Asset Management Plan 2015 Facilities and Transit

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Asset Management Plan 2015 Facilities and Transit"

Transcription

1 Asset Management Plan 2015 Facilities and Transit Prepared for Submitted by October 2015

2

3 Asset Management Plan Contents Section 1 Executive Summary Table of Content Section 2 Introduction Section 3 State of Local Infrastructure Section 4 Expected Levels of Service Section 5 Asset Management Strategy Section 6 Financing Strategy Section 7 Plan Improvement and Monitoring Appendices

4

5 Section 1 Executive Summary Table of Content

6

7 SECTION 1 Executive Summary The Town of Milton (Town) has been identified as the fastest growing municipality in Canada in recent years, based on the 2006 and the 2011 censuses. As a result of this growth, infrastructure has been constructed to accommodate the new residents and businesses, so as not to impact on the current level of service received by the rest of the community. This version of the Asset Management Plan (AMP) includes information related to the Town s Transit and Facility assets. As of February 2015, these assets had a replacement value of $8M and $224M respectively and make up approximately 18% of the total net book value of all of the Town s assets, excluding land. These assets are an important part of the infrastructure asset base that contribute to the Town s strategic goals. The Town will continue to produce AMP s for other asset classes owned by the Town. Under the Province of Ontario s Municipal Infrastructure Investment Initiative (MIII), municipalities are required to submit a detailed AMP in order to qualify for Provincial grant program funding. The Town s AMP has been developed to meet, as a minimum, the requirements set out in the Ministry of Infrastructure report Building Together: Guide to Municipal Asset Management Plans which includes content in Table 1.1 below. TABLE 1-1: AMP CONTENT BUILDING TOGETHER - GUIDE TO MUNICIPAL ASSET MANAGEMENT PLANS Part Title Content 1 Executive Summary Provides a succinct overview of the AMP, highlighting major points. 2 Introduction Provides an overview of asset management within the Town and sets the overall context and expectation for the report. 3 State of Local Infrastructure 4 Desired Levels of Service 5 Asset Management Strategy Presents information on the asset portfolio including inventory, condition, cost, etc. accompanied by information on supporting data. Describes how service is linked to infrastructure investment and defined how service is measured and how performance goals and expectations are identified and set. Sets planned actions that will enable the assets to provide the desired levels of service in a sustainable way, while managing risk, at the lowest lifecycle cost (e.g. through preventative action). 6 Financing Strategy Identifies lifecycle investment requirements and appropriate funding strategies for completing the work. In addition to the six sections detailed above, this AMP also includes a seventh section Plan Improvement and Monitoring, which focuses on the Town s continual improvement of its asset management practices. The AMP contains strategic information that integrates with other corporate planning documents such as: Town of Milton Official Plan The AMP will utilize and influence the land use policy directions for longterm growth and development as outlined in the Official Plan. Long Term Fiscal Impact Study The AMP will utilize as well as guide long term financial forecasts. Annual Budgets The construction, operation, maintenance, rehabilitation, replacement, expansion and disposal of assets, as identified in the AMP, will be considered in development of the annual capital and operating budgets. Facility Infrastructure Audits Regular Facility Infrastructure Audits will inform the AMP with regards to the condition of facility assets and the funding requirements to maintain, rehabilitate, replace or expand assets in order to meet defined levels of service 1-1

8 SECTION 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Business Plans and Manuals The AMP is based on service levels, policies and processes as identified in various business plans and manuals and will be used in the development of future business plans, performance measures and strategic decision making.. State of Local Infrastructure (Section ) The Town owns 36 facilities with a current replacement value of $224M, and 56 transit assets with a current replacement value of $8M. The condition of the assets has been rated using the Canadian National Infrastructure Report Card (NIRC) 5-point scale. A summary view of the condition of the Facilities assets in the Town covered in this version of the AMP is provided in Figure 1.1. The condition grades assigned to each facility pertains to the facility as a whole, as opposed to specific components within the facilities, such as HVAC, electrical etc. Based on the replacement value of the assets, over 80% of the Town s facilities are rated to be Very Good or Good. Condition data was not available for the Transit assets, and therefore an inferred condition grade was derived based on the age of the assets, compared with a typical useful life for that asset type. Based on this assessment approach, almost 70% (based on replacement values) of the Town s Transit assets are rated to be Very Good or Good. FIGURE 1-1: FACILITIES CONDITION - OVERALL (BY REPLACEMENT VALUE) FIGURE 1-2: TRANSIT ASSET CONDITION - OVERALL (BY REPLACEMENT VALUE) While the majority of the Town s Facility assets are in Good or Very Good condition, when assessed at the Facility level, it should be noted that there are facilities that are rated as Very Poor (1 Recreation & Culture Facility), Poor (1 Fire Hall) and Fair (3 Recreation & Culture Facilities, 1 Operational Facility, 2 Leased Facilities and 1 Community Hall). These Facility assets will be assessed further to determine whether there are specific components that are resulting in a lower condition grade, or whether the grade is representative of the Facility as a whole. 1-2

9 SECTION 5 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY It should also be noted that because of the significant growth Milton has been faced with over the past 15 years, many new facilities have been constructed to accommodate growth in service. Therefore, while the majority of Town facilities are in Good or Very Good condition, as they age, significant investments are going to be required to maintain the assets in a Good state of repair. This will be covered in more detail in future updates of the Plan. Similar to Facility assets, while almost 70% of the Town s Transit assets are in Good or Very Good condition, it should be noted that there are a number of specific assets that are rated as Poor (2 Support vehicles) and Fair (1 Portable Data System and 5 of the Towns 18 buses). The assets that are rated as either Poor or Fair are not necessarily providing a lower level of service than the other assets, as the Town selects a maintenance regime that takes into account the assets age and is focused on maintaining service levels. For assets such as the Portable Data System, the assigned condition grade is just reflective of the assets age and while still fit for purpose, this grade does provide an indication of a future funding requirement.. Expected Levels of Service (Section ) The purpose of Levels of Service (LOS) is to measure the actual service delivered to customers, the community and the environment and to enable decisions to be made regarding the assets, based on the service that they provide rather than simply on their condition. This is often called a serviceability approach and it aims to put the interests of the customer at the heart of decision-making. The Town currently performs a hybrid approach to managing their assets including both condition based and serviceability based approaches but aims to transition to a serviceability approach. Some of the more important factors affecting LOS that are considered by the Town include: Strategic goals for the Town; Legislation and regulatory requirements; Community expectations; and Affordability. The Town reports a range of performance measures associated with its assets and service delivery, including the Municipal Performance Measurement Program (MPMP) and Budget Public Input Survey. The Town is developing formal LOS measures which will be refined in future iterations of the AMP. At present, the LOS are expressed in terms of general trends upwards, downwards or stable assuming that budgets remain roughly at current levels over the next few years. A number of potential LOS measures have been developed for Facilities and Transit and details of these measures along with how the Town will likely perform against these measures over the Plan period, can be found in Section 4. A summary of the measures can be found in Table

10 SECTION 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY TABLE 1-2: POTENTIAL LEVELS OF SERVICE AND TRENDS Facilities (Internal Customers) Facilities (External Customers) Transit Value Current Trend Future Trend Current Trend Future Trend Current Trend Future Trend 1 Accessibility Reliability/ availability Quality/ Customer Service 2 2 Safety Sustainability 3 Measure not currently developed Measure not currently developed Legislative Notes Measure not currently developed Measure not currently developed Measure not currently developed Measure not currently developed 1. Measures are generally stable, but the % of bus stops that are accessible will increase over the Plan period 2. While customer satisfaction with the buses will continue to be stable, there has been a decline with regard to customer satisfaction with shelters, benches etc 3. The rate at which facilities are retrofitted for energy conservation is predicted to fall over the Plan period. Asset Management Strategy (Section ) The purpose of the Town s Asset Management Strategy is to evaluate current practices and establish future practices that will be cost effective, sustainable and enable the Town to deliver agreed LOS at an acceptable level of risk. The asset management strategy considers both asset and non-infrastructure solutions. These solutions can be used to address renewal, growth, improvement and maintenance needs and support the development of a transparent and defensible 10-year plan to sustainably enable growth and optimize the ongoing maintenance of the Town s infrastructure, while continuing to meet agreed LOS. The Town has a set of targets and goals that drive decision-making in the investment program in relation to Facility and Transit assets. These targets and goals have been categorized as Growth and Enhancement, and Renewals. With regard to growth, for the customer facing facilities, the key goals are that these facilities need to keep pace with population growth and provide quality community hubs. For the Civic facilities and the facilities that house the Town s employees the key goals are to maintain the safety and serviceability of these assets. The Town s current renewal practices and lifecycle improvement activities for facilities include: Condition Assessments/ Facility Audits Preventative Maintenance Contracts 1-4

11 SECTION 5 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Transit growth and enhancement in the Town is outlined in the Moving Milton Forward 2013 to 2017 Transit Master Plan for the Town of Milton. The Vision for Milton Transit over the next ten (10) years is to be an essential part of the way Milton moves and grows. The Town s current renewal practices and lifecycle improvement activities for transit include: Preventative Maintenance; and Mid-life Refurbishment. Future iterations of the AMP will seek to establish, in greater detail, whole life-cycle intervention options that provide the lowest capital and operational costs.. Financing Strategy (Section ) A long term financing strategy is an important step in putting the AMP into action. A comprehensive financial plan that reflects the timely rehabilitation and maintenance of assets allows the Town to identify the financial resources required for sustainable asset management based on long term needs and desired LOS. Currently there is a minor infrastructure deficit in the Town s facilities, with one facility graded as Very Poor and having a replacement value of $37,000. In addition to those assets graded as Very Poor, the recent Facility Audit identified a range of assets requiring immediate work covering repair, replacement and inspection work totaling $171,400. This will include both OPEX and CAPEX funded work. In addition, assuming that some, or all, of the Poor assets move into the Very Poor category over the Plan period, this would give a combined total of the assets requiring replacement or a major upgrade of $3.4M. For Facilities, the budgeted capital investment for Base Maintenance is adequate to meet the average annual asset need, assuming that the improvements to the Asset Management strategy are implemented. In addition the Town expects to grow further over the coming years. Therefore all of the pressures on the Town are acting to increase the requirement for Base Maintenance funding over the coming years. Future versions of the AMP will seek to further quantify this increased requirement for funding. Currently there is a minor infrastructure deficit in the Town s Transit assets, with those assets graded as Poor having a replacement value of $52,970. However, due to the short asset life of the majority of Transit assets, all of the vehicle assets that the Town currently owns, will move into the Very Poor condition category over the Plan period and will therefore require replacement in the Plan period. The planned capital investment is sufficient to replace all of the assets that will reach the end of their useful lives over the Plan period, and to keep the overall asset stock in an acceptable condition. However, Reserves will need to be reviewed and set at a level to continue with this rate of replacement, while taking into account that the asset base is continuing to grow.. Plan Improvement and Monitoring (Section ) The AMP is a living document that will continue to reflect the evolution of asset management practices within the Town. A key aspect of good practice asset management is to continually evaluate, review and enhance its practices. This continual improvement approach will result in periodic updates to the AMP as a better understanding of the asset base and its needs is obtained. Some specific improvements related to Facility and Transit assets are detailed in Section

12

13 Section 2 Introduction

14

15 SECTION 2 Introduction Since 2007, the Town has been identifying and valuing its assets in an effort to meet the requirements of the Public Sector Accounting Board (PSAB) 3150 requirements, which requires that asset information be included on the financial statements from 2009 onwards. The next step is to use this information to begin managing the assets more efficiently and effectively in order to maximize the return on investment and ensure the assets are being used, replaced or rehabilitated at the optimal time in their life cycle. This AMP has been developed following the provincial requirements as outlined in Building Together Guide for Municipal Asset Management Plans and includes the following sections: Section 1 Executive Summary Section 2 Introduction Section 3 State of Local Infrastructure Section 4 Expected LOS Section 5 Asset Management Strategy Section 6 Financing Strategy Section 7 Plan Improvement and Monitoring The Asset Management Plan (AMP) is a strategic document that will serve as a tactical plan and a financial plan to enable better management of the Town s infrastructure and other assets to deliver the desired LOS.. What is Asset Management? Asset management (AM) is a systematic process that facilitates decision making in regards to the construction, acquisition, operation, maintenance, renewal, replacement and disposition of assets in the most cost effective manner. Mandatory development of an AMP in the public sector requires a review of existing practices and preparation of documentation in a concise form.. Assets Included in the Plan This AMP includes information related to the Town s portfolio of Facilities and Transit assets. In terms of the Town s Facilities assets, as of February 2015, these assets had a replacement value of $224M and the Transit assets have a replacement value of $ 8M. Together these make up approximately 18% of the total net book value of all of the Town s assets, excluding land. These assets are an important part of the infrastructure asset base that contribute to the Town s strategic goals. The AMP will be further developed in the near future to become a comprehensive document containing information on all assets owned by the Town... Facilities Summary: Facilities Total of 36 facilities Replacement value (2015) $224,277,000 Net Book Value (2015) $140,776,

16 SECTION 2 INTRODUCTION The Town owns, operates and manages 36 facilities, classified into 6 different asset types: Civic Buildings; Community Halls; Fire Halls ; Leased Facilities; Operations Facilities; and Recreation and Culture Facilities... Transit Summary: Transit Total of 56 transit assets Replacement value (2015) $8,028,579 Historic value (2015) $4,000,066 The Town owns, operates and manages 56 Transit Assets, categorized into the following asset classes: Transit Buses; Portable Data System; Support Vehicles; Bus Pads and Amenities; and Bike Lockers.. How Infrastructure Supports the Town s Goals Municipalities are unique compared to most businesses in the sense that they provide a multitude of services. In order to effectively deliver services, a diverse portfolio of infrastructure assets is required. The Town is currently in the process of updating its Strategic Plan (Destiny Milton 3) and this will include the development of five new goals and associated actions. The goals/actions that are specifically supported by this AMP include: Strategic Goal: Organizational Excellence Provide effective service delivery and improved efficiencies. Develop a Succession Planning Strategy to retain and attract a skilled and high performing staff team, minimizing risk of leadership vacuum and ensuring transfer of organizational knowledge. Strategic Goal: Economic Growth Implement strategic initiatives to support economic growth. Strategic Goal: Financial Sustainability Long range planning processes and the annual budget process should encourage decisions that support sustainability goals, including costs for full lifecycle of assets (short, medium and long term from initial acquisition to disposal), and preventative maintenance requirements, in making investment decisions. Regularly update long-range financial plans and forecasts. 2-2

17 SECTION 5 INTRODUCTION Strategic Goal: Vibrant and Connected Community Coordinated, multi-modal Transportation Plan working with all levels of government. Work with partners to provide a range of quality programs and services that engage with, and respond to, the needs and expectations of our changing community. Safe, effective and efficient transportation options for the community. Work with surrounding municipalities and the Region to integrate and connect municipal transit systems and address Milton Education Village transit requirements. The Town of Milton Official Plan (2008) includes specific goals and objectives for Facilities and Transit assets include: Recreation and Culture Facilities: The provision of community and cultural facilities is essential for the achievement of a strong and healthy community which provides for all aspects of human life. The Town is involved in the provision of a range of recreational and cultural facilities. The programs and services are provided both directly by the Town and through partnerships with other agencies, groups and individuals. Transit: The Town's transportation system shall: Increase accessibility to major areas of employment, shopping and recreation, with an emphasis on accessibility by public transit; Promote and support integrated mobility; and Target a high level of usage in the Urban Area. The Town s recent Community Services Master Plan Update, while focusing on a range of non-asset initiatives, such as the provision of programs and higher levels of customer engagement, does specifically refer to a number of Action Plans regarding the future provision of recreation facility assets, including: Designing future community centres in a manner that permits future facility expansions and conversions that respond to future trends, conforms to the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA), integrates principles of CPTED (Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design), considers green building designs integrating energy and water conservation measures, and seeks creative partnership opportunities in their construction and/or operation. New multi-use community centres should be located within reasonable proximity to major transportation spines including arterial roads, transit routes, and active transportation infrastructure. Better monitoring of existing facility usage, to inform the need for future facilities. Asset Management will support delivery of these strategic and operational plans, through enabling a better understanding of the current lifecycle costs of the existing assets and providing a better understanding of the trigger points for future investment. 2-3

18 SECTION 2 INTRODUCTION. Relationship to Other Municipal Planning and Financial Documents The AMP contains strategic information that integrates with other corporate planning documents such as: Town of Milton Official Plan The AMP will utilize and influence policy directions for long-term growth and development as outlined in the Official Plan. Long Term Fiscal Impact Study The AMP will utilize as well as guide long term financial forecasts. Annual Budgets The construction, operation, maintenance, rehabilitation, replacement, expansion and disposal of assets, as identified in the AMP, will be considered in the development of annual capital and operating budgets. Facility Infrastructure Audits Regular Facility Infrastructure Audits will inform the AMP in regards to the condition of facility assets and the funding requirements to maintain, rehabilitate, replace or expand assets in order to meet defined levels of service Business Plans and Manuals The AMP is based on service levels, policies and processes as identified in various business plans and manuals and will be used in the development of future business plans, performance measures and strategic decision making.. Asset Management Plan Purpose The purpose of the Town s AMP is to provide a comprehensive document that will guide corporate decision making in regards to the construction, operation, maintenance, replacement, expansion and disposal of infrastructure assets while minimizing risk and cost to the Town and its taxpayers and while maximizing service delivery. The AMP allows the Town to: Provide input into long-term infrastructure master plans and the annual budget; Document existing and planned work practices and procedures; Provide a business case for key infrastructure investments to support municipal services; Develop sustainable financial plans; Support community engagement regarding customer desired levels of service derived from the infrastructure assets; Consider options related to disposition of certain facilities based upon regular updates to the AMP and LOS consideration Meet legislative requirements; and Support funding applications to the federal and provincial levels of government.. Asset Management Plan Development The development of the AMP was led by the Corporate Services department with support from the Engineering Services Department. Key staff driving the development of the AMP were: Linda Leeds, Director, Corporate Services Sheryl Hill, Senior Manager, Finance Jennifer Reynolds, Director, Community Services Doug Sampano, Senior Manager, Facility Services 2-4

