CompactLogix Performance and Capacity. Section 1: Introduction /CompactLogix System Basics:.. 3. Section 2: Glossary of Terms. 12

Save this PDF as:

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "CompactLogix Performance and Capacity. Section 1: Introduction /CompactLogix System Basics:.. 3. Section 2: Glossary of Terms. 12"

Transcription

1

2 Table of Contents Section 1: Introduction /CompactLogix System Basics:.. 3 Section 2: Glossary of Terms. 12 Section 3: CompactLogix CPU Utilization (%CPU) Baseline Testing Section 4: 1769 CompactBus I/O RPI Guidelines for the 1769-L3X Family Section 5: CompactBus RPI Effects on %CPU/ Program Execution...20 Section 6: Utilizing the Periodic Task and Minimum RPI to Obtain Fastest Possible Screw-to-Screw Performance: Section 7: Periodic and Event Based Tasks.26 Section 8: System Overhead Time Slice Section 9: Limitations Imposed by Connections Section 10: CompactLogix on Ethernet Overview Section 11: CompactLogix on Ethernet: Connections and Packets Per Second 44 Section 12: CompactLogix Ethernet Explicit Messaging...63 Section 13: CompactLogix on ControlNet Overview Section 14: CompactLogix ControlNet: Explicit Messaging...87 Section 15: Bridging Through a CompactLogix Controller Section16: Other CompactLogix Configurations Section17: Comparing the CompactLogix L3X, L4X, and ControlLogix..104 Section 18: CompactLogix 5370 L3 and Integrated Motion on EtherNet/IP.106 Appendix A: Table of Message Types (Connected vs Unconnected) Appendix B: Flex I/O vs. Point I/O Performance Comparison

3 Section 1: Introduction/ CompactLogix System Basics Section 1a: Introduction The purpose of this document is to provide CompactLogix system performance and capacity information, along with design considerations, that can be used to achieve optimized performance from a CompactLogix system. These recommendations may not be the best solution for all applications, but rather are guidelines and indications of performance. This document has had three revisions: IASIMP-QR007A-EN-P (August 2006) covered the 1769-L3X family of CompactLogix processors. IASIMP-QR007B-EN-P (March 2009) added the 1769-L4X family of CompactLogix processors. IASIMP-QR007C-EN-P (July 2012) added the 5370 L3 family of CompactLogix processors. The CompactLogix family of processors are designed to provide a Logix solution for low-end to medium applications. Typically these applications are machine-level control applications that require limited I/O quantities and limited communications capabilities. The 1769-L3X family consists of the 1769-L31, the 1769-L32C, the 1769-L32CR, the 1769-L32E and the 1769-L35E. The 1768-L4X family consists of the 1768-L43 and the1768-l45. The 5370 L3 family consists of the 1769-L30ER-NSE, the 1769-L30ER, the 1769-L30ERM, the 1769-L33ER, the 1769-L33ERM, and the 1769-L36ERM For a comparison of the 1769-L3X, the 5370 L3, and 1768-L4X Family see Section 17.This section also compares the L4X with the ControlLogix family. Section 1b: 1769-L3x Family Basics The 1769-L31 has two serial ports. The 1769-L32C and 1769-L35CR have an integrated ControlNet port and one serial port. The 1769-L32E and1769-l35e controllers have an integrated EtherNet/IP port and one serial port. The 1769-L3X controllers all use the 1769 CompactBus local I/O bus. Note- the first bank of I/O must contain the controller which must be in the leftmost slot. 3

4 The power supply distance rating of all 1769 digital and analog I/O modules is eight modules, allowing them to be placed up to eight slots from the power supply except for specialty modules. Power Supply Distance Rating: 1769 Digital Modules 8 modules 1769 Analog Modules 8 modules 1769-HSC 4 modules 1769-SM1 6 modules 1769-SM2 4 modules 1769-SDN 4 modules 1769-ADN 5 modules 1769-ASCII 4 modules 4

5 1769-L31 Controller 1769-L31 Controller Capabilities Mix and match any combination of discrete, analog and specialty modules Up to three banks of local 1769 I/O modules Connect the banks with 1m or 1ft of cable Requires one power supply for each bank Two RS-232 serial ports can be configured for ASCII, DH-485, DF1, and modems Supports multiple 1769-SDN DeviceNet modules Removable CompactFlash to store programs, tag values and firmware L31 Supports 512K Memory Up to 16 local I/O modules with up to 32 points per digital modules and 8 points per analog modules 5

6 1769-L32C and L35CR Controller 1769-L32C and L35CR Controller Capabilities Mix and match any combination of discrete, analog and specialty modules Up to three banks of local 1769 I/O modules Connect the banks with 1m or 1ft of cable Requires one power supply for each bank One RS-232 serial port can be configured for ASCII, DH-485, DF1, and Modems Supports multiple 1769-SDN DeviceNet modules Removable CompactFlash to store programs, tag values and firmware L32C supports 750K Memory and a single ControlNet connector Up to 16 local I/O modules with up to 32 points for digital modules and 8 points for analog modules L35CR supports 1.5M Memory and redundant ControlNet connectors Up to 30 local I/O modules with up to 32 points for digital modules and 8 points for analog modules 6

7 1769-L32E and L35E Controller 1769-L32E and L35E Controller Capabilities Mix and match any combination of discrete, analog and specialty modules Up to three banks of local 1769 I/O modules Connect the banks with 1m or 1ft of cable Requires one power supply for each bank One RS-232 serial port can be configured for ASCII, DH-485, DF1, and modems Supports multiple 1769-SDN DeviceNet modules Removable CompactFlash to store programs, tag values and firmware L32E: supports: 750K Memory and a single EtherNet/IP port. Up to 16 local I/O modules with up to 32 points for digital modules and 8 points for analog modules L35E supports: 1.5M Memory and a single Ethernet/IP port. Up to 30 local I/O modules with up to 32 points for digital modules and 8 points for analog modules, 7

8 Section 1c:1768-L4X Family Basics The 1768-L43 and L45 processors are a modular platform consisting of: The same1769 CompactBus local I/O bus used by the 1769-L3X to the right of the processor and; An enhanced 1768 bus to the left. This bus supports up to four 1768 modules and adds enhanced communications and motion capabilities to the L4X platform. The following 1768 modules are available: 1768-ENBT/EWEB module provides EtherNet/IP connectivity 1768-CNB module provides ControlNet connectivity 1768-CNBR module provides redundant ControlNet connectivity 1768-M04SE SERCOS module.provides up to 4 Axis of Motion capability. The CompactLogix 1768 power supply requires that a 1768 CompactLogix controller be installed to power the system. The power supply sends 24V dc to the controller located in slot 0. The controller converts the 24V dc to 5V dc and 24V dc and distributes it as needed. 5V and 24V power to 1769 I/O modules on the right side of the controller 24V power to 1768 modules on the left side of the controller Never put a 1769 power supply in the 1768 system. Each additional 1769 I/O bank must have its own power supply. Use a standard 1769 power supply such as 1769-PA4. Since the 1768-L4X processors use the same 1769 CompactBus as the 1769-L3X processors, the same rules apply when using the L4X with this bus. The power supply distance rating of all 1769 digital and analog I/O modules is eight modules, allowing them to be placed up to eight slots from the power supply except for specialty modules. Power Supply Distance Rating: 1769 Digital Modules 8 modules 1769 Analog Modules 8 modules 1769-HSC 4 modules 1769-SM1 6 modules 1769-SM2 4 modules 1769-SDN 4 modules 1769-ADN 5 modules 1769-ASCII 4 modules 8

9 1768-L43 and L45 Controller 1768-L43 and L45 Controller Capabilities Mix and match any combination of 1769 discrete, analog and specialty modules Connect the banks with 1m or 1ft of cable Requires one power supply for each 1769 bank One RS-232 serial port can be configured for ASCII, DH-485, DF1, and modems Supports multiple 1769-SDN DeviceNet modules Removable compact flash to store programs, tag values and firmware L43 supports 2M Memory 16 I/O modules with up to 32 points for digital modules and 8 points for analog modules Two 1768 network communication modules 4 axis SERCOS system (one SERCOS card supported) L45 supports: 3M Memory 30 I/O modules with up to 32 points for digital modules and 8 pionts for analog modules Two 1768 network communication modules 8 axis SERCOS system (two SERCOS cards supported) 9

10 A 4-axis system with Kinetix drives supports: execution of 4 axes per 1 ms velocity bandwidth > 400 Hz and current loop bandwidth > 1000 Hz high resolution, unlimited travel, and absolute feedback features two feedback ports per Kinetix drive optional 2094 Line Interface Module (LIM) as the incoming power source for an entire control panel Section 1d: CompactLogix 5370 L3 Family Basics The L3 controllers all have a USB port and an integrated dual EtherNet/IP port with DLR connectivity, IEEE-1588 support, and sockets. The L3 controllers all use the 1769 CompactBus local I/O bus. Note- the first bank of I/O must contain the controller which must be in the leftmost slot. The power supply distance rating of all 1769 digital and analog I/O modules is eight modules, allowing them to be placed up to eight slots from the power supply except for specialty modules. Power Supply Distance Rating: 1769 Digital Modules 8 modules 1769 Analog Modules 8 modules 1769-HSC 4 modules 1769-SM1 6 modules 1769-SM2 4 modules 1769-SDN 4 modules 1769-ADN 5 modules 1769-ASCII 4 modules 10

11 1769-L36ERM Controller L3 Controller Capabilities Mix and match any combination of discrete, analog and specialty modules. Up to three banks of local 1769 I/O modules. Connect the banks with 1m or 1ft of cable. Requires one power supply for each bank. One USB port. Supports multiple 1769-SDN DeviceNet modules. Removable SecureDigital (SD) card to store programs, tag values and firmware. Support for Integrated Motion on EtherNet/IP. IEEE-1588 Time Synchronization Socket Support Choose your controller based on the number of EtherNet/IP I/O nodes it will use on the network no need to keep track of CIP connections. Here is a summary of the L3 capabilities: CompactLogix L L30ER-NSE L30ER L30ERM L33ER L33ERM L36ERM Overview Memory 1MB 1MB 1MB 2MB 2MB 3MB Local Expansion Modules EtherNet/IP I/O Nodes Integrated Motion on EtherNet/IP No No 1-4 Axis No 1-8Axis 1-16 Axis 11

12 Section 2: Glossary of Terms Summary: This section defines terms and concepts important to understand the performance and capacity information provided in this document. Background Task: This happens during the System Overhead Time Slice. Communications, application messaging, I/O monitoring occur in this task. Buffer: A register or group of registers used for temporary storage of data. Logix has these three buffer types: Outgoing Unconnected, Incoming Unconnected and Cached. Cached-This term applies to ladder logic message instructions or messages to HMIs. These messages are always connected (use an available connection). Therefore, they will use resources such as buffers, bandwidth and memory even when the message is done or not executing. 32 cached buffers are available on both the CompactLogix ControlNet and Ethernet network ports. Class 1 (Implicit)- refers to any connection that uses an RPI (Requested Packet Interval). These include I/O and produced/consumed connections. Another name for a class 1 message is implicit. Implicit refers to information (source address, data type, destination address, etc.) which is implied in the message but not contained in the message. Class 3 (Explicit) -refers to any connection that does not use an RPI. Class 3 connections are non time critical. Example: MSG instruction and program upload. Another name for a class 3 message is explicit. Explicit messages include basic information (source address, data type, destination address, etc.) in every message, hence they are explicit. Connected- A message that uses a connection to transfer data to a device. Once the connection is established, buffers and resources will remain allocated to the message. The connection will remain open even if the data does not change. When data does change, data transfer rates are faster since the connection has already been established. Connections- A connection is a communication path. Effectively, data passes through a connection. I/O, messaging, Produced/Consumed tags, RSLinx Connections to PCs or HMIs all use connections. The number of connections used in a Logix product must be considered since they take up buffers, resources and memory in both processors and network cards. Continuous Task- A task that runs through all its programs and routines continuously, from top to bottom, unless interrupted by another task. A project does not require a continuous task, however, you can only configure one per project. All CPU time not allocated to other operations such as motion, communications and periodic or event based tasks, is used to execute the programs within this task. 12

13 CPU Utilization (%CPU)- The CPU utilization (%CPU) is a representation of how much time the controller is having to perform the sum total of all its functions in the Continuous Task, including ladder execution, task switching and communications. The lower the CPU%, the more logic, I/O and communications can be added for processing by the controller. Direct Connection- A communication connection used to communicate to I/O in a remote chassis, specifically analog modules. (Digital modules can also be configured for direct connections, but typically are configured for rack connections to conserve the number of connections used by the controller and network cards). Each module with a direct connection can be configured with its own RPI. Event Task- Is a user defined task that runs code based upon a trigger of a specific event. When the event is triggered it interrupts any lower priority tasks, executes one time, and returns control to the task that was interrupted, at the point it was interrupted. The trigger for the event based task can be: a change of a digital input a new sample of analog data a consumed tag an EVENT instruction certain motion operations Inhibit- Inhibiting a module causes the connection to the module to be broken, and may result in the loss of data. NUT -The Network Update Time is the smallest user configurable repetitive time cycle in milliseconds at which data can be sent on a ControlNet network. The range is 2 to 100 milliseconds and is configured in RSNetWorx for ControlNet. Periodic Task- Is a user defined task runs code at a user defined time period. When the end of the time period defined by the user is reached, the task is triggered and interrupts any lower priority task (either continuous, periodic, or event). All programs within that task are executed and scanned once, from top to bottom. After this single scan, an output update is triggered and control is returned to the task that was interrupted, at the point it was interrupted. Up to 7 periodic tasks can be configured, each with an interrupt priority and with independent rates. (Execution rate range (0.1ms-2,000s, in increments of 1ms)). Produced/Consumed- Type of data format. Each produced tag and each consumed tag uses a connection. With Produced/Consumed data multiple nodes can consume the same data at the same time from a single producer, resulting in more efficient use of bandwidth. Also, nodes can be synchronized. 13

14 Benefits over Source/Destination methods: Highly Efficient- No wasted effort delivering data to those who do not require it. Accurate Data - Everyone receives the data at the same time. Deterministic - Length of time to deliver data is independent of the number of nodes Rack Optimized Connection- A communication connection a user may choose to use when using digital I/O in a remote chassis. A rack connection uses only one connection to the digital I/O in the remote chassis, economizing connections. A rack connection is available only to digital I/O. (Analog modules use direct connections.) Only one RPI value can be set to all the modules configured to use the rack connection. (Note, if diagnostic digital modules are placed in a Rack Optimized Connection, the diagnostic information will be lost. Use a Direct Connection to save the diagnostic data.) RPI- Requested Packet Interval -The requested rate of data arrival to or from a module and a controller. The data will be sent at least this often or the connection will fail with the Connection Not Scheduled Fault. This value is configured in the properties for each module when added to the module configuration tree. Scheduled Connection -allow you to send and to receive data repeatedly at a predetermined and configured rate on ControlNet. Produced/consumed tags, and scheduled I/O communication on ControlNet are scheduled connections A scheduled connection stays open as long as the network, the target, and the connection originator are alive. If either the target or originator drops off the link, then the connection is closed and periodically retried by the connection originator. System Overhead Time Slice-The system overhead time slice is the ratio of the amount of time spent running the continuous task versus the amount of time running the background task, which includes handling communication requests. Uncached- This terms applies to ladder logic message instructions. These messages use a connection when starting the message and then close the message when complete, therefore freeing up resources such as buffers, bandwidth and memory. Unconnected- A message that does not use a connection to transfer data to a device. Unconnected messages can not be cached. Unscheduled Connection - are used when data is being produced on demand by the user program or HMI on ControlNet. MSG instructions and RSLinx message are examples that use unscheduled connections. Unscheduled connections can timeout if they are not used within the timeout interval. Network services will use an unconnected message to close the unscheduled connection 14

15 Section 3: CompactLogix CPU Utilization (%CPU)- Baseline Testing Summary: This section describes the test run to provide a baseline of CompactLogix CPU usage that will be used as a comparison for the other tests in this document. Since the CompactLogix controller handles multiple tasks such as I/O, network communications and messaging, CPU utilization percentage (%CPU), will be used in this document to measure the load on the controller and to determine the performance and capacity of the CompactLogix system. A baseline program was written to determine the CPU utilization percentage using a cross section of the following instructions: 1200 discrete instruction (XIC, XIO, OTE) 50 counter instructions 50 timer instructions 50 multiple instructions 50 add instructions 100 move instructions 50 compare instructions 50 copy instructions 50 FIFO instructions (FFL) 12 JSR instructions From this program, the CPU utilization (%CPU) was calculated. The %CPU is based on the number of times the baseline program is executed in 1 second. As the %CPU calculated increases the controller has to perform more operations and is spending less time on ladder execution. A ladder program calculates the %CPU. This identical baseline program was run on a 1769-L35E processor to test the 1769-L3X platform, a 1768-L45 processor to test the 1768-L4X platform, and a 1769-L36ERM processor to test the 5370 L3 platform L35E (V20): The 1769-L35E (v20) had no I/O or traffic configured for the L3E Ethernet Port, had the System Overhead Time Slice (TS) set to 20%, and had no RS232 communications. In a CompactLogix controller inhibiting the CompactBus Local I/O does not actually disable the scanning of the CompactBus, so inhibiting it with a larger RPI uses less CPU than just inhibiting it alone. 15

16 Test Results. The baseline results are as follows: System Overhead Time Slice = 20% Memory used 140,184 bytes Memory Available 1,432,680 bytes Main Task Scan Times Max 4.21 ms Last m %CPU processor used 1.0% (typical) MaxScan = 500; CPUUsed = -6 (ie -0.6%) 1768-L45: The 1768-L45 had no I/O or traffic configured for the 1768-L45 with the System Overhead Time Slice (TS) set to 20% and had no RS232 communications. Test Results. The baseline results are as follows: System Overhead Time Slice = 20% I/O Memory used 19,084 bytes bytes I/O Memory Available 486,772 bytes Data and Logic Memory Used 94,676 bytes Data and Logic Memory Available 3,051,052 bytes Main Task Scan Times Max 3.468ms Last 2.462ms %CPU processor used (typical) 0.7 % MaxScan = 570; CPUUsed = -8 (ie -0.8%) 1769-L36ERM: The 1769-L36ERM had no I/O or traffic configured for the L36ERM with the System Overhead Time Slice (TS) set to 20% and had no USB communications. Test Results. The baseline results are as follows: System Overhead Time Slice = 20% I/O Memory used 1,264 bytes I/O Memory Available 1,047,312 bytes Data and Logic Memory Used 111,272 bytes Data and Logic Memory Available 3,034,456 bytes Main Task Scan Times Max 2.516ms Last 1.457ms %CPU processor used (typical) 0.0 % MaxScan = 890; CPUUsed = -5 (ie -0.5%) 16

17 Processor Comparison: Proc Type IO Mem Used IO Mem Available Data & Logic Used Data & Logic Available Main Task Max Scan (ms) Max Scan CPU Used L35e 140,184 1,432,680 Na Na L45 19, ,772 94,676 3,051, L36ERM 1,264 1,047, ,272 3,034, SOTS (%) 17

18 Section 4: 1769 CompactBus I/O RPI Guidelines for the 1769-L3X (Pre V18 Only) Guideline: If you are using a pre V L3X, set the RPI for CompactLocal Bus modules to 5ms or higher (5ms is default in v16 and V17), unless faster RPIs are required for your application. See information below for impacts of faster RPIs. The CompactBus local RPI (Requested Packed Interval) defines the frequency at which the controller sends and receives all I/O data on the backplane. There is one RPI for the entire 1769 backplane when using Pre V L3X family processors. (The 1769-L3x V18 and later, 1768-L4X and CompactLogix 5370 L3 families supports independently set RPIs for each module in the local chassis see Section 5.) As you install modules, the minimum backplane RPI may need to be increased to handle larger amounts of data going across the backplane This setting can be found in the local CompactBus Properties. This value range is (1-750ms). Default is 2ms for V15 of RSLogix 5000 or earlier Default is 5 ms in V16 of RSLogix Minimum settings for the CompactBus local RPI: These numbers are minimum (fastest) RPI settings. Depending on communications, program processing, and I/O, a higher RPI may be needed. (See Section 5). 18

19 *Digital and Analog (any mix): 1-4 modules can be scanned in 1.0ms 5-16 modules can be scanned in 1.5ms modules can be scanned in 2.0ms 1769-HSC (High Speed Counter): Add 0.5ms for each used 1769-SDN (DeviceNet Scanner): Add 1.5ms per module (*Note - Input modules defined with a F, ie 1769-IQ16F, at the end of the catalog number have user selectable filters that can be configured for faster filter rates (0.0msec- 2.0ms) and can provide faster throughput times. Those modules without the "F" have fixed 8ms filters, this means that the module can only capture an input signal of 8ms or more. Anything lower that the filter value will be treated as noise and ignored.. Additional Notes: These considerations show how fast modules can be scanned. They are not an indication of screw to screw performance. The CompactBus Local scan is asynchronous to the program scan. Other factors, such as program execution duration, affect I/O throughput. You can always select an RPI that is slower than your calculated minimum RPI The RPI rule is a conservative benchmark. An RPI set below the recommended may result in task overruns and unpredictable I/O update behavior Caution: When using the default RPI of 2ms (in v15 or earlier) be cautious going over 8 modules to assure that you do not slow down your program execution too much for your particular application.(see Section 5.) 19

20 Section 5: CompactBus RPI Effects on %CPU /Program Execution The CPU utilization (%CPU) is a representation of the load on the processor. It takes into account how much time the controller is having to perform its functions in the Continuous Task, including code execution and task switching. The lower the %CPU, the more logic, I/O and communications can be added. Too high a %CPU, then messaging, HMI communications, uploads and downloads may be slowed. The %CPU increases as modules are added to the CompactBus, and slower RPI s may need to be considered for your particular application. Section 5a: 1769-L3X Family (Pre V18) Guideline: For the Pre V18 L3X Family, set the RPI greater than 5ms if you want the CompactBus I/O to have the least affect on messaging/hmi/upload and downloads. (Even if you are using no modules and inhibit the CompactBus, set the RPI to 5ms to achieve the best utilization.) The graph below shows the results of testing performed to determine the effects of RPI on CPU Utilization for the 1769-L35CR RPI Effects on %CPU CPU Utilization No Modules 2 Modules 4 Modules 8 Modules 30 modules ms 2ms 3ms 4ms 5ms 10ms 15ms 20ms RPI (The above chart is only for the 1769 Local CompactBus I/O only. See Baseline test used for this document). 20

21 Section 5b: 1769-L3X Family (V18 and Later) Summary: For the L3X Family (V18 and Later), set the individual modules RPI greater than 5ms if you want the CompactBus I/O to have the least affect on messaging,hmi, uploads, and downloads. The 1769-L3X (V18 and Later) family of processors support individual RPI s for local modules. The range for RPI values is 1ms 750ms; except for the 1769-SDN and 1769-ASCII modules which are 2ms 750ms. The default RPI value depends on the module type. The graph below shows the results of testing performed to determine the effects of RPI on CPU Utilization for a 1769-L35E V % 60.0% CPU Utilization 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 2 Discrete 2 Analog 2 Discrete, 2 Analog 5 Discrete, 3 Analog 1 HSC 1 ASCII 1 SDN 10.0% 0.0% 1ms 2ms 3ms 4ms 5ms 10ms 15ms 20ms RPI 21

22 Section 5c: 5370 L3 Family Summary: For the 5370 L3 processor family, set the individual modules RPI greater than 5ms if you want the CompactBus I/O to have the least affect on messaging,hmi,uploads, and downloads The 5370 L3 processors support individual RPI s for local modules. The range for RPI values is 1ms 750ms; except for the 1769-SDN module which is 2ms 750ms. Default RPI value depends on the module type. The graph below shows the results of testing performed to determine the effects of RPI on CPU Utilization for a 1769-L36ERM. Section 5d: 1768-L4X Family Summary: The 1768-L4x processor %CPU is minimally affected by either the number of 1769 CompactBus modules in the rack or the individual RPI s selected for the modules The 1768-L4X processors support individual RPI s for local modules. The range for RPI values is 1ms 750ms; except for 1769-SDN and 1769-ASCII modules which are 2ms 750ms. Default RPI value depends on the module type. 22

23 The graph below shows the results of testing performed to determine the impact of populating the1769 bus with modules of different types at different RPI values on %CPU. The results of the testing show that the 1768-L4x processor is minimally affected by either the the number of 1769 CompactBus modules being connected or the RPI s selected. 23

24 Section 6: Utilizing the Periodic Task and Minimum RPI to Obtain Fastest Possible Screw-to-Screw Performance: Some applications require not only a fast screw-to-screw update but also need to know screw-to-screw repeatability also known as Screw-to-Screw Jitter The CompactLogix backplane scan is asynchronous to the program execution. I/O updates can happen anytime throughout the program scan. Note: Your minimum screw-to-screw times will increase as you add modules to your system Section 6a: 1769-L3X Family Summary: With 4 or less non-specialty modules, the system can handle a 1ms RPI and 1ms Periodic Task. Average screw-to-screw performance is 2ms. Repeatability or Screw-to-Screw Jitter is 3ms or less. Make sure you set the priority of the Periodic task greater than 6. The following shows the results of testing performed to determine min/ max/ typical screw to screw time possible with 1768-L3X platform. Only the local CompactBus was used with a 1769-IQ16F/A input module and a 1769-OB16/B output module. RPI was set to 1ms. 100 samples were taken of an output turning on an input. Throughput Main Task Scan Time Task Priority Worse/Best Max/Min Continuous ms / 1.0ms 2.5ms /.4ms -Average screw-to-screw performance is 2ms -Repeatability or Screw-to-Screw Jitter is 3ms or less Caution: It is possible to starve the update of your I/O if you set the priority of a Periodic task higher than the Local CompactBus priority of 6. Higher priority tasks interrupt lower tasks. Section 6b: 1769-L4X Family Summary: With 4 or less non-specialty modules, the system can handle a 1ms RPI. Average screw-to-screw performance is 1.2ms. Repeatability or Screw-to-Screw Jitter is 2ms or less. The following shows the results of testing performed to determine min/ max/ typical screw to screw time possible with 1768-L4X platform. Only the local CompactBus was 24

25 used with a 1769-IQ16F/A input module and a 1769-OB16/B output module. RPI for each was set to 1ms. Throughput Main Task Scan Time Task Priority Worse/Best Max/Min Continuous ms / 0.4ms 1.9ms /.4ms -Average screw-to-screw performance is 1.2 ms -Repeatability or Screw-to-Screw Jitter is 2ms or less The histogram chart below displays the distribution of scan time values captured during L4X testing with 35 samples taken. Typical throughput ranged from ms. Histogram Frequency Frequency msec Section 6c: 5370 L3 Family Summary: With four or less non-specialty modules, the system can handle a 1ms RPI. Average screw-to-screw performance is 1.287ms. Repeatability or Screw-to-Screw Jitter is 1ms or less. The following shows the results of testing performed to determine min/ max/ typical screw to screw time possible with the 5370 L3 platform. Only the local CompactBus was used with a 1769-IQ16F/A input module and a 1769-OB16/B output module. RPI for each module was set to 1ms. Throughput Main Task Scan Time Task Priority Worse/Best Max/Min Continuous ms / 0.856ms 1.935ms/0.03ms Average screw-to-screw performance is 1.287ms Repeatability or Screw-to-Screw Jitter is 1ms or less 25

26 Section 7: Periodic and Event Based Tasks Summary: The priorities the user selects for Periodic/Event Tasks will affect both I/O throughput (5370 L3 and L3X) and Continuous (Main) Task program scan. The user needs to determine what is important for his application and adjust the priorities accordingly. For applications where speed is NOT of great concern, this will not be an issue. Section 7a: Introduction When a project is created in RSLogix 5000, a Continuous Task is automatically created, called the Main Task. Only one Continuous task is supported in the software. Optional Periodic and Event based tasks can be created by right clicking on Task and choosing New task: 26

27 Logix Priority Task Levels: Priority level: 1- highest 17 lowest Task Priority Comments Periodic Task (Ladder) *(1-15) Up to 7 periodic tasks can configured Local CompactBus (I/O) 6 I/O scan performed at RPI rate (5370 L3 and L3X) NetLinx Class 1 messaging** 6 I/O, produced/consumed data Continuous Task (Ladder) 15 Only one Continuous Task is supported NetLinx Class 3 messaging** 17 Explicit Messaging Other Communications 17 * The only priorities that can be changed by the user are the priority numbers of the Periodic tasks. ** The 1769-L3X and 5370 L3 controllers must process these message types, whereas the1768-l4x/ ControlLogix controllers do not (they have dedicated communication modules for this function) The priorities the user selects for Periodic/Event Tasks will affect both I/O throughput (5370 L3 and L3X) and Continuous (Main) Task program scan. Use of a periodic/event task will interrupt any programs in the Continuous task, thereby affecting their program scan. The user needs to determine what is important for his application and adjust the priorities accordingly. For applications where speed is NOT of great concern, this will not be an issue. Be sure to set the period time larger than the Periodic Tasks execution time and have a 30% null time to be able to service your communications once the task execution is complete. Caution: We do not recommend going below a 1ms Periodic Task. Setting the periodic task below 1ms may produce excessive task overlaps. Tip: Triggering an event task from an input event: 1. Create an event task with the code in it that you need to execute when the event occurs. Set this to the highest priority. 2. Create a periodic task at a high priority (but less than the event task) that has just the code in it that is needed to monitor the event. 3. Trigger the event task from the periodic when the event condition is met. 27

28 Section 7b: 1769-L3X Family Guideline: If your application requires a high amount of communications, only have a maximum of 1 Periodic Task configured and have it s priority set to 7 or above. This will avoid the Periodic Task interrupting the CompactBus I/O scan running at priority level 6. Test: Effects of Changing Priorities of Periodic Task: I/O Throughput Main Task Scan Time Task Priority Worse/Best Max/Min Periodic ms / 0.9ms 3.7ms / 3.2ms Periodic ms / 1.6ms 2.9ms / 2.3ms Periodic ms / 4.2ms 2.5ms/ 2.1ms This test was based on the 1769-L35CR baseline program. This time the Main Task, which was Continuous, was made Periodic with a priority of 6, the same priority as the local CompactBus I/O updates. The Main Periodic Task was run at a rate of 10 ms. Only the Local CompactBus was used, with two modules configured (a 1769-IQ16F/A with all filters set to 0ms and a 1769-OB16/B) both configured for rack-optimized connections at 1ms. The priorities the user selects for Periodic/Event Tasks will affect both I/O throughput and program scan. For high speed applications the user needs to determine what is more important for his application, I/O throughput or program scan, and adjust the priorities accordingly. For applications where speed is NOT of great concern, this will not be an issue. Section 7c: 1768-L4X Family The L4X processors do not assign a priority to the Local CompactBus I/O task as do the L3X processors therefore you do not have to consider this when selecting a task priority. Remember that your selection still impacts program scan times (as discussed in Section 7a), however. Section 7d: 5370 L3 Family Guideline: If your application requires a high amount of communications, only have a maximum of one Periodic Task configured and set it s priority to 7 or above. This will avoid the Periodic Task interrupting the CompactBus I/O scan running at priority level 6. The priorities the user selects for Periodic/Event Tasks will affect both I/O throughput and program scan. For high speed applications the user needs to determine what is more important for his application, I/O throughput or program scan, and adjust the priorities accordingly. For applications where speed is NOT of great concern, this will not be an issue. 28

29 Section 8: System Overhead Time Slice Summary: The System Overhead Time Slice, or SOTS, is the ratio of the amount of time spent running the continuous task versus the amount of time running the background task, which includes handling communication requests. Increasing the time slice will interrupt the continuous task to allow for more background time to communicate to HMIs, perform trending, execute messaging and perform serial port communications. Setting it too low can starve your communications to HMI, trending, messaging and serial communications. Setting it too high can increase the scan time of the programs in the continuous task beyond what is acceptable for the application. Changes made in Logix V16 that affects the way the SOTS works are also discussed. For RSLogix5000 the default value is set to 20% and can be changes in the Properties of the Controller on the Advanced tab. 1 The formula used for calculating the time slice ists % = 100, which means that CT CT = 1, where TS% is the time slice in percent, and CT is the amount of time TS % spent running the continuous task. Note this is not the time to scan the continuous task from top to bottom. Many scans of the continuous task may occur during this time, or only a partial scan of the task may occur. It is simply the amount of time spent executing the continuous task. 29

30 This setting only applies to the continuous task in a project. The background task may be further delayed due to any periodic or motions task interruptions also. The SOTS can only preempt or interrupt the continuous task. When the SOTS preempts the continuous task it can only perform the preemption for 1ms before it must return to the continuous task. That is the SOTS can only run in 1ms intervals of time. If there is no continuous task in the controller the SOTS will run in the null time that is when no periodic, event, or motion tasks are running. Changes to the %SOTS will only have an effect on the controller communications performance if there is a continuous task present. If you have only periodic, event, or motion tasks in the application, changes to the %SOTS will have no effect. Examples Example 1: The project consists of just one continuous task. There are no periodic tasks or motion. SOTS is set to 10%. For each 1 msec of background time, the continuous task runs for 9 ms. Continuous Task CT CT Background Task BT BT Time (ms) Figure 1 The continuous task executes for 9 of every 10 ms, and the background task executes every 10 ms. 30

31 Example 2: The project consists of just one continuous task. There are no periodic tasks or motion. SOTS is set to 20%. Continuous Task CT CT CT CT Background Task BT BT BT BT Time (ms) Figure 2 The continuous task executes for 4 of every 5 ms, and the background task executes every 5 ms. Example 3: The project consists of one continuous task and a periodic task with an interval of 2 ms, and a scan time of 1 ms. SOTS is set to 10%. Continuous Task Background Task BT Periodic Task PT PT PT PT PT PT PT PT PT Time (ms) Figure 3 The numbers in the continuous task line are the accumulated processor time for the continuous task at the end of the tick. Both the continuous and background tasks are interrupted by the periodic task. The SOTS setting still means that the continuous task has to run for a certain number of ms before the background task can run. So, here, the background task doesn t get run until almost 20 ms have elapsed overall and every 20 ms after that, but that is still after just 9 ms of continuous task execution, given the 10% SOTS setting. Remember that the TS% is a ratio between the continuous task and background task running times, not between the absolute system time and the background task time. Therefore, as the continuous task gets interrupted by periodic tasks, the time between background task updates will increase. The final kind of task that we will consider is the motion task. It has the highest priority, so it will interrupt periodic, continuous and background tasks. The period at which the 31

32 motion task runs is governed by the coarse update rate (CUR). As a rule of thumb, assume about ½ ms per axis for the actual calculations. Let s see how it affects the previous setup. Example 4: The project consists of one continuous task and a periodic task with an interval of 2 ms, and a scan time of 1 ms. SOTS is set to 10%. There are 5 axes of motion with the L4x processor, with a CUR of 5 ms, and about 2.5 ms of calculation time (½ ms per axis * 5 axes). Continuous Task CT CT CT CT Background Task Periodic Task PT PT PT PT PT PT Motion Task MT MT MT MT Time (ms) Figure 4 From the numbers on the Periodic task above: 1. The periodic task s first scheduled occurence at the 2 ms mark was delayed by 0.5 ms due to the motion task running. The second occurence at 4 ms ran as scheduled. 2. The periodic task s third scheduled occurence at the 6 ms mark was delayed by 1.5 ms due to the motion task running. This caused the task to overlap with the 8 ms start of the next occurrence. An overlap error will be generated and the 8 ms occurrence will be missed. 3. The periodic task s next scheduled occurrence at 10 ms was delayed by 2.5 ms due to the motion task running. This caused the start of the task to overlap with the 12 ms start of the next occurrence. An overlap error will be generated and the 10 ms occurrence will be missed. The task s occurrence at 12ms is then delayed by an additional 0.5 ms due to the motion task running. With motion added, by the end of our sample 20 ms run, the continuous task has only accumulated 4 ms of run time, and the background task has not run at all! Extrapolating, it will take about 45 ms before the background task gets to run. 32

33 Another thing to note is that the 2 ms task does not actually run at 2 ms intervals. In some cases it gets delayed, and in other cases it does not run at all due to an overlap condition with the previous interval. Note-If there is no continuous task, the time slice setting has no effect. All processor time not used for other tasks will be used for background operations. Changes to the System Overhead Time Slice in Logix Release V16 In the V16 release of all Logix controllers there were 2 changes made to how the System Overhead Time Slice or SOTS works. It is important to know how these changes will effect your application, specifically if you are migrating forward from older firmware revisions. The first change can be seen by looking at the Advanced tab of the Controller Properties. The area that is circled tells the controller how to use the SOTS when it is executed. Run Continuous Task: This is how the SOTS worked prior to V16. When the SOTS was triggered to execute and there was no communication or background tasks to process the controller would return to the continuous task immediately. 33

34 Reserve for Systems Task, eg Communications: This is a new option added with the release of V16. With this setting active the controller will spend the entire 1ms in the SOTS whether it has communications or background tasks to perform, before returning back to the continuous task. This feature is intended to be used as a design and test tool allowing a user to simulate a communication load on the controller during design and programming before HMIs, controller to controller messaging, etc are up and running. The other change made in V16 was how the %SOTS value was calculated. In V15 and earlier the %SOTS would be calculated as follows in the table below: SOTS Setting Time Allocated to the SOTS Time Allocated to the Continuous Task 10% 1ms 9ms 20% 1ms 4ms 25% 1ms 3ms 33% 1ms 2ms 50% 1ms 1ms 60% 1ms < 1ms 70% 1ms < 1ms 80% 1ms < 1ms 90% 1ms < 1ms In V16 the %SOTS would be calculated as follows in the table below: SOTS Setting Time Allocated to the SOTS Time Allocated to the Continuous Task 10% 1ms 9ms 20% 1ms 4ms 25% 1ms 3ms 33% 1ms 2ms 50% 1ms 1ms 66% 2ms 1ms 75% 3ms 1ms 80% 4ms 1ms 90% 9ms 1ms The tables show that in V16 you will actually see a benefit of setting the SOTS% to a value greater than 50%. Earlier it is stated that the SOTS can only run in 1ms intervals of time, but the table shows that at a setting of 90% the time allocated to the SOTS will be 9ms. The SOTS in this case is given 9 1ms intervals of consecutive time. Now when you put both of these changes to the SOTS together you can see drastic changes in continuous task performance. This will be outlined in the tables below. A simple program was created that has only a Continuous Task with a loop to create a 10ms task scantime. 34

35 Table 1 (During unused System Overhead Time Slice, Run Continuous Task selected): SOTS Setting Continuous Task Scan time 10% ms 20% ms 30% ms 40% ms 50% ms 60% ms 70% ms 80% ms 90% ms Note: This is about the same performance you would see in V15 and earlier versions. Table 2 (During unused System Overhead Time Slice, Reserve for System Tasks, eg Communications selected): SOTS Setting Continuous Task Scan time 10% ms 20% ms 30% ms 40% ms 50% ms 60% ms 70% ms 80% ms 90% ms Note: 1. You can see the drastic effect this has on the continuous task s scantime. 2. The values in Table 1 could approach the values seen in Table 2 if there is enough communication occurring in the controller to consume the SOTS s 1ms interval of time. 35

36 Section 9: Limitations Imposed by Connections Summary: The CompactLogix system uses connections to establish a communication link between two devices. This includes controllers, communication modules, input/output modules, produced/consumed tags and messages. You indirectly determine the number of connections that the Logix controller requires when configuring the controller to communicate with other devices in the system. Each module in the CompactLogix system supports a limited number of active connections. Take these connection limits into account when designing your system. An alternative to calculating these values manually is the EtherNet/IP Capacity Tool, available at Section 9a: 1769-L3x Family Device Total Number of Connections Total Number of Connected/Cached Buffers Total Number of Unconnected/Uncached Buffers 1769 L3x Controller fixed incoming/ expandable outgoing **ControlNet port *32 **EtherNet/IP port *Supports any combination of scheduled, unscheduled, cached or uncached ** Each of these connections must be subtracted from the 100 total controller connections Example: To determine the total number of connections used on a CompactLogix processor use the following: 1. Count the number of produced tags 2. Count the number of consumers for each produced tag 3. Count the number of direct I/O connections 4. Count the number of rack optimized connections 5. Count the number of messages incoming or outgoing 6. Count the number of programming terminals online and the number of RSLinx packages browsing over the network 7. Count the number of HMI s polling controller (typically 5 connections per HMI are used) To get the total number of connections used in your controller, add the individual results from steps 1 thru 7 Total Connections used by CompactLogix controller Note: It is not recommended to use all 32 connections on the built in Network ports. 36

37 Section 9b:1768-L4X Family Device Total Number of Connections Total Number of Connected/Cached Buffers Total Number of Unconnected/Uncached Buffers 1769 L4x Controller fixed incoming / expandable outgoing **1768-CNB(R) module *48 **1768-ENBT V1 module **1768-ENBT V2 module *Supports any combination of scheduled, unscheduled, cached or uncached ** Each of these connections must be subtracted from the 250 total controller connections Example: How to determine the total number of connections used on a network communication module use the following: 1 Count the number of produced tags 2 Count the number of consumers for each produced tag 3 Count the number of direct I/O connections 4 Count the number of rack optimized connections 5 Count the number of messages incoming or outgoing 6 Count the number of programming terminals online and the number of RSLinx packages browsing over the network 7 Count the number of HMI s polling controller (typically 5 connections per HMI are used) To get the total number of connections used on a network communication module: Add the individual results from steps 1 thru 7 Total Connections used by network communication module Note: The 1768-L4X will support up to two network communication modules. Remember not to exceed the total number of L4X controller connections. Also, it is not recommended to use all connections available on a communication module. 37

38 Section 9c: 5370 L3 Family With the 5370 L3 Family of processors, you only need to consider the number of EtherNet/IP nodes on the network when sizing your system Processor L30ER-NSE L30ER L30ERM L33ER L33ERM L36ERM EtherNet/IP I/O Nodes The information related to connections and the 5370 L3 family is included below for reference purposes. Device Total Number of Connections Total Number of Cached Connections Total Number of Unconnected Buffers 5370 L3 Controller/EtherNet/IP port (10 default) Example: How to determine the total number of connections used on a network communication module use the following: 1. Count the number of produced tags 2. Count the number of consumers for each produced tag 3. Count the number of direct I/O connections 4. Count the number of rack optimized connections 5. Count the number of messages incoming or outgoing 6. Count the number of programming terminals online and the number of RSLinx packages browsing over the network 7. Count the number of HMI s polling controller (typically 5 connections per HMI are used) To get the total number of connections used on a network communication module: Add the individual results from steps 1 thru 7 Total Connections used by network communication module 38

39 Section 10: CompactLogix on Ethernet Overview Guidelines: Performance of an Ethernet network is based upon the following: Identifying and counting the number of connections Calculating the packets per second for loading. Estimating maximum input and output times Note: You can use the EtherNet/IP Capacity Tool, available at /go/iatools to size your system. Section 10a: 1769-L3x Family 1769-L3X EtherNet/IP Capacity and Performance 10/100 megabits per second, Full Duplex Up to 4000 packets per second (Class 1, I/O, produced/consumed data) Up to 760 packets per second (Class 3, Messaging, HMI, OPC combined) Up to 32 CIP I/O connections Up to 64 TCP connections 2 ms minimum RPI 512 Byte maximum packet size EtherNet/IP Rules: As the packet size increases the number of packets per second decreases. Producer/Consumer packets tend to be much larger than I/O packets and may reduce the maximum packets per second NOTE: Class 1 and Class 3 values of packets per second (PPS) listed above are maximums. It is not possible for the 1769-L3X to handle 760 PPS of HMI traffic while also handling 4000 PPS of I/O traffic. When the 1769-L3X is required to handle both class 1 and class 3 traffic reference the graph listed below to determine if the requested class 1 and 3 traffic is possible. 39

Logix5000 Controllers Design Considerations

Logix5000 Controllers Design Considerations Reference Manual Logix5000 Controllers Design Considerations Catalog Numbers 1756 ControlLogix, 1756 GuardLogix, 1768 CompactLogix, 1768 Compact GuardLogix, 1769 CompactLogix, 1789 SoftLogix, CompactLogix

More information

User Manual. ControlNet Network Configuration

User Manual. ControlNet Network Configuration User Manual ControlNet Network Configuration Important User Information Solid-state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of electromechanical equipment. Safety Guidelines for

More information

Module 1 Overview ControlLogix5000

Module 1 Overview ControlLogix5000 Module 1 Overview ControlLogix5000 Module Overview This module takes a fundamental approach to a ControlLogix system. It begins with an overview of the architecture and migrates into an introduction of

More information

Logix5000 Controller Design Considerations

Logix5000 Controller Design Considerations Reference Manual Logix5000 Controller Design Considerations Catalog Numbers 1756 ControlLogix, 1756 GuardLogix, 1768 CompactLogix, 1768 Compact GuardLogix, 1769 CompactLogix, 1789 SoftLogix 5800 Important

More information

CompactLogix 5370 L1 Programmable Automation Controllers

CompactLogix 5370 L1 Programmable Automation Controllers Insert Photo Here CompactLogix 5370 L1 Programmable Automation Controllers Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. Copyright 2013 Rockwell Automation, Inc. All rights reserved. 2

More information

ControlLogix Remote I/O Communication Module

ControlLogix Remote I/O Communication Module User Manual ControlLogix Remote I/O Communication Module Catalog Number 1756-RIO Important User Information Solid-state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of electromechanical

More information

User Manual. DeviceNet Network Configuration

User Manual. DeviceNet Network Configuration User Manual DeviceNet Network Configuration Important User Information Solid-state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of electromechanical equipment. Safety Guidelines for the

More information

EtherNet/IP Modules in Logix5000 Control Systems

EtherNet/IP Modules in Logix5000 Control Systems EtherNet/IP Modules in Logix5000 Control Systems Catalog Numbers 1756-ENBT, 1756-EN2F, 1756-EN2T, 1756-EN2TR, 1756-EN2TXT, 1768-ENBT, 1769-L23E-QB1B, 1769-L23E-QBFC1B, 1769- L32E, 1769-L35E, 1783-ETAP,

More information

Logix5000 Controllers Nonvolatile Memory Card

Logix5000 Controllers Nonvolatile Memory Card Programming Manual Logix5000 Controllers Nonvolatile Memory Card Catalog Numbers 1756 ControlLogix, 1756 GuardLogix, 1768 CompactLogix, 1768 Compact GuardLogix, 1769 CompactLogix, 1789 SoftLogix, PowerFlex

More information

Industrial Communication Whitepaper. Principles of EtherNet/IP Communication

Industrial Communication Whitepaper. Principles of EtherNet/IP Communication Industrial Communication Whitepaper Principles of EtherNet/IP Communication 1 Contents Introduction...3 Producer/Consumer Model...4 EtherNet/IP Messaging Types...7 Real Time Data Exchanges...9 Typical

More information

Remote I/O Network Determinism

Remote I/O Network Determinism Remote I/O Network Determinism September 2011 by David Doggett & Manuel J. Palomino Make the most of your energy Summary Executive Summary... p 3 Introduction... p 4 Network Determinism vs Overall Performance...

More information

ControlNet PLC-5 Hot Backup System

ControlNet PLC-5 Hot Backup System ControlNet PLC-5 Hot Backup System Cat. No. 1785-CHBM User Manual Important User Information Because of the variety of uses for the products described in this publication, those responsible for the application

More information

Logix5000 Controllers Tasks, Programs, and Routines

Logix5000 Controllers Tasks, Programs, and Routines Programming Manual Logix5000 Controllers Tasks, Programs, and Routines Catalog Numbers 1756 ControlLogix, 1756 GuardLogix, 1768 Compact GuardLogix, 1768 CompactLogix, 1769 CompactLogix, 1789 SoftLogix,

More information

GuardLogix Controller Systems

GuardLogix Controller Systems Safety Reference Manual GuardLogix Controller Systems Catalog Numbers 1756-L61S, 1756-L62S, 1756-L63S, 1756-L71S, 1756-L72S, 1756-L73S, 1756-L73SXT, 1756-LSP, 1756-L7SP, 1756-L7SPXT, 1768-L43S, 1768-L45S

More information

Allen-Bradley ControlLogix Ethernet Driver Help. 2015 Kepware Technologies

Allen-Bradley ControlLogix Ethernet Driver Help. 2015 Kepware Technologies Allen-Bradley ControlLogix Ethernet Driver Help 2015 Kepware Technologies 2 Table of Contents Table of Contents 2 Allen-Bradley ControlLogix Ethernet Driver Help 7 Overview 7 Device Setup 9 Cable Diagrams

More information

Kepware Technologies Optimizing KEPServerEX V5 Projects

Kepware Technologies Optimizing KEPServerEX V5 Projects Kepware Technologies Optimizing KEPServerEX V5 Projects September, 2010 Ref. 50.16 Kepware Technologies Table of Contents 1. Overview... 1 2. Factors that Affect Communication Speed... 1 2.1 Defining Bandwidth...

