Degree Hypergroupoids Associated with Hypergraphs

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Filomat 8:1 (014), 119 19 DOI 10.98/FIL1401119F Published by Faculty of Sciences and Mathematics, University of Niš, Serbia Available at: http://www.pmf.ni.ac.rs/filomat Degree Hypergroupoids Associated with Hypergraphs Mehdi Farshi a, Bijan Davvaz a, Saeed Mirvakili b a Department of Mathematics, Yazd University, Yazd, Iran b Department of Mathematics, Payame Noor University, P. O. Box 19395-4697 Tehran, Iran Abstract. In this paper, we present some connections between graph theory and hyperstructure theory. In this regard, we construct a hypergroupoid by defining a hyperoperation on the set of degrees of vertices of a hypergraph and we call it a degree hypergroupoid. We will see that the constructed hypergroupoid is always an H v -group. We will investigate some conditions on a degree hypergroupoid to have a hypergroup. Further, we study the degree hypergroupoid associated with Cartesian product of hypergraphs. Finally, the fundamental relation and complete parts of a degree hypergroupoid are studied. 1. Introduction and preliminaries The notion of hypergraph has been introduced around 1960 as a generalization of graph and one of the initial concerns was to extend some classical results of graph theory. In [], there is a very good presentation of graph and hypergraph theory. A hypergraph is a generalization of a graph in which an edge can connect any number of vertices. Formally, a hypergraph is a pair Γ = (X, E), where X is a finite set of vertices and E = {E 1,..., E m } is a set of hyperedges which are non-empty subsets of X. Figure 1 is an example of a hypergraph with 7 vertices and 4 hyperedges. A hypergraph Γ = (X, E ) is a subhypergraph of Γ = (X, E) if X X and E E. We note that every graph can be considered as a hypergraph. We denote the set of vertices of a graph G by V(G). A simple graph is an undirected graph that has no loops (edges connected at both ends to the same vertex) and no more than one edge between any two different vertices. A complete graph is a simple graph with n vertices and an edge between every two vertices. We use the symbol K n for a complete graph with n vertices. A star graph with n edges is a graph S n = (X, E) in which X = {x} {x 1,..., x n } and E = {x i x 1 i n}. x is called the center vertex of S n. Let Γ = (X, E) be a hypergraph and x, y X. A hyperedge sequence (E 1,..., E k ) is called a path of length k from x to y if the following conditions are satisfied: (1) x E 1 and y E k, () E i E j for i j, (3) E i E i+1 for 1 i k 1. 010 Mathematics Subject Classification. Primary 0N0; Secondary 05C65 Keywords. Hypergraph, Hypergroupoid, Hypergroup, Fundamental relation Received: 0 September 013; Accepted: 11 November 013 Communicated by Francesco Belardo Email addresses: m.farshi@yahoo.com (Mehdi Farshi), davvaz@yazd.ac.ir (Bijan Davvaz), saeed_mirvakili@pnu.ac.ir (Saeed Mirvakili)

M. Farshi et al. / Filomat 8:1 (014), 119 19 10 E 1 E x 1 x x3 E 4 x 6 x 7 x 4 x 5 E 3 Figure 1: A hypergraph with 7 vertices and 4 hyperedges We contract out there is a path of length zero between x and x. In a hypergraph Γ, two vertices x and y are called connected if Γ contains a path from x to y. If two vertices are connected by a path of length 1, i.e. by a single hyperedge, the vertices are called adjacent. We use the notation x y to denote the adjacency of vertices x and y. A hypergraph is said to be connected if every pair of vertices in the hypergraph is connected. A connected component of a hypergraph is any maximal set of vertices which are pairwise connected by a path. The length of shortest path between vertices x and y is denoted by dist(x, y) and the diameter of Γ is defined as follows: { max{dist(x, y) x, y X} if Γ is connected, diam(γ) = otherwise. The hyperstructure theory was born in 1934, when Marty introduced the notion of a hypergroup [18]. Since then, many papers and several books have been written on this topic (see for instance [5 9, 0]). Algebraic hyperstructures are a suitable generalization of classical algebraic structures. In a classical algebraic structure, the composition of two elements is an element, while in an algebraic hyperstructure, the composition of two elements is a set. More exactly, let H be a non-empty set and P (H) be the set of all non-empty subsets of H. A hyperoperation on H is a map : H H P (H) and the structure (H, ) is called a hypergroupoid. A hypergroupoid (H, ) is called commutative if for all x, y H we have x y = y x. A hypergroupoid (H, ) is called a quasihypergroup if for all x in H we have x H = H x = H, which means that x u = v x = H. A quasihypergroup (H, ) is called u H v H (1) a hypergroup if is associative, i.e., for all x, y, z of H we have (x y) z = x (y z), () an H v -group if for all x, y, z of H we have (x y) z x (y z). A hypergroup (H, ) is called a total hypergroup if x y = H, for all x, y of H. A non-empty subset K of a hypergroup (H, ) is called a subhypergroup if for all x of K we have x K = K x = K. Let (H, ) and (K, ) be two hypergroupoids. A map φ : H K is called (1) an inclusion homomorphism if for all x, y H we have φ(x y) φ(x) φ(y), () a homomorphism if for all x, y H we have φ(x y) = φ(x) φ(y). If there exists a one to one (inclusion) homomorphism of H onto K, then we say that H is (inclusion) isomorphic to K and we write (H i K) H K. The connections between hyperstructure theory and graph theory have been analyzed by many researchers (see for instance [1, 3, 4, 10, 11, 14, 16, 17, 19]). In [4], Corsini considered a hypergraph Γ = (H, {E i } i ) and constructed a hypergroupoid H Γ = (H, ) in which the hyperoperation on H has defined as follows: x, y H, x y = E(x) E(y), where E(x) = {E i x E i }. Corsini proved that:

M. Farshi et al. / Filomat 8:1 (014), 119 19 11 Theorem 1.1. The hypergroupoid H Γ satisfies for each (x, y) H the following conditions: (1) x y = x x y y, () x x x, (3) y x x x y y. Also, he proved that: Theorem 1.. Let (H, ) be a hypergroupoid satisfying (1), () and (3) of Theorem 1.1. Then, (H, ) is a hypergroup if and only if the following condition is valid: (a, c) H, c c c c c a a a.. Degree hypergroupoids Let Γ = (X, {E i } i ) be a hypergraph. For each x X we define the degree deg(x) of x to be the number of hyperedges containing x. A hypergraph in which all vertices have the same degree is said to be regular. We define the degree neighborhood of x as follows: D(x) = {E i y E i such that deg(y) = deg(x)}. It is easy to check that D(x) = D(y) if deg(x) = deg(y). The set of all degrees of vertices of Γ will be denoted by D Γ. For each d D Γ we define deg 1 (d) = {x X deg(x) = d}. The hypergroupoid (D Γ, Γ ) where the hyperoperation Γ is defined by d, d D Γ, d Γ d = {deg(z) z D(x) for some x deg 1 (d) deg 1 (d )}, is called a degree hypergroupoid. We note that if Γ is a hypergraph and Γ is a connected component of Γ, then for each d, d D Γ we have d Γ d d Γ d. Theorem.1. The degree hypergroupoid (D Γ, Γ ) has the following properties for each d, d D Γ : (1) d Γ d = d Γ d d Γ d (whence d Γ d = d Γ d), () d d Γ d, (3) d d Γ d d d Γ d. By the above theorem we conclude that {d, d } d Γ d for all d, d D Γ and so for all d, d, d D Γ we have {d, d, d } (d Γ d ) Γ d d Γ (d Γ d ). On the other hand, for all d D Γ we have d Γ D Γ = D Γ. These ones imply that every degree hypergroupoid is an H v -group. Also, by using Theorem 1b of [4], for all d D Γ we have d Γ d Γ d = d Γ d. d d Γ d Corollary.. Let Γ be a hypergraph and d j D Γ. If d i Γ d i = D Γ, for every d i D Γ {d j }, then d j Γ d j = D Γ. Proposition.3. If Γ is a hypergraph with regular connected components, then for every d, d d Γ d = {d, d } and so (D Γ, Γ ) is a hypergroup. D Γ we have Corollary.4. Γ is a regular hypergraph if and only if D Γ is a singleton set. Corollary.5. If Γ is a hypergraph and D Γ = {d 1, d } and d 1 Γ d 1 {d 1 }, then (D Γ, Γ ) is a total hypergroup. Proposition.6. If Γ is a hypergraph and D Γ = 3, then (D Γ, Γ ) is a hypergroup.

M. Farshi et al. / Filomat 8:1 (014), 119 19 1 Proof. It suffices to show that Γ is associative. Let d 1, d, d 3 D Γ be arbitrary elements. If d 1 = d = d 3, then commutativity of Γ implies that (d 1 Γ d ) Γ d 3 = d 1 Γ (d Γ d 3 ). We show that (d 1 Γ d 1 ) Γ d = d 1 Γ (d 1 Γ d ) where d 1 d. If d 1 Γ d = D Γ, then the result is obvious. Suppose that d 1 Γ d = {d 1, d }. Surely d 3 d 1 Γ d 1. We have the following two cases. Case 1: Let d 1 Γ d 1 = {d 1 }. Then, d 1 Γ (d 1 Γ d ) = d 1 Γ {d 1, d } = d 1 Γ d 1 d Γ d = d 1 Γ d = (d 1 Γ d 1 ) Γ d. Case : Let d 1 Γ d 1 = {d 1, d }. Then d 1 Γ (d 1 Γ d )= d 1 Γ {d 1, d }= d 1 Γ d 1 d Γ d = d 1 Γ d = {d 1, d } Γ d = (d 1 Γ d 1 ) Γ d. If d 1, d, d 3 are distinct elements of D Γ, then (d 1 Γ d ) Γ d 3 = d 1 Γ (d Γ d 3 ) = D Γ which completes the proof. Lemma.7. Let Γ = (X, {E i } i ) be a hypergraph such that D(x) D(y) for all x, y X. Then, for all d D Γ we have d Γ d Γ d = D Γ. Proof. Let d be an arbitrary element of D Γ. We show that r d Γ d Γ d for all r D Γ. Let r = deg(x) and d = deg(y). By assumption there exists w D(x) D(y). Since w D(x), there exists an edge E i containing a vertex w of degree r such that w E i. Similarly, there exists an edge E j containing a vertex w of degree d such that w E j. If deg(w) = k, then by definition of Γ we have k d Γ d and r k Γ k. Since k Γ k k Γ d we have r k Γ d d Γ d Γ d. Theorem.8. Let Γ = (X, {E i } i ) be a hypergraph such that D(x) D(y) for all x, y X. Then, (D Γ, Γ ) is a hypergroup. Proof. Use Lemma.7 and Theorem 1.. Corollary.9. If Γ is a hypergraph with diam(γ), then (D Γ, Γ ) is a hypergroup. Lemma.10. Let Γ be a connected hypergraph and D Γ = {d 1, d, d 3 }. Then, (1) there exists i {1,, 3} such that d i Γ d i = D Γ, () for every i, j {1,, 3} with i j we have d i Γ d j = D Γ. Proof. (1) Since Γ is connected, we have d 1 Γ d 1 {d 1 }. Without loss of generality, assume d d 1 Γ d 1. If y is a vertex of degree d 3, then connectivity of Γ implies that there exists a vertex x of degree d 1 or d such that y D(x). If deg(x) = d 1 then we have d 1 Γ d 1 = D Γ otherwise we have d Γ d = D Γ. Proof of () is straightforward. Corollary.11. Let Γ be a connected hypergraph and D Γ = {d 1, d, d 3 }. Then, (D Γ, Γ ) is a total hypergroup or a hypergroup with the following table: Γ d 1 d d 3 d 1 D Γ {d } D Γ D Γ d D Γ D Γ {d 1 } D Γ d 3 D Γ D Γ D Γ Proposition.1. Let Γ = (X, {E i } i ) be a hypergraph and D Γ = {d 1, d }. Then, the following assertions are equivalent: (1) d 1 Γ d 1 = {d 1 }, () d Γ d = {d }, (3) Γ is not connected,

(4) (D Γ, Γ ) is a hypergroup with the following table: M. Farshi et al. / Filomat 8:1 (014), 119 19 13 Γ d 1 d d 1 {d 1 } {d 1, d } d {d 1, d } {d } Remark.13. By Proposition.6, the degree hypergroupoid (D Γ, Γ ) associated with the graph Γ of Figure is a hypergroup and D(x) D(y) =. This shows that the converse of Theorem.8 is not true. x y Figure : Γ 3. Degree graph of a hypergraph For any hypergraph Γ, we construct its degree graph, denoted by G Γ, as follows: the vertex set of G Γ is the set of degrees of vertices of Γ, that is D Γ, and vertices d, d D Γ are adjacent if and only if there exists a hyperedge in Γ containing vertices x, y with deg(x) = d and deg(y) = d. It is clear that a degree graph is always a simple graph. For a vertex d in G Γ, N GΓ (d) is the neighborhood of d that is the set of all vertices in G Γ which are adjacent to d (each vertex is adjacent to itself). It is easy to check that for every d D Γ we have d Γ d = N GΓ (d) and d Γ d Γ d = N GΓ (u). Therefore, if γ is a connected component of G Γ, then u N GΓ (d) for every d V(γ) we have d Γ d Γ d V(γ). Lemma 3.1. If Γ is a connected hypergraph, then G Γ is a connected graph. As the following figure shows, the converse of Lemma 3.1 does not hold in general. 