19 SECTION 5 INTRODUCTION Paul Cripps, Director, Engineering Services Tony D Alessandro, Coordinator, Transit The AMP contains four (4) components as presented in Figure 2-1: The State of Local Infrastructure Section includes details on the current condition and value of the asset class s covered by the Plan. The condition information for Facilities and Transit assets is reported using the National Infrastructure Report Card format. This approach provides a common reporting protocol that can be used for all assets across the Town. Information on the value of the assets was extracted from the 2015 Tangible Capital Asset register. The Desired Levels of Service Section contains both currently reported performance measures and a preliminary assessment of potential Customer Levels of Service (LOS) measures. A workshop was held with the key staff to obtain a common understanding of the nature and purpose of Customer LOS and to define a preliminary set of measures. Further work is required to fully develop, measure and verify the LOS measures. The Asset Management Strategy Section sets out the main policies, practices and actions that are taken to minimize the lifecycle cost of the assets. This covers both operational activity and capital expenditures. A workshop was held with key staff to document the current policies and practices and to identify opportunities for improvement to further reduce lifecycle costs while meeting desired LOS. The Financing Strategy Section includes both historical and future budgeted capital and operating expenditure and identifies the major funding sources. The future budgeted expenditure has been compared to investment needs arising from the asset management strategy in order to identify any potential future funding shortfalls. To ensure the comprehensiveness of the AMP, other resources were used including: The Building Together Guide for Municipal AMPs guidelines as published by the Province of Ontario; Attendance at workshops and seminars on the topic of asset management; and Following examples and initiatives demonstrated by other municipalities. FIGURE 2-1: COMPONENTS OF THE TOWN'S AMP. Asset Management Plan Updates and Timeframes The Asset Management Plan (AMP) is a living document that will continue to reflect the evolution of asset management practices within the Town. A key aspect of good asset management practice is to continually evaluate, review and enhance its practices. This continual improvement approach will result in periodic updates to the AMP as a better understanding of the asset base and its needs is obtained. Some specific improvements related to Facilities and Transit are detailed in Section 7. The AMP is a strategic document that should ultimately encompass the full life-cycle of the Facilities and Transit assets included in the Plan. The Town s budget covers a 3-year operating cycle and a 10-year capital forecast for the Facilities and Transit assets and therefore this first version of the AMP will be a 10-year Plan. As the full life-cycle for these assets can be in excess of 50 years (for facility assets) future versions of the AMP will consider the full life-cycle of all of these assets. 2-5

20 SECTION 2 INTRODUCTION The suite of AMP s for the Town will continue to be further developed to include information on all assets owned by the Town. This Plan will be updated every 4 to 5 years to coincide with other strategic planning documents. If significant changes arise within this timeframe that impact the AMP, an interim review could be undertaken. The following table shows the proposed updates for the AMP and associated documents. TABLE 2-1: PROPOSED DOCUMENT UPDATE FREQUENCY Asset Management Policy Asset Management Plan State of Infrastructure Report Capital Budget Document Every 10 years Every 4-5 years Every 2-3 years Annually Frequency. Data Reliability and Accuracy The quality of data used within this AMP will vary depending on the source for the data. To aid in the interpretation of the AMP, a data confidence rating in terms of reliability and accuracy of the data used is included throughout the AMP The data confidence rating scales, defined below, are used to support the rating, with confidence based on the lower of the reliability and accuracy ratings. Table 2-2: Data Reliability and Accuracy DATA CONFIDENCE 2-6

21 Section 3 State of Local Infrastructure

22

23 SECTION 3 State of Local Infrastructure To get an overall view of the Town s current state of infrastructure for Facilities and Transit assets, asset inventory, valuation, age and condition were documented. Facility inventory, condition, and age data was extracted from data provided by the Town, some of which was taken from a Facility Infrastructure Audit completed in February The data source for asset valuation was the Town s Tangible Capital Asset (TCA) system. For the purposes of this AMP, the condition of Facilities and Transit assets are stated on a 1 to 5 scale as used in the Canadian National Infrastructure Report Card (NIRC).. Asset Inventory The asset classes covered by this AMP comprise of two (2) major categories: Facilities and Transit. The Facility asset classes include civic facilities, community halls, fire halls, leased facilities, operations facilities, and recreation and culture. The Transit asset classes include transit buses, portable data systems, support vehicles, bus pads (and amenities), and bike lockers. Table 3-1 and Table 3-2 provide a high-level overview of the asset inventory included within the scope of this AMP. TABLE 3-1: ASSET INVENTORY FACILITIES Asset Unit 2015 Inventory Civic Buildings Each 1 Community Halls Each 3 Fire Halls Each 4 Leased Facilities Each 5 Operations Facilities Each 4 Recreation and Culture Each 19 Total 36 TABLE 3-2: ASSET INVENTORY TRANSIT Asset Unit 2015 Inventory Transit Buses Each 18 Portable Data Systems Each 1 Support Vehicles Each 2 Bus Pads and Amenities Each 33 Bike Lockers Each 2 Total 56 Note: In addition to the 33 bus pads, there is also a Transit Bus Stop Retrofit Pool. This is not included in the number of assets, but the value of the Pool is included in the total valuation for Bus Pads and Amenities. 3-1

24 SECTION 3 STATE OF LOCAL INFRASTRUCTURE DATA CONFIDENCE Notes: 1. Inventory is added and updated in the system as assets are placed in or out of service. These actions are generated as the capital works are completed. 2. Transit Fareboxes have not been counted as separate assets in the above numbers, but have been considered as one component of the buses.. Asset Valuation The asset valuations contained within this AMP are based on data in the Town s Tangible Capital Asset (TCA) system. Under PSAB 3150, local governments are required to summarize and present information regarding their TCA and amortization in financial statements based on historical costs. However, to proactively manage assets, estimated replacement costs need to be calculated. Therefore, TCA replacement values are re-calculated annually taking into consideration the appropriate consumer based indices for each asset type. The 2015 TCA valuation for all assets covered in this AMP is $232,305,578 (total of Facilities and Transit assets). The Town s total TCA valuation for Facilities assets is $224,277,000, and for Transit assets is $8,028,578. The replacement value is the cost to replace the asset with the same asset and does not include growth, changes and improvements in technologies, enhancements etc. In addition to the replacement costs, details of the depreciated historical costs, shown as net book value, are also included for the assets covered by this Plan as shown in Table 3-3 and Table 3-4. TABLE 3-3: ASSET VALUATION FACILITIES Asset Units 2015 Inventory 2015 Replacement Value ($000 s) 2015 Net Book Value ($000 s) % of total Facilities 2015 Replacement Value Civic Buildings each 1 33,882 19,233 15% Community Halls each 3 3,275 1,110 1% Fire Halls each 4 15,123 8,661 7% Leased Facilities each 5 18,522 8,465 8% Operations each 4 14,787 15,205 7% Recreation and Culture each ,688 88,101 62% TOTAL 224, ,

25 SECTION 5 STATE OF LOCAL INFRASTRUCTURE FIGURE 3-1: ASSET VALUATION FACILITIES DATA CONFIDENCE Notes: 1. Costs are as estimated 2015 TABLE 3-4: ASSET VALUATION TRANSIT Asset Units 2015 Inventory 2015 Replacement Value ($000 s) 2015 Net Book Value ($000 s) % of total Facilities 2015 Replacement Value Transit Buses each 18 7,734 3,811 96% Portable Data System each % Support Vehicle each % Bus Pads / Amenities each % Bike Lockers each % TOTAL 56 8,029 4,

26 SECTION 3 STATE OF LOCAL INFRASTRUCTURE FIGURE 3-2: ASSET VALUATION TRANSIT DATA CONFIDENCE Notes: 1. Costs are 2015 based 3-4

27 SECTION 5 STATE OF LOCAL INFRASTRUCTURE. Asset Age Asset useful lives (or economic lives) developed as part of the 2009 PSAB 3150 TCA project are used in this version of the AMP as follows: TABLE 3-5: ASSET USEFUL LIFE - FACILITIES AND TRANSIT Asset Type Asset Useful Life (PSAB) Years Facilities All 50 Transit Buses (Conventional) 12 Buses (Specialized mini bus) 7 Buses (Acquired as used) 5 Portable Data System 12 Support vehicle 7 Bus Pads/Amenities 30 Bus Pads/Amenities (Retrofit) 7 Bike Lockers 15.. Asset Age: Facilities and Transit Almost 60% (by value), of the Towns facilities are less than 20 years old and based on a typical useful life of these facilities of 50 years, they are yet to reach the mid-point. However they will still require annual maintenance and periodic major maintenance activities to ensure that they will continue to provide the intended level of service through their service life. For Transit assets, almost 70% (by value) are 3 years old or less. This is reflective of the fact that over 95% of the Transit assets (by Value) are vehicles with a relatively short useful life. The Town s asset age profile of their Facility and Transit assets are shown in the pie charts below. FIGURE 3-3: ASSET AGE DISTRIBUTION BY REPLACEMENT VALUE FACILITIES 3-5

28 SECTION 3 STATE OF LOCAL INFRASTRUCTURE FIGURE 3-4: ASSET AGE DISTRIBUTION BY REPLACEMENT VALUE TRANSIT. Asset Condition A 5 point rating scale that aligns with the NIRC, produced by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM), Canadian Construction Association (CCA), Canadian Public Works Association (CPWA) and Canadian Society of Civil Engineering (CSCE) was used to determine the state of the Town s Facility and Transit assets. The use of this 5 point rating scale allows the Town of Milton s asset base to be described using a common approach and will enable benchmarking against other municipalities. The rating scale ranges from Very Good to Very Poor, as described in Table 3-6 and reflects the physical condition of the given assets. Future iterations of the Town s AMP will be extended to include other asset types and service measures (e.g. reliability) to more accurately reflect the Town s ability to meet service needs. TABLE 3-6: ASSET CONDITION GRADE SUMMARY - NIRC 5-POIINT RATING SCALE 1 Very Good 2 Good 3 Fair 4 Poor 5 Very Poor The infrastructure in the system or network is generally in very good condition, typically new or recently rehabilitated. A few elements show general signs of deterioration that require attention. The infrastructure in the system or network is in good condition; some elements show general signs of deterioration that require attention. A few elements exhibit significant deficiencies. The infrastructure in the system or network is in fair condition; it shows general signs of deterioration and requires attention. Some elements exhibit significant deficiencies. The infrastructure in the system or network is in poor condition and mostly below standard, with many elements approaching the end of their service life. A large portion of the system exhibits significant deterioration. The infrastructure in the system or network is in unacceptable condition with widespread signs of advanced deterioration. Many components in the system exhibit signs of imminent failure, which is affecting service... Facilities Condition A summary view of the condition of the Facilities assets in the Town covered in this version of the AMP is provided in Figure 3-5. The condition grades assigned to each facility pertains to the facility as a whole. Over 80% (based on replacement values) of the Town s facilities are rated to be Very Good or Good. 3-6

29 SECTION 5 STATE OF LOCAL INFRASTRUCTURE FIGURE 3-5: CONDITION BY REPLACEMENT VALUE FACILITIES (OVERALL) FIGURE 3-6: CONDITION BY REPLACEMENT VALUE CIVIC FACILITIES FIGURE 3-7: CONDITION BY REPLACEMENT VALUE COMMUNITY HALLS 3-7

30 SECTION 3 STATE OF LOCAL INFRASTRUCTURE FIGURE 3-8: CONDITION BY REPLACEMENT VALUE FIRE HALLS FIGURE 3-9: CONDITION BY REPLACEMENT VALUE LEASED FACILITIES FIGURE 3-10: CONDITION BY REPLACEMENT VALUE OPERATIONS FACILITIES FIGURE 3-11: CONDITION BY REPLACEMENT VALUE RECREATION AND CULTURE FACILITIES Overall the majority of the Town s Facility assets are in Good or Very Good condition, when assessed at the Facility level (as opposed to assessing the condition of components within a facility). However it should be noted that there are facilities that are rated as Very Poor (1 Recreation & Culture Facility), Poor (1 Fire Hall) and Fair (3 Recreation & Culture Facilities, 1 Operational Facility, 2 Leased Facilities and 1 Community Hall). These Facility assets will be assessed further to determine whether there are specific components that are resulting in a lower condition grade, or whether the grade is representative of the Facility as a whole. It should also be noted that because of the significant growth Milton has been faced with over the past 15 years, many new facilities have been constructed to accommodate growth in service. Therefore while the majority of Town facilities are in Good or Very Good condition, as they age, significant investments are going to be required to maintain the assets in good state of repair. This will be covered in more detail in future updates of the Plan. 3-8

31 SECTION 5 STATE OF LOCAL INFRASTRUCTURE.. Transit Asset Condition Figure 3-12 through to Figure 3-17 show the overall condition of Transit assets in the Town covered in this version of the AMP. It should be noted that Condition data was not available for the Transit assets, and an inferred condition grade was derived based on the age of the assets, compared with a typical useful life for that asset type. Based on this assessment approach, almost 70% (based on replacement values) of the Town s Transit assets are rated to be Very Good or Good. FIGURE 3-12: CONDITION BY REPLACEMENT VALUE TRANSIT (OVERALL) FIGURE 3-13: CONDITION BY REPLACEMENT VALUE TRANSIT BUSES FIGURE 3-14: CONDITION BY REPLACEMENT VALUE PORTABLE DATA SYSTEMS 3-9

32 SECTION 3 STATE OF LOCAL INFRASTRUCTURE FIGURE 3-15: CONDITION BY REPLACEMENT VALUE SUPPORT VEHICLES FIGURE 3-16: CONDITION BY REPLACEMENT VALUE BUS PADS AND AMENITIES FIGURE 3-17: CONDITION BY REPLACEMENT VALUE BIKE LOCKERS Overall almost three quarters of the Town s Transit assets are in Good or Very Good condition. However it should be noted that there are a number of specific assets that are rated as Poor (2 Support vehicles) and Fair (1 Portable Data System and 5 of the Towns 18 buses). The assets that are rated as either Poor or Fair are not necessarily providing a lower level of service than the other assets, as the Town selects a maintenance regime that takes into account the assets age and is focused on maintaining service levels. For assets such as the Portable Data System, the assigned condition grade is just reflective of the assets age and while still fit for purpose, this grade does provide an indication of a future funding requirement. DATA CONFIDENCE FACILITIES Notes: 1. Facilities Condition grades are qualitative, but are based on the professional views of consultants during the preparation of a recent Facility Audit 3-10

33 SECTION 5 STATE OF LOCAL INFRASTRUCTURE DATA CONFIDENCE TRANSIT Notes: 1. Transit Condition grades have been derived from the assets age, when compared with the assets useful life. 3-11

34

35 Section 4 Expected Levels of Service

36

37 SECTION 4 Expected Levels of Service. The Purpose of Levels of Service The management of the Towns assets needs to consider their affordability while balancing customer needs and expectations. Levels of Service (LOS) is the means to measure this aspect of asset management. Through LOS, decisions are made based on their impact on customers, the community, and the environment and this enables a clear line of sight to be put in place, from the strategic goals of the Town through to day-to-day asset management decision making. LOS are linked at three (3) levels within the Town Corporate, Customer and Asset (or Technical) and the setting of these LOS measures needs to define reasonable expectations taking into consideration present and future needs over the lifecycle of the assets, affordability and risk. LOS can be measured at three (3) levels: Corporate LOS The key corporate performance expectations, based upon core values and sets the corporate objective. (e.g. providing safe roads) Customer LOS Defines the service that the Asset Manager/Town provides to the customer. (e.g. Number of traffic accidents for X amount of time) Asset (or Technical) LOS Defines the technical requirements necessary to achieve the service objectives. (e.g. % of preventative maintenance inspections completed) Currently the vast majority of performance indicators used to measure and track performance are asset/ technical indicators. This traditional view of asset stewardship drives asset interventions based on age and condition rather than customer or stakeholder outcomes. Although the asset stewardship approach provides a reasonably sound engineering assessment of the state of the asset base, the approach has a number of weaknesses: The grades assigned for condition and performance are subjective and the approach to grading may vary between departments and/or individuals; The information which underpins the grades and the assessment of remaining life may be of varying age and quality; and There is no assessment of the LOS that the asset provides to customers. In addition, the approach tends to overestimate the requirement for asset renewal/rehabilitation. This is because it overlooks the organization s capacity to: Rationalize the assets (by assessing whether or not it is still required); Adopt strategic solutions, by reorganizing the network to reduce or remove the asset; Use new technology; and Implement cost-effective operational solutions to defer replacement. 4-1

38 SECTION 4 EXPECTED LEVELS OF SERVICE The Town currently performs a hybrid approach to managing its assets, but aims to transition more fully into a serviceability approach that fosters a more customer centric view of asset management that will help to put the customer at the heart of decision-making. FIGURE 4-1: TRANSITION FROM TRADITION APPROACH TO SERVICEABILITY APPROACH A LOS framework and associated measures can have a number of uses within an Asset Management Program including: Forms the basis to inform customers of the proposed LOS to be offered; Enables the costs and associated benefits of the services offered to be identified linking investment to customer outcomes; Enables an assessment of the suitability, affordability and equity of the services offered; Provides a measure of the effectiveness of the AMP; and Provides a focus for the asset management strategies developed to deliver the agreed LOS.. Factors Affecting Levels of Service There are a wide range of factors affecting LOS. Some of the more important factors are: Strategic goals for the Town; Legislation and regulatory requirements; Community expectations; and Affordability... Strategic Goals for the Town The Town s LOS are established based on the strategic goals and objectives of Council. In general, the Town s strategic goals describe the direction that the Town wants to go in (i.e. what does the Town want to become?), and also influences resource allocation and guides future spending. This then enables resources to be allocated in a manner that aligns with and enables the Town to accomplish its strategic priorities and objectives. 4-2

