The 3.8% Surtax on Investment Income - Individuals

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "The 3.8% Surtax on Investment Income - Individuals"

Transcription

1 WEALTH STRATEGY REPORT The 3.8% Surtax on Investment Income - Individuals OVERVIEW Beginning in 2013, certain investment income will be subject to an additional 3.8% surtax (the surtax). This surtax is in addition to the regular income tax, and it is in addition to the alternative minimum tax. It will also have to be taken into account for estimated tax purposes. This is sometimes referred to as the Medicare surtax because the legislation enacting this tax created a new chapter of the tax code entitled: Chapter 2A Unearned Income Medicare Contribution. However, this was simply a revenue-raiser enacted to offset the cost of health care legislation; there is no requirement that this surtax be used for Medicare. This surtax was enacted as part of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, but its effective date was delayed until So, the statute has been around for almost three years, allowing for much analysis even before it becomes effective. Furthermore, on November 30, 2012 the IRS issued proposed regulations (the Regulations ) that offer additional guidance. (We have a separate Tax Alert : New Regulations for 3.8% Medicare Surtax Answer Several Questions, Leave Others Unanswered.) Although the regulations are proposed and final regulations are planned to be issued later in 2013, the IRS has made it clear that taxpayers can rely on the proposed regulations in the meantime. This summary describes this 3.8% surtax, how it is calculated, and some planning issues and opportunities for individuals. We have a separate Wealth Strategy Report addressing how the surtax applies to trusts. INTRODUCTION The surtax applies to individuals, trusts and estates. For an individual 1, the surtax is imposed on the lesser of: (i) net investment income (NII), or (ii) the excess of modified adjusted gross income 2 (MAGI) over a certain threshold amount. WHAT IS NET INVESTMENT INCOME? NII is defined to consist of three categories of income. These are then reduced by the deductions... properly allocable to such gross income or net gain, which are discussed below. Category #1: Gross income from interest, dividends, annuities, royalties and rents (other than such income which is derived in the ordinary course of an active trade or business). This would not include tax-exempt municipal bond interest. 1 This tax does not apply to nonresident aliens. 2 Modified adjusted gross income is adjusted gross income increased by the net amount of foreign-sourced income that was exempt for regular tax purposes under Section 911(a)(1).

2 It would not matter that these types of income are from your investment in a partnership or S corporation. For purposes of this surtax, interest, dividends, etc., of a partnership or S corporation flow through and constitute NII to the partner/shareholder. If these types of income are generated in the ordinary course of an active trade or business, then that would not constitute NII. However, if these types of income are generated by an active business s investment of working capital, that would be NII. Rental income. Although rent is generally considered passive income, which is Category #2 income discussed below, the surtax statute includes in Category #1 rents other than rents derived in the ordinary course of an active trade or business. As a result, rental income from a passive activity would be included in your NII under Category #1. Distributions From Trusts. Distributions from a trust can also result in the beneficiary/recipient receiving NII. One example would be a distribution from a charitable remainder trust. Another example would be a distribution from one of the many kinds of irrevocable trusts commonly used as part of estate planning. The treatment of trusts is discussed in a separate Wealth Strategy Report: The 3.8% Medicare Surtax on Investment Income -- Trusts. Additional items of Category #1 Income. There are several types of investment income that are not clearly included in the terms interest, dividends, annuities, royalties and rents. The Regulations add the following to Category #1 income. Investment income earned through foreign corporations. In the case of an investment in a controlled foreign corporation (CFC) or a passive foreign investment company (PFIC), investment income that is deemed income for regular tax purposes is not considered NII at that time 3. Rather, when those amounts are later distributed, they will (i) not be subject to regular income tax (having already been taxed), but (ii) will constitute NII to the extent such amounts are distributions of earnings and profits that were previously subject to regular income tax after This means the income from a CFC or PFIC might be taxed in one year for regular income tax purposes but in a later year (when distributed) for purposes of the 3.8% surtax. This will generate complicated accounting. To ease this, an election is allowed to treat this income as NII in the same year it is reported as income for regular income tax purposes. Substitute payments. A substitute interest payment or a substitute dividend payment made to the transferor of a security in a securities lending transaction or a sale-repurchase transaction is treated as interest or dividends for purposes of the surtax. Notional principal contracts. Payments under notional principal contracts, such as interest rate swaps and equity swaps, are deemed not to be NII (unless it is income from a passive activity). 4 Category #2: Gross income from (1) a passive activity, or (2) a trade or business of trading in financial instruments or commodities. A passive activity is defined to be a trade or business in which you do not materially participate. 3 Amounts that are included in income and that are derived from a trade or business of a CFC or PFIC would constitute passive income and would be included in NII at the same time as for regular income tax purposes, as Category #2 income. 4 However, gain on the disposition of a notional principal contract is NII, being Category #3 gain. 2

3 This category would include income from master limited partnerships (MLPs) that operate as limited liability companies (LLCs) or partnerships and are taxed as partnerships. The income of such MLPs is business income, and because of the LLC or partnership structure, that income flows through to passive investors as passive income. Often, however, MLPs have deductions that offset much of the business income. This category would also include business income from closely-held family businesses operating in LLC, partnership or S corporation form, where some family members own units/shares but are not actively involved in the business (i.e., they are passive under the tax rules). The business income that flows through to the noninvolved family members would be passive income and therefore would be NII. Passive loss carryovers. To the extent you have a passive activity loss that cannot be used currently because of the passive loss rules, that loss carries forward for regular income tax purposes and is considered a passive activity loss in future years. The Regulations state that passive activity losses also carry forward for purposes of calculating NII (including losses incurred prior to 2013). One-time opportunity to re-group passive activities. When determining whether you are engaged in a passive activity for regular income tax purposes, how you define activity is very important. For example, it is possible that you participate in two separate businesses but in neither one does your participation rise to the level of material participation. However, if you were to consider both businesses together to be one activity, then your level of involvement might indeed be material. For regular tax purposes, there are regulations governing the extent to which you can group activities. Generally, once you have grouped activities, you cannot change those groupings. The 3.8% surtax raises a new consequence for being engaged in a passive activity. Because of that, the Regulations allow you to elect to re-group passive activities, once. Such a re-grouping would apply both for regular tax purposes and surtax purposes. You would have to make this election to re-group on the tax return for the first year you would be subject to the surtax. The Regulations are proposed, and the goal is to have final regulations later in The election just described, for re-grouping passive activities, is required to be made for the first year you are subject to the surtax, starting in However, the Regulations also state that you can make such an election for 2013, if you want. It would seem you could also (i) not make the election for 2013, even if you are subject to the surtax, but (ii) make the election for Category #3: Net gain to the extent taken into account in computing taxable income. This would include capital gain. The Regulations state that capital losses can be carried forward for purposes of calculating NII (including losses incurred prior to 2013). Gain excluded from income for regular tax purposes is not subject to the 3.8% surtax. This would exclude gains such as the following, all of which are excluded from taxable income for regular tax purposes: gain on the sale of a principal residence that is excluded from income under Section 121 (up to $250,000; $500,000 for a married couple); gain on the sale of Qualified Small Business Stock that is excluded from income, either pursuant to the exclusion rule or the rollover rule applicable to such stock; gain on tax-free like-kind exchanges; 3

