In the course of this work we observed:

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "In the course of this work we observed:"

Transcription

1 $6%(67265(/$7('',6($6(6 7+(,1685$1&(&267 SUHSDUHGE\ 7LP$QGUHZVDQG*HRII$WNLQV,QWURGXFWLRQ The ideas for this paper evolved out of studies we were asked to undertake by a number of insurers involving estimation of the cost of asbestos-related disease claims. In the course of this work we observed: considerable differences in reserving approach among insurers limited awareness of the potential for significant future costs to arise widespread confusion and uncertainty. We sought to develop a methodology for future projection which, while necessarily involving a number of approximations, was based on only a few key assumptions. The derivation of our estimates is described in this paper. To put the cost of asbestos-related disease claims into perspective; Australia s worst two catastrophes of recent times were Darwin s Cyclone Tracy and the Newcastle Earthquake. In current values these catastrophes are estimated to have generated insured losses of about $1 billion each. We will show that the cost to the insurance industry of claims arising from asbestos-related diseases may ultimately exceed the $1 billion mark. The cost to the whole community is of course much greater. By preparing this paper, we hope to provide a brief explanation of the background and issues relevant to asbestos-related disease claims and give a framework for financial analysis. Further work is clearly needed to refine and develop the modelling framework we have prepared. ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 1

2 ,QIRUPDWLRQ The following were the main sources of information used in development of this work: the claims experience of individual companies we have worked for (although none of this information is shown in this paper) various publicly available documents and papers, all of which are listed in the bibliography at the end of the paper interviews with personnel involved with various aspects of asbestos claims on a regular basis. 8QFHUWDLQW\ At this stage considerable uncertainty attaches to most of the elements of our projections. While the body of knowledge concerning asbestos diseases is increasing, much is still unknown, and in some cases unknowable, about: the degree and nature of the exposure to asbestos and asbestos products typically associated with the various asbestos diseases the population that is likely to have been so exposed the latency period of the diseases. From an insurance viewpoint, costs will also depend on future decisions by the courts and by governments which are impossible to predict. 6WUXFWXUHRI3DSHU The paper comprises four main sections in addition to the Introduction: Background - a brief introduction to asbestos compiled from various papers and articles, including a description of the types and uses of asbestos and the main asbestos-related diseases. Australia-wide Mesothelioma Liability - this section explains the derivation of our estimate of the Australia-wide compensation liabilities for mesothelioma cases (both public sector and private sector). Other Asbestos-related Diseases - provides estimates of compensation liabilities arising from asbestos-related diseases other than mesothelioma. Total Asbestos-related Liabilities and Allocation by Type of Insurer - this section combines our estimates of liability for each of the main types of disease and attempts to allocate the total cost among the major categories of insurer. ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 2

3 %DFNJURXQG 7\SHVDQG8VHVRI$VEHVWRV Asbestos is a general name used to describe a large number of naturally occurring silicates that have grown in fibrous form. The three types of asbestos of major commercial importance in Australia are: Chrysotile - (white asbestos) Crocidolite - (blue asbestos) Amosite - (grey/brown asbestos). Chrysotile is a member of the serpentile (flexible, curly) group of minerals and crocidolite and amosite are amphiboles (straight, rigid). The crocidolite and amosite fibres tend to be much thicker than those of chrysotile, and are believed to present a higher risk as explained later. The desirable qualities of asbestos are its resistance to heat and chemicals, and its low cost. The main areas of use in the past have been as: a fire retardant: for insulation for frictional and wear properties (e.g. brakes/clutches) for reinforcement (e.g. asbestos cement) for acid and alkaline resistance (e.g. gaskets, batteries). While chrysotile accounts for over 90% of world-wide use of asbestos, with amosite being the next most popular form in a commercial sense, Australia is one of only two countries (the other being South Africa) to have mined crocidolite to a significant extent. 3HULRGRI$VEHVWRV([SRVXUH Australia has used asbestos since the 1900 s and was the highest per capita user in the world during the 1950 s (mainly of chrysotile). Australia was also a major producer of crocidolite between 1943 and 1966 through the Wittenoom mine in Western Australia. Usage remained high up until the 1960 s when crocidolite was phased out, followed by amosite in the 1970 s and chrysotile in the 1980 s. The only industries still in existence are for frictional products such as brakes and clutches where there is no viable substitute at this stage, and for asbestos gaskets (chrysotile only). The safety standards are much more stringent now than they were prior to the 1960 s and air concentration levels are currently ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 3

4 less than.25 fibres per ml compared to between 5 and 50 fibres per ml in the 1930 s to 1960 s. 7\SHVRI$VEHVWRVUHODWHG'LVHDVHV The main asbestos-related diseases are: Mesothelioma - a severe cancer of the mesothelium (lining of the lungs or abdomen), invariably fatal and very rare except when exposed to asbestos; its onset most always occurs more than fifteen years after the initial exposure to asbestos, and usually much later. Asbestosis - scarring of the lung tissue, fatal in cases of heavy asbestos exposure but more usually disabling, the degree of which depends directly on the level of exposure; the latency period is shorter than for mesothelioma. Lung Cancer - a relatively common disease, closely related to smoking and also believed to be due to asbestos exposure; the latency period is long, although not as long as for mesothelioma. Asbestos also produces a number of benign conditions of the lung; among these is pleural plaques which, while not of itself disabling is nevertheless indicative of heavy asbestos exposure. Studies have shown that, due to the nature of the mineral fibres, mesothelioma is most commonly associated with crocidolite, less often with amosite and only rarely with chrysotile. Lung cancer is also believed to be more common with crocidolite and amosite than with chrysotile. 'RVHUHVSRQVH5HODWLRQVKLS Asbestos presents a health hazard in a dose-related manner - i.e. the higher the dose, the greater the effect. Exposure to asbestos (i.e. the dosage) is usually measured by combining the concentration of fibres in the air with the period of exposure. Thus exposure for two years at a concentration of 10 fibres per ml presents the same hazard as for four years at 5 fibres per ml. The dose-response relationship is believed to be linear, i.e. a 50% increase in dose also increases the risk by 50%. Asbestosis is believed to occur in any person heavily enough exposed. The severity of the illness depends only on the level of exposure. The condition will normally also continue to deteriorate over time. The same direct relationship between exposure and disease has not been established for either mesothelioma or lung cancer. It is not known what causes mesothelioma in one person and not another. ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 4

5 $XVWUDOLD:LGH0HVRWKHOLRPD/LDELOLWLHV Mesothelioma is the most significant asbestos-related disease financially. It also happens to be that area where most published data is available. For these reasons, and also since the compensation issues are more clearly defined for mesothelioma than for either of the other major diseases, we have initially made estimates of the mesothelioma liabilities in isolation. Later sections consider the likely costs of lung cancer and asbestosis cases relative to the projected mesothelioma costs. $SSURDFK The estimate of the Australia-wide mesothelioma liabilities has been developed in stages as follows: Stage 1: Stage 2: Stage 3: Stage 4: Stage 5: Examine the number and characteristics of past mesothelioma cases. Estimate the number of future reported cases considering among other matters - any available authoritative projections - knowledge of the periods of heaviest exposure and the latency period of the disease. Estimate the proportion of mesothelioma cases that result in a claim for compensation. Estimate the average cost of each claim. Combine assumptions for the number of cases, the proportion of cases that result in a claim, and the average claim cost to derive an estimate of the overall liabilities. 6WDJH1XPEHURI$XVWUDOLDZLGH0HVRWKHOLRPD&DVHV3DVW The Australian Mesothelioma Register records cases of mesothelioma diagnosed since Between 1980 and 1985 additional data was collected on individual cases and compiled for the Australian Mesothelioma Surveillance Program ( ) referred to as the "Surveillance Program". Various statistics from the Surveillance Program of significance to our study are given in Appendix A and are used at various stages throughout the remainder of the paper. The register relies on voluntary notifications from clinicians and pathologists as soon as a patient is suspected of having mesothelioma. Deaths from State cancer registries are used to cross-check the notifications. The initial diagnoses are confirmed by a specially appointed pathology panel - only a small proportion of cases (about 5%) appear to have been either assessed by the panel as not being mesothelioma or withdrawn by the doctor malting the initial notification. ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 5