39 SECTION 5 EXPECTED LEVELS OF SERVICE The Town is currently in the process of updating its Strategic Plan and this will include the development of five new goals and associated objectives. The goals/objectives that will specifically influence the development of LOS measures and targets include: TABLE 4-1: STRATEGIC GOALS THAT WILL INFLUENCE LOS MEASURES AND TARGETS Strategic Goal Objectives Organizational Excellence Provide effective service delivery and improved efficiencies; Develop a Succession Planning Strategy to retain and attract a skilled and high performing staff team, minimizing risk of leadership vacuum and ensuring transfer of organizational knowledge. Economic Growth Implement strategic initiatives to support economic growth Financial Sustainability Long range planning processes and the annual budget process should encourage decisions that support sustainability goals, including costs for full lifecycle of assets (short, medium and long term from initial acquisition to disposal), and preventative maintenance requirements, in making investment decisions; Regularly update long-range financial plans and forecasts. Vibrant and Connected Coordinated, multi-modal Transportation Plan working with all levels of Community government; Work with partners to provide a range of quality programs and services that engage with, and respond to, the needs and expectations of our changing community; Safe, effective and efficient transportation options for the community; Work with surrounding municipalities and the Region to integrate and connect municipal transit systems and address Milton Education Village transit requirements. The Town of Milton Official Plan (2008) includes strategic objectives for Facilities and Transit assets as follows: Recreation and Culture Facilities: The provision of community and cultural facilities is essential for the achievement of a strong and healthy community which provides for all aspects of human life. The Town is not involved in the provision and enhancement of all such services; however, where it is not directly involved it can assist in their provision and enhancement through its involvement with the appropriate agencies, groups and individuals. Transit: The Town's transportation system shall: Increase accessibility to major areas of employment, shopping and recreation, with an emphasis on accessibility by public transit; Promote and support integrated mobility; and Target a high level of usage in the Urban Area. These specific strategic goals directly influence the development and setting of LOS targets for the Town... Legislation and Regulatory Requirements Several of the Town s LOS are linked directly to legislative and regulatory standards and requirements. For example, in 2005, the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) was passed and 2015 will mark the mid-point of a 20-year plan to make Ontario more accessible. The legislation has a range of impacts on 4-3

40 SECTION 4 EXPECTED LEVELS OF SERVICE the Town s assets including impacting on both Transit and Facility assets, such as continued infrastructure improvements at bus stops and other related transit infrastructure or the accessibility for persons with disabilities to the Towns Facilities... Community Expectations The experience of a citizen of the Town, relative to another municipality can influence the customer s expectation of the LOS that the Town should provide in either a positive or negative manner. Furthermore, given the varying condition of assets in use within the Town, there are a variety of LOS that a citizen could experience. The expectations of the community can also be influenced by specific experiences of localized asset failure (e.g. at a specific recreational facility), which is not necessarily reflective of the Town s overall performance. In consideration of this, as part of the annual budget development process the Town conducts a Budget Public Input Survey to consult with the public. This is a method for engaging residents and business owners and soliciting public feedback on LOS and programs offered by the Town. The latest survey (May 2015) was conducted during the same timeframe as a statistically valid telephone survey by Forum Research Inc. The telephone survey results show that 50% of respondents are satisfied with the current LOS for Transit and 82% were satisfied with Recreation Facilities. The results of the surveys provide valuable information to staff for consideration in preparing the annual budgets, including satisfaction with LOS, recommendations for new services or elimination of existing services and level of support for property tax increases. Moving forward, the Town seeks to further educate its citizens with regards to the costs associated with improving or maintaining service levels... Affordability Funding levels and willingness-to-pay are primary factors governing the LOS that can be delivered by the Town. The current tax base does not provide sufficient funding both to maintain the existing asset base and to meet all of the future goals for improved and expanded services. Continued high rates of growth within the Town will make the situation worse. Through the Budget Public Input Survey conducted in May 2015, 43% of respondents indicated they would support an increase in the tax levy to provide incremental funding to maintain assets and 25% indicated they would support the introduction of new fees and taxes where possible to address the infrastructure funding deficit. The Town will continue to address the gap in funding through these options as well as looking to Provincial and Federal funding sources to support investment in its infrastructure and at some point in the future may need to make difficult decisions balancing the LOS provided with what is affordable. Future versions of this AMP should provide a useful vehicle for assessing and communicating the issues, options and decisions of affordability. 4-4

41 . Existing Performance Measures SECTION 5 EXPECTED LEVELS OF SERVICE The Town reports a range of performance measures associated with its assets and service delivery. Two (2) sets of measures relevant to facilities and transit are reproduced here. The Municipal Performance Measurement Program (MPMP) is reported annually by the Town and contains a range of efficiency and effectiveness measures across all municipal programs and services. TABLE 4-2: TRANSIT PASSENGER TRIPS LOS Metric Total number of Regular Service Passenger Trips on Conventional Transit in Service Area 409, , , , , , ,316 Population of the serviced area 85,191 83,227 79,842 63,939 62,800 49,700 49,000 Number of conventional transit passenger trips per person in the service area in a year The service area is defined as population within 400 metres of an existing transit route and/or population within an alternative service delivery program area (i.e. Trans-Cab service area). TABLE 4-3: INDOOR RECREATION FACILITY SPACE LOS Metric Square meters of indoor recreation facilities (municipally owned) 42,395 42,395 35,465 35,465 22,400 21,944 21,944 Population 100,743 98,000 92,200 88,000 82,000 81,000 75,000 Square metres of indoor recreation facilities per 1,000 persons (municipally owned) The measure per 1,000 persons fluctuates due to increases in population and the construction of new facilities. For example, in 2011 this measure increased by 47.5% due to an expansion of the Milton Sports Centre, and of the Nassagaweya Tennis Centre and Community Hall, partially offset by a 7.3% increase in population. In 2012, this measure decreased due to a 4.8% increase in population and no additional facility space added.. Levels of Service Measures As part of the development of this AMP the Town has started developing a formal suite of LOS measures. The measures are at an early stage of development and will be refined in future iterations of the AMP. The LOS have not been quantified yet, as such, they are expressed in terms of general trends upwards, downwards or stable assuming that budgets remain roughly at current levels over the next ten (10) years. 4-5

42 SECTION 4 EXPECTED LEVELS OF SERVICE TABLE 4-4: LEGEND OF TREND DESCRIPTIONS Symbol Trend Description Negative Upward Trend An upward trend represents a negative outcome for the Town of Milton and a deterioration in service delivery performance Positive Upward Trend An upward trend represents a positive outcome for the Town of Milton and an improvement in service delivery performance Negative Downward Trend A downward trend represents a negative outcome for the Town of Milton and a deterioration in service delivery performance Positive Downward Trend A downward trend represents a positive outcome for the Town of Milton and an improvement in service delivery performance Stable Trend Service delivery performance will remain stable Potential Levels of Service measures have been developed for seven (7) key customer values: Accessibility Reliability/availability Quality Customer Service Safety Sustainability Legislative TABLE 4-5: POTENTIAL LEVELS OF SERVICE AND TRENDS - FACILITIES (EXTERNAL CUSTOMERS) Value Objective Potential Level of Service Measure Current Trend Future Trend Comments Accessibility Provide sufficient facilities Meet AODA requirements # of facilities per capita (e.g. swimming pools, Libraries, Senior Centres, Ice Pads, Community Halls) % of Facilities compliant with AODA Requirements There is generally a high demand compared to capacity for facilities. Additional facilities are planned The Town is creating its own standards which will exceed the AODA. Facilities are mostly compliant. Community halls are among the oldest buildings in inventory and generally don't meet standards. The Town does provide other options for users. Availability/ Reliability Facilities available during opening hours (including holidays) % Availability (Actual available hours/planned available hours) Highly reliable service. Some issues with community Halls 4-6

43 SECTION 5 EXPECTED LEVELS OF SERVICE Quality Provide adequate quality of facilities % Customer Satisfaction (swimming pools, Libraries, Senior Centre, Ice Pads, Community Halls) Facilities generally meet expectations. Risk that the Senior Centre may not be meeting the required levels of service Safety Provide safe facilities / service # of reportable incidents Excellent safety record. Supported by reports, proactive investigation / inspection. Sustainability Energy Conservation # of LEED Facilities New buildings are LEED # of Facilities retrofitted for energy conservation Older buildings have been retrofitted for energy conservation Legislative Potable water at community halls from wells # of Boil Water Orders pa There is a water quality sampling program in place. Within the last 5 years there has been an instance of a boil water order being issued. 4-7

44 SECTION 4 EXPECTED LEVELS OF SERVICE TABLE 4-6: POTENTIAL LEVELS OF SERVICE AND TRENDS FACILITIES (INTERNAL CUSTOMERS) Value Objective Potential LOS Measure Current Trend Future Trend Commentary Accessibility/Quality Provide sufficient facilities for job roles and the same standard of accommodation for all Meet AODA requirements % satisfaction (Civic Buildings) % Facilities compliant with AODA requirements Currently the Facilities meet the needs of users, however the Town is projecting the number of administrative staff will grow and accommodation plans must be considered to provide adequate space. Fire Station 1 is not to the same standard as others. Station 1 is an inherited building that was re-purposed. There is committed capital for improvements at Station 1 High compliance except in heritage buildings. All new buildings will be compliant. The Town is creating a new standard to comply with legislation Availability/ Reliability Facilities available and fit for purpose during opening hours (including holidays) % Facilities that are fully available and functioning correctly e.g. temperature controlled at deg. C (Actual available hours/planned available hours) There are limited staff complaints about temperature depending on the location within a facility. Recent changes have improved the situation. Safety Provide safe workplace # of reportable incidents High performing Sustainability All new builds to LEED standards Minimize energy usage and costs # of LEED Facilities It is planned to assess the cost-benefit of LEED standard Facilities, compared with alternate green standards. # of Facilities retrofitted for energy conservation There are building automation systems but there are opportunities to improve. 4-8

45 SECTION 5 EXPECTED LEVELS OF SERVICE TABLE 4-7: POTENTIAL LEVELS OF SERVICE AND TRENDS TRANSIT Value Objectives CLOS Measures Current Trend Future Trend Commentary Provide a fully accessible service, capture higher ridership and meet AODA requirements % of fleet fully accessible Currently at 100%. Accessibility aimed at all customer groups % of stops that are accessible Continual improvement in bus stop accessibility as identified in annual Transportation Accessibility Plans Accessibility Transit is accessible to the majority of residents in the urban area % of population within 400m of a transit stop and/or within an alternative service delivery program area Service availability # Service hours available per week Availability/ Reliability On time service 99% of all trips within 2 mins of scheduled time Under 'normal' conditions the service is reliable. Reliability most affected by 3rd party activity such as road construction work and associated traffic Quality Adequate coverage and condition of benches, shelters and other transit stop amenities % Customer Satisfaction (Shelters, benches etc) There is a delay in new stops acquiring full amenities at the time of service delivery launch due to the nature of growth in population (need for flexibility, adaptation, etc.) therefore, there is an overall downward trend, that needs to be viewed alongside the ease of adaptability to future changes Clean buses & good ride quality % Customer Satisfaction (Buses) Buses are routinely cleaned (daily). There are no specific cleanliness objectives. Ride quality is not currently assessed Safety Provide a safe service # or Reportable Incidences Excellent safety record. 4-9

46 SECTION 4 EXPECTED LEVELS OF SERVICE. Internal and External Trends with potential to impact on Service Delivery There are also a number of internal and external factors and trends that have the potential to impact on the ability of the Town to continue to deliver established LOS over the Plan period. The following are key influences that the Town has identified as potentially impacting on LOS: TABLE 4-8: EXTERNAL / INTERNAL TRENDS Key External Trends Potential Impacts Complexity in regulation New legislation, e.g. Emissions standards or further accessibility requirements can potentially result in the existing Town assets not being able to meet the new LOS. To address this, the Town has in place processes to monitor when and how future legislation can impact the asset base and, where possible, new assets are future proofed where their design and construction takes into account the potential impact of any new legislation. However regardless of the processes that are in place to deal with new legislation, there can be a lag between new legislation coming into effect and the time it takes the Town to become fully compliant. The time to become fully compliant would be agreed with the relevant legislative body. Complexity in growth forecasts Expectations Key Internal Trends Aging infrastructure Loss of qualified or certified operations staff The timing and scale of development across the Town, which can sometimes be difficult to predict or plan, varies in accordance with market demands and the Town s own approval processes. This has the potential to impact on both financial and operational performance indicators. Societal and political influences will continue to shape the Town s strategy and priorities. Social trends have the potential to impact on LOS delivered by the Town, as people increasingly want more information and more dialogue, and this could be with regard to the type and quality of service delivered by the Town. Also, residents will likely expect the Town to use a broader range of communication approaches including social media to connect the Town and its residents, regarding service levels. Potential Impacts The Town, while having a relatively young asset base, does still have a number of older facilities in its portfolio. As these assets further deteriorate, there is a risk that levels of service may decline. However, the adoption of asset management practices by the Town will enable cost-effective and timely maintenance and rehabilitation activities (see Section 5.0 Asset Management Strategy) that will go some way in mitigating this risk. The Town has an aging workforce and as staff retire, there is a risk that their knowledge is lost to the organization. This can result in either inefficient working as staff will, initially, take additional time to carry out tasks or this can result in a declining LOS, as asset failures may not be prevented or the response to an asset failure may not be dealt with as promptly as it had previously. To address this, the Town continues to focus on training and documentation of work practices to help mitigate this risk. 4-10

47 Section 5 Asset Management Strategy

48

49 SECTION 5 Asset Management Strategy. Objective The purpose of the Town s Asset Management Strategy is to evaluate current practices and establish future practices that will be cost effective, sustainable and enable the Town to deliver agreed LOS at an acceptable level of risk. This asset management strategy considers both asset and non-infrastructure solutions. These solutions can be used to address renewal, growth, improvement and maintenance needs and support the development of a transparent and defensible 10-year plan to sustainably enable growth and optimize the ongoing maintenance of the Town s infrastructure, while continuing to meet agreed LOS. Section 5 of this document will cover asset management strategies for Facilities and Transit from a renewal/replacement, operations and maintenance, non-infrastructure solutions, IT support, procurement and risk management perspective. Future iterations of the AMP will seek to establish, in greater detail, whole life-cycle intervention options that provide the optimal mix of capital and operational interventions.. Asset Life Cycle Management Strategy An asset life-cycle management strategy provides a comprehensive and effective approach to asset management illustrated in Figure 5-1. It manages and optimizes the cost and performance of an asset by considering the whole life cycle. FIGURE 5-1: ASSET LIFECYCLE The asset lifecycle management strategy allows the Town to focus on the entire lifecycle of the asset from cradle to grave and make better informed and optimized decisions that consider a wider spectrum of solutions. Key components of this strategy include: 1. Operational Strategies: These include non infrastructure solutions to mitigating risks, deferring the need for upgrades/renewals, allowing for rehabilitation and renewals to be deferred without impacting on the risk to delivery of agreed LOS. These also include the consideration of Asset utilization and demand management along with emergency response planning and shut down and outage management. 2. Maintenance Strategies: These include approaches for establishing the optimal combination of planned and unplanned maintenance, considering factors such as cost-effectiveness, time delays, coordination with other Town Departments and other municipalities etc. 3. Investment Planning: This includes linking investment decisions to customer outcomes through the robust identification of needs, scoping of projects and prioritizing projects. It focuses on base maintenance (renewal and rehabilitation), meeting agreed LOS, adhering to legislation, accommodating growth, and the reduction of operating costs ( spend to save ). 5-1

50 SECTION 5 ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY.. Investment Planning The Investment Planning Process (see figure below) supports the Town s ability to provide agreed LOS and implement a robust, transparent and defendable delivery plan. This process focuses on linking investment decisions on the infrastructure to customer-oriented service delivery. Overall, the Town follows the Investment Planning Process by identifying goals/objectives, establishing needs, evaluating a variety of feasible solutions, prioritizing the solutions and developing investment plans based on the selected options. FIGURE 5-2: INVESTMENT PLANNING PROCESS.. Condition Assessment Programs Accurate and comprehensive data on an assets current condition is a fundamental aspect of good asset management practices, as having complete information regarding the infrastructure, mitigates premature replacement or failure of the assets. Sound management decisions regarding capital expenditures, operations and maintenance activities can therefore be based on a clear understanding of an assets condition and performance. For entire asset classes, a more cost effective cursory approach utilizing metrics such as Very Good, Good, Fair, Poor and Very Poor has been used for this version of the AMP. This approach allows for an overview of the assets and indicates which assets (e.g. those in poor and very poor condition) require more detailed inspections and assessments. Integrating condition assessment programs into asset management practices provides many benefits. A better understanding of an assets condition leads to more sound management practices and allows for the minimization of unnecessary expenditures. It also enables accurate asset reporting (e.g. accurate asset valuations, asset service life, etc.) contributing to the maintenance of agreed LOS and enables better decision making. In combination with risk management frameworks, having a sound understanding of the current condition of the asset base allows for the identification of potential future failures, leading to the establishment and scheduling of repairs, preventative maintenance and rehabilitation programs, in a financially accountable and transparent manner. 5-2

51 SECTION 5 ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY. Future Demand Data released by Statistics Canada with the 2011 Census shows that Milton has experienced rapid growth over the 10 year period from as seen in Table 5-1. During this timeframe Milton was the fastest growing municipality in Canada. TABLE 5-1: TOWN OF MILTON - POPULATION GROWTH Year Population Increase % , , % , % Growth is projected to continue for the foreseeable future, with a population of 160,000 by With the growth in population comes a proportional increase in Transit infrastructure and in the provision of facilities, both those used by the public and the civic buildings.. Procurement Methodologies The Town utilizes a range of procurement methodologies to ensure the best value when procuring goods and services and disposing of surplus assets. The Towns Purchasing Bylaw encourages competition in bids to obtain the highest quality of goods and services at a cost effective price while ensuring fairness, objectivity, accountability and transparency in the procurement process. Where possible, the Town partners with other municipalities for the procurement of goods and services, thereby maximizing purchasing power and avoiding potential duplication of work. The annual budget is typically approved by Town Council in December of the preceding year to which the budget applies. This allows for the tender process to begin early in the year when contractors are not as busy and pricing is more favorable.. Facilities.. Current Targets and Goals The Town has a set of targets and goals that drive decision-making in the investment program in relation to Facility assets. These targets and goals have been categorized as Growth and Enhancement, and Renewals.... Growth and Enhancement For the customer facing facilities, the key goals are that these facilities need to keep pace with population growth and provide quality community hubs. For the Civic facilities and the facilities that house the Town s employees the key goals are to maintain the safety and serviceability of the Town s facility assets. As outlined in the Community Services Master Plan Update (Aug 2015), key growth areas include a multiuse community centre by the year 2018 containing (subject to confirmation and budget approval): a twin pad arena indoor aquatics centre branch library dedicated older adult activity space active living studio large multi-purpose space 5-3

52 SECTION 5 ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY In addition it is planned to undertake a pre-planning process for the development of a subsequent Community Centre, with the potential for working in partnership with others. The Town is also focused on ensuring that all facilities are compliant with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act. Other enhancements have been provided at new facilities based on community demand including seating at the pool in the expansion to Milton Sports Centre, additional seating in arenas, and indoor walking tracks.... Renewals Practices & Lifecycle Improvement for Facilities The Town s current renewal practices and lifecycle improvement activities include: Condition Assessments/ Facility Audits; and Preventative Maintenance Contracts. Condition Assessments / Facility Audits / Accessibility Audits Condition assessments/ Facility Audits of the facilities and their components are carried out on a regular basis, by an external consultant approximately every 4 years. The results of these assessments help to identify the needs across a 25 year time span, in 5 year increments, identifying both the immediate needs (i.e. addressing any health and safety issues) along with future needs and this information is used to inform the budget forecast. The condition assessments are used to monitor the performance of an asset and compare the actual remaining service life with the notional remaining service life. This allows the Town to better inform the timeline for maintenance or replacement/ rehabilitation activities. The Town also incorporates the requirements for legislative items (i.e. Green Energy Act) as a part of their facility condition audit to help identify any corrective actions that need to be addressed. Additionally, the Town performs Accessibility Audits to identify areas where a retrofit is required to ensure compliance with the accessibility requirements of AODA i.e. this specific enhancement is legislative driven. Preventative Maintenance Contracts The Town hires external contractors to perform preventative maintenance activities on the Facilities. As part of these maintenance activities, equipment is inspected as per manufacturer recommendations while it is being serviced. In this way, any recommendations from the inspections can be used to inform the capital planning process. Records of maintenance or the replacement of parts are documented and are used to inform the actual remaining service life of the assets and to validate the forecast model in the Capital Plan. Investment Decision Considerations Customer needs are integrated into the Towns decision making process by considering public opinion and through ongoing discussions with Facilities staff, who utilize the assets on a daily basis. In addition, user survey information is collected to assist in collecting input. Meetings with community groups also help to inform trends and emerging interest areas. These discussions enable the identification of emerging trends, asset needs or required changes to the capital budget forecast. The capital budget forecast is also based upon the results of facility inspections that help to determine whether the replacement schedule should be compressed or can be extended to a later time period. In addition to asset condition and customer needs, investment decisions can also be driven by the availability of grant programs. For example, the Energy Conservation Grant motivated the replacement of incandescent lights with LED lights and the installation of sensor switches... Current Operational Maintenance Practices for Facilities Current operational work is carried out with the aim of maintaining the current LOS, enabling the deferment of capital, extending the life of the assets and/or to improve overall performance of the facilities and their respective components. The Facilities staff has a comprehensive overview of the current state of the facilities and regularly evaluates critical areas (i.e. areas where a failure could cause service interruptions) 5-4

53 SECTION 5 ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY with a view to better understanding where breakdowns could occur and uses the output of this assessment to inform and validate the forecasting/planning process. The Town has a planned maintenance program that utilizes external service contracts with licensed professionals who perform maintenance to meet legislative standards. The maintenance program includes a workplan which supports inspections and maps out preventative maintenance activities on a daily, weekly and monthly schedule. Maintenance work is optimized to consider coordination with external contracted work, seasonal effects, and is scheduled to minimize service disruptions. An area of improvement that the Town has identified for their operational maintenance practices is to proactively identify the utilization of the various facilities on a regular basis. Doing this will better inform maintenance planning decisions and validate if the Town is meeting aspects of its agreed customer levels of service... Information Technology Systems for Facilities The two key IT systems available to Facilities in support of their maintenance and renewal activities include: 1. Building Automation System 2. Work Management System Building Automation Systems (BAS) The facilities in the Town are equipped with Building Automation Systems which control the various systems within a facility (i.e. mechanical, electrical, HVAC etc.). A key challenge that the Town faces is that the various BAS systems are currently not centralized into one system and therefore each BAS is a stand-alone system for each of the individual facilities. Facilities staff are currently coordinating with their IT group to establish if the BAS s of the various facilities can be centralized under one platform and if feasible will improve efficiencies and standardization. Currently, individual facilities can have their own specific BAS platforms, resulting in the need for a range of vendors to support these. With the centralization of the systems, it is an opportunity to utilize the BMS as an operational tool to provide analytical data in addition to a management tool. Work Management Systems There is a Work Management System in place for maintenance services for Town Hall staff which is currently under-utilized, as the vast majority of current maintenance requests are in-person. The Town plans to improve on the capabilities and utilization of their WMS to provide more detailed maintenance history. The Town has prioritized a number of IT improvements including: 1. Adopting a strategic approach to the centralization of all IT systems within Facilities (i.e. harmonize all Building Automation Systems). 2. Acquiring a software control system for various building components. 3. Carrying out improvements to the current WMS to provide a more robust, detailed maintenance history... Risks to the Facilities Asset Management Strategy Knowledge Retention Through the Town s Strategic Plan goal of Organizational Effectiveness, the Town is working towards developing a Succession Planning Strategy to retain and attract a skilled and high performing staff team, minimizing risk of leadership vacuum and ensuring transfer of organizational knowledge. It is not forecasted that there will be significant turnover in staff in the near future but this is a risk that the Town will seek to mitigate in the future. 5-5

54 SECTION 5 ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY Asset Renewal Reserves The Town currently has reserves with target balances that are based on the average annual requirements for asset renewal activities based on lifecycle costing information. Contributions to reserves have not been sufficient for the Town s older facilities but as new facilities have been constructed in the past 10 years, the operating budget for each facility includes an annual contribution to reserves to fund future repair and replacement activities. The balances of the reserves are currently below their target balances as per approved policies and therefore sufficient funding may not be available for all future replacements. This poses a potential challenge to providing sufficient funding for the future maintenance needs for the facilities portfolio. Service Industry for Specialized Technology Milton is a rapidly growing Town with several new facilities and further facilities planned for the future. These newer facilities are accompanied by increasingly specialized technology, the majority of which are licensed and manufactured outside of Canada. This, in combination with a lack of local contractors specializing in these specific technologies, can result in process inefficiencies along with the associated costs. The Town currently has a standing agreement with a general contractor and recognizes the risk that the lack of alignment between the service industry and the specialized technology poses to the AM Strategy. As such the Town is currently exploring other options to mitigate this risk such as: The inclusion of specifications in future contracts that require a Canadian supplier or if not a Canadian supplier then one with a service facility within Canada; and The use of local contractors for specialized work.. Transit.. Current Targets and Goals The Town has a set of targets and goals that drive decision-making in the investment program in relation to Transit assets. These targets and goals have been categorized as Growth and Enhancement and Renewals.... Growth and Enhancement Transit growth and enhancement in the Town is outlined in the Moving Milton Forward 2013 to 2017 Transit Master Plan for the Town of Milton. This Plan provides a comprehensive review of current Milton Transit service levels, system deficiencies, cost reduction and revenue generating opportunities along with recommendations for service delivery improvement in the context of planned growth and community objectives. The Vision for Milton Transit over the next ten years is to be an essential part of the way Milton moves and grows. Key objectives that underlie the Town s plans for transit growth and enhancement include: 1. Ridership Growth 2. Strategic Investments 3. Seamless Regional and Inter-Regional Travel 4. Mobility Management 5. Technology, Productivity and Customer Service 6. Accessible Services The Town s 5 year service plan recognizes the need to enhance the transit level of service that will take the Town to a level that is more in line with other peer municipalities and address the needs of a diverse customer base and prepare for future population growth. Moving forward, over the next 5 years the Town s Transit strategy is focused on 4 services: 5-6

55 SECTION 5 ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY Conventional Transit Service. The focus for the conventional service is on servicing the growing neighborhoods, expanding service hours to include weekends and weekday evenings, provide improved connections to meet all GO train arrivals and departures and providing service to the growing employment areas. Paratransit Service. The focus for paratransit service is to continue the contracted door-to-door paratransit service (including brokered services such as taxis), to improve the accessibility of the fixed route conventional transit system and to improve the marketing and introduction of travel training. These services are targeted towards seniors and people with lower levels of mobility. Based on projections the paratransit ridership will increase by 59% over the next 5 years. Transit Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). Milton will have an onboard stop announcement system to meet AODA requirements as well as a system to estimate time of arrival at bus stops and provide real time information to customers. To improve incident management and service reliability, an operational system to monitor adherence to scheduled timing and transit signals will also be implemented. Marketing, Communications and Staffing. The Town will implement ambassadors to promote student and senior transit and will deploy social media and mobile applications to support this. An adequate amount of Town staff will be employed for performance monitoring, system planning, contract management, public and stakeholder consultation, partnership development, coordination with other departments and interface with other transit agencies. Any other specialized marketing and asset activities will be acquired as needed.... Renewals Practices & Lifecycle Improvement for Transit The Town s current renewal practices and lifecycle improvement activities for transit include: Preventative Maintenance Mid-life Refurbishment Preventative Maintenance: the Transit fleet has regular day-to-day maintenance carried out by a service provider who follows a regimented preventative maintenance approach. The approach is monitored through CVOR (commercial vehicle operation registration). The schedule for maintenance is based on the kilometers of service and is prescribed based on a combination of legislative and commercial requirements along with manufacturer suggested vehicle maintenance. Transit shelters are regularly inspected and monitored by the Town s contractor to maintain the interior area of the shelters in an acceptable condition. Bus stops are inspected regularly, with a higher frequency following the winter season. Operators of the Transit vehicles notify supervisors if they observe a missing or broken sign, with signs then being replaced and repaired on an as-needed basis. Mid-life Refurbishment: The Town s fleet of assets are all relatively new, but some are approaching their mid-life. All heavy duty vehicles are scheduled for a mid-life (6 years for heavy duty vehicles), refurbishment including an engine and transmission rebuild. In the past, some vehicles required a compressed scheduled for their mid-life maintenance i.e. an engine rebuild is required before it was scheduled, due to some vehicle fleet reliability issues. The decision was then made to replace the units with more reliable pre-owned vehicles, resulting in the same total expected lifecycle of the service vehicle. 5-7

56 SECTION 5 ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY.. Information Technology Systems for Transit The key IT systems available in Transit to support maintenance and renewal activities include: 1. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) 2. GFI Farebox 3. Fleet Assist 4. Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) Geographical Information Systems (GIS): The Town uses GIS to map the transit stops in the Town including GO Transit stops. The information included in the layers includes a description of what is at each stop location (i.e. bus shelter, sign) as well as the standards for covering maintenance requirements. GFI Farebox: GFI Farebox is an electronic system used by the Town that counts the number of passengers that board each transit vehicle. GFI Farebox counts the passengers by counting coins, tickets and also has a manual input option. The information from GFI Farebox is used to inform better understand the overall ridership for the Transit system and feeds into the Transit Ridership report. Fleet Assist: The Town s transit service provider utilizes the Fleet Assist system to schedule maintenance for transit vehicles. This systems considers various scenarios e.g. the presence of dust, in determining the maintenance schedule. The Town is able to access to the data from the contractor upon request. Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL): The Town will be introducing an AVL system for automated next stop announcement in compliance with AODA requirements. Moving forward the Town will look into systems which will enable real-time customer information and will collect data on actual versus scheduled time of arrival. This information would provide the basis for further establishment of current Levels of Service (LOS) measures and would be a key input into future business cases for renewal and upgrades... Risks to the Transit Asset Management Strategy Changing Environment: Investment in the Transit assets are long term commitments. With this, comes the challenge of adapting transit to changes in customer demands and behaviors along with changes in emerging transit trends. The Town seeks to find a feasible flexible and dynamic transit model in the future that will allow the ability for decisions to be made that are best able to adapt to future changes. The Role of Transit: At this time the role of transit within the Town is not well established. There are efforts being made to encourage behaviors that are more geared towards the use of public transit, however this needs to be assessed alongside the future potential funding and control options for Transit system. Integration of Transportation Services: Currently Milton transit is integrated with other transit services including Metrolinx and GO Transit. When possible, the Town seeks to integrate the transit services in a manner that is most beneficial for the customers. The Town is in support of two-way all day GO Train service to/from Milton with a Council commitment to support the service with required growth on the local transit system (for service integration).there are concerns about policies that have an associated risk to the performance of Milton Transit (i.e. paid versus non-paid parking). Ability to Meet Service Expectations: In its current environment, the Town is challenged in its ability to offer an enhanced level of service that would be comparable to other municipalities (i.e. higher frequency service, greater off-peak service, etc.). There are concerns that the Town will therefore have difficulty in meeting the service expectations of residents who have come from a larger municipality with a more established transit service. Limited Manufacturers: In Canada, there are only two manufacturers of the transit vehicles used by the Town. Due to this limited number of manufacturers, there is concern regarding the possible risks associated with potential price increases, parts availability along with the knowledge and support required. This is a risk that all municipal transit systems share in Canada. 5-8

57 Section 6 Financing Strategy

58

59 SECTION 6 Financing Strategy This section contains the financial requirements associated with the management of the Town's Facility and Transit assets over the Plan period. The financial projections presented in this section are based on the best available information to date. Plans for the ongoing improvement of information quality and the planning process will be an integral part of the Town's Corporate Asset Management Program going forward and is covered in greater detail in Section 7. The financing strategy for Facilities and Transit was developed using capital and operating expenditure data for the previous five years as well as the capital budget forecast and operating expenditure assumptions for the future. In order to ensure the effective implementation of the Town s AMP, it is important that this Plan is integrated with the Town s financial planning and long term budgeting process as well as departmental master plans. The development of a comprehensive financial plan that reflects the timely rehabilitation and maintenance of assets will allow the Town to identify the financial resources required for sustainable asset management based on long term asset needs, agreed LOS, legislative requirements, and projected growth requirements. This version of the AMP is focused, primarily, on the Town s asset lifecycle needs, specifically the expenditure required to maintain the current level of service for the Towns Facilities and Transit users and stakeholders. Details of the forecast expenditure also include the financial requirements associated with enhanced LOS, meeting new legislation and accommodating growth. Having a financial plan is critical for putting an asset management plan into action. In addition, by having a strong financial plan, the Town can demonstrate that they have made a concerted effort to integrate asset management planning with financial planning and budgeting and to make full use of all available infrastructure financing tools. This section of the AMP contains information related to the historical and forecast capital expenditure (CAPEX) and operating expenditure (OPEX) required to deliver the agreed LOS and ensure an appropriate level of asset stewardship.. Historical Capital and Operating Expenditures The breakdown of expenditure by type (e.g. Base Service Provision, Legislation, Growth, Enhancement etc.) for both CAPEX and OPEX has been assessed by analyzing the actual spending for the previous five years as well as the current Financial Plan. Capital expenditures are defined as expenditures that are of significant value and the resulting assets have a useful economic life of more than one year. Capital projects add value to the Town s physical assets or significantly increase their useful life. The figures below show the historical capital and operating expenditures for Facilities and Transit for the period 2010 to This section provides details of the CAPEX and OPEX prior year actual expenditures. From an asset management perspective, it is important to understand what the drivers for investment have been over recent years and also to understand how expenditure has changed year on year (if that is the case) as this will have an effect on how the asset base behaves in the future along with the associated future funding requirements. 6-1

60 SECTION 6 FINANCING STRATEGY The historic expenditure levels have been classified by expenditure type as outlined in the breakdown below, with two (2) predominant categories; base-service provision or renewal (i.e. to maintain the current service level), and enhancement (i.e. to provide some change or improvement from the current service level). This type of analysis will provide an understanding of what proportion of the actual expenditure has been focused on maintaining the current asset base, as opposed to being used for purposes such as growth driven projects or projects focused on providing an enhanced level of service. The same approach has been taken for the forecast expenditure as detailed in the next section... Expenditure Type Classification The two (2) predominant categories for expenditure classification are: Base-service Provision (or Renewal) This relates to capital expenditures that are required to maintain the current level of serviceability to customers. Base maintenance expenditure is not just for assets that are beginning to fail, but can also be used where there is a demonstrable saving in OPEX arising from the project (that is, automation or replacing the asset with a modern equivalent). This form of funding is classified as Spend to Save but is still base maintenance. Enhancement This relates to capital expenditures that cause a permanent increase in the current level of serviceability to a new base level. Enhancement is further divided as follows: Legislative This relates to expenditures that are required for compliance with new legally-enforceable obligations. E.g. AODA Enhanced Levels of Service This relates to expenditures that provide an identifiable, measurable, and permanent step change in overall level of service to existing customers above the standard previously provided. E.g. extending the hours of the bus service Supply/Demand Balance or Growth This relates to expenditures that provide services for new customers with no net deterioration from the current level of service provided to existing customers, as well as expenditure that accommodates the increased use of services by existing customers at the current level of service. E.g. providing additional capacity at facilities.. Historic Capital Expenditures Historic capital expenditure has been evaluated by analyzing the previous five years capital program with regard to the breakdown of expenditure into the four categories of expenditure, this breakdown is shown in Figure 6-1 and Figure 6-2 below. 6-2

61 SECTION 5 FINANCING STRATEGY FIGURE 6-1: HISTORICAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE (CAPEX) LEVEL FACILITIES TABLE 6-1: HISTORICAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE (CAPEX) LEVELS FACILITIES Historical Capital Expenditure (CAPEX) Base Maintenance $13,932,170 $4,703,659 $3,155,778 $4,471,800 $3,458,289 Legislation $2,724 $64,683 $37,577 $81,610 $909 Enhanced LOS $15,296,820 $7,708,614 $5,048,376 $14,710,587 $13,699,015 Growth $24,454,287 $20,372,143 $2,085,434 $18,179,603 $17,795,057 Totals $53,686,000 $32,849,100 $10,327,166 $37,443,600 $34,953,270 It should be noted that the expenditure highlighted in the above graph does vary considerably from year to year, specifically in year 2012, which is not uncommon for the annual spending in the capital program based on the requirement of the particular year. In each of the preceding and following years, the capital expenditures were higher than 2012 primarily due to new growth related facilities that were being constructed. In 2010 the Town was fortunate to receive grant funding for new facilities that were constructed in 2010 and 2011 which led to the higher expenditures in these years. $15.1m and $17.6m respectively was spent on the Milton Sports Centre Expansion and similarly $14.7m and $7.5m was spent on the Arts & Entertainment Centre, with these two projects accounting for almost 60% of the annual expenditure on facility assets. The expenditures in 2013 and 2014 are higher than 2012 mostly related to the construction of the Velodrome for the 2015 PanAm / ParapanAm Games. There were no significant growth related facilities being constructed in In contrast, the amount of expenditure on Base Maintenance has been relatively stable over the last four years, averaging at $3.95M per annum. The largest portion of the annual expenditure on Facilities assets in most years, has been allocated to enabling growth. Therefore, to ensure that the assets are effectively maintained and able to provide the level of service for which they are intended into the future, it is important that the Town allocates increased Base Maintenance expenditure in the capital forecast and increases contributions to reserves to fund Base Maintenance expenditures in the future as the asset base ages. 6-3

62 SECTION 6 FINANCING STRATEGY FIGURE 6-2: HISTORICAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE (CAPEX) LEVEL TRANSIT TABLE 6-2: HISTORICAL CAPITAL EXPENDITURE (CAPEX) LEVELS TRANSIT Historical Capital Expenditure (CAPEX) Base Maintenance $147,942 $16,500 $359,800 Legislation $14,131 $8,682 $16,294 $433 Enhanced LOS Growth $1,331,017 $600,369 $433 Totals $147,942 $14,131 $1,339,699 $633,163 $360,666 The expenditure profile for the Town s Transit assets is quite different to that of the Facility assets. While the Facility assets are relatively long lived, with a useful life of 50 years or more, and will require numerous capital repairs and maintenance throughout their life, the Transit assets, generally, have a much shorter life and the need for capital is much more predictable. The Town s buses account for approximately 96% of the transit assets, by value, and the replacement of these assets is based on a sound understanding of the typical bus life and what is the optimal time for replacement. Therefore due to the age profile of the bus fleet, the replacement cycle for these assets will result in peaks of expenditure in certain years and minimal expenditure in other years. In the last five (5) years, notably in 2012 and 2013, the bulk of expenditure has been focused on accommodating growth with the addition of new buses to the fleet... Historical Operating Expenditures. Figure 6-3 and Table 6-3 show the historical operating expenditures for Facilities and Transit from

63 SECTION 5 FINANCING STRATEGY FIGURE 6-3: HISTORICAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE (OPEX) FACILITIES 500, , , , ,000 Actual levels of Operational Expenditure (OPEX) - Facilities Civic Community Halls Fire Stations Leased Operations Recreation & Culture TABLE 6-3: HISTORICAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE (OPEX) FACILITIES Actual (Historical) Operating Expenditures (OPEX) Civic Community Halls Fire Stations Leased Operations Recreation & Culture 2010 $ 32,670 $ 9,908 $ 20,557 $ 7,849 $ 13,614 $ 79,698 $ 164, $ 34,557 $ 6,339 $ 20,412 $ 6,640 $ 17,212 $ 135,937 $ 221, $ 34,927 $ 11,089 $ 10,455 $ 943 $ 16,520 $ 150,033 $ 223, $ 100,214 $ 21,572 $ 36,533 $ 1,385 $ 37,559 $ 260,575 $ 457, $ 65,285 $ 13,616 $ 35,574 $ 2,342 $ 18,011 $ 284,747 $ 419,576 Total The operational expenditure associated with Facilities has increased year on year, with a significant increase in 2013, as the result of increased work on HVAC and electrical systems, repairs to doors at the sand/salt dome due to significant corrosion and repairs to life safety systems at various facilities in order to receive Certificate of Inspection Reports. The increase is, also, partially related to all the new facilities that were constructed or expanded in the years prior to 2013/2014 and the maintenance activities that were required at these facilities. 6-5

64 SECTION 6 FINANCING STRATEGY FIGURE 6-4: HISTORICAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE (OPEX) TRANSIT (CONVENTIONAL) Actual Levels of Operational Exenditure (OPEX) - Transit $4,500,000 $4,000,000 $3,500,000 $3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $ Actual Expenditure TABLE 6-4: HISTORICAL OPERATING EXPENDITURE (OPEX) TRANSIT (CONVENTIONAL) Actual (Historical) Operating Expenditures (OPEX) Actual $ 2,199,437 $ 2,497,542 $ 2,817,982 $ 3,665,050 $ 4,008,229 Operational expenditure related to the Transit assets has grown year on year over the last five years. This increase in expenditure reflects the growth in the asset base, with the largest increase being in 2013, which corresponds to the purchase of additional buses in the previous year.. Budget Forecasts Long range financial planning is an important exercise to ensure funds are available in the future as required to meet anticipated needs. Annually, Town staff prepare a ten year capital budget and forecast and 3-year operating budget and forecast for Council approval. This Plan has been prepared on the basis of the Capital Forecast and the Operating Forecast. These projections are subject to further review based on Council s review and approval of this Plan and its funding requirements... Forecast Capital Expenditure Typically a current year budget, plus the following 9-year capital forecast is prepared and presented to Council as part of the annual budget process. Council approves the current year capital budget and any projects where construction will span multiple years and also approves, in principle, the remaining 9 years. The approved capital budget represents a significant investment in the development and rehabilitation of capital infrastructure and associated studies to support the provision of services to the current and future citizens of the Town. The budget identifies and balances the capital requirements of growth while maintaining existing infrastructure. Through the preparation of the budget, consideration is given to actual costs incurred in the past for similar projects, current priorities, the impact on future operating budgets, feedback gathered through the public input process, availability of staff resources to undertake and properly manage the program and the available sources of revenue to fund the program. 6-6

65 SECTION 5 FINANCING STRATEGY FIGURE 6-5: 10-YEAR CAPITAL EXPENDITURE (CAPEX) FORECAST FACILITIES $35,000,000 $30,000,000 $25,000,000 $20,000,000 $15,000,000 $10,000,000 $5,000,000 Forecast Capital Expenditure - Facilities $ Base Maintenance Legislative Enhanced LOS Growth TABLE 6-5: 10-YEAR CAPITAL EXPENDITURE (CAPEX) FORECAST FACILITIES Total Base Maintenance $ 1,655,692 $ 3,676,530 $ 1,874,471 $ 557,221 $ 754,804 $ 1,084,783 $ 1,258,768 $ 1,038,163 $ 878,213 $ 758,038 $ 13,536,683 Legislation $ 145,188 $ 55,875 $ 55,875 $ 55,875 $ 55,875 $ 55,875 $ 55,875 $ 50,875 $ 50,875 $ 50,875 $ 633,063 Enhanced LOS $ - Growth $ 24,372,973 $ 26,931,524 $ 5,274,647 $ 25,883,435 $ 21,898,897 $ 14,176,715 $ 12,576,378 $ 7,526,167 $ 7,526,168 $ 146,166,904 Total $ 1,802,895 $ 28,107,394 $ 28,863,887 $ 5,889,761 $ 26,696,133 $ 23,041,575 $ 15,493,379 $ 13,667,438 $ 8,457,278 $ 8,337,105 The planned expenditure on the Facility assets over the next ten years is $160M, with over 90% of this planned expenditure being focused on enabling growth in the Town. Over the Plan period Base Maintenance expentiture totals $13.5M, which is reasonably stable on a year by year basis with an average of $1.35M per annum. In addition to Base Maintenance and Growth expenditure, the Town is also planning to continue to progress its program of making its facilities more accessible to the public. The annual forecast fluctuates from year to year based on the level of growth expected during the year and the timing for the delivery of infrastructure to accommodate the growth. It is not uncommon for the capital program to experience large fluctuations in annual spending as one or two large infrastructure projects can significantly increase the total program. 6-7

66 SECTION 6 FINANCING STRATEGY FIGURE 6-6: 10-YEAR CAPITAL EXPENDITURE (CAPEX) FORECAST TRANSIT Forecast Capital Expenditure - Transit $4,000,000 $3,500,000 $3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $ Base Maintenance Legislative Enhanced LOS Growth TABLE 6-6: 10-YEAR CAPITAL EXPENDITURE (CAPEX) FORECAST TRANSIT Total Base Maintenance $ 331,001 $ 404,261 $ 156,534 $ 183,150 $ 1,457,224 $ 971,483 $ - $ 2,428,706 $ 595,441 $ 830,150 $ 7,357,950 Legislative $ - Enhanced LOS $ 10,175 $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ 10,175 Growth $ 457,441 $ 1,016,633 $ 1,016,633 $ 520,716 $ 1,016,633 $ 1,016,633 $ 1,016,633 $ 1,016,633 $ 520,716 $ 520,716 $ 8,119,387 Total $ 798,617 $ 1,420,894 $ 1,173,167 $ 703,866 $ 2,473,857 $ 1,988,116 $ 1,016,633 $ 3,445,339 $ 1,116,157 $ 1,350,866 $ 15,487,512 Similar to Facilities, the capital forecast for Transit can fluctuate significantly from year to year depending on the needs of a particular year. The majority of Transit assets have a relatively short asset life and therefore all of the vehicles will require replacement over the Plan period, with some of the shorter life assets, such as the support vehicles, requiring two replacements. In addition to maintaining the existing fleet of buses, it is also planned that the bus fleet be further expanded as new routes are introduced and funding has been allocated to this expansion on a yearly basis. To accommodate this growth in the bus fleet due to new routes, it is also planned to add two (2) new bus pads per year... Operating Forecast The annual operating budget and a 2-year forecast is prepared and presented to Council for consideration and approval. The operating budget is an important document as it sets out the programs and LOS to be provided to the community and the sources of funding, including the tax levy, that are required to fund the programs and services. In preparing the operating budget, consideration is given to previous trends in revenues and expenditures, current inflation rates, economic conditions and finding more efficient methods of providing services. Consideration is also given to the operating impacts of recently completed capital projects to ensure that funding is available to operate, repair and maintain new assets. This includes allocating funding to reserves to be used in the future for the redevelopment of assets as required. 6-8

67 SECTION 5 FINANCING STRATEGY FIGURE 6-7: TOTAL OPERATIONAL EXPENDITURE (OPEX) FORECAST FACILITIES TABLE 6-7: TOTAL OPERATIONAL EXPENDITURE (OPEX) FORECAST FACILITIES Forecast Operating Community Civic Expenditures ( Halls Fire Stations Leased Operations Total OPEX) Recreation & Culture 2015 $ 649,445 $ 126,998 $ 326,832 $ 902,541 $ 404,201 $ 11,031,690 $ 13,441, $ 662,434 $ 129,538 $ 333,369 $ 920,592 $ 412,285 $ 11,252,324 $ 13,710, $ 675,683 $ 132,129 $ 340,036 $ 939,004 $ 420,531 $ 11,477,370 $ 13,984,752 Total FIGURE 6-8: MAINTENANCE OPERATIONAL EXPENDITURE (OPEX) FORECAST FACILITIES 6-9

68 SECTION 6 FINANCING STRATEGY TABLE 6-8: MAINTENANCE OPERATIONAL EXPENDITURE (OPEX) FORECAST FACILITIES Forecast Operating Expenditures (Maintenance OPEX) Civic Community Halls Fire Stations Leased Operations Recreation & Culture Total 2015 $ 66,591 $ 13,888 $ 36,285 $ 2,389 $ 18,372 $ 290,442 $ 427, $ 68,948 $ 14,380 $ 37,569 $ 2,473 $ 19,022 $ 300,724 $ 443, $ 71,017 $ 14,811 $ 38,697 $ 2,548 $ 19,593 $ 309,746 $ 456,411 The forecast operational expenditure profile over the next 3 years is planned to be relatively stable. Forecasting operational expenditure over a 10 year period is something that will be considered for future versions of the AMP. This would then enable a better understanding of any step changes in operational expenditure either due to new capital assets coming into operation or as a result of changes in operational practices. FIGURE 6-9: OPERATIONAL EXPENDITURE (OPEX) FORECAST TRANSIT (CONVENTIONAL) TABLE 6-9: OPERATIONAL EXPENDITURE (OPEX) FORECAST TRANSIT (CONVENTIONAL) Forecast Operating Expenditures (OPEX) Maintenance Costs $588,000 $588,000 $620,000 Other OPEX Costs $3,689,175 $4,503,238 $5,630,630 Transit $4,277,175 $5,091,238 $6,250,630 Operational funding for Transit assets continues to grow at approximately 20% per year. This reflects the growth in the bus fleet, with the largest increases being in insurance, fuel, maintenance contracts and vehicle licenses. The funding for future replacement of Transit assets is primarily from Reserves. Therefore as the number of buses increases, contributions to the Reserve should increase proportionally to allow for 6-10

69 SECTION 5 FINANCING STRATEGY the future replacement of the assets. Therefore over the period 2015 to 2017, there is also a significant increase in transfers to Reserves reflected in the 2016 and 2017 operational expenditure forecasts.. Sources of Funding The Town obtains funding for its operating and capital expenditures for Facilities and Transit assets from a number of sources, as detailed below: Property Taxation: Each year the Town levies and collects property taxes. These are based on a tax rate applied to the assessed value of land and buildings. User Fees: User fees recover the costs of municipal programs or services from the individuals or organizations that specifically use the program or service. The user fees charged by the Town are approved by Council through the Rates and Fees By-law. User fees include an allocation for the management of Town assets used to deliver programs and services. Capital Reserves and Reserve Funds: These funds are revenues earned by the municipality that have been allocated for use in future years for capital revenue sources including such things as property taxes, user fees, development charges or contributions from Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation Grants: From time to time, there may be an opportunity to apply for Provincial or Federal grants to fund asset improvements. Cost Sharing Agreements: There may be opportunities for the Town to enter into cost sharing agreements with third parties, to fund recreation facility development and ongoing maintenance. The sources of funding specifically related to Facilities and Transit are outlined below. FIGURE 6-10: SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING FACILITIES 6-11

70 SECTION 6 FINANCING STRATEGY TABLE 6-10: SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING FACILITIES Facilities Capital Forecast Revenues Summary Recoveries from others $ - $ 75,245 $ 600,000 $ - $ 1,217,634 $ 1,217,634 $ - $ - $ - $ - Contribution from operating $ - $ 3,580,557 $ 2,028,403 $ 540,496 $ 3,693,865 $ 3,657,679 $ 1,575,955 $ 5,949,572 $ 4,144,984 $ 4,595,161 Reserves and Reserve Funds $ 1,800,880 $ 6,190,689 $ 4,600,720 $ 1,188,032 $ 6,038,054 $ 6,082,587 $ 3,043,087 $ 10,520,285 $ 8,455,255 $ 8,335,081 Development Charges $ - $ 21,839,444 $ 23,661,150 $ 4,699,711 $ 19,438,426 $ 15,739,334 $ 12,448,271 $ 3,145,131 $ - $ - Total $ 1,800,880 $ 31,685,935 $ 30,890,273 $ 6,428,239 $ 30,387,979 $ 26,697,234 $ 17,067,313 $ 19,614,988 $ 12,600,239 $ 12,930,242 Since the majority of the capital forecast is related to the construction of new infrastructure to accommodate growth in the community, the largest source of revenue for the capital budget is Development Charges. Development Charges provide a source of funding to construct new infrastructure but may not be used for the future redevelopment of that infrastructure. Therefore, as infrastructure is built, the Town should proactively be planning for funding the costs associated with maintaining the infrastructure in the future so that it can continue to function at the LOS for which it was intended. The second largest source of funding in the capital forecast is contributions from reserves and reserve funds. These sources make up approximately 35 percent of the funding in the capital forecast and come from both external sources as well as internal contributions made to reserves for future requirements as per long term financial plans. Following that the next largest source of funding is contributions from the operating budget, with the smallest contribution coming from Recoveries from others This mix of funding sources will be subject to further review and may change through future budgets after Council s review of the AMP and other financial planning documents. Funding for the capital program will consider long term financial plans, master plans for delivery of infrastructure to accommodate growth and will also give consideration to putting in place a more sustainable approach to funding maintenance and redevelopment programs. FIGURE 6-11: SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING TRANSIT 6-12

71 SECTION 5 FINANCING STRATEGY TABLE 6-11: SOURCES OF CAPITAL FUNDING TRANSIT Recoveries from others $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - Reserves and Reserve Funds $ 731,322 $ 1,295,424 $ 1,047,697 $ 629,971 $ 2,348,387 $ 1,862,646 $ 891,163 $ 3,319,869 $ 1,042,262 $ 1,276,971 Development Charges $ 67,295 $ 125,470 $ 125,470 $ 73,895 $ 125,470 $ 125,470 $ 125,470 $ 125,470 $ 73,895 $ 73,895 Debentures $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - $ - Total $ 798,617 $ 1,420,894 $ 1,173,167 $ 703,866 $ 2,473,857 $ 1,988,116 $ 1,016,633 $ 3,445,339 $ 1,116,157 $ 1,350,866 Even though just over 50% of the forecast capital expenditure for Transit assets is associated with accommodating growth in the Town, this is not reflected in the sources of funding, in that less than 10% of the capital funding is from Development Charges. However, while the fixed assets such as bus pads are funded by Development charges, purchases of buses and other vehicles are funded from the reserves and reserve funds.. The Infrastructure Gap The difference, if any, between the amount of funding required to maintain assets in a reasonable state of repair, compared with the currently available capital funding over the Plan period is referred to as the Infrastructure Gap. Typically the initial value of the Gap, at the start of the Plan period, is the current replacement value of all those assets that have been categorized as Very Poor. The value for the required funding over the total Plan period is then the current replacement value of all those assets that have been categorized as Very Poor in 2015 plus what is anticipated to become Very Poor by the end of The infrastructure gap is usually focused on renewal funding, the funding allocated as base maintenance in the above sections, as opposed to funding allocated to growth, new legislation, enhanced Levels of Service, or Spend to Save. (i.e. spending capital specifically to reduce operating costs... Facilities Currently there is a minor infrastructure deficit in the Town s facilities, with one facility graded as Very Poor and having a replacement value of $37,000. Due to foundation issues and the structure nearing the end of its design life, the most likely solution for this facility will be demolition. Demolition costs have been estimated at approximately $6,000. In addition to the asset graded as Very Poor, the recent Facility Audit identified a range of assets requiring immediate work covering repair, replacement and inspection work totaling $171,400. This will include both OPEX and CAPEX funded work. In addition, assuming that some, or all, of the Poor assets move into the Very Poor category over the Plan period, this would give a combined total of the assets requiring replacement or a major upgrade of $3.4M. While the total 10 year capital program is $160M, the majority of this is allocated to growth and enhancement projects. However $13.5M has been allocated for Base Maintenance which will be directed at those assets in poorer condition and will also be directed at assets in the Fair, Good and Very Good categories. The pace at which these assets will deteriorate is dependent on the typical useful life of the assets, the associated operational and maintenance regimes and the environmental conditions the assets are subject to, as well as the continually evolving methodologies for asset maintenance and replacement. For Facility assets which have long asset lives, it is anticipated that only a small portion of the asset base will move into Very Poor condition over the next decade. It is also prudent to recognize that just beyond the plan period there will be assets which are currently in Fair condition that will move to the poor and subsequently Very Poor conditions category unless proactive action is taken for maintenance and redevelopment. Therefore, the Town should not wait until assets reach a poor state of repair before investing in these assets, as there 6-13