4 gain on the sale of stock to an ESOP that is excluded from income due to the purchase of qualified replacement property ; gain on the tax-free exchange of insurance policies; the internal build up of value inside a life insurance policy. Exception for business gain. Net gain is defined to be net gain attributable to the disposition of property other than property held in [an active] trade or business. In other words, gain on the sale of business assets used in an active business would not be subject to the surtax. The Regulations clarify that goodwill is indeed a business asset. Therefore, if an active trade or business is sold and goodwill is included in the sales price, that gain will not be NII. The term net gain also includes recapture income that is often recognized on the sale of investment real estate. Mark-to-market income and gains. For Category #1 income, there were certain types of investment income not within the literal terms of the statute, and the Regulations addressed that by including several types of investment income within Category #1. Similarly, the Regulations expand on what is included in Category #3 gain. Under certain statutory or regulatory provisions, a non-trader may be required to mark assets to market, being taxed as if the assets had been sold. Such gains are deemed to be NII. THE DEDUCTIONS PROPERLY ALLOCABLE TO SUCH GROSS INCOME OR NET GAIN NII is defined to consist of the three categories of income described above, reduced by the deductions... properly allocable to such gross income or net gain. The Regulations have clarified the deductions available when calculating NII, following closely the rules governing deductions for regular income tax purposes. For Category #1 income included in NII (gross income from interest, dividends, annuities, royalties and rents), allowable deductions include (i) deductions allowed for regular income tax purposes for rent and royalty income; (ii) investment expenses deductible for regular income tax purposes; and (iii) investment interest deductible for regular income tax purposes. (Investment interest that is carried forward for regular income tax purposes will also be carried forward for purposes of the surtax, even if incurred prior to 2013.) If any of these expenses are limited for regular income tax purposes by (i) the 2% floor for miscellaneous itemized deductions, or (ii) the so-called Pease limitations for certain itemized deductions, those same limitations will apply for purposes of the 3.8% surtax. (If both limitations apply, the former is applied first, then the latter.) For Category #2 income included in NII (gross income from a passive activity, which is a trade or business in which you do not materially participate5), the business deductions allowed for regular income tax purposes are also deductible for purposes of calculating the surtax (unless already deducted for self-employment tax). For Category #3 income included in NII, net gain, capital losses can be carried forward for purposes of calculating NII, including losses incurred prior to In somewhat of a surprising result, state and local income taxes are also allowed as a deduction when calculating NII, but only to the extent allocable to NII. For example, state and local income taxes allocable to salary would 5 Category #2 income also includes gross income from a trade or business of trading in financial instruments or commodities. 4

5 not be deductible when calculating the surtax because salary is not NII. The Regulations state that this allocation of state and local income taxes between NII and non-nii can be determined by taxpayers using any reasonable method. The Regulations provide an effective safe harbor by stating that allocating state and local income tax based on the ratio of (NII)/(Gross Income) is an example of a reasonable method. SPECIAL RULES FOR SALE OF S CORP STOCK OR PARTNERSHIP INTERESTS In the case of gain on the sale of stock in an S corporation or an interest in a partnership (or an interest in an LLC treated for tax purposes as a partnership), the seller can exclude from NII the amount of gain that would have been excluded from NII if the entity (the S corporation or partnership/llc) had sold all of its property for fair market value immediately before the stock or interest was sold. This is intended to be a pro-taxpayer provision, shielding from the 3.8% surtax net gain attributable to an active trade or business. The Regulations set out a rather complicated 4-step process that one must go through in order to get the benefit of this rule. These steps are: (1) pretend there is a cash sale by the entity of all properties; (2) determine the pretend gain/loss for each property; (3) determine how much gain/loss would be allocated to the selling partner/shareholder for regular income tax purposes; (4) determine how much of that gain/loss is attributable to property held in an active trade or business. After these 4 steps, if there is gain attributable to property held in an active trade or business, that amount of gain is subtracted from that gain on the sale of the interest in the S corporation, partnership/llc when calculating NII. If there is loss attributable to property held in an active trade or business, that is ignored (i.e., all the gain on the sale of the interest constitutes NII). Note that this approach is not based on percentages. That is, if 40% of such a pretend asset sale would be business gain, it is not necessarily the case that 40% of the gain from a stock sale (or partnership/llc unit sale) is also business gain. Rather, you start by assuming that all of the gain on a stock sale (or partnership/llc unit sale) is NII. Then you subtract, on a dollar-for-dollar basis, the amount that would have been business gain if there had been an asset sale. GAIN ON THE SALE OF A BUSINESS - SUMMARY CHART Three rules have been discussed that apply to owners of S corporation stock or partnership/llc units: 1. For purposes of the 3.8% surtax, as for regular tax purposes, the entity s NII flows through to the owners; 2. Gain from the sale of assets used in an active trade or business are not included in NII; 3. In the case of gain on the sale of stock in an S corporation or an interest in a partnership/llc, the seller can exclude from NII the amount of gain that would have been excluded from NII if the entity had sold all of its property for fair market value immediately before the stock or partnership/llc interest was sold. The result is yet another factor when considering the sale of a business, the consequences of which can depend on (i) the form of the business (S corp., LLC, C corp., etc.) and (ii) whether it is an asset sale or a stock sale. The following chart offers a summary of how the 3.8% surtax might now be a new consideration. 5

6 Is gain on the sale of a business Net Investment Income? (Assume this is an active business owner and all assets are used in the business) Business in S corp. form Business in Partnership form or LLC taxed as a Partnership Asset Sale No. The surtax N/A to gain from sale of an asset used in an active trade or business No. Same as above. Sale of Stock/Units No. Special rules allows the business aspect to flow through, making it gain on the sale of business assets No. Same as above. Business in C corp. form No. The surtax applies only to individuals, trusts and estates; it does not apply to C corps. Yes, this would be net gain includible in NII, unless the gain is not recognized for regular tax purposes (e.g., QSB stock exclusion/rollover, ESOP rollover, etc.) WHAT IS NOT INCLUDED IN NII Exception for retirement plan distributions. The statute expressly states that distributions from the following retirement plans are not NII: qualified pension, profit-sharing, and stock bonus plans; qualified annuity plans; annuities for employees of tax-exempt organizations or public schools; IRAs; Roth IRAs; deferred compensation plans of state and local governments and tax-exempt organizations. The Regulations introductory text indicates that nonqualified deferred compensation is also not NII. Incentive Stock Options (ISOs). Generally, the exercise of an ISO is not subject to regular income taxation, though it is taxed as compensation for purposes of the alternative minimum tax. Because this income is not subject to regular income tax, it is not NII. Note, however, that if the stock is later sold, it would generate capital gain at that time, and that gain will be NII. Other income. Any income not within the definition of NII would not be subject to this tax. This would include the following: wages, salary and other compensation income; income on the exercise of compensatory options; income on the vesting of restricted stock; All of these, however, would still be included in modified adjusted gross income (MAGI). That is also an important element of the surtax and is discussed below. 6

7 THE THRESHOLDS The threshold amount ( Threshold ) for a tax year depends on your filing status, as set forth in the chart below. Filing Status Married filing jointly, or Qualifying Widow[er] Threshold $250,000 Single, Head of Household $200,000 Married filing separately $125,000 These Thresholds are not indexed for inflation. As a result, each year more taxpayers will become exposed to the surtax because other items that enter into the calculation will inflate, but these Thresholds will not. UNDERSTANDING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN NII, MAGI AND THE THRESHOLD The surtax is imposed on the lesser of: (i) NII and (ii) the excess of MAGI over the Threshold. These three numbers, NII, MAGI, and the Threshold, are inter-related, as illustrated in the chart below. This chart contains eight examples/columns. In each case there is $100,000 of NII represented by the white rectangle. All other income that is not NII but goes into MAGI (e.g., salary) is represented by the shaded rectangle ( Other Income ), which increases from column 1 to column 8. The horizontal line at $250,000 represents the Threshold applicable to taxpayers filing jointly. Columns 1-4: Even though NII is $100,000, until the combined Other Income and NII (which together are MAGI) reaches the Threshold, the surtax is not triggered. Columns 5-7: Once you have sufficient Other Income, you will begin incurring the surtax because the Other Income will push the NII above the Threshold. When that happens, only the NII over the Threshold is subject to the surtax. Columns 5 through 7 also illustrate a useful warning, illustrated as follows. Consider the following question: Is my taxable Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) from a traditional IRA going to be subject to the 3.8% surtax? One answer would be that no, it is not included in NII, which is true. However, that overlooks the relationship between NII and Other Income such as the RMD. If your surtax situation before the RMD is described by Column 4 but after the RMD is described by Column 7, the RMD will cause more of your NII to be pushed over the Threshold, triggering the surtax. Column 8: After a certain amount of Other Income, your NII might be fully exposed to the surtax. For example, assume a Husband and Wife have a fixed amount of NII, $100,000. Both work and their combined salaries are $275,000, represented by the shaded rectangle in Column 8. That level of salary will push their NII fully above 7