More information

ControlLogix Redundancy

ControlLogix Redundancy User Manual Original Instructions ControlLogix Redundancy Important User Information Read this document and the documents listed in the additional resources section about installation, configuration, and

More information

CompactLogix System. Selection Guide

CompactLogix System. Selection Guide Selection Guide CompactLogix System Catalog Numbers 1769-L16ER-BB1B, 1769-L1ER-BB1B, 1769-L1ERM-BB1B, 1769-L24ER-QB1B, 1769-L24ER-QBFC1B, 1769-L27ERM-QBFC1B, 1769-L30ER, 1769-L30ER-NSE, 1769-L30ERM, 1769-L33ER,

More information

Comparing performance of L7x vs L6x using Logix5000 Task Monitor tool

Comparing performance of L7x vs L6x using Logix5000 Task Monitor tool Purpose: This document shows how to use the Logix5000 Task Monitor tool to compare the scan times of an application running in an Logix556x controller vs Logix 557x controller. The Logix5000 Task Monitor

More information

2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Chapter 5

2011, The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Chapter 5 Chapter 5 5.1 Processor Memory Organization The memory structure for a PLC processor consists of several areas, some of these having specific roles. With rack-based memory structures addresses are derived

More information

Integrated Motion on the EtherNet/IP Network: Configuration and Startup

Integrated Motion on the EtherNet/IP Network: Configuration and Startup User Manual Original Instructions Integrated Motion on the EtherNet/IP Network: Configuration and Startup ControlLogix, CompactLogix, Kinetix 350, Kinetix 5500, Kinetix 5700, Kinetix 6500, PowerFlex 527,

More information

Global Common Controls Software Design (GCCS-2) Course (Version 6.0)

Global Common Controls Software Design (GCCS-2) Course (Version 6.0) Global Common Controls Software Design (GCCS-2) Course (Version 6.0) Course No. GCCS8029, (CTIS: 33544) Duration 4 days Recommended RS Logix 5000 Basic Ladder Logic Programming experience Objectives Upon

More information

Ethernet/IP Explicit Messaging Using Unity Software

Ethernet/IP Explicit Messaging Using Unity Software Data Bulletin 8000DB1025 07/2010 Raleigh, NC, USA Ethernet/IP Explicit Messaging Using Unity Software Retain for future use. Overview Presumption Requirements This data bulletin illustrates how to setup

More information

EZ-ZONE RMA & EtherNet/IP Configuration & Startup Using an Allen-Bradley CompactLogix PLC EtherNet/IP Fundamentals

EZ-ZONE RMA & EtherNet/IP Configuration & Startup Using an Allen-Bradley CompactLogix PLC EtherNet/IP Fundamentals EtherNet/IP Fundamentals EtherNet/IP is built on the Common Industrial Protocol (CIP) at a foundational level. When communicating using CIP there are two ways to communicate to/from the Master and Slave

More information

INTEGRATION WITH CONTROLLOGIX PROGRAMMABLE AUTOMATION CONTROLLERS (PACS) USING ETHERNET/IP

INTEGRATION WITH CONTROLLOGIX PROGRAMMABLE AUTOMATION CONTROLLERS (PACS) USING ETHERNET/IP INTEGRATION WITH CONTROLLOGIX PROGRAMMABLE AUTOMATION CONTROLLERS (PACS) USING ETHERNET/IP Concepts and Principles of EtherNet/IP Communication with Rockwell Automation Products Authors: Vivek Hajarnavis,

More information

Logix5000 Controllers Information and Status

Logix5000 Controllers Information and Status Programming Manual Logix5000 Controllers Information and Status Catalog Numbers 1756 ControlLogix, 1756 GuardLogix, 1768 Compact GuardLogix, 1768 CompactLogix, 1769 CompactLogix, 1789 SoftLogix, PowerFlex

More information

Introduction: Implementation of the MVI56-MCM module for modbus communications:

Introduction: Implementation of the MVI56-MCM module for modbus communications: Introduction: Implementation of the MVI56-MCM module for modbus communications: Initial configuration of the module should be done using the sample ladder file for the mvi56mcm module. This can be obtained

More information

Application Technique. EtherNet/IP Socket Interface

Application Technique. EtherNet/IP Socket Interface Application Technique EtherNet/IP Socket Interface Important User Information Read this document and the documents listed in the additional resources section about installation, configuration, and operation

More information

1769 CompactLogix Packaged Controllers

1769 CompactLogix Packaged Controllers 1769 CompactLogix Packaged Controllers Quick Start and User Manual (Catalog Numbers 1769-L23E-QB1B, 1769-L23E-QBFC1B, and 1769-L23-QBFC1B) Important User Information Solid state equipment has operational

More information

CompactLogix 5370 L3 Controllers

CompactLogix 5370 L3 Controllers Quick Start CompactLogix 5370 L3 Controllers Catalog Numbers 1769-L30ER, 1769-L30ERM, 1769-L30ER-NSE, 1769-L33ER, 1769-L33ERM, 1769-L36ERM Important User Information Solid-state equipment has operational

More information

Logix5000 Controllers Nonvolatile Memory Card

Logix5000 Controllers Nonvolatile Memory Card Programming Manual Logix5000 Controllers Nonvolatile Memory Card Catalog Numbers 1756 ControlLogix, 1768 CompactLogix, 1769 CompactLogix, PowerFlex with DriveLogix Important User Information Solid-state

More information

Configuring Allen-Brandly ControlLogix PLC with Moxa MGate 5105-MB-EIP. 1 Application Description... 3. 1.1 Objective... 3 1.2 Goals...

Configuring Allen-Brandly ControlLogix PLC with Moxa MGate 5105-MB-EIP. 1 Application Description... 3. 1.1 Objective... 3 1.2 Goals... Moxa MGate 5105-MB-EIP Contents Moxa Technical Support Team support@moxa.com 1 Application Description... 3 1.1 Objective... 3 1.2 Goals... 3 2 System Topology... 3 3 Hardware and Software Requirements...

More information

DeviceNet Motor Control

DeviceNet Motor Control Quick-Start Guide for the DN65 DeviceNet I/O Module using Rockwell RSNetWorx version 2.22 or later This Quick-Start Guide provides instructions for configuring a Cutler-Hammer Freedom full voltage, non-reversing

More information

L5354 ControlNet Communications Interface

L5354 ControlNet Communications Interface L5354 ControlNet Communications Interface Technical Manual HA470733 Issue 2 Copyright SSD Drives Inc 2005 All rights strictly reserved. No part of this document may be stored in a retrieval system, or

More information

EtherNet/IP Network Configuration

EtherNet/IP Network Configuration User Manual EtherNet/IP Network Configuration EtherNet/IP Communication Modules 1756-ENBT, 1756-EN2F, 1756-EN2T, 1756-EN2TR, 1756-EN2TXT, 1756-EN3TR, 1756-EN2TSC, 1756-EN2TRXT, 1756-EWEB, 1768-ENBT CompactLogix

More information

SIMATIC S7-1200. It s the Interplay that makes the difference. Siemens AG 2010. All Rights Reserved.

SIMATIC S7-1200. It s the Interplay that makes the difference. Siemens AG 2010. All Rights Reserved. SIMATIC S7-1200 It s the Interplay that makes the difference SIMATIC S7-1200 Controller SIMATIC S7-1200 CPUs CPU 1211C 3 configurations per CPU Dimensions W x H x D (mm) CPU 1212C CPU 1214C DC/DC/DC, AC/DC/RLY,

More information

L23 DeviceNet Drawing

L23 DeviceNet Drawing 4 2 1 Cat. Number 1769-L2-QFC1 Embedded Communication Port Isolated Serial Non-Isolated Serial CompactLogix Capacity CompactLogix Configuration EtherNet/IP Connections Memory Embedded I/O (pre-configured

More information

Using Ladder Logic Instructions to Communicate with an Ethernet IP Nexus Unit

Using Ladder Logic Instructions to Communicate with an Ethernet IP Nexus Unit Communicating to an AMCI Ethernet IP Nexus unit is typically accomplished by using a scanner module in the PLC rack. However, it is also possible to communicate with these units directly using instructions

More information

Application about Communication

Application about Communication Application about Communication Integration of a MicroMaster Drive with Rockwell ControlLogix using DeviceNet Third-Party Integration Warranty, liability and support Note The application examples are not

More information

POINT I/O EtherNet/IP Adapter Module. Catalog Number 1734-AENT User Manual

POINT I/O EtherNet/IP Adapter Module. Catalog Number 1734-AENT User Manual POINT I/O EtherNet/IP Adapter Module Catalog Number 1734-AENT User Manual Important User Information Solid state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of electromechanical equipment.

More information

Building a groov HMI for Allen-Bradley Logix Systems. About groov. Building a groov HMI for Allen-Bradley Logix. A-B Systems and groov

Building a groov HMI for Allen-Bradley Logix Systems. About groov. Building a groov HMI for Allen-Bradley Logix. A-B Systems and groov About groov Opto 22 s groov makes it easy to build and deploy simple, effective operator interfaces for your system. groov is browser-based and uses only Internet standards (HTML5, CSS3, SVG, SSL). That

More information

MBP_MSTR: Modbus Plus Master 12

MBP_MSTR: Modbus Plus Master 12 Unity Pro MBP_MSTR 33002527 07/2011 MBP_MSTR: Modbus Plus Master 12 Introduction This chapter describes the MBP_MSTR block. What s in this Chapter? This chapter contains the following topics: Topic Page

More information

Design, Operate, and Maintain Your Logix/Factory Talk HMI System

Design, Operate, and Maintain Your Logix/Factory Talk HMI System Design, Operate, and Maintain Your Logix/Factory Talk HMI System Fred Habenschuss & Tim Menge Rev 5058-CO900C Design, Operate, and Maintain Your Logix/Factory Talk HMI System Session Description This workshop

More information

A+ Guide to Managing and Maintaining Your PC, 7e. Chapter 1 Introducing Hardware

A+ Guide to Managing and Maintaining Your PC, 7e. Chapter 1 Introducing Hardware A+ Guide to Managing and Maintaining Your PC, 7e Chapter 1 Introducing Hardware Objectives Learn that a computer requires both hardware and software to work Learn about the many different hardware components

More information

WHITEPAPER. August 15, 2006

WHITEPAPER. August 15, 2006 August 15, 2006 WHITEPAPER DeltaV Integration with Rockwell PLCs Using Ethernet/IP Process DeltaV Integration with Rockwell PLCs is quick and cost-effective using the Ethernet/IP Driver for the DeltaV

More information

Logix5000 Controllers I/O and Tag Data

Logix5000 Controllers I/O and Tag Data Programming Manual Logix5000 Controllers I/O and Tag Data 1756 ControlLogix, 1756 GuardLogix, 1768 Compact GuardLogix, 1769 CompactLogix, 1789 SoftLogix, PowerFlex with DriveLogix Important user information

More information

SCADA System. Application Guide

SCADA System. Application Guide SCADA System Application Guide Important User Information Solid state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of electromechanical equipment. Safety Guidelines for the Application,

More information

M-series Virtual I/O Module 2

M-series Virtual I/O Module 2 DeltaV Distributed Control System Product Data Sheet M-series Virtual I/O Module 2 Non-intrusive DeltaV I/O simulation Powerful integration solution Easy to use Modular, flexible packaging The M-series

More information

Configuring RSLinx as an OPC Server for PanelMate epro

Configuring RSLinx as an OPC Server for PanelMate epro Configuring RSLinx as an OPC Server for PanelMate epro RSLinx includes OPC Server functionality in all versions except RSLinx Lite. This means that if a user purchases a license for RSLinx OEM, Standard,

More information

ETHERNET/IP PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE

ETHERNET/IP PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE ETHERNET/IP PROGRAMMER'S GUIDE 3600-4168_00_EtherNetIP LINEAR SOLUTIONS MADE EASY Tolomatic reserves the right to change the design or operation of the equipment described herein and any associated motion

More information

Accessing EtherNet/IP Network Variables in a WAGO 750-841 with a ControlLogix PLC Application note

Accessing EtherNet/IP Network Variables in a WAGO 750-841 with a ControlLogix PLC Application note Accessing EtherNet/IP Network Variables in a WAGO 750-841 with a ControlLogix PLC, English Version 1.0.0 2 General Copyright 2002 by WAGO Kontakttechnik GmbH All rights reserved. WAGO Kontakttechnik GmbH

More information

DeviceNet Bus Software Help for Programming an Allen Bradley Control System

DeviceNet Bus Software Help for Programming an Allen Bradley Control System FBP FieldBusPlug V7 DeviceNet Bus Software Help for Programming an Allen Bradley Control System DeviceNet Software Help for Programming an Allen Bradley Control System Contents Page General Purpose...

More information

PR03. High Availability

PR03. High Availability PR03 High Availability Related Topics NI10 Ethernet/IP Best Practices NI15 Enterprise Data Collection Options NI16 Thin Client Overview Solution Area 4 (Process) Agenda Overview Controllers & I/O Software

More information

JNIOR. Overview. Get Connected. Get Results. JNIOR Model 310. JNIOR Model 312. JNIOR Model 314. JNIOR Model 410

JNIOR. Overview. Get Connected. Get Results. JNIOR Model 310. JNIOR Model 312. JNIOR Model 314. JNIOR Model 410 The INTEG is an Ethernet I/O (digital, analog) device that monitors and controls a small set of process signals. functions as both basic I/O for integration with another application or system AND as a

More information

Allen-Bradley Stratix 5700 Network Address Translation (NAT)

Allen-Bradley Stratix 5700 Network Address Translation (NAT) 00:00:BC:66:0F:C7 DANGER SINK\ SOURCE SOURCE 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 00 08 01 09 02 10 03 11 04 12 05 13 06 14 07 15 COM COM 0 1 NC NC +V +V 00 08 01

More information

EtherNet/IP Adapter. 22-COMM-E FRN 1.xxx. User Manual

EtherNet/IP Adapter. 22-COMM-E FRN 1.xxx. User Manual EtherNet/IP Adapter 22-COMM-E FRN 1.xxx User Manual Important User Information Solid state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of electromechanical equipment. Safety Guidelines

More information

CompactLogix 5370 L1 Controllers

CompactLogix 5370 L1 Controllers Quick Start CompactLogix 5370 L1 Controllers Catalog Numbers 1769-L16ER-BB1B, 1769-L18ER-BB1B, 1769-L18ERM-BB1B Important User Information Read this document and the documents listed in the additional

More information

AKD EtherNet/IP Communication

AKD EtherNet/IP Communication AKD EtherNet/IP Communication Edition August 2012, Revision C Valid for firmware version 1.7 Patents Pending Part Number 903-200008-00 Keep all manuals as a product component during the life span of the

More information

High Availability and Safety solutions for Critical Processes

High Availability and Safety solutions for Critical Processes High Availability and Safety solutions for Critical Processes An Introduction to AADvance Subrahmanya Bhat P Sr. Systems Engineer 09 & 10 th Sep 2014 PUBLIC INFORMATION Rev 5058-CO900E 2 Agenda Process

More information

Application Note 3: TrendView Recorder Smart Logging

Application Note 3: TrendView Recorder Smart Logging Application Note : TrendView Recorder Smart Logging Logging Intelligently with the TrendView Recorders The advanced features of the TrendView recorders allow the user to gather tremendous amounts of data.

More information

NJ Programming Best Practices

NJ Programming Best Practices NJ Programming Best Practices Johnston Hall October 15, 2014 NJ Best Practices V1.1 1 Contents Summary... 5 The purpose of this paper... 5 Fastest Way to Get Started... 6 Hardware and I/O Configuration...

More information

AlarmsandEvents SYSTEM CONFIGURATION GUIDE INTEGRATED PRODUCTION & PERFORMANCE SUITE. PUBLICATION FTAE-RM001H-EN-E December 2014

AlarmsandEvents SYSTEM CONFIGURATION GUIDE INTEGRATED PRODUCTION & PERFORMANCE SUITE. PUBLICATION FTAE-RM001H-EN-E December 2014 INTEGRATED PRODUCTION & PERFORMANCE SUITE AlarmsandEvents SYSTEM CONFIGURATION GUIDE PUBLICATION FTAE-RM001H-EN-E December 2014 Supersedes Publication FTAE-RM001G-EN-E Contact Rockwell Customer Support

More information

Modbus Communications for PanelView Terminals

Modbus Communications for PanelView Terminals User Guide Modbus Communications for PanelView Terminals Introduction This document describes how to connect and configure communications for the Modbus versions of the PanelView terminals. This document

More information

(Cat. No. 6008-SI) Product Data

(Cat. No. 6008-SI) Product Data (Cat. No. 6008-SI) Product Data 1 Because of the variety of uses for this product and because of the differences between solid state products and electromechanical products, those responsible for applying

More information

Communicating with devices

Communicating with devices Introduction to I/O Where does the data for our CPU and memory come from or go to? Computers communicate with the outside world via I/O devices. Input devices supply computers with data to operate on.

More information

SHORT TRAINING COURSES

SHORT TRAINING COURSES Post Office Box SR 95, Spintex Road, Ghana Tel: +233 302 812680, Fax: +233 302 814709 E mail: contact@automationghana.com Website: www.automationghana.com SHORT TRAINING COURSES Equipping industries with

More information

Modbus and ION Technology

Modbus and ION Technology 70072-0104-14 TECHNICAL 06/2009 Modbus and ION Technology Modicon Modbus is a communications protocol widely used in process control industries such as manufacturing. PowerLogic ION meters are compatible

More information

Application Technique. Troubleshoot EtherNet/IP Networks

Application Technique. Troubleshoot EtherNet/IP Networks Application Technique Troubleshoot EtherNet/IP Networks Important User Information Read this document and the documents listed in the additional resources section about installation, configuration, and

More information

Using Logix5000 Controllers as Masters or Slaves on Modbus

Using Logix5000 Controllers as Masters or Slaves on Modbus Application Solution Using Logix5000 Controllers as Masters or Slaves on Modbus Purpose of the Document This application solution, and the associated RSLogix 5000 project files, help you use Logix5000

More information

WinPFT File Transfer Utility (Catalog No. 2711-ND7)

WinPFT File Transfer Utility (Catalog No. 2711-ND7) Technical Data WinPFT File Transfer Utility (Catalog No. 2711-ND7) Overview WINPFT is a stand-alone Windows utility which lets you transfer applications developed for standard PanelView terminals or Dataliner

More information

CONTROL MICROSYSTEMS DNP3. User and Reference Manual

CONTROL MICROSYSTEMS DNP3. User and Reference Manual DNP3 User and Reference Manual CONTROL MICROSYSTEMS SCADA products... for the distance 48 Steacie Drive Telephone: 613-591-1943 Kanata, Ontario Facsimile: 613-591-1022 K2K 2A9 Technical Support: 888-226-6876

More information

IMPORTANT PRODUCT INFORMATION

IMPORTANT PRODUCT INFORMATION January 2010 IMPORTANT PRODUCT INFORMATION READ THIS INFORMATION FIRST Product: Max-ON Hot-Backup Redundancy Software, Release 2.05 Introduction Max-ON is a trademark of GE Intelligent Platforms, Inc.

