Carleton University School of Social Work SOWK FOUNDATIONS OF STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS, SOCIAL WELFARE AND SOCIAL WORK

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1 Carleton University School of Social Work SOWK FOUNDATIONS OF STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS, SOCIAL WELFARE AND SOCIAL WORK Fall 2014, Fridays 11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., Room TBD Instructor: Manuela Popovici Office: 629 Dunton Tower Office Hours: Fridays 10:00-11:00 a.m. or by appointment COURSE DESCRIPTION This course will explore the historical roots of social work and social welfare in Canada; the development of social work as a profession; the structural context of social welfare; and key social work theories and approaches. Structural analysis will be used to examine contemporary social issues and social work responses. Through critical reflections and dialogue, the course will support students to develop reflexivity in relation to social work practice and examine models of working across difference. COURSE OBJECTIVES Upon successful completion of this course, the student will: 1. Gain an awareness of the social, economic and political contexts of social welfare; 2. Understand the influence of the social and political context on social work theories and practice; 3. Understand how the intersecting axes of social inequalities such as social class, sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, gender identity, citizen status, and dis/ability shape personal and social well being and influence both the provision of and access to social welfare services; 4. Recognize the relationship between theory, practice, and the self in social work. REQUIRED TEXTS The following book is required and will be available through Octopus Books bookstore (see Lundy, Colleen. (2011). Social Work, Social Justice and Human Rights: A Structural Approach to Practice, 2nd edition. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. Additional reading materials will be available online and through the Carleton University Library. Page 1 of 11

2 PARTICIPATION The course relies heavily on your participation. Your rich work and life experience contributes significantly to everyone s learning in the classroom. You are expected to attend every class, do all the readings, and be prepared to engage in thoughtful discussions. There is no grade assigned for participation. However, if you miss more than three classes over the two semesters, or more than two over one semester, you will lose 5% of your final grade for every additional class missed, except in exceptional circumstances that must be accompanied by documentation. A signup sheet will be distributed each class to record attendance it is your responsibility to sign it. Use of electronic devices that is not class related (e.g. social media, ) is not permitted and can result in the instructor recording an absence for you that class. ASSIGNMENTS 1. Reflective questions 4 x 10% = 40% of Fall term grade (20% of year grade) Submit four (4) 2-page papers during the weeks 2 to 8 of the Fall semester; a signup sheet will be distributed in the first week of class and on the course website after that. For each paper, begin with two reflective questions based on the readings from the respective week, followed by reflections that emerge for you in response to your own questions. These questions and reflections are meant to show your engagement with the material and ability to apply the concepts that are discussed. They may focus on a particular aspect of the readings; reflect on broad, theoretical concepts; apply concepts from the readings to your personal experience; make connections with readings or discussions from other weeks; etc. The questions should have no obvious, immediate answers that could be obtained from a perusal of the readings or from an internet search. In fact, the questions may have no clear answers at all, but they will stimulate creative and/or analytical thinking on the topic of the week. Papers will be graded based on how well they reflect an engagement with the week s materials, integration of that week s readings, integration with other course topics and readings, connections with/integration of your own experience, and the ability to stimulate thinking and discussion. On occasion, the instructor may use some of these questions during that week s class activities; in such cases the questions will be used anonymously, without attribution to the student. Papers should be no longer than 2 pages, double-spaced, with one question per page. Papers are due by 4 p.m. the Thursday before the respective class, and must be submitted online through the course website (or by to only if CU Learn happens to be down that day). Papers submitted after 4 p.m. will only be considered with advance notice, adequate reason and documentation, and at the discretion of the instructor. 2. Social justice project 60% of Fall term grade (30% of year grade) The final project has several parts that will be outlined below. You will be asked to form groups of 2 or 3 people and work together to: a. identify and explore a relevant social justice issue, b. facilitate a class presentation of your project, and c. prepare a creative project and an analysis paper based on your explorations. Page 2 of 11

3 Groups must be formed by week 3, so that you can work together on the proposal, which is due by week 6. Group members will all receive the same grade. a. proposal (5 pages) 15% of Fall term grade Due week 6, October 10, beginning of class. Select a social justice issue that is of particular interest to your group and of relevance to the subject matter of the course. This may be linked to our readings and discussions during the term, or may go beyond them. Conduct preliminary research on your selected issue and begin planning your project. Submit a 5-page proposal for your chosen social justice project, using the following outline: 1. The nature & extent of the social justice issue. 2. The human rights implications of the social justice issue. 3. The differing impact of the issue based on one s race/ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation, ability, etc., including demonstrated awareness of your social/cultural/economic/etc locations and how they influence your explorations. 4. The social services available to those who are affected (government response) and any advocacy/resistance around the issue/services available (civil society response). 5. Preliminary thoughts on why this issue is a concern for social workers, the role of social work, and how social work has/is responding or not to the issue and population(s) involved. 6. One page of the 5 will be an annotated bibliography of 5 major sources outside of course materials, at least 3 of which are academic (journal article, book, book chapter, study report). The other 2 can be a website, organization, art project, education project, fiction or nonfiction book, etc. For each source include 2-3 sentences with a brief description, an explanation of its importance, and why you recommend it to your classmates. Proposals need not be exhaustive, but they should show that you have begun exploring the topic. The proposal can be written as a narrative or as an outline (bullet form) based on the 6 points above. You will share you proposal with the class through the course website, and provide feedback individually to at least two other proposals posted by your classmates. Use this part of the assignment as an opportunity to start your thinking on the project and receive feedback from the instructor and your classmates. Once the proposal has been submitted and graded, major changes to your topic will not be allowed. Minor changes to your focus may be possible as determined by the instructor; however, you would have to submit a revised proposal for your revised focus, and the grade from the first proposal would stand. No changes are possible after October 24. b. presentation (45-60 min.) 20% of Fall term grade Due date: November 7, 14, 21, and 28 Plan a 45 minute presentation that outlines your selected issue, main findings, and reflections. Describe or show your planned/completed creative project (see below for description). Make sure you leave minutes for questions and discussion. The aim is two-fold: for your classmates to learn from your research and arguments, and for you to get constructive feedback which you can then Page 3 of 11

4 incorporate into your project. Presentations will be graded based on how well they meet these aims. The length will depend on the final number of presentations, but will not exceed 1 hour per group. c. final project 25% of Fall term grade Due date: December 5, before 4 p.m. