 and You Issue 4 - July 2010 Registered Company Number 3148360 Registered Charity No 1058284 Welcome to the fourth issue of Type 2 and You. In this issue we look

More information

Postnatal depression is an illness. It is not a sign that you don't love your baby or can't look after your baby properly.

Postnatal depression is an illness. It is not a sign that you don't love your baby or can't look after your baby properly. Patient information from the BMJ Group Postnatal depression Postnatal depression is an illness that women can get after having a baby. If you have it, you may feel sad and anxious, and find it hard to

More information

Withdrawal Symptoms: How Long Do They Last?

Withdrawal Symptoms: How Long Do They Last? Withdrawal Symptoms: How Long Do They Last? Posted by First Step Medical Detox on November 24, 2015 When considering stopping drugs or alcohol, many addicts and alcoholics are concerned about the withdrawal

More information