72 SECTION 6 FINANCING STRATEGY will be repair and replacement work that will need to be addressed throughout the assets lifecycle, if the asset life is to be optimized. TABLE 6-12: ASSET CONDITION FACILITIES Very Poor Poor Fair Good Very Good Total Facilities (Replacement Value) $ 37,000 $ 3,356,000 $ 33,064,000 $129,385,000 $ 8,435,000 $224,277,000 Facilities (%) 0.02% 1.50% 14.74% 57.69% 26.05% For Facilities, the budgeted capital investment for Base Maintenance is adequate to meet the average annual asset need, assuming that the improvements to the Asset Management strategy are implemented. In addition the Town expects to grow further over the coming years. Therefore all of the pressures on the Town are acting to increase the requirement for Base Maintenance funding over the coming years. Future versions of the AMP will seek to further quantify this increased requirement for funding. The recent report prepared by Morrison Hershfield, Facility Infrastructure Audit Report, identified the following repairs: Priority 1 immediate repairs totaling approximately $178K, recommended for completion in Total 10 year Capital Expense Forecast ( ) $14.9M. This includes some discretionary renewal items where the timing and scope is at the Town s discretion and also includes a number of recommendations that would be funded from the OPEX budget. The current level of planned expenditure of $13.5M for Base Maintenance is therefore currently sufficient to maintain service levels, at least for the first five years of the Plan, however the Town needs to be mindful that as new facilities are constructed adequate funding needs to be set aside in reserves for future asset renewal and rehabilitation activities. More work is required to define the Town s Level of Service measures and targets, which will enable a better understanding of the required service and hence condition that the asset base should be maintained at, which can then be fed into the Town s risk based assessment approaches and would then enable a more accurate assessment of the funding required to achieve that target... Transit Currently there is a minor infrastructure deficit in the Town s Transit assets, with those assets graded as Poor having a replacement value of $52,970. However, due to the short asset life of the majority of Transit assets, all of the vehicle assets that the Town currently owns, will move into the Very Poor condition category over the Plan period and will therefore require replacement in the Plan period. Over the Plan period, $7.4M has been allocated for Base Maintenance. This differs slightly from the replacement value of the assets, in that the replacement value is based on the historic cost of the asset, inflated to today s costs. However in developing the 10 year Capital Investment forecast, actual estimates of the costs to replace the asset with its modern equivalent are used. Taking into account this variation between the replacement cost used for TCA purposes and the Modern equivalent Asset valuation (MEAV), along with accounting for the approximately $200K of fixed assets that will not require replacement in this period, the planned capital investment of $7.4M is sufficient to replace all of the assets that will reach the end of their useful lives over the Plan period, and to keep the overall asset stock in an acceptable condition. 6-14

73 SECTION 5 FINANCING STRATEGY However, Reserve funds will need to be reviewed and set at a level to continue with this rate of replacement, while taking into account that the asset base is continuing to grow. TABLE 6-13: ASSET CONDITION TRANSIT Very Poor Poor Fair Good Very Good Total Transit (Replacement value) 0 $ 52,970 $ 2,590,345 $ 2,251,139 $ 3,134,125 $ 8,028,579 Transit (%) 0% 1% 32% 28% 39%. Strategies for Addressing Future Funding Shortfalls This section provides details of what the Facilities and Transit divisions have been doing and what it plans to do, to minimize any infrastructure backlog, to better understand the size of the backlog and to manage the assets so that the correct level of rehabilitation is carried out with the aim of slowing the deterioration of assets... Asset Management Strategies By adopting the asset management practices and strategies as covered in Section 5, any future Infrastructure backlog can be partially mitigated. An example of this will be to obtain better condition and performance data on assets and to gather this data at a more granular level. This would enable better estimation of which elements of the assets are actually in Very Poor condition. By doing this our future estimates of any infrastructure backlog would only include those parts of the assets classified as Very Poor. This is in contrast to the current approach which assumes that the complete asset is Very Poor. An example of this is a Facility asset where currently the complete Facility could be classified as Very Poor, where in reality only a single key component of the facility is Very Poor, but other elements still have remaining life. In addition, the cost of the Very Poor asset that has been used in the assessment is the full replacement cost of the asset, whereas in many cases, the Town will consider a range of solutions that will likely lead to lower cost replacement options. Similarly other strategies include the rationalization of assets where there may currently be two assets in Very Poor condition which could be replaced by one, thereby significantly reducing the total replacement cost. With regard to the further deterioration of assets causing them to move into the Very Poor category, there are a number of maintenance approaches available that the Town has been adopting. If applied at the correct point in an assets lifecycle, these approaches can slow down the deterioration process and therefore lessen the growth of any Infrastructure Deficit. These maintenance activities are normally funded from a combination of the Capital and Operational budgets and may, in the short term, require enhanced funding for a period of time. The Town will also need to continue its reactive work while enhancing its proactive maintenance approach. However decisions on the selection of optimum maintenance activities should be made on a lowest whole life cost basis. By adopting a more proactive approach to the management of its assets, the Town will realize significant cost savings over the useful life of these assets. 6-15

74 SECTION 6 FINANCING STRATEGY.. Funding Options Funding options will be dependent on the Town s spending priorities.... Reserves and Reserve Funds The Town maintains reserve and reserve funds for various purposes that are used in allocating funding to the capital program. Council has approved policies on the purpose and use of each of the reserves and reserve funds along with the target balances required to provide sustainable long range financial forecasts. Reserves are an important component of long range financial planning. The benefits of having reserve funding available for asset management include being able to stabilize tax rates when dealing with unforeseen circumstances, financing one-time investments, accumulating funding for significant future projects and managing the use of debentures. Through the 2013 budget, Council approved the creation of an Infrastructure Renewal Reserve. Annual funding has been allocated to this reserve for future asset management requirements. Funding from the dividends earned through being the sole shareholder of Milton Hydro as well as the reallocation of GTA Pooling funds from the Region to the Town are also transferred into a reserve to be used for infrastructure renewal projects. The Town also maintains other reserves that are used for the maintenance and renewal of assets.... Debenture Funding As a lower tier municipality within the Region of Halton, Milton s credit rating is evaluated as part of all the municipalities within the Region. Standard and Poor s Ratings Services affirmed the Region s AAA long-term issuer credit and senior unsecured debt ratings. This rating is the highest rating available. Standard and Poor s (S&P) rating analysis was based on a number of factors including very strong liquidity, a well-diversified economy and a history of strong budgetary performance. The achievement of an AAA rating is widely recognized in the investment industry. It ensures the Town will continue to achieve the lowest possible financing rates when issuing debt in the financial markets minimizing the longer term costs of infrastructure capital. The Town s 2015 debt payments total $5.4M, which is equivalent to 6.1% of own source revenues. This is well within the established internal and external debt capacity limits. Expressed in dollar terms, the OMB guideline permits $22.3Min maximum annual debt payments, and the Council policy of 15% permits $13.4M. The graph that follows demonstrates the Town s current, approved borrowing per the 2015 capital budget in relation to the various debt capacity limits in place. The Town is well within the approved limits with 2017 as the most constrained year with a ratio of 9.29 percent due to a one time principle repayment. The town has the option to refinance this principle amount for an additional 5 years but it is anticipated that full repayment will be made in

75 SECTION 5 FINANCING STRATEGY FIGURE 6-12: TOWN OF MILTON: DEBT CAPACITY RATIOS ,000 Town of Milton Debt Capacity Ratios (Existing, Approved, 2015 Budget and Capital Forecast Debt) $000's 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 New Debt Payments per Capital Forecast Total 2015 Budget Debt Non-Tax Supported Existing and Approved Existing and Approved (Tax Supported) OMB 25% Council Policy 20% (All Debt) Council Policy 15% (Tax Supported) Debenture funding is used as a source of revenue in funding the annual capital program however, the interest payments incurred on the debt result in increased costs overall. Consideration should be given to increasing funding from the tax levy and working towards a pay-as-you-go funding model in order to maximize the investment of funds into infrastructure maintenance and renewal.... External Sources Grants and Subsides The Federal and Provincial governments have provided funding to finance capital projects through programs such as Building Canada, Gas Tax revenue sharing and other infrastructure investment programs. Some of these programs, such as Building Canada and infrastructure investment programs, are one-time in nature as a result of economic stimulus funding or are application based. Therefore, this type of funding is not necessarily predictable or sustainable and revenue from these types of programs is recognized once a formal agreement is in place. Gas Tax revenue sharing is a more predictable and reliable funding source as it is based on a multi-year contribution agreement but is limited in how it can be applied. The Town continues to take advantage of all opportunities to maximize revenue from grants and subsidies where possible; however, due to the unpredictable nature of some grants and subsidies it cannot be relied upon as a tool for addressing the infrastructure deficit. Development Charges Development Charges are a source of funding provided by developers to be used in financing the growth related capital infrastructure needs in the community as outlined in the Development Charges Background Study and Development Charges Bylaw. As this funding is to be used for growth related infrastructure it cannot be utilized in addressing the infrastructure deficit. 6-17

76 SECTION 6 FINANCING STRATEGY. Summary and Associated Risks The 10 year plan presented in this AMP addresses those assets in poorer condition and provides a long term approach to sustain the assets. The majority of spending is focused on enabling growth in the Town, although for both Transit and Facilities the amount allocated for the maintenance of the assets is considered appropriate until the next review of the AMP which will include a further analysis of any potential backlog. Should the AMP not be accepted as presented there will be an increasing risk to the LOS provided to user groups for Facilities and Transit, including addressing the poorer condition assets as well as the general aging of the remaining assets over the term of this plan in order to maintain LOS. Growth in demand will require additional assets in both the short and the long term to maintain LOS. A further risk to the plan is competing priorities within the capital plan, as the departments must fund a number of areas within the capital plan and priorities may arise that reduce the funding available for base maintenance, with extended periods of reduced funding resulting in a long-term reduction in the LOS. This risk must be reviewed in the context of corporate priorities in the Annual Financial Plan. Data Gaps & Recommendations In this version of the Plan, a detailed analysis of future funding methodologies has not been included. However this will be a focus area as part of the improvement of the AMP and therefore will be featured in future versions of the Plan In compiling the data for this Section, it should be noted that the current OPEX budgeting process only contains information for the first three years of the Planned period. This has resulted in varying levels of data confidence within this section as shown per Figure 6-13, and Figure 6-14 below. The Capital budget forecast for renewal/rehabilitation was developed from estimates of the work required for each project/asset purchase. The forecast is considered accurate and reliable for the initial five year plan with lower confidence in the latter part of the plan. FIGURE 6-13: CURRENT FINANCIAL DATA CONFIDENCE RATING FACILITIES DATA CONFIDENCE Notes: 1. Future forecasts of OPEX are based on a % increase compared with the current year. 2. CAPEX forecasts are less accurate for the latter five years of the Plan FIGURE 6-14: CURRENT FINANCIAL DATA CONFIDENCE RATING TRANSIT DATA CONFIDENCE Notes: 1. Future forecasts of OPEX are based on a % increase compared with the current year 2. CAPEX forecasts are less accurate for the latter five years of the Plan 6-18

77 Section 7 Plan Improvement and Monitoring

78

79 SECTION 7 Plan Improvement and Monitoring. Improvement Plan This section outlines the improvement and monitoring program to enhance future revisions of this plan and the associated asset management strategies and financial projections. The recommended improvements move the Town towards a more sustainable management of its assets. The following improvement plan recognizes that management of the Town s Facilities and Transit assets is a continual and ongoing process. Implemented on an annual basis, improvement projects are essential for the continual improvement of the Departments asset management practice. In 2014 Council adopted the Town s Asset Management Plan for Roads and Structures assets. A corporate approach towards asset management should be adopted to review and consolidate priorities and resources identified for roads, structures, facilities and transit assets. The proposed asset management improvement plan tasks are shown in Table 7.1. The projects listed below will be reviewed by the Asset Management Team for timing, taking into account resource availability and priority. TABLE 7-1: IMPROVEMENT PLAN TASKS Task No. Task Responsibility Resources Required Timeline 1 Update and revise the plan to reflect changes in the asset portfolio and business practices. Corporate Services Internal Ongoing 2 Consolidate priorities and resources identified in the Town s AMP for Roads and Structures with the AMP for Facilities and Transit Corporate Services Internal Ongoing 3 Levels of Service a. Further Develop Level of Service measures for existing assets b. Ensure Level of Service measures are developed with each new facility project undertaken c. Review and refine data capture and reporting d. Establish Target LOS along with associated costs Community Services, Engineering Services Community Services Community Services, Engineering Services Community Services, Engineering Services Internals /

80 Task No. Task Responsibility Resources Required Timeline 4 State of the Infrastructure Review approaches for assigning condition grades to assets, including assigning condition grades at a more granular level e.g. components within a facility Community Services, Engineering Services Internal / External TBD a. Facilities b. Transit 5 Asset Management Strategy Assess the economic potential of proposed improvements to the current asset management strategy and then implement the improvements. Corporate Services, Community Services, Engineering Services Internal 2016 Develop a more robust approach to investment prioritization across asset groups Corporate Services External 2017 Gradually review asset management practices such as risk management, asset lifecycle and investment planning within the Town and recommend further improvements Corporate Services External Finance Strategy Consider extending OPEX forecasting to 10 years 7 Have future iterations of the AMP extended to include other asset groups, namely: Corporate Services Internal 2017 Corporate Services External 2017 Parks Storm Water Management Systems Roads right-of-way (sidewalks, traffic signals, signs, street trees). Plan Review and Monitoring.. Plan Review Once approved, this plan will become the Town s plan for the effective and efficient management of its assets. This plan will remain current until replaced by an updated plan. This Asset Management Plan is a living document which is relevant and integral to the daily Asset Management activities within the Town. To ensure the plan remains useful and relevant, the following process of Asset Management plan monitoring and review activities will be undertaken: Formal adoption of the plan by the Town; Review and formally adopt levels of service, as these become available; 7-2

81 Revise Plan every four to five years to incorporate and document changes to work programs, outcomes of service level reviews and new knowledge resulting from the asset management improvement program. Some sections, such as Section 3 (State of the Infrastructure) or Section 4 (Levels of Service) may require updating more frequently; and Quality assurance audits of asset management information to ensure the integrity and cost effectiveness of data collected (ongoing)... Plan Monitoring The following indicators will be monitored to measure the effectiveness of this Plan: Compliance with legislative requirements; Quality of Service Delivery 100% compliance with service targets or targets exceeded; Capital project delivery outputs delivered to schedule (or better) and on budget (or better); Operational and maintenance budgets met (or better); Quality of Risk Management No events occurring outside the risk profile; and Benchmarking with comparable Departments in other municipalities Maintain performance.

82

83 Appendices

84

85 Appendix A: Facilities Asset List

86

87 Age Condition Replacement Facility Type Facility Name Asset ID (2015) (Qualitative) Cost 1 Civic Town Hall - Heritage Section A21 - Town Hall, 150 Mary Street, Milton 84 Good $ 33,882,000 2 Community Halls Boyne CC B01 - Boyne Community Centre, 2287 Britannia Road West, Boyne 61 Fair $ 483,000 3 Community Halls Nassagaweya CC A28 - Nassagaweya Tennis Centre & Community Hall, 9267 Guelph Line, Campbellville 4 Very Good $ 1,104,000 4 Community Halls Hugh Foster Hall A07 - Hugh Foster Hall, 141 King St., Milton 138 Good $ 1,688,000 5 Fire Fire Station 1 A04 - Fire Station #1(Central), 405 Steeles Ave., Milton 38 Poor $ 3,356,000 6 Fire Fire Station 2 A25 - Fire Station #2, 2665 Reid Sideroad, Campbellville 12 Good $ 3,562,000 7 Fire Fire Station 3 A06 - Fire Station #3 Headquarters, 610 Savoline Blvd., Milton 3 Very Good $ 4,657,000 8 Fire Fire Station 4 A26 - Fire Station #4, 405 James Snow Parkway, Milton 5 Good $ 3,548,000 9 Leased 555 Industrial Dr A Industrial Drive, Milton 22 Fair $ 10,366, Leased 45 Bruce St A11-45 Bruce Street, Milton 41 Fair $ 4,229, Leased 25 Brown St A29-25 Brown Street, Milton 35 Good $ 2,799, Leased 16 Hugh Ln A30-16 Hugh Lane, Milton 129 Good $ 629, Leased Chris Hadfield Park Building A03 - Chris Hadfield Park Building, 1 Hadfield Way, Milton 40 Good $ 499, Operations Brookville Dome A01 - Brookville Dome, Guelph Line, Brookville 45 Good $ 304, Operations Brookville Depot Fair $ 665, Operations Salt and Sand Facility A23 - Salt and Sand Facility, 5600 Regional Road 25, Milton 6 Good $ 1,556, Operations Milton Operations Centre - Excluding Salt & Sand Facility A24 - Milton Operations Centre, 5600 Regional Road 25, Milton 1 Very Good $ 12,262, Recreation & Culture Milton Centre for the Arts A22 - Milton Centre For The Arts & Main Library, 1010 Main St. East, Milton 4 Very Good $ 35,846, Recreation & Culture Library Branch No. 1 A27 - Library Branch #1, 945 Fourth Line, Milton 6 Very Good $ 3,514, Recreation & Culture Rotary Park Building A17 - Rotary Park Building, 100 Garden Lane, Milton 11 Good $ 710, Recreation & Culture Brookville Concession B03 - Brookville Concession, Guelph Line, Brookville 26 Good $ 216, Recreation & Culture Campbellville Concession (New) B04 - Campbellville Concession (New), 100 Main St., N., Campbellville 25 Good $ 183, Recreation & Culture Campbellville Concession (Old) B05 - Campbellville Concession (Old), 93 Campbellville Ave. E., Campbellville 19 Good $ 141, Recreation & Culture Lions Sport Park Concession B06 - Lion Sport Park Concession, 77 Thompson Rd., Milton 19 Fair $ 187, Recreation & Culture Omagh Concession B08 - Omagh Concession, 1426 Britannia Road West, Omagh 45 Very Poor $ 37, Recreation & Culture Field House - Community Park B11 - Field House, Community Park, Milton 2 Very Good $ 859, Recreation & Culture Mill Pond Gazebo B07 - Mill Pond Gazebo, 50 Martin St., Milton 15 Very Good $ 193, Recreation & Culture Victoria Park Gazebo B10 - Victoria Park Gazebo, Victoria Park Square, Milton 30 Fair $ 115, Recreation & Culture Bronte Meadows Park Washrooms B02 - Bronte Meadows Park Washrooms, Laurier Ave., (Bronte Meadows) 26 Good $ 117, Recreation & Culture John Tonelli Sports Centre A08 - John Tonelli Sports Centre, 217 Laurier Ave., Milton 37 Good $ 7,901, Recreation & Culture Milton Memorial Arena A10 - Milton Memorial Arena, 77 Thompson Rd., Milton 40 Good $ 8,378, Recreation & Culture Milton Sports Centre A13 - Milton Sports Centre, 605 Santa Maria Blvd., Milton 6 Good $ 60,827, Recreation & Culture Milton Leisure Centre A09 - Milton Leisure Centre, 1100 Main Street East, Milton 24 Fair $ 17,019, Recreation & Culture Milton Tennis Club A14 - Milton Tennis Club, 800 Santa Maria Blvd., Milton 11 Good $ 624, Recreation & Culture Nassagaweya Tennis Centre A16 - Nassagaweya Community Centre, Guelph Line, Campbellville 27 Good $ 1,515, Recreation & Culture Lions Sport Park Building B12 - Lions Sports Park Washroom, 77 Thompson Road South, Milton 9 Good $ 306,000 $ 224,277,000 Appendix A: Facilities Asset List Page 1 of 1 Town of Milton Asset Management Plan Facilities and Transit