6 The number of cases notified by year are shown in the graph below: We believe that the dip in 1986 may be due in some way to the changeover from Surveillance Program to register. The total number of cases reported between 1981 and 1990 is 2,003 and is currently running at around 300 cases per annum. 6WDJH1XPEHURI$XVWUDOLDZLGH0HVRWKHOLRPD&DVHV)XWXUH As we noted earlier, mesothelioma has a long latency period. Once diagnosed, the disease is invariably fatal within one or two years. Results from the Surveillance Program indicate that the average time lag between the first exposure to asbestos and the diagnosis of mesothelioma is approximately thirty-seven years. Fewer than 6% of cases were diagnosed within twenty years of first exposure and fewer than 30% within thirty years. From Berry (1991) we know that the risk of dying from mesothelioma (averaged over all levels of exposure) has varied among Wittenoom workers up to thirty-five years from first exposure as follows: ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 6

7 It is clear that some understanding of how the risk changes beyond year 35 is vital to projection of future cases. We are aware of studies which show that the risk stabilises, and perhaps reduces, beyond year 35. Other studies show no such effect. In each case however, the data is too scanty for reliable conclusions to be drawn. Berry (1991) prepared projections of future mesothelioma cases among Wittenoom workers on five different bases, all of which fitted the experience up to duration 35 years satisfactorily but which allowed for differing risk levels beyond that time. The abstract to his paper states: "Between the years 1987 and 2020 it is predicted that between 250 and 680 deaths will occur due to mesothelioma. This wide range is due to uncertainty on the functional form of the relation between mesothelioma rate and time, and insufficient data to estimate the elimination rate of crocidolite from the lungs. The most likely range is the lower half of this total range, that is between 250 and 500". The results from each of the projection bases used by Berry are summarised below from lowest to highest: Reported to Projected to Projected to Ratio ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 7

8 Thus Berry s projections imply that the ratio of Wittenoom cases reported after 1990 to cases reported between 1981 and 1990 will be about 2 to 5 times, with around 3 to 3.5 times being more likely. We have used these ratios to derive corresponding numbers of future cases Australiawide, assuming that the pattern of reporting is similar to that for Wittenoom and allowing for the 2,003 cases reported to the Mesothelioma Register between 1981 and It can be noted that crocidolite was mined at Wittenoom between 1943 and 1966, which encompasses the period of greatest consumption of asbestos throughout Australia. The results are as follows Low - 4,000 Middle - 7,000 High - 9,000 While we have been unable to identify any documented projections of future Australiawide mesothelioma cases, Worksafe Australia recently predicted another 6,000 cases over the next twenty years (press release dated 25 February 1991). Considering that: the number of notifications is running at around 300 per annum, the average latency period between the date of first exposure and the date of contracting the disease is thought to be about thirty-five to forty years, the production of asbestos-based products continued well into the 1960 s, then it seems likely that the level of notifications will remain high for another ten years at least. As such the Worksafe prediction does not appear unreasonable. For this study we have adopted a range for future Australia-wide mesothelioma cases of 5,000 to 9,000. The major uncertainty at this stage appears to be if, and by how much, the risk of contracting mesothelioma rises beyond thirty-five years after first exposure. If it does continue to rise significantly, then a figure towards the higher end of this range may well be more appropriate. Otherwise the lower end of the adopted range (around 6,000) appears more likely. &RPSDULVRQZLWK863RSXODWLRQ3URMHFWLRQVIRU0HVRWKHOLRPD We have compared the projected Australia-wide cases given above with estimates contained in Nicholson et al s paper (1982) of asbestos-related deaths due to lung cancer and mesothelioma among US workers (which we refer to as "the US Study"). The US Study related only to occupational exposure between 1940 and The projections assumed that the risk of death from mesothelioma would continue to rise up ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 8

9 to forty-five years from onset of exposure and would remain constant thereafter. This shape is similar to the second lowest basis used by Berry (1991) for the Wittenoom projections which produced 339 mesothelioma cases after 1991 (equivalent to about 6,000 Australia-wide cases) or about 3.2 times the number reported in 1981 to The following results taken from the US Study are comparable to our estimates for Australia 1. Projected cases (all industries) in 1990 to 2030 are 94,700 or about 4.5 times the number in 1980 to Excluding shipping (which peaks earlier) the projected cases in 1990 to 2030 are 75,400 or about 5.6 times the number in 1980 to For construction trades only, the projected cases in 1990 to 2030 are 34,200 or about 8.1 times the number in 1980 to The US Study thus suggests that the ratios used for our crude projections for Australia may be low. It is noteworthy also that trends over time can differ significantly for different industries due to the assumed timing of exposure in the past. 6WDJH1XPEHURI&RPSHQVDWLRQ&ODLPV It is difficult to ascertain what proportion of past Australia-wide mesothelioma cases have resulted in a claim for compensation. We have called this proportion the propensity to claim, equal to: Number of Compensation Claims ) Number of Mesothelioma Cases Part of the difficulty in calculating this ratio lies with the need to collate information from a wide range of third parties exposed to compensation claims as described below. 6RXUFHVRI&ODLP The most common type of claim would probably be against the worker s employer at the time of asbestos exposure, assuming that the exposure is occupational - i.e. a workers compensation claim. The Surveillance Program showed that the period of occupational exposure exceeded ten years in 50% of cases. Often therefore more than one employer would be involved. Sometimes the employers would be large government bodies (e.g. railways, navy, electricity boards), sometimes large companies (e.g. manufacturers of asbestos products such as James Hardie and CSR) and also small family businesses (e.g. plumbers, builders). More recently, it has been common for the asbestos manufacturer to be cited as a joint defendant with the employer in cases of occupational exposure outside the asbestos production industries. Other third parties may also be involved, e.g. the building contractor who specified the use of certain asbestos products, leading to an injury to a ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 9

10 worker of the building company involved with that site. Such a claim might be shared among the employer, the contractor and the manufacturer of the asbestos product. From an insurance viewpoint, it is worth noting that claims against the manufacturer/contractor in these cases would be covered under public or products liability policies, and not employers liability policies. Public liability claims can sometimes also result from mesothelioma cases where there is no occupational exposure if the source of environmental exposure can be traced to a third party - e.g. the location of an asbestos factory next to the person s home. The way in which the liability of the various parties to any litigation is resolved depends on a number of factors. Central to these is the question of forseeability and state of knowledge, having regard to the role and size of the organisation concerned. At one extreme is the large company engaged in mining of asbestos and manufacture of asbestos based products on a large scale. At the other extreme is the small employer whose employees might have had casual exposure to asbestos dust at a time when it was not widely known that relatively modest exposure could cause mesothelioma. 'XVW'LVHDVHV%RDUG In view of the impossibility of obtaining information from all of these parties, we have estimated the propensity to claim solely from the experience of the Dust Diseases Board in New South Wales ("the Board"). The Board show the number of claims for compensation due to mesothelioma in their annual reports each year. This information has been available since The mesothelioma victims entitled to receive compensation from the Board are those due to occupational exposure in New South Wales excluding employees of the Commonwealth government. We have estimated the number of such cases using: information from the Australian Mesothelioma Register showing the number of cases diagnosed in New South Wales in each year Surveillance Program data showing the proportion of occupational cases in various industries. The Surveillance Program data indicates that nearly 70% of mesothelioma cases appear to be due to occupational exposure. The claims from occupational exposure arose in the following industries: ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 10