1 3 Figure 3: A disconnected hypergraph and it s degree graph A question that comes to mind after defining degree graph is the following: Given a graph G with non-negative integer vertices, is there any hypergraph Γ such that G is the degree graph of Γ? The answer is yes as can be seen in Theorem 3.3. Lemma 3.. Let d, d be two distinct non-negative integers and let G be a simple graph on two vertices d and d. Then, there exists a graph Γ such that G Γ = G.

M. Farshi et al. / Filomat 8:1 (014), 119 19 14 Proof. We may assume without loss of generality that d < d. If G has no edge, then Γ can be a graph containing two connected components K d and K d. So, let the graph G be not null. We first prove the lemma in the case that d and d are odd. Consider the star graph S d with center vertex x and edges x 1 x,..., x d x. For i = 1,..., d, we add the edges x i x i+1, x i x i+,..., x i x i+ d 1 to the edges of S d, where i + r i + r (mod d) and 1 i + r d, for each 1 r d 1. We denote the resulting graph by G d,d. Obviously, degree graph of G d,d is G. Now, we prove the lemma in other cases. In the case that d is odd and d is even, if d = d 1, then it is sufficient to duplicate K d and connect two vertices of degree d 1, otherwise we construct our desired graph by duplicating the graph G d,d 1 and adding an edge between the vertices of degree d 1. In the case that d is even and d is odd, we duplicate the graph G d 1,d and for i = 1,..., d, we add the edges x i x i where x i is duplicated vertex of x i. Finally, whenever d and d are even first we duplicate the graph G d 1,d 1 and then we connect the vertices of degree d 1 and for i = 1,..., d 1, we add the edges x i x i where x i is duplicated vertex of x i. Theorem 3.3. If G is a simple graph such that its vertex set is a subset of non-negative integers, then there exists a graph Γ such that G Γ = G. Proof. Suppose that the edge set of G is {E 1,..., E m }. By Lemma 3., for each E i, 1 i m, there exists a graph Γ i such that G Γi covers E i. By putting Γ i s together we will have a graph whose degree graph is G. Theorem 3.4. Let (H, ) be a finite hypergroupoid satisfying (1), (), (3) of Theorem 1.1. Then, there exists a graph Γ such that (D Γ, Γ ) (H, ). Proof. Let H = {a 1,..., a n } and let G be a graph with V(G) = {1,..., n} and E(G) = {ij i j and a i a j a j }. By Theorem 3.3, there exists a graph Γ such that G Γ = G. Clearly, f : D Γ H defined by f (i) = a i is an isomorphism. Lemma 3.5. If diam(g Γ ), then for every d D Γ we have d Γ d Γ d = D Γ. Proof. Clearly, for every d D Γ we have d Γ d Γ d D Γ. Let d D Γ be an arbitrary element. If d, d are adjacent vertices in G Γ, then we have d d Γ d d Γ d Γ d. Otherwise, by assumption there exists a vertex d V(G Γ ) which is adjacent to d and d. Since d Γ d Γ d = z Γ z and d d Γ d, we have d d Γ d d Γ d Γ d. z d Γ d Lemma 3.6. Let G Γ be connected. If 3 diam(g Γ ), then (D Γ, Γ ) is not a hypergroup. Proof. By assumption, there exists a path ({d 1, d }, {d, d 3 }, {d 3, d 4 }) in G Γ such that d 1, d 3 and d, d 4 and d 1, d 4 are not adjacent vertices. It is not difficult to see that d 4 (d 1 Γ d 1 ) d whereas d 4 d 1 Γ (d 1 Γ d ). This shows that Γ is not associative and so (D Γ, Γ ) is not a hypergroup. Theorem 3.7. If G Γ is connected, then a necessary and sufficient condition for (D Γ, Γ ) to be a hypergroup is diam(g Γ ). Proof. If (D Γ, Γ ) is a