88

89 Appendix B: Transit Asset List

90

91 Transit Asset Type Asset ID Age Condition Replacement 1 BUS 0901 O Fair $ 506,610 2 BUS 0902 O Fair $ 506,610 3 BUS 0903 O Fair $ 506,610 4 UNIT 1001 O Fair $ 506,610 5 UNIT 1002 O Fair $ 506,610 6 UNIT 1201 O Good $ 506,610 7 UNIT 1202 O Good $ 506,610 8 UNIT 1203 O Good $ 506,610 9 UNIT 1301 O Good $ 229, UNIT 1302 O Good $ 229,564 Buses 11 UNIT 1303 O Good $ 229, TRANSIT BUS 9701 O V Good $ 506, TRANSIT BUS 9702 O V Good $ 506, TRANSIT BUS 9703 O V Good $ 506, TRANSIT BUS 9704 (2015 Addition) 0 V Good $ 506, TRANSIT BUS 9705 (2015 Addition) 0 V Good $ 506, TRANSIT BUS 1401 (2015 Addition) 0 V Good $ 229, TRANSIT BUS 1402 (2015 Addition) 0 V Good $ 229,564 TRANSIT FAREBOX 2010 O01037 Included under buses (Not counted in asset numbers) 5 Fair 19 Data Sytems PORTABLE DATA SYSTEM O00327 PORTABLE DATA SYSTEM 7 Fair $ 57, Support SUPPORT VEHICLE T FORD RANGER 5 Poor $ 25, Vehicles SUPPORT VEHICLE T JEEP PATRIOT 5 Poor $ 27, BUS PADS/AMENITIES P BUS PAD POOL (8 Assets) 7 Good $ 23, BUS PADS/AMENITIES P BUS PAD POOL (5 Assets) 6 V Good $ 14, BUS PADS/AMENITIES P00350 BUS PAD-MILTON HOSPITAL (5 Assets) 4 V Good $ 16, Bus Pads BUS PADS/AMENITIES P00390 Bus Pads 2012 POOL (6 Assets) 3 V Good $ 17, BUS PADS/AMENITIES P00422 BUS PADS 2013 POOL (9 Assets) 2 V Good $ 28,232 BUS PADS/AMENITIES O01526 Transit Bus Stp Retrofit Pool (Not counted in asset numbers) 1 V Good $ 48, BIKE LOCKERS O01046 METROLINX BIKE RACKS/LOCKERS 5 Good $ 19,407 Lockers 56 BIKE LOCKERS O01452 LS-BIKE LOCKERS 2 V Good $ 17,064 $ 8,028,579 Appendix B: Transit Asset List Page 1 of 1 Town of Milton Asset Management Plan Facilities and Transit

92

93

94 Prepared for Follow 2015 CH2M

LONDON CORPORATE ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN 2014

LONDON CORPORATE ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN 2014 LONDON CORPORATE ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN 2014 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT Acknowledgement The Corporate Asset Management office would like to acknowledge the efforts of the staff of the individual City of London Service

More information

2014 ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN Building, Stormwater & Linear Transportation

2014 ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN Building, Stormwater & Linear Transportation 2014 ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN Building, Stormwater & Linear Transportation Version 1 Table of Contents Executive Summary... 5 1.1 Background... 5 1.2 State of Local Infrastructure... 5 1.3 Desired Levels

More information

COMPREHENSIVE ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

COMPREHENSIVE ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY COMPREHENSIVE ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY APPROVED BY SENIOR MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE ON AUGUST 23, 2012 (TO BE FINALIZED AFTER APPROVAL OF CAM POLICY BY COUNCIL) August 2012 Contents CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

More information

Town of Mattawa Asset Management Plan. December 2013

Town of Mattawa Asset Management Plan. December 2013 Town of Mattawa Asset Management Plan December 2013 2 P a g e Town of Mattawa Asset Management Plan Executive Summary This Asset Management Plan is intended to describe the infrastructure owned, operated,

More information

Business Unit Asset Management Plan Framework & Guidelines

Business Unit Asset Management Plan Framework & Guidelines Draft Report Business Unit Asset Management Plan Framework & Guidelines Prepared for March 2014 Contents Section Page Contents... i Background... 1 Asset Management Plans... 1 The AMP Framework... 1 About

More information

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. Asset Management Relationships and Dependencies. Introduction

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. Asset Management Relationships and Dependencies. Introduction EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Introduction The Asset Management Plan demonstrates sound stewardship of the Region s existing assets to support services at desired levels and to ensure the support of the Region s infrastructure

More information

Financial Statement Guide. A Guide to Local Government Financial Statements

Financial Statement Guide. A Guide to Local Government Financial Statements Financial Statement Guide A Guide to Local Government Financial Statements January, 2012 Ministry of Community, Sport and 1 Financial Statement Guide Table of Contents Introduction Legislative Requirements

More information

Asset Management Plan

Asset Management Plan City of Powell River Buildings Asset Management Plan Scenario 1 and 2 Version 2.2 July 2013 Document Control Doc ID Rev No Date Revision Details buildings s1_v1 buildings s2_v1 buildings s1_v2 buildings

More information

The Corporation of the Municipality of Callander. Asset Management Plan

The Corporation of the Municipality of Callander. Asset Management Plan The Corporation of the Municipality of Callander Asset Management Plan April 2014 1 Index A) Executive Summary P. 3 B) Introduction P. 4 C) State of Local Infrastructure P. 7 D) Expected Levels of Service

More information

Financial Services FINANCIAL SERVICES UTILITIES 57 FINANCIAL SERVICES AND UTILITIES 2016-2018 BUSINESS PLAN. CR_2215 Attachment 1

Financial Services FINANCIAL SERVICES UTILITIES 57 FINANCIAL SERVICES AND UTILITIES 2016-2018 BUSINESS PLAN. CR_2215 Attachment 1 CR_2215 Attachment 1 Financial Services FINANCIAL SERVICES & UTILITIES 57 FINANCIAL SERVICES AND UTILITIES 2016-2018 BUSINESS PLAN Acting Branch Manager: Stacey Padbury Table of Contents INTRODUCTION Our

More information

Long-Term Asset Management Plan 2011-2021

Long-Term Asset Management Plan 2011-2021 Long-Term Asset Management Plan 2011-2021 Contents Introduction...3 A shared vision...4 Strategic planning to achieve our goals...4 Towards 2031...5 A long-term vision, communicated by our community...5

More information

Program: Facilities and Construction Management. Program Based Budget 2016-2018. Facilities and Construction Management. Page 81

Program: Facilities and Construction Management. Program Based Budget 2016-2018. Facilities and Construction Management. Page 81 Program: Program Based Budget 2016-2018 Page 81 Program: Vision: To develop and maintain town buildings which are safe, comfortable and welcoming to all. Mission Statement: To provide technical expertise

More information

The Town of Fort Frances

The Town of Fort Frances The Town of Fort Frances Long-Term Capital Financial Plan POLICY Resolution Number: 391 (Consent) 12/09 SECTION ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE NEW: December 2009 REVISED: Supercedes Resolution No. Policy Number:

More information

CVRD Asset Management Policy

CVRD Asset Management Policy CVRD Asset Management Policy Policy Statement The Cowichan Valley Regional District (CVRD) shall adopt and apply recognized holistic Asset Management practices in its strategic planning, operations and

More information

RE: 2014 Asset Management Plan. OBJECTIVE: To present Council with an Asset Management Plan and recommended implementation strategy moving forward.

RE: 2014 Asset Management Plan. OBJECTIVE: To present Council with an Asset Management Plan and recommended implementation strategy moving forward. HALDIMAND COUNTY Report PW-GM-01-2014 of the General Manager of Public Works For Consideration by RE: 2014 Asset Management Plan OBJECTIVE: To present Council with an Asset Management Plan and recommended

More information

The City of Owen Sound Asset Management Plan

The City of Owen Sound Asset Management Plan The City of Owen Sound Asset Management Plan December 013 Adopted by Council March 4, 014 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY... 1 INTRODUCTION....1 Vision.... What is Asset Management?....3 Link to

More information

Asset Management Plan Overview

Asset Management Plan Overview Council Strategy Asset Management Plan Overview City of Albany 2013 File Ref: CM.STD.6 Synergy Ref: NMP1331749 102 North Road, Yakamia WA 6330 Version: 25/06/2013 PO Box 484, ALBANY WA 6331 Tel: (08) 9841

More information

STRATEGIC FINANCIAL PLAN 2007 to 2010

STRATEGIC FINANCIAL PLAN 2007 to 2010 STRATEGIC FINANCIAL PLAN 2007 to 2010 January 2008 Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction Page 3 2.0 Linkage Long Term Financial Planning and the City s Community Strategic Plan Page 4 3.0 Why is Long Term

More information

Business Plan: Corporate Asset Management

Business Plan: Corporate Asset Management Business Plan: Corporate Asset Management How does this service contribute to the results identified in the City of London Strategic Plan? A Strong Economy A Sustainable Infrastructure Corporate Asset

More information

2010 financial statement discussion and analysis

2010 financial statement discussion and analysis 2010 financial statement discussion and analysis INTRODUCTION The City of Ottawa 2010 Annual Financial Report contains the audited consolidated financial statements prepared in accordance with principles

More information

Building Infrastructure Asset Management Plan

Building Infrastructure Asset Management Plan Building Infrastructure Asset Management Plan Version 1.1 Building Infrastructure Asset Management Plan (Version 1.1) Page 1 of 19 Document Control Council policy documents change from time to time and

More information

Enterprise Asset Management Program

Enterprise Asset Management Program Purpose: The City of Red Deer 2009 2011 Strategic Plan identifies the implementation of an as one of The City s strategies to achieve medium and long term financial sustainability of the organization.

More information

Page 1 of 24. To present the Asset Management Policy 2014 for Council adoption.

Page 1 of 24. To present the Asset Management Policy 2014 for Council adoption. Page 1 of 24 COMMUNITY AND SERVICES SPECIAL COMMITTEE REPORT 9 DECEMBER 2104 AGENDA ITEM 6.1 ASSET MANAGEMENT POLICY 2014 REVIEW Director: Manager: Ian Butterworth Director Infrastructure and Engineering

More information

Infrastructure Asset Management Strategy

Infrastructure Asset Management Strategy Infrastructure Asset Management Strategy Strategy Owner Manager Parks and Assets Engineering and Infrastructure Creation Date 27 March 2006 Revision Date 4 March 2015 Please check Council s Intranet to

More information

ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY City of Salisbury ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY Version 6 June 2015 City of Salisbury Asset Management Strategy Document Control Document Control NAMS.PLUS Asset Management www.ipwea.org/namsplus Document

More information

Township of Amaranth. Asset Management Plan Report

Township of Amaranth. Asset Management Plan Report Township of Amaranth Prepared By: R.J. Burnside & Associates Limited 15 Townline Orangeville ON L9W 3R4 Prepared for: Township of Amaranth File No: 300033404 The material in this report reflects best judgement

More information

ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN

ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN DECEMBER 2013 (Released in August 2014) Asset management planning is the process of making the best possible decisions regarding the building, operating, maintaining, renewing, replacing

More information

Four Pillars of Urban Sustainability Submission

Four Pillars of Urban Sustainability Submission Four Pillars of Urban Sustainability Submission Introduction The sustainability of a city can, in part, be measured by the quality of its infrastructure. Physical assets such as roads, sewer lines, transit,

More information

Asset Management Primer. the Canadian Infrastructure Report Card

Asset Management Primer. the Canadian Infrastructure Report Card Canadian Infrastructure Report Card Asset Management Primer the Canadian Infrastructure Report Card For more information on this Report Card, or the project, please contact info@canadainfrastructure.ca.

More information

1. INTRODUCTION... 1 2. PURPOSE OF THE ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY... 2 3. ASSET MANAGEMENT... 3

1. INTRODUCTION... 1 2. PURPOSE OF THE ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY... 2 3. ASSET MANAGEMENT... 3 ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY 2010-2020 November 2009 1. INTRODUCTION... 1 2. PURPOSE OF THE ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY... 2 3. ASSET MANAGEMENT... 3 4. WESTERN AUSTRALIAN ASSET MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM

More information

DISTRICT OF NORTH VANCOUVER GUIDE TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

DISTRICT OF NORTH VANCOUVER GUIDE TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS DISTRICT OF NORTH VANCOUVER GUIDE TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS DISTRICT OF NORTH VANCOUVER Our goal at North Vancouver District is to make information sharing and reporting convenient, accessible and relevant

More information

2014 Business Plan & Budget

2014 Business Plan & Budget 2014 Business Plan & Budget Finance Department Mission Statement To support our internal and external stakeholders in bringing together people, partnerships and possibilities to be financially strong and

More information

Asset Management Plan Public Works and Social Housing Infrastructure City of Brantford, Ontario

Asset Management Plan Public Works and Social Housing Infrastructure City of Brantford, Ontario 2013 Asset Management Plan Asset Management Plan City of Brantford, Ontario November 29, 2013 Prepared by: Capital Planning Facilities and Asset Management, Public Works Corporation of the City of Brantford

More information

Asset Management Plan Final Report

Asset Management Plan Final Report AssetManagementPlan FinalReport DillonConsultingLimited 10FifthStreetSouth Chatham,ONN7M4V4 T:519-352-7802 F:519-354-2050 May,2014 www.dillon.ca EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Public infrastructure is central to our

More information

Municipal Asset Management Toolkit

Municipal Asset Management Toolkit Municipal Asset Management Toolkit A Guideline for Local Decision Makers Implemented by: Network of Associations of Local Authorities of South East Europe WHAT IS ASSET MANAGEMENT? An integrated approach

More information

2015-18 Department Business Plan. Fleet Services

2015-18 Department Business Plan. Fleet Services 2015-18 Department Business Plan Fleet Services My objective as Director of Fleet Services is to provide a comprehensive fleet management program that supports our internal partners and the citizens of

More information

ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN

ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN Tof Proud Heritage, Exciting Future ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE 3 OVERVIEW 8 FACILITIES 12 FLEET 16 PLAYGROUND EQUIPMENT 19 ROADWAYS 23 BRIDGES 26 WATER RELATED ASSETS 2 One of the goals

More information

TEC Capital Asset Management Standard January 2011

TEC Capital Asset Management Standard January 2011 TEC Capital Asset Management Standard January 2011 TEC Capital Asset Management Standard Tertiary Education Commission January 2011 0 Table of contents Introduction 2 Capital Asset Management 3 Defining

More information

DRAFT 2016 Budget and 2017-18 Financial Plan

DRAFT 2016 Budget and 2017-18 Financial Plan DRAFT 2016 Budget and 2017-18 Financial Plan Presentation to Special Council Council Chamber 1 Strategy Map Outlines Vaughan s vision, mission, values Brings focus and alignment to position City for success

More information

City of Brantford Water and Wastewater Ontario Regulation 453/07 Financial Plans. Financial Plan #063-301

City of Brantford Water and Wastewater Ontario Regulation 453/07 Financial Plans. Financial Plan #063-301 City of Brantford Water and Wastewater Ontario Regulation 453/07 Financial Plans Financial Plan #063-301 May 26, 2015 Contents Page EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (i) 1. Introduction... 1-1 1.1 Study Purpose... 1-1

More information

Strategic Plan. Valid as of January 1, 2015

Strategic Plan. Valid as of January 1, 2015 Strategic Plan Valid as of January 1, 2015 SBP 00001(01/2015) 2015 City of Colorado Springs on behalf of Colorado Springs Page 1 of 14 INTRODUCTION Integrated and long-term strategic, operational and financial

More information

Financial Plan #203-301B

Financial Plan #203-301B The Corporation of the Township of Whitewater Region Financial Plan #203-301B Cobden Drinking Water System Licence #203-101 Beachburg Drinking Water System Licence #203-102 Haley Drinking Water System

More information

Saugeen Shores Asset Management Plan

Saugeen Shores Asset Management Plan 2012 Saugeen Shores Asset Management Plan Town of Saugeen Shores Asset Management Plan 1 Table of Contents SECTION PAGE NO. Table of Contents 1 List of Figures 2 Executive Summary 3 1.0 Preamble 4 2.0

More information

Alberta Municipal Sustainability Strategy Self-Assessment Questionnaire. Promoting Municipal Sustainability

Alberta Municipal Sustainability Strategy Self-Assessment Questionnaire. Promoting Municipal Sustainability Alberta Municipal Sustainability Strategy Self-Assessment Questionnaire Promoting Municipal Sustainability This page intentionally left blank INTRODUCTION Sustainable, responsive, and accountable municipal

More information

Corporation of the County of Renfrew

Corporation of the County of Renfrew Corporation of the County of Renfrew Asset Management Plan November 26, 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Executive Summary Page 3 2.0 Introduction Page 5 3.0 State of Infrastructure Page 15 Buildings Page 20

More information

ROAD NETWORK ASSET MANAGEMENT AS A BUSINESS PROCESS. Paper prepared for the REAAA Conference in Japan, 4 9 September 2000

ROAD NETWORK ASSET MANAGEMENT AS A BUSINESS PROCESS. Paper prepared for the REAAA Conference in Japan, 4 9 September 2000 ROAD NETWORK ASSET MANAGEMENT AS A BUSINESS PROCESS Paper prepared for the REAAA Conference in Japan, 4 9 September 2000 Florentina Mihai, BEng, GDipMgt, MIEAust Main Roads Western Australia Neville Binning,

More information

Managing municipal assets for regulatory compliance with PSAB 3150

Managing municipal assets for regulatory compliance with PSAB 3150 Managing municipal assets for regulatory compliance with PSAB 3150 White paper July 2009 By Sil Zoratti Director of Marketing, The Createch Group, a Bell Canada company, Executive summary As of January

More information

ACHIEVING GREEN IN FEDERAL REAL PROPERTY ASSET MANAGEMENT

ACHIEVING GREEN IN FEDERAL REAL PROPERTY ASSET MANAGEMENT ACHIEVING GREEN IN FEDERAL REAL PROPERTY ASSET MANAGEMENT President s Management Agenda Federal Real Property Asset Management Initiative February 2006 Table of Contents Introduction...1 Background...1

More information

Where available we have reviewed preliminary documents completed as part of these studies.