8 the Threshold, meaning they have exposed 100% of their NII to the surtax. In that case, it is useful to know that exposure to the surtax has maxed out and additional Other Income will not generate additional exposure. The chart above assumes that NII was fixed at $100,000 and Other Income varies. Now assume the reverse: Other Income is fixed at $100,000 and NII varies. PLANNING: OVERVIEW Columns 1-4: Until the combined Other Income and NII (which together are MAGI) reach the Threshold, the surtax is not triggered. This is the same dynamic as in the previous chart. Columns 5-11: Once the surtax applies (when enough NII has been recognized to cause MAGI to exceed the Threshold), the dynamics here are very different than in the prior example. Here, the amount of NII exposed to the surtax does not hit a maximum. Rather, as NII increases, the amount of income exposed to the surtax increases, without a limit. In this case, the straightforward planning would be to reduce your NII so that MAGI does not exceed the Threshold. The two preceding charts illustrate the important relationship between NII and Other Income (which together comprise MAGI). These two categories also suggest how to approach planning: you can minimize NII and/or you can minimize Other Income. When planning to minimize the 3.8% surtax, it is important to keep in mind that there are two other similar taxes. You don t want to avoid this 3.8% surtax only to trigger a different 3.8% tax, for no net benefit. 3.8% tax on wages. Wages are subject to payroll taxes that consist of two parts: 6.2% for Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance, and 1.45% for Hospital Insurance. The $113,700 wage base limit (for 2013) only applies to the first component; there is no cap for the 1.45%. Employers also pay these taxes, so the Hospital Insurance tax totals 2.9%. Beginning in 2013, the employee s portion of the Hospital Insurance tax increases by 9/10ths of a percentage point to 2.35% for wages in excess of $250,000 (married filing jointly); $200,000 (single); or $125,000 (married filing separate). Thus, the total combined Hospital Insurance tax imposed on wages is 1.45% % + 0.9% = 3.8%. 3.8% tax on self-employment income. A self-employed individual pays both the employer and employee components of these payroll taxes. As a result, beginning in 2013 self-employment income will also be subject to a 3.8% Hospital Insurance tax. 8

9 PLANNING: MINIMIZING NII The first step should be to confirm whether there is any benefit to minimizing NII. As shown in the charts above, it could be the case that recognizing additional NII would not expose you to the surtax; it might not be an issue. If it is, here are some planning considerations. Tax-exempt bonds. Investing in tax-exempt bonds might result is less exposure to the surtax than investing in taxable bonds. That will depend on a comparison of the after-tax yields of both. The after-tax yields of taxable bonds will now be affected by this surtax. If the after-tax yield of a tax-exempt municipal bond and the after-tax yield of a taxable bond are the same after factoring in the 3.8% surtax, then you would be indifferent for tax purposes as to which type of bond you owned (absent other differences). Minimize dividends. Dividend-paying stocks may now be taxed more heavily. This could encourage a preference for investments that pay little/no dividends and instead generate capital appreciation. This could include non-dividend or low-dividend stocks and, in general, non-principal protected structured notes. While the resulting capital gain from these investments would also be included in NII, there would be two differences: (i) the capital gain would be exposed to the surtax only when the stock is sold; and (ii) capital gains can be offset by capital losses whereas dividends cannot. 6 Increase participation to make passive income non-passive. Income from a passive activity may be subject to the 3.8% surtax. If your level of activity could be increased so that the business income becomes non-passive, that could avoid the surtax. However, keep in mind that depending on the form in which the business is operated (i.e., S corp., LLC, etc.), you might be recharacterizing the income to be self-employment income, which might simply be triggering a different 3.8% tax, discussed above. Review how your passive activities are grouped. In determining whether you are active or passive in an activity, there are rules governing what constitutes an activity and how different activities might be grouped and considered one single activity. The Regulations allow you a one-time opportunity to re-group your activities. This was discussed above at page 3. Convert passive income to salary. Income from a trade or business that is a passive activity will taxed as ordinary income and may also be subject to the 3.8% surtax. If some of that income could instead be paid as compensation, that would also be taxed as ordinary income but would avoid the 3.8% surtax. However, it would also expose that income to payroll taxes discussed above, which could result in even heavier taxation. Capital loss harvesting. Harvesting capital losses is a common tax planning idea that could now be even more important. Similarly, certain investment programs that emphasize harvesting capital losses on a regular basis throughout the year could now be more appealing. One example of such a program is U.S. Trust s Tax Efficient Structured Equity (TESE) Program. Installment sales. An installment sale is a sale where some of the payments are to be received in a future year. In that case, if certain conditions are met, you can report any resulting capital gain ratably as the payments are received, rather than reporting all of the gain in the year of sale. If the capital gain involved is NII, then 6 After capital losses are used to offset capital gains, another $3,000 of capital losses can be used to offset other income, for regular tax purposes. For purposes of the 3.8% surtax, however, this $3,000 extra does not reduce NII. 9

10 spreading it out over multiple years might cause the 3.8% surtax to be less than if all of the capital gain were included in NII in the year of sale. PLANNING: MINIMIZING OTHER INCOME If you can minimize non-nii income, then that could minimize the excess of MAGI over Threshold, which could minimize the surtax. Again, however, you should confirm whether there is any benefit to such planning. As discussed above, it could be the case that recognizing additional income would not expose you to additional surtax. If it would, here are some planning considerations. Income in AGI. There are several opportunities to reduce AGI (and therefore MAGI), which can be seen by looking at the front page of Form The planning here is not to reduce NII; the income described below is not NII. Rather, it is the second part of the calculation the excess of MAGI over the Threshold that is being planned for here. Also, none of these income-reducing ideas is new. For example, presumably you were motivated to minimize Schedule C income even before enactment of the surtax. Schedule C income sole proprietor. Any expenses that would reduce the net business income on Schedule C will reduce AGI and possibly the amount of income exposed to the surtax. Schedule D - capital gains. Harvesting losses would now save 23.8% (assuming the rate applicable to longterm capital gain is 20% in 2013). Similarly, certain investment programs that emphasize harvesting capital losses on a regular basis throughout the year (such as U.S. Trust s TESE Program) could now be more appealing. IRA distributions. Distributions from an IRA are not NII. However, if an IRA distribution is taxable, that will increase MAGI, which could have the result of exposing NII to the surtax. Therefore, minimizing the income from IRA distributions could minimize the surtax. That could include the following planning considerations: o The charitable IRA rollover provision. This provision allows for distributions directly from your IRA to certain charities. The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 extended this provision for 2012 and We have a separate Wealth Strategy Report: Lifetime Distributions from IRAs to Charities. Using this provision would cause you to have less income in your MAGI, which could decrease your exposure to the surtax. o Roth conversion. 7 If your traditional IRA is converted to a Roth IRA, then future distributions that are qualified distributions would be tax-free and therefore would not increase your MAGI or otherwise affect your exposure to the surtax. This could be another factor in favor of a Roth conversion. Note, however, that a Roth conversion itself would cause you to recognize income, which would increase your AGI, which could affect your exposure to the surtax in the year of conversion. Schedule E income from rental real estate, royalties, partnerships, S corporations, estates, trusts, REMICs, etc. Any expenses that would reduce the net business income on Schedule E will reduce AGI and possibly the amount of income exposed to the surtax. Schedule F farming. Any expenses that would reduce the net business income on Schedule F will reduce AGI and possibly the amount of income exposed to the surtax. 7 We have a separate Wealth Strategy Report on Roth conversions. 10

11 Above the line deductions. The following deductions are allowed before determining AGI and therefore could reduce the income exposed to the surtax: deductible contributions to a Health Savings Account; deductible contributions to self-employed retirement accounts; deductible contributions to a traditional IRA. MAXIMIZING THE THRESHOLD Presumably there is limited opportunity here. Nevertheless there are situations when there is a choice of filing status. In those cases, the filing status chosen would determine the Threshold, which could affect the impact of the surtax. One example could be where a U.S. citizen/resident (subject to the surtax) is married to a nonresident alien (not subject to the surtax). The question is how the various Thresholds would apply. The Regulations provide the following. Default Rule. In the case of a U.S. citizen or resident who is married to a nonresident alien, the spouses will be treated as married filing separately for purposes of the surtax. As a result, the U.S. citizen or resident spouse will be subject to the $125,000 Threshold and must determine his or her own NII and modified adjusted gross income, and the nonresident alien spouse will not be subject to the surtax. Election. Generally, a married couple cannot file a joint return for regular income tax purposes if one spouse is a nonresident alien. However, under Section 6013(g) of the tax code, an election can be made to treat the nonresident alien as a resident for income tax purposes, allowing a joint return to be filed. The Regulations state that a nonresident alien spouse can also now elect to be treated as a resident for purposes of the surtax, which would mean (i) the couple could file jointly and use the $250,000 Threshold, and (ii) the NII and modified adjusted gross income of both spouses would be considered. THE ROLE OF ITEMIZED DEDUCTIONS Itemized deductions are taken into account after the calculation of AGI and so do not affect MAGI. As a result, itemized deductions do not factor into planning for the surtax. For example, charitable contributions are deductible as an itemized deduction for regular tax purposes but will have no effect on the amount of income exposed to the surtax. However, the statute allows for the deductions allowed by this subtitle which are properly allocable to such investment income. Some of these deductions allowed for surtax purposes also happen to be itemized deductions for regular tax purposes. These deductions are discussed at page 4 above. PLANNING FOR THE KIDDIE TAX The so-called kiddie tax was enacted by Congress to prevent parents from transferring income-producing assets to their children in order to shift income from the parents higher tax bracket to the children s lower tax bracket. If certain conditions are met, a part of your child s unearned income will be taxed at your highest marginal tax rate. (We have a separate Wealth Strategy Report: The kiddie tax. ) As part of planning for the kiddie tax, you can elect to include your child s net unearned income on your income tax return as your own income. There are often reasons not to elect to do this; the 3.8% surtax is another reason not to make this election. That is, if you include your child s net unearned income on your income tax return as your own income, it will be surtaxed as your NII. 11

12 If you do not make this election but rather have your child prepare his/her own tax return and report his/her own NII, then although that will not save any income tax (due to the kiddie tax), it will allow the child the calculate his/her own surtax, using his/her own Threshold of $200,000 for a single taxpayer. PLANNING FOR TRUSTS We have a separate Wealth Strategy Report addressing how the 3.8% surtax applies to trusts. CONCLUSION If you have any questions, we invite you to contact your U.S. Trust advisor. National Wealth Planning Strategies Group Any examples are hypothetical and are for illustrative purposes only. Note: This is not a solicitation, or an offer to buy or sell any security or investment product, nor does it consider individual investment objectives or financial situations. Information in this material is not intended to constitute legal, tax or investment advice. You should consult your legal, tax and financial advisors before making any financial decisions. If any information is deemed written advice within the meaning of IRS Regulations, please note the following: IRS Circular 230 Disclosure: Pursuant to IRS Regulations, neither the information, nor any advice contained in this communication (including any attachments) is intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, for the purpose of (i) avoiding tax related penalties or (ii) promoting, marketing or recommending to another party any transaction or matter addressed herein. While the information contained herein is believed to be reliable, we cannot guarantee its accuracy or completeness. U.S. Trust operates through Bank of America, N.A. and other subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation. Bank of America, N.A., Member FDIC Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved. AR9F038C

The 3.8% Medicare Surtax on Investment Income

The 3.8% Medicare Surtax on Investment Income Wealth Strategy Report The 3.8% Medicare Surtax on Investment Income OVERVIEW Beginning in 2013, certain investment income will be subject to an additional 3.8% surtax, enacted as part of the Health Care

More information

PFS Planning Update Planning for the Net Investment Income Tax, also known as the Medicare Contribution Tax

PFS Planning Update Planning for the Net Investment Income Tax, also known as the Medicare Contribution Tax www.pwc.com/us/pfs PFS Planning Update Personal Financial Services Planning for the Net Investment Income Tax, also known as the Medicare Contribution Tax Local disclaimer and copyright statements go here

More information

Medicare taxes for higher-income taxpayers

Medicare taxes for higher-income taxpayers Medicare taxes for higher-income taxpayers Many changes from the 2010 Affordable Care Act are now in effect Begin planning now You ll especially want to discuss these tax provisions with your Financial

More information

ADDITIONAL MEDICARE TAX ON EARNED INCOME

ADDITIONAL MEDICARE TAX ON EARNED INCOME Assisting Family Lawyers With Navigating the 2013 Tax Changes Under the Patient Protection Care Act (PPACA) and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation ACT (HCERA) On June 28, 2012, the United States

More information

1040 Review Guide: MARKETS ADVANCED. Using Your Clients 1040 to Identify Planning Opportunities

1040 Review Guide: MARKETS ADVANCED. Using Your Clients 1040 to Identify Planning Opportunities 1040 Review Guide: Using Your Clients 1040 to Identify Planning Opportunities ADVANCED MARKETS Producers Guide to a 1040 Review At Transamerica, we re committed to providing you and your clients with the

More information

Tax Alpha. Robert S. Keebler, CPA, M.S.T., AEP. Keebler & Associates, LLP 420 South Washington Street Green Bay, WI 54301.

Tax Alpha. Robert S. Keebler, CPA, M.S.T., AEP. Keebler & Associates, LLP 420 South Washington Street Green Bay, WI 54301. Tax Alpha Presented by Robert S. Keebler, CPA, M.S.T., AEP Keebler & Associates, LLP 420 South Washington Street Green Bay, WI 54301 Agenda 1. Five Dimensional Tax System Ordinary Income Rates Capital

More information

2016 Tax Planning & Reference Guide

2016 Tax Planning & Reference Guide 2016 Tax Planning & Reference Guide The 2016 Tax Planning & Reference Guide is designed as a reference and is not intended to function as tax advice. Please consult your professional accounting advisor

More information

2015 Savvy Year-End Tax Planning Thoughts & Ideas

2015 Savvy Year-End Tax Planning Thoughts & Ideas 2015 Savvy Year-End Tax Planning Thoughts & Ideas JONATHAN GASSMAN CFP, CPA/PFS November 11, 2015 2015 Tax Rates Ordinary Income Qualified Dividends & Long-Term Capital Gains 10% 15% 25% 28% 2015 Rates

More information

ACTIONABLE STRATEGIES FOR REDUCING MEDICARE TAXES

ACTIONABLE STRATEGIES FOR REDUCING MEDICARE TAXES ACTIONABLE STRATEGIES FOR REDUCING MEDICARE TAXES Medicare taxes increased in 2013 for high-income earners. Timely action can help reduce the impact of higher taxes. KEY TAKEAWAYS High-income taxpayers

More information

Taxes and Transitions

Taxes and Transitions Taxes and Transitions THE NEW FRONTIER FOR RETIREMENT PLANNING Wealthy individuals have been hit with their first major tax increase in more than 20 years, with tax hikes on ordinary income, dividends