hypergroup, then by Lemma 3.6 we have diam(g Γ ). Conversely, if diam(g Γ ), then by Lemma 3.5 and Theorem 1., (D Γ, Γ ) is a hypergroup. Corollary 3.8. If (D Γ, Γ ) is a hypergroup, then the diameter of every connected component of G Γ is less than or equal to. Corollary 3.9. If (D Γ, Γ ) is a hypergroup and γ is a connected component of G Γ, then (D γ, Γ ) is a subhypergroup of (D Γ, Γ ). Theorem 3.10. If diam(g Γ ) =, then (D Γ, Γ ) is a hypergroup if and only if the diameter of every connected component of G Γ is less than or equal to 1.

M. Farshi et al. / Filomat 8:1 (014), 119 19 15 Proof. Let (D Γ, Γ ) be a hypergroup. By Corollary 3.8, the diameter of every connected component of G Γ is less than or equal to. Suppose that G Γ has a connected component G Γ1 of diameter. If d, d are non-adjacent vertices in G Γ1, then d d Γ d Γ d d Γ d. Now, if d V(G Γ ) V(G Γ1 ), then d Γ d Γ d d Γ d d Γ d Γ d. This contradicts the Theorem 1.. Conversely, assume that diameter of every connected component of G Γ is less than or equal to 1. Then, for each d V(G Γ ) we have d Γ d Γ d = d Γ d and so by Theorem 1., (D Γ, Γ ) is a hypergroup. 4. Direct product of degree hypergroupoids Let Γ = (X, E) and Γ = (X, E ) be two hypergraphs, where E = {E 1,..., E m } and E = {E 1,..., E n}. We define their product to be the hypergraph Γ Γ whose vertices set is X X and whose hyperedges are the sets E i E j with 1 i m, 1 j n. It is easy to see that for every (x, y) X X we have deg((x, y)) = deg(x) deg(y). Lemma 4.1. Vertices d and d of G Γ Γ that r r, s s, d = rs and d = r s. are adjacent if and only if there exist r, r V(G Γ ) and s, s V(G Γ ) such Proof. Suppose that d, d V(G Γ Γ ) are adjacent. By definition, there exists a hyperedge E i E j containing vertices (x, y) and (u, v) with d((x, y)) = d and d((u, v)) = d. Now, it is sufficient to assume r = deg(x), s = deg(y), r = deg(u) and s = deg(v). Conversely, since r, r are adjacent in G Γ there exists a hyperedge E i containing vertices x and y with deg(x) = r and deg(y) = r. Similarly, since s, s are adjacent in G Γ there exists a hyperedge E j containing vertices u and v with deg(u) = s and deg(v) = s. Therefore, by definition the vertices d and d of G Γ Γ are adjacent. Lemma 4.. If G Γ and G Γ are degree graphs of hypergraphs Γ and Γ respectively, then the diameter of G Γ Γ is less than or equal to Max{diam(G Γ ), diam(g Γ )}. Proof. Assume that m = Max{diam(G Γ ), diam(g Γ )}. Whenever m =, there is nothing to prove. For the case m <, let d and d be arbitrary vertices of G Γ Γ. By Lemma 4.1, there exist r, r V(G Γ ) and s, s V(G Γ ) such that r r, s s, d = rs and d = r s. Since diam(g Γ ) m, there exist vertices r 1,..., r m 1 V(G Γ ) (not necessarily distinct) such that r r 1... r m 1 r. Reasoning in the same way, since diam(g Γ ) m, there exist vertices s 1,..., s m 1 V(G Γ ) (not necessarily distinct) such that s s 1... s m 1 s. Now, by using Lemma 4.1, we have rs r 1 s 1... r m 1 s m 1 r s. This means that there exists a path from d to d of length less than or equal to m. Therefore, we have diam(g Γ Γ ) m. If G Γ and G Γ are connected, then by Lemma 4., G Γ Γ is connected. But the converse does not hold in general, as Example 4.4 shows. Theorem 4.3. If (D Γ, Γ ) and (D Γ, Γ ) are hypergroups with connected degree graphs, then (D Γ Γ, Γ Γ ) is a hypergroup. Proof. By Theorem 3.7, we have diam(g Γ ) and diam(g Γ ) and so by Lemma 4., we have diam(g Γ Γ ). Therefore, by Theorem 3.7, (D Γ Γ, Γ Γ ) is a hypergroup. The following example shows that the above result need not be true if G Γ or G Γ are not connected.