11 Asbestos Production 26% Shipping 23% Building 13% Railways 9% Metal Fabrication 9% Power Stations 4% Other 16% 100% A significant proportion of shipping cases would be for Commonwealth employees. The majority of cases in each of the other categories would probably be for employees of private companies or State government departments. We have assumed that 20% of all occupational cases relate to Commonwealth employees (for more detail see Table 5). One measure of propensity to claim can therefore be estimated by combining: the number of known compensation claims recorded by the Board, and estimates of the number of potential victims entitled to compensation. This analysis is set out below - Table 1 - Dust Diseases Board Estimated Propensity to Claim Dust Diseases Total Potential Propensity Year of Board NSW Dust Disease to Diagnosis/Notification Claims Cases Claims* Claim % % % % % % % % % Overall % * Equals total cases 0. 7 x (1-0. 2), (ie. excluding non-occupational cases and public sector cases) On this basis the propensity to claim appears to be about 50% to 70%. Also, since the Board provides statutory benefit payments only, workers seeking general damages against their employer need to claim separately. These common law claims are heard in the Dust Diseases Tribunal. We were not able to obtain any data showing the proportion of Board cases lodged with the Tribunal, although we believe it may be as low as 50% of the ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 11

12 claims accepted by the Board. The common law claim frequency may therefore be only 25 % to 35 %. Ideally, we would select rates for the propensity to claim applicable to: both statutory benefit claims and common law claims claims for Commonwealth government employees, as well as employees of State government departments and private companies other States besides NSW. In view of the shortage of useful information for this purpose we have chosen, on a largely subjective basis, to use a single rate for past cases of 40%. There are likely to be a number of factors contributing to the low propensity to claim in the past, among them: lack of awareness by the worker difficulty in identifying the relevant employer(s) (in some cases the exposure may even have occurred overseas) or in proving negligence reluctance to litigate at a time when the worker is already subject to considerable distress general reluctance of the generation of workers exposed to asbestos to litigate (i.e. differing social attitudes). It is possible that the propensity to claim will increase over time as the rights of workers become more established and as the general awareness of those exposed increases. For example, we believe that the foreseeability issue associated with the need to show negligence on the part of the employer has generally been found in favour of the worker (not to say that cases in future will not be won by employers on foreseeability) and does not present such a major obstacle for future claimants. This is discussed further in Appendix B. For the remainder of this paper we have assumed a range of propensity to claim for future occupational cases of Low - 45% High - 60% The propensity to claim for cases from environmental exposure would be much lower due to difficulties in proving negligence. Considering the lack of any relevant data we have assumed a claim frequency of 5 % for both past and future environmental cases. ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 12

13 6WDJH$YHUDJH&ODLP6L]H The average cost of mesothelioma claims is difficult to determine. The heads of damage which typically apply to court awards would include: general damages economic loss (both past and future) medical expenses (including palliative care costs). We believe that the benchmark for general damages is probably between $50,000 and $100,000 in most States. Court awards tend to be slightly higher than out of court settlements. Note that where the worker is deceased then the Compensation of Relatives Act and Wrongs Act apply in New South Wales and Victoria respectively (other States have similar legislation). In these cases the payments for general damages to the worker s estate tend to be relatively small. The level of the award for economic loss is largely dependent on the age of the worker when the illness is diagnosed. Most workers would probably be beyond the normal retirement age consistent with an average latency period for the disease of around thirtyfive to forty years. The economic loss component would be nil or small for the majority of these cases. The latency period can however be as short as twenty years for a small proportion of claims. In fact, the Surveillance Program showed that 25% of occupational exposures were diagnosed when the worker was aged 55 or less and another 32% were for workers aged 55 to 64. In such cases the average loss of future working life might be as much as ten years, suggesting an average economic loss award for these cases of perhaps $150,000 or $200,000. Note that the Compensation of Relatives Act (or equivalent) requires there be economic dependence for a claim to be made. Considering all of the above, we expect that the average economic loss payment across all claims is probably around $50,000. Once diagnosed, the survival period of injured workers is short (rarely more than three years). Little can be done to prolong life or to curtail the spread of the disease. Each of these factors limits the medical expenses typically incurred. The benchmark for medical costs may be about $40,000. On the basis of the above rough figures, the overall average claim size would appear to be about $150,000 to $200,000, allowing for say $10,000 to $20,000 for other heads of damage (e.g. loss of expectations of life). This range is consistent with the settlement experience shown by various insurers data that we have been able to examine. For the remainder of the paper we have adopted an average cost per mesothelioma claim of $150,000. ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 13

14 6WDJH$XVWUDOLDZLGH0HVRWKHOLRPD/LDELOLWLHV&DOFXODWLRQ The Australia-wide mesothelioma liabilities can be calculated from the assumptions set out in the preceding sections as follows: Table 2 - Australia-wide Mesothelioma Liabilities Future Past Low High 1. Number of Cases 2,000 5,000 9, Number of Occupational Claims Proportion due to occupational exposure Propensity to claim for occupational cases 70% 70% 70% 40% 45% 60% Number of occupational claims 560 1,575 3, Number of Environmental Claims Proportion due to environmental exposure Propensity to claim for environmental exposure 30% 30% 30% 5% 5% 5% Number of environmental claims Average Claim Size $150,000 $150,000 $150, Liabilities ($m) Occupational Environmental Total These estimates are neither inflated nor discounted. As such, they represent the total costs which would be incurred if all claims (both past and future) were settled in current dollars. ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 14

15 2WKHU$VEHVWRV5HODWHG'LVHDVHV /XQJ&DQFHU The following comparisons of financial significance can be made between lung cancer and mesothelioma. 1XPEHURI&DVHV The number of new certificates of disablement issued by the Dust Diseases Board for mesothelioma and lung cancer are - Table 3 - Dust Diseases Board - Certificates of Disablement Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Ratio % % % % % % % % % Total % We believe that the Dust Diseases Board only accept asbestos-related lung cancers where there is some scarring of the lung. This position is consistent with recent studies which suggest there is no excess lung cancer among workers without radiographically detectable lung fibrosis. In the past we believe that some organisations have been prepared to settle out of court without scarring of the lung having been proven. In future, however, it seems likely that the Dust Diseases Board practice will become more common, leading perhaps to relatively fewer claims in future. To the end of 1986 there had been 141 cases of lung cancer among former workers of Wittenoom compared to 94 cases of mesothelioma. Not all of these lung cancer cases would have been due to asbestos exposure. Berry (1991) predicts 340 to 465 future deaths due to lung cancer; 45 % of these cases are assumed to be due to asbestos exposure - say 150 to 210 cases or between 30% and 60% of the number of predicted mesothelioma cases. ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 15