More information

Instructions for Form 8960

Instructions for Form 8960 2014 Instructions for Form 8960 Net Investment Income Tax Individuals, Estates, and Trusts Department of the Treasury Internal Revenue Service Section references are to the Internal Revenue Code unless

More information

PLANNING FOR HIGHER MEDICARE TAXES

PLANNING FOR HIGHER MEDICARE TAXES PLANNING FOR HIGHER MEDICARE TAXES Consider strategies to reposition assets for the higher Medicare tax landscape KEY TAKEAWAYS Starting in 2013, high-income taxpayers face an additional 0.9% Medicare

More information

*Brackets adjusted for inflation in future years. 2015 Long Term Capital Gains & Dividends Taxable income up to $413,200/$457,600 0% - 15%*

*Brackets adjusted for inflation in future years. 2015 Long Term Capital Gains & Dividends Taxable income up to $413,200/$457,600 0% - 15%* Income Tax Planning Overview The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 extended prior law for certain income tax rates; however, it also increased income tax rates on upper income earners. Specifically,

More information

2013 Income Taxes - What s Old is New Again

2013 Income Taxes - What s Old is New Again Tax Alert 2013-02 2013 Income Taxes - What s Old is New Again OVERVIEW Both the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 ( EGTRRA ) and Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of

More information

HEALTH CARE ACT TAX OVERVIEW INDIVIDUALS. Expanded Medicare taxes and other changes make planning critical

HEALTH CARE ACT TAX OVERVIEW INDIVIDUALS. Expanded Medicare taxes and other changes make planning critical HEALTH CARE ACT TAX OVERVIEW INDIVIDUALS Expanded Medicare taxes and other changes make planning critical 1 The agenda The health care act s tax impact on individuals Medicare tax increase on earned income

More information

2013 YEAR-END INDIVIDUAL TAX PLANNING LETTER

2013 YEAR-END INDIVIDUAL TAX PLANNING LETTER Bollenback & Forret, P.A. Michael D. Bollenback, CPA Richard G. Buschart, CPA, ABV, CVA Suzanne E. Patrick, CPA Janet K. Rosenquist, CPA Roderick B. Stuart, CPA J. Patrick Callan, CPA Peter B. Forret,

More information

2014 YEAR-END TAX PLANNING

2014 YEAR-END TAX PLANNING OCTOBER This summary addresses several common year-end federal tax issues for high net-worth individuals, but only at a general level. Your particular situation can only be evaluated by your tax advisor

More information

tax planning strategies

tax planning strategies tax planning strategies In addition to saving income taxes for the current and future years, effective tax planning can reduce eventual estate taxes, maximize the amount of funds you will have available

More information

2013 Year-End Tax Planning Letter

2013 Year-End Tax Planning Letter PLAN AHEAD 2013 Year-End Tax Planning Letter You are receiving this letter because your income tax rates have increased based on 2012 data. Please be sure to talk with your advisor to discuss anticipated

More information

IRS Issues Reliance Proposed Regulations On Some Net Investment Income Tax Issues. Background

IRS Issues Reliance Proposed Regulations On Some Net Investment Income Tax Issues. Background /////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////// Special Report Series on Section 1411

More information

Taxation of Carried Interest: What the Future Holds

Taxation of Carried Interest: What the Future Holds Taxation of Carried Interest: What the Future Holds Recent tax law changes have increased taxes in general on compensation received by managers of hedge funds and private equity funds through the implementation

More information

tax planning strategies

tax planning strategies tax planning strategies In addition to saving income taxes for the current and future years, tax planning can reduce eventual estate taxes, maximize the amount of funds you will have available for retirement,

More information

Wealth Planning Year End Tax Tips. Income Tax Planning

Wealth Planning Year End Tax Tips. Income Tax Planning Wealth Planning Year End Tax Tips The end of every year poses a critical deadline for utilizing certain tax benefits. The following covers various items to address in your annual tax, estate, retirement

More information

NAR Frequently Asked Questions Health Insurance Reform

NAR Frequently Asked Questions Health Insurance Reform NEW MEDICARE TAX ON UNEARNED NET INVESTMENT INCOME Q-1: Who will be subject to the new taxes imposed in the health legislation? A: A new 3.8% tax will apply to the unearned income of High Income taxpayers.

More information

Non-Financial Assets Tax and Other Special Rules

Non-Financial Assets Tax and Other Special Rules Wealth Strategy Report Non-Financial Assets Tax and Other Special Rules OVERVIEW Because unique attributes distinguish them from other asset classes, nonfinancial assets may offer you valuable financial

More information

THE AMERICAN LAW INSTITUTE Continuing Legal Education

THE AMERICAN LAW INSTITUTE Continuing Legal Education 41 THE AMERICAN LAW INSTITUTE Continuing Legal Education American Taxpayer Relief Act: What You Need To Know for Tax Planning and Compliance January 22, 2013 Video Presentation Service Issues Proposed

More information

2014 YEAR-END TAX PLANNING LETTER. Tax Strategies for Individuals

2014 YEAR-END TAX PLANNING LETTER. Tax Strategies for Individuals Dear Clients and Friends, The country s taxpayers are facing more uncertainty than usual as they approach the 2014 tax season. They may feel trapped in limbo while Congress is preoccupied with the November

More information

2014 tax planning tables

2014 tax planning tables 2014 tax planning tables 2014 important deadlines Last day to January 15 Pay fourth-quarter 2013 federal individual estimated income tax January 27 Buy in to close a short-against-the-box position (regular-way

More information

2015 Individual Tax Planning Letter

2015 Individual Tax Planning Letter 2015 Individual Tax Planning Letter Just as the daylight hours are getting shorter, so is the time for fine tuning any last-minute strategies to lower your 2015 tax bill. While year-end legislation extending

More information

Tax Tips. Sidney Kess. Trusts have historically been used for a variety of reasons: to benefit family

Tax Tips. Sidney Kess. Trusts have historically been used for a variety of reasons: to benefit family Tax Tips Sidney Kess This article was drafted in conjunction with Robert S. Barnett, CPA, JD, MS (Taxation). Mr. Barnett is a partner at Capell Barnett Matalon & Schoenfeld LLP in Jericho, New York, where

More information

Understanding the Net Investment Income Tax, also known as the Medicare Contribution Tax

Understanding the Net Investment Income Tax, also known as the Medicare Contribution Tax Understanding the Net Investment Income Tax, also known as the Medicare Contribution Tax February 22, 2013 In brief The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and The Health Care and Education Reconciliation

More information

2011 Tax And Financial Planning Tables

2011 Tax And Financial Planning Tables 2011 Tax and Financial PLanning Tables Investment Planning 2011 Tax And Financial Planning Tables Tax planning is an important component for your overall financial plan. 2011 Tax and Financial PLanning

More information

Tax Breaks for Families and Students. Increased Medicare Payroll Tax. Qualified Plan Distributions Exempt from the NIIT. Nonspouse IRA Beneficiaries

Tax Breaks for Families and Students. Increased Medicare Payroll Tax. Qualified Plan Distributions Exempt from the NIIT. Nonspouse IRA Beneficiaries Oregon Pike PO Box 669 Brownstown Pennsylvania 17508 Phone: 717.859.1158 or 717.627.1250 Fax: 717.859.4884 Web: www.hersheyadvisors.com May 2013 Welcome to this month's edition of the Tax and Business

More information

Tax Items For Businesses Ohio Tax Law Changes

Tax Items For Businesses Ohio Tax Law Changes FRUSH & ASSOCIATES, INC. OVERVIEW Recap of 2013 ACA Act NII Surtax Medicare Wage Surtax Tax Items For Businesses Ohio Tax Law Changes Circular 230 Disclosure Pursuant to the rules of professional conduct

More information

2013 TAX PLANNING TIPS FOR INDIVIDUALS

2013 TAX PLANNING TIPS FOR INDIVIDUALS 2013 TAX PLANNING TIPS FOR INDIVIDUALS The 2012 American Taxpayer Relief Act, which was enacted in early January 2013, was a sweeping tax package that included permanent extension of the Bush-era tax cuts

More information

Understanding the taxability of investments

Understanding the taxability of investments Understanding the taxability of investments Managing your portfolio to help control your tax bill Investors need to consider many factors in the process of choosing investments. One at the top of many

More information

Bunting, Tripp IngleyLLP

Bunting, Tripp IngleyLLP Dear Clients and Friends, As the end of 2011 approaches, now is a good time to start year-end tax planning to minimize your individual and business tax burden. Generally, year-end tax planning involves

More information

FInancIal PlannIng In an uncertain tax landscape. understanding today s tax environment // strategies for 2012 // Planning for 2013

FInancIal PlannIng In an uncertain tax landscape. understanding today s tax environment // strategies for 2012 // Planning for 2013 FInancIal PlannIng In an uncertain tax landscape understanding today s tax environment // strategies for 2012 // Planning for 2013 Key Takeaways Without further changes by Congress, tax rates are scheduled

More information

Tax Rate Increases? The Outlook and Tax Planning Considerations. Partner. Copyright Keiter All Rights Reserved.

Tax Rate Increases? The Outlook and Tax Planning Considerations. Partner. Copyright Keiter All Rights Reserved. Tax Future Update Tax Rate Increases? The Outlook and Tax Planning Considerations Carroll D. Hurst, CPA Partner IRS Circular 230 Disclosure: To ensure compliance with requirements imposed by the IRS, we

More information

American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012- UPDATED

American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012- UPDATED American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012- UPDATED On January 2, 2013, the President signed the American Taxpayer Relief Act, thus ending the nation s brief stint over the fiscal cliff a confluence of expiring

More information

Dealing with the 23.8% tax on trust capital gains: 21 ways (and counting) to have a trust s capital gain taxed to the beneficiary

Dealing with the 23.8% tax on trust capital gains: 21 ways (and counting) to have a trust s capital gain taxed to the beneficiary Dealing with the 23.8% tax on trust capital gains: 21 ways (and counting) to have a trust s capital gain taxed to the beneficiary John Goldsbury 1 U.S. Trust, Bank of America Private Wealth Management

More information

Staying Healthy, Wealthy & Wise: The Aftermath of the Fiscal Cliff. Heather Kovalsky, CPA

Staying Healthy, Wealthy & Wise: The Aftermath of the Fiscal Cliff. Heather Kovalsky, CPA Staying Healthy, Wealthy & Wise: The Aftermath of the Fiscal Cliff Heather Kovalsky, CPA 2013 Tax Changes The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act American Tax Relief Act of 2012 The Patient Protection

More information

Custodial accounts 3. Kiddie tax 4. Estimated tax payments 4. Retirement plans 6. 2015 individual income tax rates 10. Charitable contributions 12

Custodial accounts 3. Kiddie tax 4. Estimated tax payments 4. Retirement plans 6. 2015 individual income tax rates 10. Charitable contributions 12 a b 2015 tax planning guide The confidence to pursue all your life goals begins with a plan. Advice. Beyond investing. Your financial life encompasses much more than the current markets. It includes your

More information

Cohen Smith & Company, P.A. NEWSLETTER. CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS Business and Personal Advisors 133 EAST INDIANA AVENUE DELAND, FLORIDA 32724-4329

Cohen Smith & Company, P.A. NEWSLETTER. CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS Business and Personal Advisors 133 EAST INDIANA AVENUE DELAND, FLORIDA 32724-4329 Cohen Smith & Company, P.A. NEWSLETTER CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS Business and Personal Advisors 133 EAST INDIANA AVENUE DELAND, FLORIDA 32724-4329 Phone: (386) 738-3300 Fax: (386) 736-2267 Interested

More information

New Legislation Enhances the Benefits of a Section 1042 Tax-Deferred Sale

New Legislation Enhances the Benefits of a Section 1042 Tax-Deferred Sale ESOP Transaction Insights New Legislation Enhances the Benefits of a Section 1042 Tax-Deferred Sale Michael R. Holzman, Esq., and Christopher T. Horner II, Esq. Recent legislation increased the income

More information

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Private Wealth Management Products & Services March 2010 The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Health care act includes variety of tax changes President Obama signed the Patient Protection and

More information

Tax Law Snapshot for Small Businesses 2014 Filing Season

Tax Law Snapshot for Small Businesses 2014 Filing Season Tax Law Snapshot for Small Businesses 2014 Filing Season As the economy recovers, you want to position your business for growth. By combining unrivaled education, training and experience and adherence

More information

SC REVENUE RULING #06-12. All previous advisory opinions and any oral directives in conflict herewith.

SC REVENUE RULING #06-12. All previous advisory opinions and any oral directives in conflict herewith. State of South Carolina Department of Revenue 301 Gervais Street, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214 Website Address: http://www.sctax.org SC REVENUE RULING #06-12 SUBJECT: Tax Rate Reduction

More information

Creating Tax Alpha B & F Financial Analytics, Inc.

Creating Tax Alpha B & F Financial Analytics, Inc. This presentation is not intended to provide legal or tax advice. Consult with your legal and tax professional To determine how the concepts presented apply in your Situation. Creating Tax Alpha B & F

More information

13 FINANCIAL PLANNING STRATEGIES FOR 2013

13 FINANCIAL PLANNING STRATEGIES FOR 2013 13 FINANCIAL PLANNING STRATEGIES FOR 2013 Timely, actionable ideas following the American Taxpayer Relief Act KEY TAKEAWAYS With the passing of the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 in reaction to the

More information

Final IRS Regulations on Net Investment Income Results in Good News for Farmers in Many Situations

Final IRS Regulations on Net Investment Income Results in Good News for Farmers in Many Situations 2321 N. Loop Drive, Ste 200 Ames, Iowa 50010 www.calt.iastate.edu Final IRS Regulations on Net Investment Income Results in Good News for Farmers in Many Situations by Paul Neiffer with CliftonLarsonAllen

More information

MAXIMUM TAX EFFICIENCY

MAXIMUM TAX EFFICIENCY Estate Planning Tax Guide Pass your estate with MAXIMUM TAX EFFICIENCY Insurance products are issued by Minnesota Life Insurance Company in all states except New York. In New York, products are issued

More information

IRS Issues Final and New Proposed Regulations Implementing the 3.8% Tax on Investment Income

IRS Issues Final and New Proposed Regulations Implementing the 3.8% Tax on Investment Income IRS Issues Final and New Proposed Regulations Implementing the 3.8% Tax on Investment Income Final Regulations and New Proposed Regulations Implement the 3.8% Tax on Net Investment Income of Individuals,

More information

AN ANALYSIS OF ROTH CONVERSIONS 1

AN ANALYSIS OF ROTH CONVERSIONS 1 AN ANALYSIS OF ROTH CONVERSIONS In 1997, Congress introduced the Roth IRA, giving investors a new product for retirement savings. The Roth IRA is essentially a mirror image of the Traditional IRA, but

More information

Post Election Focus: Stars, Stripes & Taxes

Post Election Focus: Stars, Stripes & Taxes Post Election Focus: Stars, Stripes & Taxes Presented By: Margo Cook, CPA December 6, 2012 Click HERE to listen to webinar. Post Election Focus: Stars, Stripes & Taxes Presented By: Margo Cook, CPA December

More information

Federal Tax and Capital Gains: Rates Over Time

Federal Tax and Capital Gains: Rates Over Time Preparing for a World of Higher Taxes Are You Ready? Presented by: Matt Sommer, CFP, CPWA, AIF Director and Senior Retirement Specialist, Retirement Strategy Group C-0610-114 4-30-11 Federal Tax and Capital

More information

TRADITIONAL TAX PLANNING

TRADITIONAL TAX PLANNING Partners David R. Brzezniak CPA Daniel P. Schreiber CPA William T. Botzum CPA Thomas C. Zonaras CPA Oliver R. McElroy CPA Re: 2014 Year-End Tax Planning For Individuals As 2014 draws to a close, we are

More information

Crunch or Crucible? Upcoming Changes in the Federal Tax Law A Special Edition Tax Guide for Friends and Alumni of Pomona College

Crunch or Crucible? Upcoming Changes in the Federal Tax Law A Special Edition Tax Guide for Friends and Alumni of Pomona College Upcoming Changes in the Federal Tax Law A Special Edition Tax Guide for Friends and Alumni of Pomona College Pomona College, Office of Trusts & Estates, 550 N. College Ave., Claremont, CA 91711 www.pomona.planyourlegacy.org

More information

2014 TAX AND FINANCIAL PLANNING TABLES. An overview of important changes, rates, rules and deadlines to assist your 2014 tax planning.