M. Farshi et al. / Filomat 8:1 (014), 119 19 16 Example 4.4. By Theorem 3.3, there exist graphs Γ and Γ with the following degree graphs: 1 4 1 3 Figure 4: Degree graphs of G Γ and G Γ. By Proposition.6, (D Γ, Γ ) and (D Γ, Γ ) are hypergroups. By using Lemma 4.1, degree graph of Γ Γ has the following figure: 1 1 3 8 6 4 Figure 5: Degree graph of G Γ Γ. Since diam(g Γ Γ ) = 3, by Theorem 3.7, (D Γ Γ, Γ Γ ) is not a hypergroup. The following example shows that the converse of Theorem 4.3 is not true. Example 4.5. Consider the following figure: 3 3 8 4 3 1 4 6 18 9 1 4 6 Figure 6: Degree graphs of G Γ, G Γ and G Γ Γ. Since diam(g Γ Γ ) =, by Theorem 3.7, (D Γ Γ, Γ Γ ) is a hypergroup and since diam(g Γ ) = 3, by Lemma 3.6, (D Γ, Γ ) is not a hypergroup. As can be seen by the Example 4.5, the inequality of Lemma 4. may be hold strictly. In the next lemma, we show that the equality can be hold under some conditions.

M. Farshi et al. / Filomat 8:1 (014), 119 19 17 Lemma 4.6. If Γ and Γ are hypergraphs with connected degree graphs such that D Γ Γ = D Γ D Γ, then diameter of G Γ Γ is equal to Max{diam(G Γ ), diam(g Γ )}. Proof. By Lemma 4., we have diam(g Γ Γ ) Max{diam(G Γ ), diam(g Γ )}. We prove the reverse inequality. Let r, r V(G Γ ) and s, s V(G Γ ) be arbitrary elements. Put d = rs and d = r s. If diam(g Γ Γ ) = m, then there exist vertices d 1,..., d m 1 V(G Γ Γ ) (not necessarily distinct) such that d d 1... d m 1 d. Since D Γ Γ = D Γ D Γ, for each 1 i m 1, there are unique elements r i V(G Γ ) and s i V(G Γ ), such that d i = r i s i. Also, d and d have no other decompositions. Now, by Lemma 4.1, we have r r 1... r m 1 r and s s 1... s m 1 s. This shows that d(r, r ) m and d(s, s ) m. The following corollary is an immediate consequence of Theorem 3.7 and Lemma 4.6. Corollary 4.7. Let Γ and Γ be hypergraphs with connected degree graphs such that D Γ Γ = D Γ D Γ. Then, (D Γ, Γ ) and (D Γ, Γ ) are hypergroups if and only if (D Γ Γ, Γ Γ ) is a hypergroup. Let (H, ) and (K, ) be hypergroupoids. We define the hyperoperation on the Cartesian product H K as follows: (x 1, y 1 ) (x, y ) = {(x, y) x x 1 x and y y 1 y }, and so (H K, ) is a hypergroupoid. Theorem 4.8. Let Γ and Γ be hypergraphs such that D Γ Γ = D Γ D Γ. Then, D Γ Γ i D Γ D Γ. Proof. By assumption, for each d D Γ Γ, there are unique elements r D Γ and s D Γ, such that d = rs. Consider the map φ : D Γ Γ D Γ D Γ defined by φ(rs) = (r, s). It is clear that φ is well-defined, one to one and onto. We show that φ is an inclusion homomorphism. Let r 1 s 1, r s D Γ Γ be arbitrary elements. Then, φ(r 1 s 1 Γ Γ r s ) = φ ( {rs rs r 1 s 1 or rs r s } ) = {(r, s) (r r 1 and s s 1 ) or (r r and s s )} {(r, s) (r r 1 or r r ) and (s s 1 or s s )} = {(r, s) r r 1 Γ r and s s 1 Γ s } = (r 1, s 1 ) (r, s ) = φ(r 1 s 1 ) φ(r s ). Corollary 4.9. Let Γ and Γ be hypergraphs such that D Γ Γ = D Γ D Γ. Then, D Γ Γ D Γ D Γ if G Γ or G Γ is a complete graph. It is easy to verify that if Γ and Γ are hypergraphs such that D Γ Γ = D Γ D Γ, then G Γ Γ is a complete graph if and only if G Γ and G Γ are complete graphs. Hence, the following corollary is an immediate consequence of Corollary 4.9. Corollary 4.10. Let Γ and Γ be hypergraphs such that D Γ Γ = D Γ D Γ. Then, D Γ Γ D Γ D Γ if G Γ Γ is a complete graph. Theorem 4.11. If φ : D Γ Γ D Γ D Γ defined by φ(rs) = (r, s) is an isomorphism, then G Γ or G Γ is a complete graph. Proof. Suppose that G Γ is not complete and s 1, s V(G Γ ) are non-adjacent vertices. Let r 1, r be arbitrary vertices of V(G Γ ). It is sufficient to show that r 1 r. As in the proof of Theorem 4.8, we have φ(r 1 s 1 Γ Γ r s ) = {(r, s) (r r 1 and s s 1 ) or (r r and s s )}, φ(r 1 s 1 ) φ(r s ) = {(r, s) (r r 1 or r r ) and (s s 1 or s s )}. Since φ(r 1 s 1 Γ Γ r s ) = φ(r 1 s 1 ) φ(r s ) and (r 1, s ) φ(r 1 s 1 ) φ(r s ), we have (r 1, s ) φ(r 1 s 1 Γ Γ r s ) and so r 1 r.

5. Some other properties of degree hypergroupoids M. Farshi et al. / Filomat 8:1 (014), 119 19 18 One of the main tools to study hyperstructures are fundamental relations. Fundamental relations have been introduced on hypergroups by Koskas [15] and then studied mainly by Corsini [5] and Freni [1, 13] concerning hypergroups, Vougiouklis [0] concerning H v -groups and many others. Let (H, ) be an H v -group, n a natural number and let U H (n) be the set of all hyperproducts of n elements in H. We define the relation β n on H as follows: xβ n y iff there exists P U H (n) such that {x, y} P. Let β = n β i, where β 1 = {(a, a) a H}. It is easy to see that β is reflexive and symmetric. We denote by β i=1 the transitive closure of β and define it as follows: x βy if there exists a natural number k and elements x = a 1, a,..., a k 1, a k = y in H such that a 1 βa, a βa 3,..., a k 1 βa k. Obviously, β is an equivalence relation and we have β = β if β is transitive. Freni [1] proved that the relation β defined on a hypergroup is transitive. If (H, ) is an H v -group and R is an equivalence relation on H, then the set of all equivalence classes will be denoted by H/R, i.e., H/R = {R(x) x H}. We denote by β the fundamental relation on H. β is the smallest equivalence relation on H such that H/β is a group with respect to the following operation: β (a) β (b) = β (c), for all c a b. Theorem 5.1. Let (H, ) be an H v -group. Then the fundamental relation β is the transitive closure of the relation β. Proof. See Theorem.1 of [0]. Theorem 5.. If Γ is a hypergraph and (D Γ, Γ ) is the H v -group associated with Γ, then D Γ /β = 1 and β = β = D Γ, where β is the fundamental relation on D Γ. Proof. For every d, d D Γ we have {d, d } d d and so we have D Γ β β. On the other hand we have β β D Γ and therefore we have D Γ = β. Now, by using Theorem 5.1 we have D Γ /β = 1 and β = β = D Γ. By the above theorem, fundamental relation of every degree hypergroupoid D Γ is the full relation D Γ. But, the converse is not true as the following example shows. Example 5.3. Let (H = {a, b}, ) be an H v -group with the following table: a b a a b b b {a, b} One easily checks that β = H and the fundamental relation on (H, ) is equal to β, but (H, ) is not a degree hypergroupoid. Let (H, ) be an H v -group and A be a non-empty subset of H. We say that A is a complete part of H if for any natural number n and for all hyperproducts P H H (n), the following implication holds: A P = P A. Proposition 5.4. Let Γ be a hypergraph and (D Γ, Γ ) be the degree hypergroupoid associated with Γ. Then, complete part of (D Γ, Γ ) is equal to D Γ.