16 /DWHQF\ The latency period for lung cancer is believed to be shorter than for mesothelioma. de Klerk et al (1989) noted that the lung cancer incidence rate among Wittenoom workers increased more than linearly over time, but less than quadratically. Mesothelioma, on the other hand, was observed to increase between the third and fourth power from time of first exposure. Nicholson et al (1982) observed a linear increase in excess lung cancers among insulation workmen. A shorter latency period for lung cancer than for mesothelioma would mean, all thing being equal, that lung cancer cases in future will represent a smaller proportion of mesothelioma cases than they have done so far. $YHUDJH&ODLP6L]H We believe that the average claim size tends to be similar for asbestos-related lung cancer and mesothelioma. /XQJ&DQFHU&RQFOXVLRQ After considering all of the evidence presented above we have assumed that both past and future asbestos-related lung cancer claims will cost 25% of mesothelioma claims, i.e. assuming a similar average claim size to mesothelioma, but a frequency which is lower. $VEHVWRVLV The following features are relevant to the likely ultimate cost of asbestosis claims relative to those for mesothelioma. 1XPEHURI&DVHV The number of new certificates of disablement issued by the Dust Diseases Board since 1980 for each of mesothelioma and asbestosis is shown below: ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 16

17 Year Mesothelioma Certificates Asbestosis Certificates We also know from Berry s paper (1991) that up to 1986 there had been 356 successful compensation claims for asbestosis among Wittenoom workers compared to only 94 cases of mesothelioma. /DWHQF\3HULRG The latency period is much shorter for asbestosis than for mesothelioma. This is reflected in the lower increase in new certificates issued by the Dust Diseases Board during the 1980 s relative to mesothelioma. Also, of the 356 asbestosis claims among Wittenoom workers, only 100 were successful in the period 1981 to 1986, i.e. most of the claims were reported prior to The reducing asbestosis frequency is also illustrated by Berry s (1991) projections of mesothelioma and asbestosis among Wittenoom workers (using the middle projection basis): Mesothelioma Asbestosis Ratio Actual to :1 Projected 1987 to 2020* :1 * Middle Basis $YHUDJH&ODLP6L]H The average cost of asbestosis claims tends to be much lower than for mesothelioma due to the lesser severity of the disease. We understand that the benchmark for general damages is probably $30,000 to $50,000. While asbestosis can be a crippling disease, and in some cases fatal, the worker may often be able to remain in employment in some reduced capacity and as a result, economic loss payments, on average, are probably lower ASBESTOS-RELATED DISEASES THE INSURANCE COST 17

Asbestos Diseases Uncovered

Asbestos Diseases Uncovered Asbestos Diseases Uncovered Your complete download & keep guide to asbestos-related diseases. Their symptoms, causes and potential compensation payable Contents What is Asbestos? What diseases are caused

More information

Your Guide to Asbestos Related Disease Claims

Your Guide to Asbestos Related Disease Claims Your Guide to Asbestos Related Disease Claims www.colemans-ctts.co.uk enquiries@colemans-ctts.co.uk 100 Talbot Road, Stretford, Manchester M16 0PG 1-3 Union Street, Kingston-Upon-Thames, Surrey KT1 1RP

More information

MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 2009 MORTALITY 1997 TO 2011

MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 2009 MORTALITY 1997 TO 2011 MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 29 MORTALITY 1997 TO 211 OCTOBER 213 Safe Work Australia Mesothelioma in Australia Incidence 1982 to 29 Mortality 1997 to 211 OCTOBER 213 Acknowledgement Disclaimer

More information

Asbestos Diseases. What Is Asbestos?

Asbestos Diseases. What Is Asbestos? 1 Asbestos Diseases What Is Asbestos? Asbestos is a term applied to a group of minerals formed into rock and mined in a similar way to coal. In this form, asbestos is made up of strong, fine and flexible

More information

NHS Barking and Dagenham Briefing on disease linked to Asbestos in Barking & Dagenham

NHS Barking and Dagenham Briefing on disease linked to Asbestos in Barking & Dagenham APPENDIX 1 NHS Barking and Dagenham Briefing on disease linked to Asbestos in Barking & Dagenham 1. Background 1.1. Asbestos Asbestos is a general name given to several naturally occurring fibrous minerals

More information

MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 2008 MORTALITY 1997 TO 2007

MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 2008 MORTALITY 1997 TO 2007 MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 28 MORTALITY 1997 TO 27 August 212 Safe Work Australia Mesothelioma in Australia Incidence 1982 to 28 Deaths 1997 to 27 August 212 Acknowledgement Data on the

More information

Mesothelioma in Australia: Incidence (1982 to 2013) and Mortality (1997 to 2012)

Mesothelioma in Australia: Incidence (1982 to 2013) and Mortality (1997 to 2012) Mesothelioma in Australia: Incidence (1982 to 213) and Mortality (1997 to 212) 215 Disclaimer The information provided in this document can only assist you in the most general way. This document does not

More information

FIGHTING FOR YOU. Asbestos and dust diseases

FIGHTING FOR YOU. Asbestos and dust diseases FIGHTING FOR YOU Asbestos and dust diseases The sad legacy of years of exposure to asbestos, both in commercial and industrial situations, and at home, has left a terrible number of South Australians either

More information

Asbestos Health Risks. Dr Andrew Pengilley Acting Chief Health Officer

Asbestos Health Risks. Dr Andrew Pengilley Acting Chief Health Officer Asbestos Health Risks Dr Andrew Pengilley Acting Chief Health Officer Asbestos Asbestos is a name given to several different fibrous minerals Three main commercial types are Chrysotile (white asbestos)

More information

ASBESTOS. Know what it is and how you can protect yourself. environmental affairs Department: Environmental Affairs REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

ASBESTOS. Know what it is and how you can protect yourself. environmental affairs Department: Environmental Affairs REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA ASBESTOS Know what it is and how you can protect yourself environmental affairs Department: Environmental Affairs REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA 1 What is asbestos? The term asbestos designates a group of naturally

More information

Malignant Mesothelioma in Australia, 1945 2000

Malignant Mesothelioma in Australia, 1945 2000 Ann. occup. Hyg., Vol. 46, Supplement 1, pp. 160 165, 2002 2002 British Occupational Hygiene Society Published by Oxford University Press DOI: 10.1093/annhyg/mef669 Malignant Mesothelioma in Australia,

More information

ATTORNEY GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT OF NSW & THE DEPARTMENT OF PREMIER AND CABINET

ATTORNEY GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT OF NSW & THE DEPARTMENT OF PREMIER AND CABINET NSW GOVERNMENT REVIEW OF THE DUST DISEASES CLAIMS RESOLUTION PROCESS ISSUES PAPER DECEMBER 2008 ATTORNEY GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT OF NSW & THE DEPARTMENT OF PREMIER AND CABINET Issues Paper: Review of the

More information

ASBESTOS DISEASES. Dr Alastair Robertson

ASBESTOS DISEASES. Dr Alastair Robertson ASBESTOS DISEASES Dr Alastair Robertson Occupational Health Department University Hospital Birmingham Birmingham B29 6JF 01216278285 Alastair.robertson@uhb.nhs.uk Occupational Lung Disease Unit Birmingham

More information

NISG Asbestos. Caroline Kirton

NISG Asbestos. Caroline Kirton NISG Asbestos Caroline Kirton 1 The Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012, Regulation 10 requires every employer to ensure that adequate information, instruction and training is given to their employees

More information

ASBESTOS SAFETY & ERADICATION AGENCY CONFERENCE NOVEMBER 2014

ASBESTOS SAFETY & ERADICATION AGENCY CONFERENCE NOVEMBER 2014 ASBESTOS SAFETY & ERADICATION AGENCY CONFERENCE NOVEMBER 2014 Litigation Trends and Asbestos Related Diseases Anyone who doubts the importance of litigation in the arena of asbestos disease should note