2014 TAX AND FINANCIAL PLANNING TABLES. An overview of important changes, rates, rules and deadlines to assist your 2014 tax planning. 2014 TAX AND FINANCIAL PLANNING TABLES An overview of important changes, rates, rules and deadlines to assist your 2014 tax planning. 2014 2014 TAX TAX AND AND FINANCIAL FINANCIAL PLANNING PLANNING TABLES

More information

Implications of the New Medicare Surcharge Tax and Net Investment Income Tax

Implications of the New Medicare Surcharge Tax and Net Investment Income Tax I. Medicare Surcharge Tax Implications of the New Medicare Surcharge Tax and Net Investment Income Tax 61 st Annual University of Montana Tax Institute October 18-19, 2013 Professor Kristen G. Juras A.

More information

How do the 2016 Presidential Tax Plans Compare So Far?

How do the 2016 Presidential Tax Plans Compare So Far? How do the 2016 Presidential Tax Plans Compare So Far? 10-Year GDP Growth 10.0% 16.0% -1.0% 13.9% 15.0% -9.5% 11.5% 10-Year Capital Investment Growth 28.8% 46.6% -2.8% 43.9% 48.9% -18.6% 29% 10-Year Wage

More information

Hedge Funds: Tax Advantages and Liabilities

Hedge Funds: Tax Advantages and Liabilities Presenting a live 110-minute teleconference with interactive Q&A Hedge Funds: Tax Advantages and Liabilities for Investors and Fund Managers Leveraging Qualified Dividend Income, Net Investment Tax, Management

More information

Mutual Fund Tax Guide

Mutual Fund Tax Guide 2010 Mutual Fund Tax Guide TABLE OF CONTENTS Part 1 - Tax Items of Interest... 2-6 Part 2 - Tax Forms... 7-14 Form 1099-DIV...7 Form 1099-B...8 Form 1099-R...9 Form 1099-Q...10 Form 1099-INT...11 Form

More information

2013 Year End Tax Planning Seminar

2013 Year End Tax Planning Seminar 2013 Year End Tax Planning Seminar Walter H. Deyhle, CPA, CFP December 4, 2013 GRF s Tax Team 2 Disclosure This presentation and these materials are designed to provide accurate and authoritative information

More information

Investments & Retirement Plans

Investments & Retirement Plans PREPARING FOR THE CHANGES AHEAD. Year End Planning for Year End Planning for Investments & Retirement Plans Td Today s Session Review of Changing Tax Laws Discuss Planning Opportunities Questions & Answers

More information

IRA Custodian Disclosure Statement and Plan Agreement

IRA Custodian Disclosure Statement and Plan Agreement Deutsche Asset & Wealth Management IRA Custodian Disclosure Statement and Plan Agreement Retain these pages for your records. Custodian disclosure statement The following information is provided to you

More information

Income, Gift, and Estate Tax Update

Income, Gift, and Estate Tax Update Income, Gift, and Estate Tax Update Individual Income Tax Rates p. 1 Phil Harris Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics University of Wisconsin-Madison Marriage Penalty Relief p. 1 Capital Gains

More information

Hardship distributions. A hardship distribution is not eligible for rollover.

Hardship distributions. A hardship distribution is not eligible for rollover. SPECIAL TAX NOTICE REGARDING PLAN PAYMENTS 1 (Alternative to IRS Safe Harbor Notice - For Participant) This notice explains how you can continue to defer federal income tax on your retirement plan savings

More information

Social Security and Your Retirement

Social Security and Your Retirement Social Security and Your Retirement Important information for investors planning Social Security will not and was never designed to provide all of the income you ll need to live comfortably during retirement.

More information

New section 1411 regulations answer a number of questions

New section 1411 regulations answer a number of questions New section 1411 regulations answer a number of questions Taxpayers receive some favorable guidance in the final regulations interpreting the 3.8 percent net investment income tax Prepared by: Ed Decker,

More information

Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs)

Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs) Department of the Treasury Internal Revenue Service Publication 590 Cat. No. 15160x Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs) (Including Roth IRAs and Education IRAs) For use in preparing 1999 Returns

More information

2013 Federal Income Tax Update with The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012

2013 Federal Income Tax Update with The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 THE UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE 2013 SINGLETON B. WOLFE MEMORIAL TAX CONFERENCE OCTOBER 31, 2013 2013 Federal Income Tax Update with The American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 JOHN D. HOUSTON, CPA Certified

More information

The 3.8 Percent Medicare Surtax in Retirement Income Planning

The 3.8 Percent Medicare Surtax in Retirement Income Planning Reprinted with permission from the Society of FSP. Reproduction prohibited without publisher's written permission. The 3.8 Percent Medicare Surtax in by Lynn A. Nolan, CLU, ChFC, CASL, RICP Abstract: In

More information

IN THIS ISSUE: August, 2011 j Top Income Tax Planning Ideas for 2011 and 2012

IN THIS ISSUE: August, 2011 j Top Income Tax Planning Ideas for 2011 and 2012 IN THIS ISSUE: Income Tax Overview Qualified Dividends Long-Term Capital Gains Ordinary Income Additional Income Tax Planning Ideas Income Shifting to Junior Generations Roth IRA Conversions NUA Planning

More information

ADVANCED PLANNING CONCEPTS IN LIGHT OF THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER RELIEF ACT (October 11, 2013)

ADVANCED PLANNING CONCEPTS IN LIGHT OF THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER RELIEF ACT (October 11, 2013) ADVANCED PLANNING CONCEPTS IN LIGHT OF THE AMERICAN TAXPAYER RELIEF ACT (October 11, 2013) By: Phoebe Moffatt, Attorney CERTIFIED AS A SPECIALIST IN ESTATE AND TRUST LAW STATE BAR OF ARIZONA BOARD OF LEGAL

More information

Tax Planning Circa 2011. The Rules We Live By

Tax Planning Circa 2011. The Rules We Live By Tax Planning Circa 2011 FPA Houston December 6, 2011 The Rules We Live By 2010 Tax Relief Act (December 17, 2010) Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) Hiring Incentives to Restore Employment

More information

Issues INSIGHTS AND. Halfway Over the Cliff Taxes Resolved but Debt Ceiling and Spending Cuts Loom

Issues INSIGHTS AND. Halfway Over the Cliff Taxes Resolved but Debt Ceiling and Spending Cuts Loom Issues AND INSIGHTS January 7 2013 Halfway Over the Cliff Taxes Resolved but Debt Ceiling and Spending Cuts Loom Carol Kroch, Esq. Managing Director, Wealth and Philanthropic Planning, Wilmington Trust