M. Farshi et al. / Filomat 8:1 (014), 119 19 19 Proof. Suppose that A is a complete part of D Γ and b D Γ is an arbitrary element. Clearly, for every a A we have A a Γ b which implies that a Γ b A and so b A. This completes the proof. Consider the H v -group H of Example 5.3. It is easy to verify that H is the only complete part of H but H is not a degree hypergroupoid. This shows that the converse of Proposition 5.4 is not true. Acknowledgments. The authors are highly grateful to the referees for their valuable comments and suggestions for improving the paper. References [1] M.I. Ali, Hypergraphs, hypergroupoid and hypergroups, Ital. J. Pure Appl. Math. 8 (000) 45 48. [] C. Berge, Graphs and Hypergraphs, North Holland, 1979. [3] P. Corsini, Graphs and join spaces, J. Combin. Inform. System Sci. 16 (1991) 313 318. [4] P. Corsini, Hypergraphs and hypergroups, Algebra Universalis 35 (1996) 548 555. [5] P. Corsini, Prolegomena of Hypergroup Theory, Aviani editore, Second edition, 1993. [6] P. Corsini, V. Leoreanu, Applications of Hyperstructure Theory, Advances in Mathematics, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, 003. [7] B. Davvaz, Polygroup Theory and Related Systems, World Sci. Publ., 013. [8] B. Davvaz, V. Leoreanu-Fotea, Hyperring Theory and Applications, International Academic Press, USA, 007. [9] M. De Salvo, G. Lo Faro, On the n -complete hypergroups, Discrete Math. 08/09 (1999) 177 188. [10] M. De Salvo, G. Lo Faro, Hypergroups and binary relations, Mult.-Valued Log. 8 (00) 645 657. [11] M. De Salvo, G. Lo Faro, A new class of hypergroupoids associated to binary relations, J. Mult.-Valued Logic Soft Comput. 9 (003) 361 375. [1] D. Freni, Une note sur le coeur d un hypergroupe et sur la clôture β de β, Riv. Mat. Pura Appl. 8 (1991) 153 156. [13] D. Freni, Minimal order semihypergroups of type U on the right, II, J. Algebra, 340 (011), no. 1, 77-89. [14] M.N. Iradmusa, A. Iranmanesh, The combinatorial and algebraic structure of the hypergroup associated to a hypergraph, J. Mult.-Valued Logic Soft Comput. 11 (005) 17 136. [15] M. Koskas, Groupoides, demi-hypergroups et hypergroups, J. Math. pures et Appl. 49 (1970) 155 19. [16] V. Leoreanu and L. Leoreanu, Hypergroups associated with hypergraphs, Ital. J. Pure Appl. Math., 4 (1998), 119 16. [17] V. Leoreanu-Fotea, P. Corsini, A. Iranmanesh, On the sequence of hypergroups and membership functions determined by a hypergraph, J. Mult.-Valued Logic Soft Comput. 14 (008) 565 577. [18] F. Marty, Sur une generalization de la notion de group, In 8th Congress Math. Scandenaves, pages 45 49, 1934. [19] J. Nieminen, Join spaces graphs, J. Geom. 33 (1988) 99 103. [0] T. Vougiouklis, Hyperstructures and their Representations, Aviani editor, Hardonic Press, Palm Harber, USA, 1994.