More information

All About Asbestos. Read this booklet to learn more about:

All About Asbestos. Read this booklet to learn more about: All About Asbestos Read this booklet to learn more about: identifying asbestos-containing material in you home the health risks of asbestos what you can do about asbestos. What Is Asbestos? Asbestos is

More information

Asbestos: health effects and risk. Peter Franklin Senior Scientific Officer, EHD Senior Research Fellow, UWA

Asbestos: health effects and risk. Peter Franklin Senior Scientific Officer, EHD Senior Research Fellow, UWA Asbestos: health effects and risk Peter Franklin Senior Scientific Officer, EHD Senior Research Fellow, UWA What is asbestos Naturally occurring mineral that has crystallised to form long thin fibres and

More information

Occupational respiratory diseases due to Asbestos. Dirk Dahmann, IGF, Bochum

Occupational respiratory diseases due to Asbestos. Dirk Dahmann, IGF, Bochum Occupational respiratory diseases due to Asbestos Dirk Dahmann, IGF, Bochum Contents Introduction Diseases Further Effects Preventive Strategies Conclusion Asbestos minerals Woitowitz, 2003 Imports (+

More information

Asbestos Disease Claims

Asbestos Disease Claims Asbestos Disease Claims A client s guide Spring 2007 Contents 2. Essential elements for a successful claim 3. What we will do 3. Funding the case 3. Preliminary investigations 4. What happens next? 4.

More information

Asbestos and the diseases it causes

Asbestos and the diseases it causes Asbestos and the diseases it causes October 2013 Liz Darlison Mesothelioma UK University Hospitals of Leicester Contents What is asbestos Why is it such an issue in the UK Disease Statistics Asbestos Related

More information

Frequently Asked Questions. What is asbestos? 2. How is asbestos harmful? 2. What illnesses does asbestos cause? 3

Frequently Asked Questions. What is asbestos? 2. How is asbestos harmful? 2. What illnesses does asbestos cause? 3 Duty to Manage Asbestos in Non-Domestic Premises Frequently Asked Questions Page What is asbestos? 2 How is asbestos harmful? 2 What illnesses does asbestos cause? 3 How many people die as a result of

More information

Health effects of occupational exposure to asbestos dust

Health effects of occupational exposure to asbestos dust Health effects of occupational exposure to asbestos dust Authors: N.Szeszenia-Dąbrowska, U.Wilczyńska The major health effects of workers' exposure to asbestos dust include asbestosis, lung cancer and

More information

INSTRUCTIONS FOR FILING A CLAIM WITH THE CELOTEX ASBESTOS SETTLEMENT TRUST

INSTRUCTIONS FOR FILING A CLAIM WITH THE CELOTEX ASBESTOS SETTLEMENT TRUST INSTRUCTIONS FOR FILING A CLAIM WITH THE CELOTEX ASBESTOS SETTLEMENT TRUST The Celotex Asbestos Settlement Trust (Celotex Trust) was established as a result of the bankruptcy of the Celotex Corporation

More information

Scientific Update on Safe Use of Asbestos. Robert P. Nolan, PhD International Environmental Research Foundation New York, New York www.ierfinc.

Scientific Update on Safe Use of Asbestos. Robert P. Nolan, PhD International Environmental Research Foundation New York, New York www.ierfinc. Scientific Update on Safe Use of Asbestos Robert P. Nolan, PhD International Environmental Research Foundation New York, New York www.ierfinc.org When We Talk about Asbestos What Do We Mean? Anthophyllite

More information

April 2011. Asbestos in the university and higher education sector

April 2011. Asbestos in the university and higher education sector April 2011 Asbestos in the university and higher education sector Contents Introduction... 1 Executive summary... 1 Background to asbestos... 2 Closer look: Research report results, and their impact on

More information

Testimony of. Laura Welch, M.D. Medical Director Center to Protect Workers Rights November 17, 2005

Testimony of. Laura Welch, M.D. Medical Director Center to Protect Workers Rights November 17, 2005 Testimony of Laura Welch, M.D. Medical Director Center to Protect Workers Rights November 17, 2005 Testimony of Laura Welch, MD Medical Director, Center to Protect Workers Rights On Asbestos Related Diseases

More information

chemical poisoning. We work in a practical,

chemical poisoning. We work in a practical, Our specialist team has a wealth of experience in dealing with claims arising from asbestos and chemical poisoning. We work in a practical, supportive & clear way, dedicated to gaining the best possible

More information

Asbestos Related Diseases. Asbestosis Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Pleural Disease. connecting raising awareness supporting advocating

Asbestos Related Diseases. Asbestosis Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Pleural Disease. connecting raising awareness supporting advocating Asbestos Related Diseases Asbestosis Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Pleural Disease connecting raising awareness supporting advocating 1800 017 758 www.asbestosassociation.com.au Asbestos lagging was widely

More information

Table 2.4. Summary of design and findings from mesothelioma case-control studies

Table 2.4. Summary of design and findings from mesothelioma case-control studies categories Agudo et al. (2000) Barcelona and Cadiz, Spain 32 cases (77% males) of histologically con rmed malignant pleural mesothelioma identified from hospital in the region between //993 and 2/3/996.

More information

MWR Solicitors A legal guide HEALTH & SAFETY: Industrial diseases. Lawyers for life

MWR Solicitors A legal guide HEALTH & SAFETY: Industrial diseases. Lawyers for life MWR Solicitors A legal guide HEALTH & SAFETY: Industrial diseases Lawyers for life CONTENTS Time Limits 4 Foreseeable Risk of Injury 4 Asbestos-Related Disease 4 - A Brief Insight 4 - Overview 5 - Pleural

More information

What is Asbestos? Asbestos was also used in household items, such as: oven gloves ironing board pads simmer mats for stoves fire blankets.

What is Asbestos? Asbestos was also used in household items, such as: oven gloves ironing board pads simmer mats for stoves fire blankets. All About Asbestos Read this booklet to learn more about: identifying asbestos-containing material in your home the health risks of asbestos what you can do about asbestos. What is Asbestos? Asbestos is

More information

Damages (Asbestos-related Conditions) Bill

Damages (Asbestos-related Conditions) Bill Research and Library Service 13 January 2010 Damages (Asbestos-related Conditions) Bill NIAR 644-10 This paper provides an overview and discussion of the Damages (Asbestos-related Conditions) Bill. Paper

More information

UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER ESTATES & FACILITIES MANAGEMENT DIVISION ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT PLAN

UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER ESTATES & FACILITIES MANAGEMENT DIVISION ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT PLAN UNIVERSITY OF LEICESTER ESTATES & FACILITIES MANAGEMENT DIVISION ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT PLAN Revision Date Nature of Revision Prepared by Approved by 0.2 Jul 2013 Initial draft for comment Jon Fahie 0.3 Sep

More information

Asbestos. Part 1. Overview. What is asbestos? Prepared by: Penny Digby Principal Adviser (Occupational Health) Workplace Health and Safety Queensland

Asbestos. Part 1. Overview. What is asbestos? Prepared by: Penny Digby Principal Adviser (Occupational Health) Workplace Health and Safety Queensland Asbestos Prepared by: Penny Digby Principal Adviser (Occupational Health) Workplace Health and Safety Queensland Part 1. Overview types history respiratory system and defence mechanisms asbestos related

More information

Estimates of the impact of extending the scope of the Mesothelioma payment scheme. December 2013

Estimates of the impact of extending the scope of the Mesothelioma payment scheme. December 2013 Estimates of the impact of extending the scope of the Mesothelioma payment scheme December 2013 Contents Introduction... 6 Background... 7 Estimated volumes and costs if the scheme started on particular

More information

ADVICE to safety representatives

ADVICE to safety representatives UNITE LEGAL SERVICES - TRUST YOUR UNION ADVICE to safety representatives Unite has launched a new asbestos campaign aiming to: Raise members awareness of asbestos hazards at work Provide advice to Unite

More information

Preparing an estimate of the national pattern of exposure to asbestos in cases of malignant mesothelioma

Preparing an estimate of the national pattern of exposure to asbestos in cases of malignant mesothelioma Preparing an estimate of the national pattern of exposure to asbestos in cases of malignant mesothelioma JULY 2008 Copyright Notice Commonwealth of Australia 2008 ISBN 978 0 642 32792 5 This work is copyright.