More information

ControlFLASH Firmware Upgrade Software

ControlFLASH Firmware Upgrade Software User Manual ControlFLASH Firmware Upgrade Software Catalog Numbers ControlFLASH 12.00.00 Important User Information Solid-state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of electromechanical

More information

FLEX I/O EtherNet/IP Adapter Module

FLEX I/O EtherNet/IP Adapter Module FLEX I/O EtherNet/IP Adapter Module 1794-AENT User Manual Important User Information Because of the variety of uses for the products described in this publication, those responsible for the application

More information

Allen-Bradley. ControlLogix Gateway System (Cat. No. 1756 series) User Manual

Allen-Bradley. ControlLogix Gateway System (Cat. No. 1756 series) User Manual Allen-Bradley ControlLogix Gateway System (Cat. No. 1756 series) User Manual Important User Information Because of the variety of uses for the products described in this publication, those responsible

More information

EtherNet/IP Web Server Module

EtherNet/IP Web Server Module EtherNet/IP Web Server Module 1756-EWEB, 1768-EWEB User Manual Important User Information Solid state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of electromechanical equipment. Safety

More information

Connecting UniOP to Telemecanique PLC s

Connecting UniOP to Telemecanique PLC s Connecting UniOP to Telemecanique PLC s Contents 1. Introduction... 2 2. Uni-Telway Driver... 2 2.1 Uni-Telway Addresses... 2 2.2 Designer Controller Setup... 4 2.3 Point To Point Connection Addressing...

More information

APPENDIX 1 USER LEVEL IMPLEMENTATION OF PPATPAN IN LINUX SYSTEM

APPENDIX 1 USER LEVEL IMPLEMENTATION OF PPATPAN IN LINUX SYSTEM 152 APPENDIX 1 USER LEVEL IMPLEMENTATION OF PPATPAN IN LINUX SYSTEM A1.1 INTRODUCTION PPATPAN is implemented in a test bed with five Linux system arranged in a multihop topology. The system is implemented

More information

Multi-Master DF1 Protocol User Guide

Multi-Master DF1 Protocol User Guide Multi-Master DF1 Protocol User Guide Part Number 900-282 Revision B August 2004 Copyright & Trademark Contacts 2002, Lantronix. All rights reserved. No part of the contents of this book may be transmitted

More information

PROFINET the Industrial Ethernet standard. Siemens AG 2013. Alle Rechte vorbehalten.

PROFINET the Industrial Ethernet standard. Siemens AG 2013. Alle Rechte vorbehalten. the Industrial Ethernet standard is 100% Ethernet is Ethernet Ethernet is the established standard in the IT world for fast exchange of data (IEEE 802.3) is always full duplex simultaneous communication

More information

Technical Manual. FAN COIL CONTROLLER COOLING or HEATING ANALOG or PWM Art. 119914 631001A

Technical Manual. FAN COIL CONTROLLER COOLING or HEATING ANALOG or PWM Art. 119914 631001A COOLING or HEATING ANALOG or PWM Art. 119914 631001A TOTAL AUTOMATION GENERAL TRADING CO. LLC SUITE NO.506, LE SOLARIUM OFFICE TOWER, SILICON OASIS, DUBAI. UAE. Tel. +971 4 392 6860, Fax. +971 4 392 6850

More information

Communication Protocol

Communication Protocol Analysis of the NXT Bluetooth Communication Protocol By Sivan Toledo September 2006 The NXT supports Bluetooth communication between a program running on the NXT and a program running on some other Bluetooth

More information

Hands-On Lab Workbook. Introduction to EtherNet/IP

Hands-On Lab Workbook. Introduction to EtherNet/IP Hands-On Lab Workbook Introduction to EtherNet/IP WELCOME TO THE INTRODUCTION TO ETHERNET/IP HANDS-ON LAB 7 ABOUT THIS HANDS-ON LAB 7 BEFORE YOU BEGIN 7 DOCUMENT CONVENTIONS 9 REVIEWING THE APPLICATION

More information

Logix5000 Controllers

Logix5000 Controllers Logix5000 Controllers Catalog Numbers 1756 ControlLogix, 1756 GuardLogix, 1768 CompactLogix, 1768 Compact GuardLogix, 1769 CompactLogix, 1789 SoftLogix, PowerFlex with DriveLogix Quick Start Important

More information

Final for ECE374 05/06/13 Solution!!

Final for ECE374 05/06/13 Solution!! 1 Final for ECE374 05/06/13 Solution!! Instructions: Put your name and student number on each sheet of paper! The exam is closed book. You have 90 minutes to complete the exam. Be a smart exam taker -

More information

DeviceNet Scanner Module

DeviceNet Scanner Module Installation Instructions DeviceNet Scanner Module Catalog Number 1771-SDN/C Contents Use this document as a guide to install your 1771-SDN/C Scanner Module. To: understand important user information See

More information

AXIS 262+ Network Video Recorder

AXIS 262+ Network Video Recorder 31433/EN/R4/0803 Complete Network Video Recording Solution Complete Network Video Recording Solution Picture this: A simple and reliable, plug-and-play video surveillance system for hotels, shops, banks,

More information

FINS Gateway For OMRON PLCs

FINS Gateway For OMRON PLCs 1 Purpose This Technical Note describes how to set up a remote collaboration. A remote collaboration consists in configuring, programming or monitoring a PLC from a remote location, without the need of

More information

Performance Test Methodology for EtherNet/IP Devices

Performance Test Methodology for EtherNet/IP Devices Performance Test Methodology for EtherNet/IP Devices Version 1.0 March 14, 2005 PUB00081R1 Published by EtherNet/IP Implementors Workshop ODVA Document Revision Log Revision Section Remarks Date Author(s)

More information

1. Computer System Structure and Components

1. Computer System Structure and Components 1 Computer System Structure and Components Computer System Layers Various Computer Programs OS System Calls (eg, fork, execv, write, etc) KERNEL/Behavior or CPU Device Drivers Device Controllers Devices

More information

MVI56E-MNET / MNETXT. ControlLogix Platform Modbus TCP/IP Communication Module SETUP GUIDE

MVI56E-MNET / MNETXT. ControlLogix Platform Modbus TCP/IP Communication Module SETUP GUIDE MVI56E-MNET / MNETXT ControlLogix Platform Modbus TCP/IP Communication Module SETUP GUIDE Important Safety Information - MVI56E and MVI56E-XT Modules North America Warnings A Warning - Explosion Hazard

More information

RSLinx-Lite PLC Programming software communication interface. RSLinx-OEM Provides DDE capability for Rockwell DDE capable software.

RSLinx-Lite PLC Programming software communication interface. RSLinx-OEM Provides DDE capability for Rockwell DDE capable software. H 1 H. RSLinx is a windows based communication software package developed by Rockwell Software to interface to all of the Rockwell and A-B industrial control and automation hardware. RSLinx comes in a

More information

The goal is to program the PLC and HMI to count with the following behaviors:

The goal is to program the PLC and HMI to count with the following behaviors: PLC and HMI Counting Lab The goal is to program the PLC and HMI to count with the following behaviors: 1. The counting should be started and stopped from buttons on the HMI 2. The direction of the count

More information

4m. MONITORING OF ETHERNET/IP NETWORK TRAFFIC.

4m. MONITORING OF ETHERNET/IP NETWORK TRAFFIC. 4m. MONITORING OF ETHERNET/IP NETWORK TRAFFIC. Wireshark (see Section 6) is a network packet analyser. It is used to: troubleshoot network problems, examine security problems, debug protocol implementations,

More information

User Manual. PowerFlex 525 Embedded EtherNet/IP Adapter

User Manual. PowerFlex 525 Embedded EtherNet/IP Adapter User Manual PowerFlex 525 Embedded EtherNet/IP Adapter Important User Information Solid-state equipment has operational characteristics differing from those of electromechanical equipment. Safety Guidelines

More information

CompactLogix Selection Guide

CompactLogix Selection Guide CompactLogix Selection Guide 1769 Compact I/O Modules 176 CompactLogix Integrated Motion 1769 CompactLogix Communication Modules 176 and 1769 CompactLogix Controllers 176 and 1769 CompactLogix Power Supplies

More information

Disturbance Recoder SPCR 8C27. Product Guide

Disturbance Recoder SPCR 8C27. Product Guide Issued: April 1999 Status: Updated Version: C/26.04.2006 Data subject to change without notice Features Versatile digital disturbance recorder module for recording various phenomena in the electric power

More information

Process Control and Automation using Modbus Protocol

Process Control and Automation using Modbus Protocol Process Control and Automation using Modbus Protocol Modbus is the fundamental network protocol used in most industrial applications today. It is universal, open and an easy to use protocol. Modbus has

More information

Industrial Ethernet How to Keep Your Network Up and Running A Beginner s Guide to Redundancy Standards

Industrial Ethernet How to Keep Your Network Up and Running A Beginner s Guide to Redundancy Standards Redundancy = Protection from Network Failure. Redundancy Standards WP-31-REV0-4708-1/5 Industrial Ethernet How to Keep Your Network Up and Running A Beginner s Guide to Redundancy Standards For a very

More information

ENET-710. ENET-710 - Ethernet Module ENET-710 JAN / 06 FOUNDATION

ENET-710. ENET-710 - Ethernet Module ENET-710 JAN / 06 FOUNDATION ENET-710 ENET-710 - Ethernet Module JAN / 06 ENET-710 FOUNDATION E N E T 7 1 0 ME smar www.smar.com Specifications and information are subject to change without notice. Up-to-date address information is

More information