Where available we have reviewed preliminary documents completed as part of these studies. 1. Introduction urbanmetrics inc. has been retained by the City of Vaughan to conduct a Commercial Land Use Review (CLR). The purpose of this study is to examine the current commercial structure in the

More information

A Quick Guide to Municipal Financial Statements MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS

A Quick Guide to Municipal Financial Statements MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS A Quick Guide to Municipal Financial Statements MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS June 2010 Alberta Municipal Affairs (2010) A Quick Guide to Municipal Financial Statements Edmonton: Alberta Municipal Affairs For more

More information

Road Asset Management vs Pavement Management A new Paradigm. Arthur Taute Stewart Russell

Road Asset Management vs Pavement Management A new Paradigm. Arthur Taute Stewart Russell Road Asset Management vs Pavement Management A new Paradigm Arthur Taute Stewart Russell Contents Background Definitions Improvements over PMS TMH22 elements Conclusions BACKGROUND Municipal AMS GRAP17

More information

Managing Capital Assets

Managing Capital Assets Managing Capital Assets A New Emphasis on a Traditional Role By Public Sector Digest Research and Shayne Kavanagh Capital asset management has become a topic of increasing interest for local governments,

More information

Calgary s Asset Management Strategy

Calgary s Asset Management Strategy Calgary s Asset Management Strategy www.calgary.ca 268-CITY (2489) Introduction A city s health can be measured by the quality of its infrastructure. Municipal infrastructure is the foundation for a healthy

More information

2012-2016 Business Plan Summary

2012-2016 Business Plan Summary Owner: 2012-2016 Business Plan Summary Program Corporate, Operational & Council Services Service grouping Corporate Services Service Type Internal Service Tom Johnson, Managing Director - Corporate Assets,

More information

Asset Management Plan

Asset Management Plan Asset Management Plan Table of Contents Executive Summary... 5 Asset Management Plan... 6 Introduction... 6 Financial Overview... 10 Conclusion... 10 Attached Appendices... 10 Asset Management Strategy...

More information

CITY OF VAUGHAN EXTRACT FROM COUNCIL MEETING MINUTES OF MARCH 19, 2013

CITY OF VAUGHAN EXTRACT FROM COUNCIL MEETING MINUTES OF MARCH 19, 2013 CITY OF VAUGHAN EXTRACT FROM COUNCIL MEETING MINUTES OF MARCH 19, 2013 Item 9, Report No. 9, of the Committee of the Whole, which was adopted, as amended, by the Council of the City of Vaughan on March

More information

Contents. 3 Overview. 4 Snapshot of the Future. 4 Vision. 4 Guiding Principles. 5 The Strategy. 6 What Will We Do? 6 Create a Customer-Centred Culture

Contents. 3 Overview. 4 Snapshot of the Future. 4 Vision. 4 Guiding Principles. 5 The Strategy. 6 What Will We Do? 6 Create a Customer-Centred Culture CUSTOMER SERVICE STRATEGY 2013 Contents 3 Overview 4 Snapshot of the Future 4 Vision 4 Guiding Principles 5 The Strategy 6 What Will We Do? 6 Create a Customer-Centred Culture 6 Update Corporate Customer

More information

Glenorchy City Council Asset Management Strategy for Infrastructure Assets

Glenorchy City Council Asset Management Strategy for Infrastructure Assets Glenorchy City Council Asset Strategy for Infrastructure Assets 2014/15 to 2017/18 Version 1.3 June 2014 Glenorchy City Council Asset Strategy for Infrastructure Assets Document Control Document Control

More information

TOWN OF RICHMOND HILL WATER AND WASTEWATER ONTARIO REGULATION 453/07 FINANCIAL PLAN

TOWN OF RICHMOND HILL WATER AND WASTEWATER ONTARIO REGULATION 453/07 FINANCIAL PLAN TOWN OF RICHMOND HILL WATER AND WASTEWATER ONTARIO REGULATION 453/07 FINANCIAL PLAN Financial Plan #022-301 JUNE 3, 2010 CONTENTS Page 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Study Purpose 1-1 1.2 Background 1-1 1.2.1 Financial

More information

The Corporation of the City of Burlington PARKS & RECREATION

The Corporation of the City of Burlington PARKS & RECREATION The Corporation of the City of Burlington PARKS & RECREATION REC 026 ADMINISTRATIVE POLICY FACILITIES JOINT VENTURE POLICY Effective: January 2010 PREAMBLE: Parks and Recreation services are part of the

More information

2008/09 Financial Management Strategy

2008/09 Financial Management Strategy 2008/09 Financial Management Strategy Report on outcomes For more information visit www.manitoba.ca R e p o r t o n O u t c o m e s / 1 Report on Outcomes Budget 2008 set out the second Financial Management

More information

Asset Management. Framework and Guidelines. Part 2 - Asset Management Guidelines for Western Australian Local Governments p1.

Asset Management. Framework and Guidelines. Part 2 - Asset Management Guidelines for Western Australian Local Governments p1. Asset Management Framework and Guidelines Part 2 - Asset Management Guidelines for Western Australian Local Governments p1. Contents Foreword 4 Part 1 Asset Management Framework 5 1. Introduction 7 2.

More information

AP 531 - TANGIBLE CAPITAL ASSETS

AP 531 - TANGIBLE CAPITAL ASSETS AP 531 - TANGIBLE CAPITAL ASSETS The following topics are discussed in this administrative procedure: 1.0 Policy 2.0 Purpose 3.0 Scope 4.0 Glossary 5.0 Categorization of Assets 6.0 Accounting and Reporting

More information

10.1.2 Corporate Asset Management Corporate, Operational & Council Services

10.1.2 Corporate Asset Management Corporate, Operational & Council Services HOW DOES THIS SERVICE CONTRIBUTE TO THE QUALITY OF LIFE IN THE CITY OF LONDON? The desired population results in the City of London s Strategic Plan: A Strong Economy, A Vibrant and Diverse Community,

More information

Revenue Administration: Performance Measurement in Tax Administration

Revenue Administration: Performance Measurement in Tax Administration T e c h n i c a l N o t e s a n d M a n u a l s Revenue Administration: Performance Measurement in Tax Administration William Crandall Fiscal Affairs Department I n t e r n a t i o n a l M o n e t a r

More information

CAPITAL ASSET MANAGEMENT AND FINANCING POLICY

CAPITAL ASSET MANAGEMENT AND FINANCING POLICY Effective Date: October 7, 2014 Supersedes /Amends: December 14, 1998 Originating Office: Office of the Chief Financial Officer Policy Number: CFO-4 SCOPE The University owns, operates, and maintains a

More information

The Asset Management Landscape

The Asset Management Landscape The Asset Management Landscape ISBN 978-0-9871799-1-3 Issued November 2011 www.gfmam.org The Asset Management Landscape www.gfmam.org ISBN 978-0-9871799-1-3 Published November 2011 This version replaces

More information

City of Toronto STRATEGIC ACTIONS 2013-2018

City of Toronto STRATEGIC ACTIONS 2013-2018 City of Toronto STRATEGIC ACTIONS 2013-2018 Contents Message from the City Manager 2 Council s Strategic Plan 3 Developing Strategic Actions 6 Strategic Actions 2013-2018 7 City Building 8 Economic Vitality

More information

Township of Terrace Bay Drinking Water System Financial Plan

Township of Terrace Bay Drinking Water System Financial Plan Township of Terrace Bay Drinking Water System Financial Plan August 2014 Introduction Municipalities in Ontario recently adopted a full accrual accounting approach to tangible municipal assets in accordance

More information

Asset Management Plan

Asset Management Plan Asset Management Plan Contents Executive Summary... 4 Asset Management Plan... 6 Introduction... 6 Financial Overview... 11 Conclusion... 11 Attached Appendices... 11 Asset Management Strategy... 13 Introduction...

More information

Table of Contents. WATER AND WASTEWATER MODEL AND SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS 6 Model Development 6 10-Year Water/WW - Challenges, Risks and Opportunities 7

Table of Contents. WATER AND WASTEWATER MODEL AND SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS 6 Model Development 6 10-Year Water/WW - Challenges, Risks and Opportunities 7 Table of Contents LONG-RANGE FINANCIAL PLAN INTRODUCTION 1 Water and Wastewater Financial Plan 2 What is a Long Range Financial Plan 3 Importance of a Long Range Financial Plan 4 General Approach to Preparing

More information

2015-18 Department Business Plan. Facility Services

2015-18 Department Business Plan. Facility Services 2015-18 Department Business Plan Facility Services The Facility Services Department provides facility asset management and construction, routine preventative maintenance and facility support services.

More information

CGAM022.1/12/10. Asset Management Improvement Strategy 2010

CGAM022.1/12/10. Asset Management Improvement Strategy 2010 Asset Management Improvement Strategy 2010 Version Control Version No. Date Details Author/s 1.0 July 2009 Adopted Strategy 2.0 October 2010 Update TABLE OF CONTENTS OF CONTENTS 4 OF THE ASSET MANAGEMENT

More information

Asset Management For Small Municipalities Presented to: Infrastructure AM Alberta,

Asset Management For Small Municipalities Presented to: Infrastructure AM Alberta, Asset Management For Small Municipalities Presented to: Infrastructure AM Alberta, Steve Wyton, City of Calgary Manager, Corp. Project & Asset Mgmt October 08, 2014 Organization policy, objectives, values

More information

STRATEGIC PLAN 2012 2015

STRATEGIC PLAN 2012 2015 THE CITY OF HAMILTON STRATEGIC PLAN 2012 2015 OUR Vision To be the best place in Canada to raise a child, promote innovation, engage citizens and provide diverse economic opportunities. OUR Mission WE

More information

Asset Management Plan

Asset Management Plan Asset Management Plan Final Report May 2014 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Adequate municipal infrastructure such as roads, bridges, and underground water and sewage pipes are essential to economic development, citizen

More information

Guide to Integrated Strategic Asset Management

Guide to Integrated Strategic Asset Management Guide to Integrated Strategic Asset Management Issue date: 14 November 2011 Acknowledgements This guide is based on the Australasian Procurement and Construction Council Inc. s (APCC) publication, Asset

More information

BUILDING TOGETHER. Guide for Municipal Asset Management Plans. Ministry of Infrastructure

BUILDING TOGETHER. Guide for Municipal Asset Management Plans. Ministry of Infrastructure BUILDING TOGETHER Guide for Municipal Asset Management Plans Ministry of Infrastructure Letter from the Minister of Infrastructure and Minister of Transportation Infrastructure investments are vital to

More information

Township of T Tay Energy Conservation and Demand Management Plan July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2019

Township of T Tay Energy Conservation and Demand Management Plan July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2019 Township of Tay Energy Conservation and Demand Management Plan July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2019 Table of Contents Executive Summary... 4 Introduction... 5 Organization... 5 Personnel Involved... 6 Commitment...

More information

Quick Guide: Meeting ISO 55001 Requirements for Asset Management

Quick Guide: Meeting ISO 55001 Requirements for Asset Management Supplement to the IIMM 2011 Quick Guide: Meeting ISO 55001 Requirements for Asset Management Using the International Infrastructure Management Manual (IIMM) ISO 55001: What is required IIMM: How to get

More information

cugog TOWNSHIP OF Ian

cugog TOWNSHIP OF Ian TOWNSHIP OF cugog EDUCATION AND TRAINING SESSION AGENDA MONDAY, OCTOBER 28, 2013 AT 9:00 A.M. IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS Road and Bridge Asset Management Plan The What and the How 9:00 a.m. The What Ian Roger

More information

Asset Management Plan

Asset Management Plan Wandering Shire Council Roads Asset Management Plan TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 Executive Summary... 2 Context... 2 Questions you may have... 4 2. INTRODUCTION... 5 2.1 Background... 5 2.2 Goals and objectives

More information

Town of Huntsville Municipal Asset Management Plan

Town of Huntsville Municipal Asset Management Plan Town of Huntsville Municipal Asset Management Plan Adopted by Council (Resolution 470-13) December 20, 2013 1 P age Table of Contents Executive Summary... 3 Introduction... 4 State of Local Infrastructure...

More information

Mission, Vision and Values

Mission, Vision and Values Mission, Vision and Values The City of Greater Sudbury is a growing, world-class community bringing talent, technology and a great northern lifestyle together. We are committed to providing excellent access

More information

2015-2018 Business Plan Driving Change. Investing in the Future of London s Mobility

2015-2018 Business Plan Driving Change. Investing in the Future of London s Mobility 2015-2018 Business Plan Driving Change Investing in the Future of London s Mobility Contents 3 Introduction 5 The Vision, Mission and Principles 6 Strategic Outcomes 6 An Integrated, Affordable and Valued

More information

4 TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNITY PLANNING 2013 STATE OF INFRASTRUCTURE REPORT

4 TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNITY PLANNING 2013 STATE OF INFRASTRUCTURE REPORT Clause No. 4 in Report No. 9 of Committee of the Whole was adopted, without amendment, by the Council of The Regional Municipality of York at its meeting held on May 15, 2014. 4 TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNITY

More information

Council Strategic Plan 2015-2018. squamish.ca

Council Strategic Plan 2015-2018. squamish.ca Council Strategic Plan 2015-2018 squamish.ca 2 Summary Our Council began their 2014 2018 term with a strategic planning exercise. The exercise identified a number of areas of focus for Council and directed

More information

AUCKLAND TRANSPORT ASSET MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

AUCKLAND TRANSPORT ASSET MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK AUCKLAND TRANSPORT ASSET MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK April 2011 Contents 1 Introduction... 1 The purpose of the Asset Management framework... 1 Overview of the asset management activity... 2 2 Auckland Transport

More information

2. CORPORATE POLICIES 2.3 OTHER CORPORATE 2.3.11 Asset Management Policy

2. CORPORATE POLICIES 2.3 OTHER CORPORATE 2.3.11 Asset Management Policy 2. CORPORATE POLICIES Background & Issues Local Government across Australia is facing the challenge of building, operating and maintaining vital infrastructure necessary for the well-being of their communities.

More information

Service Delivery Review

Service Delivery Review Building Strong Communities A Guide to Service Delivery Review for Municipal Managers August 2004 The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing and its partners on this project offer A Guide to Service

More information

3.06. Infrastructure Asset Management at Colleges. Chapter 3 Section. Background. Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities

3.06. Infrastructure Asset Management at Colleges. Chapter 3 Section. Background. Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities Chapter 3 Section 3.06 Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities Infrastructure Asset Management at Colleges Chapter 3 VFM Section 3.06 Background The Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities

More information

Glossary. means the asset valuation module of Municipal DataWorks. means Geographic Information System

Glossary. means the asset valuation module of Municipal DataWorks. means Geographic Information System Getting Started The Prerequisites for Asset Management July 2009 Glossary Asset... means public infrastructure or a component thereof that has a tangible value, enables services to be provided and has

More information

IMAGINE REGINA ACCELERATING EXCELLENCE. City of Regina Corporate Strategic Plan 2008-2012

IMAGINE REGINA ACCELERATING EXCELLENCE. City of Regina Corporate Strategic Plan 2008-2012 IMAGINE REGINA 2020 ACCELERATING EXCELLENCE City of Regina Corporate Strategic Plan 2008-2012 Accelerating Excellence Table of Contents Message From The Mayor & City Council............. 2 Message From

More information

Asset Management Plan

Asset Management Plan BUILDING Asset Management Plan Version 1 May 2013 Document Control Document ID: Buildings AMP 2013 Rev No Date Revision Details Author Reviewer Approver 1 22 May 2013 JN RG WI Copyright 2012 All rights

More information

TITLE C171 ASSET MANAGEMENT POLICY DEPARTMENT. Engineering Services POLICY DIRECTIVE

TITLE C171 ASSET MANAGEMENT POLICY DEPARTMENT. Engineering Services POLICY DIRECTIVE TITLE C171 ASSET MANAGEMENT POLICY DEPARTMENT Engineering Services POLICY DIRECTIVE This Asset Management policy will ensure that Asset Management is clearly recognised by Council and community in accordance

More information

HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY 16 November 2015 Highway Infrastructure Asset Management Strategy Contents Introduction 1.0 The Need for Asset Management 1.1. Background 1.2. Aims and

More information

UNDERSTANDING CANADIAN PUBLIC SECTOR FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

UNDERSTANDING CANADIAN PUBLIC SECTOR FINANCIAL STATEMENTS June 2014 UNDERSTANDING CANADIAN PUBLIC SECTOR FINANCIAL STATEMENTS www.bcauditor.com TABLE OF CONTENTS Who Will Find this Guide Helpful 3 What a Set of Public Sector Financial Statements Includes 5 The

More information

Sustaining Local Assets. Local government asset management policy statement

Sustaining Local Assets. Local government asset management policy statement Sustaining Local Assets Local government asset management policy statement December 2003 ISBN 0 646 42106 9 Authorised by the Victorian Government Address: Local Government Victoria Department for Victorian

More information

2015-2018 STRATEGIC PRIORITIES

2015-2018 STRATEGIC PRIORITIES STRATEGIC PRIORITIES 2015-2018 Strategic Priorities Economic Growth and Prosperity Infrastructure Sustainability Financial Stability Convenient, Accessible, and Sustainable Transportation 2015-2018 Strategic

More information

County of Oxford Asset Management Plan 2014. 1.0 Executive Summary... 2. 2.0 Introduction... 7. 3.0 Purpose and Methodology... 10

County of Oxford Asset Management Plan 2014. 1.0 Executive Summary... 2. 2.0 Introduction... 7. 3.0 Purpose and Methodology... 10 Asset Management Plan AUGUST 2014 County of Oxford Asset Management Plan 2014 Table of Contents 1.0 Executive Summary... 2 2.0 Introduction... 7 3.0 Purpose and Methodology... 10 4.0 State of Infrastructure...

More information