More information

Lessons learned from the Western Australian experience with mesothelioma

Lessons learned from the Western Australian experience with mesothelioma Lessons learned from the Western Australian experience with mesothelioma Alison Reid, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research In partnership with Nick de Klerk, Nola Olsen, Jan Sleith, Geoffrey

More information

Asbestos - Frequently Asked Questions

Asbestos - Frequently Asked Questions Asbestos - Frequently Asked Questions 1. What is asbestos? Asbestos is the name given to a group of fibrous minerals which occur naturally in the earth. These are grouped into two mineral types known as

More information

Health and Social Care Committee Recovery of Medical Costs for Asbestos Diseases (Wales) Bill RMCA12 Forum of Insurance Lawyers

Health and Social Care Committee Recovery of Medical Costs for Asbestos Diseases (Wales) Bill RMCA12 Forum of Insurance Lawyers Health and Social Care Committee Recovery of Medical Costs for Asbestos Diseases (Wales) Bill RMCA12 Forum of Insurance Lawyers Written submission to the National Assembly of Wales, Heath and Social Care

More information

Current Usage and Health Significance of the Modern Use of Chrysotile Products: Review of Recently Published Evidence

Current Usage and Health Significance of the Modern Use of Chrysotile Products: Review of Recently Published Evidence Current Usage and Health Significance of the Modern Use of Chrysotile Products: Review of Recently Published Evidence John Hoskins Health & Safety Consultant, Haslemere, Surrey, UK ASBESTOS SERPENTINE

More information

Frequently asked questions

Frequently asked questions Frequently asked questions Asbestos investigation An investigation into asbestos-related health concerns has found that there is no evidence of elevated asbestos-related health risk to residents who have

More information

Asbestos Related Diseases

Asbestos Related Diseases Asbestos Related Diseases Asbestosis Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Pleural Disease Asbestosis and Mesothelioma (LUNG CANCER) Support Group 1800 017 758 www.amsg.com.au ii Helping you and your family through

More information

Asbestos risks, safety and its role in lung disease

Asbestos risks, safety and its role in lung disease Asbestos risks, safety and its role in lung disease Fraser Brims Respiratory Physician, SCGH Head of Occupa9onal and Respiratory Health Unit, Ins9tute for Lung Health, WA Lung Founda9on Australia Educa9on

More information

June 20, 2002. 2002.06.20: Wagner Testimony on Workplace Exposure to Asbestos. This is an archive page. The links are no longer being updated.

June 20, 2002. 2002.06.20: Wagner Testimony on Workplace Exposure to Asbestos. This is an archive page. The links are no longer being updated. Page 1 of 6 skip navigational links This is an archive page. The links are no longer being updated. Statement by Gregory R. Wagner, M.D. Director, Division of Respiratory Disease Studies National Institute

More information

Asbestos Awareness at the University of Toronto

Asbestos Awareness at the University of Toronto Asbestos Awareness at the University of Toronto What is Asbestos? Asbestos is a general term given to a group of naturally occurring mineral silicates that are made up of long thin fibres. These fibrous

More information

Asbestos and Mesothelioma a briefing document for the Metropolitan Police

Asbestos and Mesothelioma a briefing document for the Metropolitan Police Asbestos and Mesothelioma a briefing document for the Metropolitan Police Prepared by Professor John Cherrie, Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh, UK. Introduction The purpose of this document is to provide

More information

Compensation for Asbestos-related Diseases in Australia. Luisa Formato Slater & Gordon

Compensation for Asbestos-related Diseases in Australia. Luisa Formato Slater & Gordon Compensation for Asbestos-related Diseases in Australia Luisa Formato Slater & Gordon 1 Introduction Asbestos exposure in Australia occurred as a result of mining, milling, manufacture, product use and

More information

Specialists in asbestos litigation

Specialists in asbestos litigation Specialists in asbestos litigation Patient information fact sheet about: Asbestos Compensation Claims Your guide and information pack to explain what financial help is available for those suffering from

More information

Asbestos awareness for Craftsman. Presented by Bob Miller & Andrew Knight

Asbestos awareness for Craftsman. Presented by Bob Miller & Andrew Knight Asbestos awareness for Craftsman Presented by Bob Miller & Andrew Knight What do you know about asbestos? Outline four things you know about asbestos. What could be asbestos here? What is asbestos? Asbestos

More information

Asbestos-related Claims (Management of Commonwealth Liabilities) (Consequential and Transitional Provisions) Bill 2005

Asbestos-related Claims (Management of Commonwealth Liabilities) (Consequential and Transitional Provisions) Bill 2005 Parliament of Australia Department of Parliamentary Services Parliamentary Library Information analysis and advice for the Parliament BILLS DIGEST 2 June 2005, nos.,175 176, 2004 05, ISSN 1328-8091 Asbestos-related

More information

Asbestos Brochure. Jim Wyatt - jwyatt@hamers.com Stephen Ball - sball@hamers.com. Freephone: 0800 591 999. www.hamers.com

Asbestos Brochure. Jim Wyatt - jwyatt@hamers.com Stephen Ball - sball@hamers.com. Freephone: 0800 591 999. www.hamers.com Jim Wyatt - jwyatt@hamers.com Stephen Ball - sball@hamers.com Freephone: 0800 591 999 5 Earls Court, Priory Park East, Hull, HU4 7DY Tel: 01482 326666 Fax: 01482 324432 Aspect Court, 47 Park Square East,

More information

UK Asbestos Working Party

UK Asbestos Working Party GIRO conference and exhibition 2010 Robert Brooks, Darren Michaels, Andy Whiting and Stephen Robertson-Dunn UK Asbestos Working Party 12-15 October 2010 Introduction What has the Working Party done? Since

More information

Changing Trends in Mesothelioma Incidence. Hans Weill, M.D. Professor of Medicine Emeritus Tulane University Medical Center

Changing Trends in Mesothelioma Incidence. Hans Weill, M.D. Professor of Medicine Emeritus Tulane University Medical Center Changing Trends in Mesothelioma Incidence Hans Weill, M.D. Professor of Medicine Emeritus Tulane University Medical Center International Conference on Chrysotile Montreal, May 23, 2006 Global Mesothelioma

More information

ASBESTOS AWARENESS. Environmental Health And Safety. www.uoguelph.ca/ehs MAINTENANCE CONTRACTORS

ASBESTOS AWARENESS. Environmental Health And Safety. www.uoguelph.ca/ehs MAINTENANCE CONTRACTORS ASBESTOS AWARENESS MAINTENANCE CONTRACTORS Environmental Health And Safety www.uoguelph.ca/ehs March 2007 ASBESTOS AWARENESS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH What is Asbestos? The term asbestos refers to a