More information

capital gains and dividend income

capital gains and dividend income capital gains and dividend income Managing capital gains and losses can help you save taxes, defer taxes and obtain the highest after-tax yield on your assets. Since the tax rate on short-term capital

More information

MCCLANAHAN & EATON, LLC CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS

MCCLANAHAN & EATON, LLC CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS , LLC CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS It's that time of year where we should think about preparing an estimate of your current year tax liability and see if we can reduce that liability. There are several

More information

INDIVIDUAL TAX STRATEGIES

INDIVIDUAL TAX STRATEGIES BY SCOTT HENSLEY SHENSLEY@STANCILCPA.COM DECEMBER 4, 2014 STANCIL & COMPANY CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 4909 WINDY HILL DRIVE RALEIGH, NC 27609 919-872-1260 TOPICS TO BE COVERED TODAY WHAT IS TAX PLANNING

More information

KEY FACTORS WHEN CONSIDERING A ROTH IRA CONVERSION

KEY FACTORS WHEN CONSIDERING A ROTH IRA CONVERSION KEY FACTORS WHEN CONSIDERING A ROTH IRA CONVERSION PERTINENT INFORMATION Mr. Kugler has accumulated $1,000,000 in a traditional IRA. Mrs. Kugler is the designated beneficiary (DB) and their daughter is

More information

Presented By: Tracy Monroe, CPA, MT

Presented By: Tracy Monroe, CPA, MT Presented By: Tracy Monroe, CPA, MT Tax extenders for individuals Tax planning Ohio update On December 18, 2015 the President signed the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH Act): Extended many expired

More information

Choosing tax-efficient investments

Choosing tax-efficient investments Choosing tax-efficient investments Managing your portfolio to help control your tax bill Investors need to consider many factors in the process of choosing investments. One at the top of many investors

More information

Wealth Management Systems Inc. 2015 Tax Guide. What You Need to Know About the New Rules

Wealth Management Systems Inc. 2015 Tax Guide. What You Need to Know About the New Rules Wealth Management Systems Inc. 2015 Tax Guide What You Need to Know About the New Rules Tax Guide 2015 This guide is not intended to be tax advice and should not be treated as such. Each individual s tax

More information

Distributions and Rollovers from

Distributions and Rollovers from Page 1 of 6 Frequently Asked Questions about Distributions and Rollovers from Retirement Accounts Choosing what to do with your retirement savings is an important decision. Tax implications are just one

More information

Year-End Tax and Financial Planning Ideas

Year-End Tax and Financial Planning Ideas Private Wealth Management Products & Services Year-End Tax and Financial Planning Ideas A year without change provides a nice respite. Will it last? Whoever said Variety is the spice of life clearly wasn

More information

2014-2015 Tax Update: Another Year For Tax Breaks By Kurt J. Kilwein, CPA, CFP, Partner and Olga Zarney, CPA, MBT, Manager

2014-2015 Tax Update: Another Year For Tax Breaks By Kurt J. Kilwein, CPA, CFP, Partner and Olga Zarney, CPA, MBT, Manager WINTER 2014-2015 2014-2015 Tax Update: Another Year For Tax Breaks By Kurt J. Kilwein, CPA, CFP, Partner and Olga Zarney, CPA, MBT, Manager Individual Taxation Many of the tax breaks which expired at the

More information

2016 tax planning tables

2016 tax planning tables 216 tax planning tables 216 important deadlines Last day to... January 15 Pay fourth-quarter 215 federal individual estimated income tax January 26 Buy in to close a short-against-the-box position (regular-way

More information

2008-2012 $5,000 2013-2015 $5,500 Future years Increased by cost-of-living adjustments (in $500 increments)

2008-2012 $5,000 2013-2015 $5,500 Future years Increased by cost-of-living adjustments (in $500 increments) Part One of the Disclosure Statement describes the rules applicable to Traditional IRAs. IRAs described in these pages are called Traditional IRAs to distinguish them from the Roth IRAs, which are described

More information

Beginning in 2010, the Tax Increase Prevention and ROTH IRA CONVERSION

Beginning in 2010, the Tax Increase Prevention and ROTH IRA CONVERSION ROTH IRA CONVERSION Assessing Suitability of the Strategy for Individuals and their Heirs Executive Summary A Roth IRA conversion may benefit individuals during their retirement years by potentially reducing

More information

The Financial Advisor s Guide to Reviewing Client Tax Returns for Planning Opportunities

The Financial Advisor s Guide to Reviewing Client Tax Returns for Planning Opportunities The Financial Advisor s Guide to Reviewing Client Tax Returns for Planning Opportunities The Financial Advisor s Guide to Reviewing Client Tax Returns for Planning Opportunities 1 Reviewing tax returns

More information

Retirement. A Guide to Roth IRAs

Retirement. A Guide to Roth IRAs Retirement A Guide to Roth IRAs A Roth IRA is an individual retirement account named for the late Senate Finance Committee Chairman, William Roth, Jr. who championed the creation of this new type of IRA.

More information

2016 Fingertip Tax Guide

2016 Fingertip Tax Guide ADVANCED MARKETS 2016 Fingertip Tax Guide INCOME TAXES 2016 If Taxable Income Is: 1 Married Filing Jointly: $0 $18,550 $0 + 10% $0 $18,550 $75,300 $1,855 + 15% $18,550 $75,300 $151,900 $10,367.50 + 25%

More information

Tax planning for employees coming to work in the U.S. Up close

Tax planning for employees coming to work in the U.S. Up close Tax planning for employees coming to work in the U.S. Up close Tax > International tax > Expatriate taxes In U.S. tax law the term alien refers to a foreign national (an individual who is not a citizen

More information

Roth IRA Conversions: A Powerful Wealth-Transfer Tool

Roth IRA Conversions: A Powerful Wealth-Transfer Tool July 2014 Private Wealth Advisory Roth IRA Conversions: A Powerful Wealth-Transfer Tool Converting a traditional IRA or another qualified retirement plan to a Roth IRA can be a powerful wealth-transfer

More information

Frequently asked questions

Frequently asked questions Page 1 of 6 Frequently asked questions Distributions and rollovers from retirement accounts Choosing what to do with your retirement savings is an important decision. Tax implications are just one of several

More information

2008 Presentation created by: Michael E. Kitces, MSFS, MTAX, CFP, CLU, ChFC, RHU, REBC, CASL, CWPP www.kitces.com

2008 Presentation created by: Michael E. Kitces, MSFS, MTAX, CFP, CLU, ChFC, RHU, REBC, CASL, CWPP www.kitces.com New Medicare Taxes By: Michael E. Kitces, MSFS, MTAX, CFP, CLU, ChFC, RHU, REBC, CASL, CWPP Director of Research, Pinnacle Advisory Group Publisher, The Kitces Report, www.kitces.com Overview All individuals

More information

Application of the Self-Employment Tax and 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax to Fund Managers

Application of the Self-Employment Tax and 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax to Fund Managers March 6, 2013 Application of the Self-Employment Tax and 3.8% Net Investment Income Tax to Fund Managers By Robert A.N. Cudd and Michelle M. Jewett With the imposition of a new 3.8% net investment income

More information

Wealth and Taxes: Planning for 2014

Wealth and Taxes: Planning for 2014 NOVEMBER 2013 Wealth and Taxes: Planning for 2014 2013 YEAR-END TAX PLANNING GUIDE TABLE OF CONTENTS On January 1, 2013, Congress passed the American Taxpayer Relief Act (ATRA), which addressed the scheduled

More information

YOUR ROLLOVER OPTIONS GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT ROLLOVERS

YOUR ROLLOVER OPTIONS GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT ROLLOVERS SPECIAL TAX NOTICE REGARDING PAYMENTS FROM QUALIFIED PLANS YOUR ROLLOVER OPTIONS You are receiving this notice because all or a portion of a payment you are receiving from your Employer s plan (the "Plan")

More information