More information

Occupational Characteristics of Cases with Asbestosrelated Diseases in The Netherlands

Occupational Characteristics of Cases with Asbestosrelated Diseases in The Netherlands Ann. occup. Hyg., Vol. 47, No. 6, pp. 485 492, 2003 2003 British Occupational Hygiene Society Published by Oxford University Press DOI: 10.1093/annhyg/meg062 Occupational Characteristics of Cases with

More information

The Carcinogenicity of Chrysotile Asbestos A Review

The Carcinogenicity of Chrysotile Asbestos A Review Industrial Health 2001, 39, 57 64 Review Article The Carcinogenicity of Chrysotile Asbestos A Review William J. NICHOLSON Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY, NY, USA Received December 23, 2000 and accepted

More information

Mesothelioma Act 2014 and the Diffuse Mesothelioma Payment Scheme

Mesothelioma Act 2014 and the Diffuse Mesothelioma Payment Scheme www.fieldfisher.com/personalinjury Freephone 0800 358 3848 Mesothelioma Act 2014 and the Diffuse Mesothelioma Payment Scheme A guide for clients Head and shoulders above the rest in terms of skills, experience

More information

National Strategic Plan for Asbestos Awareness and Management 2013-2018

National Strategic Plan for Asbestos Awareness and Management 2013-2018 National Strategic Plan for Asbestos Awareness and Management 2013-2018 July 2013 ISBN: 978-1-74361-140-1 Contents The essentials... 1 Aim... 1 Principles... 1 Strategies and Outcomes... 2 Introduction...

More information

Ms. Jennifer L. Biggs

Ms. Jennifer L. Biggs Testimony of Ms. Jennifer L. Biggs June 4, 2003 Committee on the Judiciary United States Senate Solving the Asbestos Litigation Crisis: S.1125, the Fairness in Asbestos Injury Resolution Act of 2003 June

More information

M E S O T H E L I O M A Questions & Answers

M E S O T H E L I O M A Questions & Answers M E S O T H E L I O M A Questions & Answers A G U I D E F O R M E S O T H E L I O M A P A T I E N T S A N D T H E I R L O V E D O N E S MORGAN & MORGAN FORTHEPEOPLE.COM 877-667-4265 Mesothelioma Questions

More information

ANNEX 2: Assessment of the 7 points agreed by WATCH as meriting attention (cover paper, paragraph 9, bullet points) by Andy Darnton, HSE

ANNEX 2: Assessment of the 7 points agreed by WATCH as meriting attention (cover paper, paragraph 9, bullet points) by Andy Darnton, HSE ANNEX 2: Assessment of the 7 points agreed by WATCH as meriting attention (cover paper, paragraph 9, bullet points) by Andy Darnton, HSE The 7 issues to be addressed outlined in paragraph 9 of the cover

More information

Asbestos. General information

Asbestos. General information Asbestos General information Key Points Fire Non flammable and non combustible under normal conditions Chemically inert under normal conditions. Resistant to most solvents, acids and alkalis In the event

More information

Asbestos related cancers

Asbestos related cancers New cancer cases 1954-215 in Finland, Men Pukkala et al. 26 Asbestos related cancers Panu Oksa, MD, docent Course on asbestos-related diseases Tartu 4-5.12.26 Asbestos related cancer / FIOH / PO / 1.1.27

More information

The Management of Asbestos at the University of Manitoba

The Management of Asbestos at the University of Manitoba The Management of Asbestos at the University of Manitoba WHAT IS ASBESTOS? Asbestos is a name given to a group of minerals which occur naturally as masses of long silky fibres. Asbestos is known for its

More information

Policy on Asbestos Management

Policy on Asbestos Management Policy on Asbestos Management Introduction Asbestos and its derivatives were extensively used as building materials in the UK from the 1950s through to the mid-1980s. It was used for a variety of purposes

More information

Efficiently Maintaining Commercial Buildings. Asbestos Awareness

Efficiently Maintaining Commercial Buildings. Asbestos Awareness Efficiently Maintaining Commercial Buildings Asbestos Awareness What are the risks? Asbestos was used extensively between the 1950s and 1980s in both domestic and commercial buildings and although its

More information

Transcript for Asbestos Information for the Community

Transcript for Asbestos Information for the Community Welcome to the lecture on asbestos and its health effects for the community. My name is Dr. Vik Kapil and I come to you from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Agency for Toxic Substances

More information

The asbestos crisis Why Britain needs an eradication law

The asbestos crisis Why Britain needs an eradication law Why Britain needs an eradication law All-Party Parliamentary Group on Occupational Safety and Health The All-Party Parliamentary Group on Occupational Safety and Health believes that the time has come

More information

Asbestos Disease Awareness. help

Asbestos Disease Awareness. help Asbestos Disease Awareness help Asbestos: Contents Asbestos Disease Awareness Contents What have I got Page 2 The five main types of asbestos How did I get it? Page 3 Can I get compensation? Pages 4/5

More information

Page 1 of 9. Table of Contents

Page 1 of 9. Table of Contents Table of Contents 1. Executive Summary Page 2 2. Introduction.. Page 3 3. Definitions of Occupational Disease. Page 4 4. Occupational Disease Branch. Page 6 5. Adversarial vs. Inquiry.. Page 7 6. Quicker

More information

The asbestos crisis. Why Britain needs an eradication Law. Background. Levels of mortality

The asbestos crisis. Why Britain needs an eradication Law. Background. Levels of mortality The asbestos crisis. Why Britain needs an eradication Law. The All-Party Parliamentary Group on Occupational Safety and Health believes that the time has come to put in place regulations requiring the

More information

Asbestos-Related Cancer Research and Prevention

Asbestos-Related Cancer Research and Prevention Asbestos-Related Cancer Research and Prevention Professor Nico van Zandwijk Asbestos Diseases Research Institute University of Sydney International Conference on Asbestos Awareness and Management 18 November

More information

PATTERNS OF MORTALITY IN ASBESTOS FACTORY WORKERS IN LONDON*

PATTERNS OF MORTALITY IN ASBESTOS FACTORY WORKERS IN LONDON* PATTERNS OF MORTALITY IN ASBESTOS FACTORY WORKERS IN LONDON* M. L. Newhouse TUC Centenary Institute of Occupational Health London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine London WCIE 7HT. England G. Berry

More information

INJURY & NEGLIGENCE SPECIALISTS Illnesses. Asbestos Illnesses

INJURY & NEGLIGENCE SPECIALISTS Illnesses. Asbestos Illnesses Asbestos Illnesses INJURY & NEGLIGENCE Asbestos SPECIALISTS Illnesses Injury & Negligence I was totally satisfied with my solicitors service, it was First Class. Quote about Pannone part of Slater & Gordon,

More information

Instructions for Filing a Claim with the ABB Lummus Global Inc. 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust

Instructions for Filing a Claim with the ABB Lummus Global Inc. 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust Subject: Instructions for Filing a Claim with the ABB Lummus Global Inc. 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust Dear Plaintiff Counsel: The ABB Lummus Global Inc. 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust (the Trust ) was established

More information

IAAust Asbestos Working Group Discussion Paper

IAAust Asbestos Working Group Discussion Paper IAAust Asbestos Working Group Discussion Paper Prepared by the Asbestos Working Group: Andrew Huszczo, Peter Martin, Siddharth Parameswaran, Craig Price, Andrew Smith, Donna Walker, Bruce Watson (Chair),

More information

ASBESTOS COMPENSATION IN TASMANIA A GUIDE

ASBESTOS COMPENSATION IN TASMANIA A GUIDE ASBESTOS COMPENSATION IN TASMANIA A GUIDE Asbestos Compensation Commissioner Disclaimer This information is for guidance only and not to be taken as an expression of the law. It should be read in conjunction

More information

Asbestos exposure during Canterbury rebuild unlikely to cause significant health problems for house occupants report finds

Asbestos exposure during Canterbury rebuild unlikely to cause significant health problems for house occupants report finds News release from the Royal Society of New Zealand and the Office of the Prime Minister s Chief Science Advisor 15 April 2015 Asbestos exposure during Canterbury rebuild unlikely to cause significant health

More information

ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT IN THE MIDDLE EAST. Charles Faulkner Asbestos Risk Management Consultant TEP Environmental Consultants

ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT IN THE MIDDLE EAST. Charles Faulkner Asbestos Risk Management Consultant TEP Environmental Consultants ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT IN THE MIDDLE EAST Charles Faulkner Asbestos Risk Management Consultant TEP Environmental Consultants SALACIOUS HEADLINES ALARMING IMAGES DUBAI AIRPORT FORMER ASBESTOS CEMENT PIPE FACTORY

More information

PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS

PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS Frequently Asked Questions 1. Can I make a claim? If you have been injured because of the fault of someone else, you can claim financial compensation through the courts. The dependants

More information

Asbestos related disease compensation. no-one can change the past, but one of us could change your future

Asbestos related disease compensation. no-one can change the past, but one of us could change your future Asbestos related disease compensation no-one can change the past, but one of us could change your future Although asbestos was introduced into the UK in the 19th century, it s only in the last few decades

More information

Asbestos News. [ accident compensation ] The latest from Australia and elsewhere. Key:

Asbestos News. [ accident compensation ] The latest from Australia and elsewhere. Key: d finitive [ accident compensation ] Keeping you informed. JUNE 2014 Asbestos News The latest from Australia and elsewhere News has been running hot in the asbestos area over the last six months. This

More information

Primary reason asbestos is used, is its special resistance to heat. Asbestos fibers are also virtually indestructible.

Primary reason asbestos is used, is its special resistance to heat. Asbestos fibers are also virtually indestructible. ASBESTOS AWARENESS Asbestos Awareness Asbestos is a serious health hazard commonly found in our environment today. This module is designed to provide initial education of asbestos and its associated hazards.

More information

Asbestos-Related Lung Cancer: How big business lawyers are hurting cancer patients efforts to secure justice. By J. Conard Metcalf

Asbestos-Related Lung Cancer: How big business lawyers are hurting cancer patients efforts to secure justice. By J. Conard Metcalf Asbestos-Related Lung Cancer: How big business lawyers are hurting cancer patients efforts to secure justice By J. Conard Metcalf TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary 1 Introduction 2 The Problem: Creative

More information

PROTECTION OF WORKERS FROM THE RISKS RELATED TO EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS AT WORK REGULATIONS

PROTECTION OF WORKERS FROM THE RISKS RELATED TO EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS AT WORK REGULATIONS RELATED TO EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS AT WORK [S.L.424.23 1 SUBSIDIARY LEGISLATION 424.23 RELATED TO EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS AT WORK REGULATIONS LEGAL NOTICE 323 of 2006. 15th December, 2006 1. (1) The title of

More information

Asbestos awareness. University of Brighton 2016

Asbestos awareness. University of Brighton 2016 Asbestos awareness University of Brighton 2016 What is asbestos? Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral which has been in use for over 2,000 years. It was named by the Greeks, meaning is inextinguishable.

More information

Master Builders Australia NATIONAL ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT CONTROL AND REMOVAL POLICY

Master Builders Australia NATIONAL ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT CONTROL AND REMOVAL POLICY Master Builders Australia NATIONAL ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT CONTROL AND REMOVAL POLICY 2013 Master Builders Australia Limited 2013. Master Builders Australia Limited ABN 68 137 130 182 Level 1, 16 Bentham Street

More information

Francine Lortie-Monette, MD, MSc, CSPQ, MBA Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics University of Western Ontario 2003

Francine Lortie-Monette, MD, MSc, CSPQ, MBA Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics University of Western Ontario 2003 ASBESTOS Francine Lortie-Monette, MD, MSc, CSPQ, MBA Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics University of Western Ontario 2003 Asbestosis Asbestosis is a model for other dust diseases as well as

More information

HEALTH CARE FOR EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS. 2010 The SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research Memorial University www.safetynet.mun.

HEALTH CARE FOR EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS. 2010 The SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research Memorial University www.safetynet.mun. HEALTH CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS 2010 The SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research Memorial University www.safetynet.mun.ca HEALTH CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH EXPOSURE

More information

Asbestos in the Home MISAWA AB, JAPAN

Asbestos in the Home MISAWA AB, JAPAN Asbestos in the Home MISAWA AB, JAPAN Asbestos Awareness OCCUPANT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF INFORMATION SIGNATURE UNIT NUMBER DATE Prepared by: 35 CES/CEV If you have further question about location of asbestos

More information

Emerging Liability Risks A Practical Accumulation Example

Emerging Liability Risks A Practical Accumulation Example Emerging Liability Risks A Practical Accumulation Example Emerging Liability Risks A Practical Accumulation Example Wilhelm Zeller, Rüschlikon, 4 November 2015 Sources incl.: Wikipedia, RAND, NERA. Emerging

More information

LegCo Panel on Manpower. A proposal to make mesothelioma a compensable disease under the Pneumoconiosis (Compensation) Ordinance

LegCo Panel on Manpower. A proposal to make mesothelioma a compensable disease under the Pneumoconiosis (Compensation) Ordinance LC Paper No. CB(2)310/07-08(03) For discussion on 15 November 2007 LegCo Panel on Manpower A proposal to make mesothelioma a compensable disease under the Pneumoconiosis (Compensation) Ordinance Purpose

More information

Asbestos at the Work Site

Asbestos at the Work Site Asbestos at the Work Site Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral. The most commonly used types of asbestos are named chrysotile, amosite and crocidolite. Asbestos has been and continues to be used in

More information

quick history of asbestos

quick history of asbestos quick history of asbestos 2500BC Asbestos used embalming Pharaohs and cooking pots. c100bc Roman historian Pliny notes illness and death for slaves wearing asbestos cloth 1880s Major asbestos mines open

More information

KAISER ALUMINUM & CHEMICAL CORPORATION ASBESTOS PERSONAL INJURY TRUST

KAISER ALUMINUM & CHEMICAL CORPORATION ASBESTOS PERSONAL INJURY TRUST KAISER ALUMINUM & CHEMICAL CORPORATION ASBESTOS PERSONAL INJURY TRUST Dual Claimants Frequently Asked Questions Q. How does the Trust review a lung cancer claim where the injured party also had silica

More information

Instructions for Filing a Claim with the Combustion Engineering 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust

Instructions for Filing a Claim with the Combustion Engineering 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust Subject: Instructions for Filing a Claim with the Combustion Engineering 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust Dear Plaintiff Counsel: The Combustion Engineering 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust (the Trust ) was established

More information

Williams v. University of Birmingham [2011] EWCA Civ 1242 Court of Appeal, 28 October 2011

Williams v. University of Birmingham [2011] EWCA Civ 1242 Court of Appeal, 28 October 2011 Williams v. University of Birmingham [2011] EWCA Civ 1242 Court of Appeal, 28 October 2011 Summary In a mesothelioma claim, the defendant was not in breach of duty in relation to exposure to asbestos for

More information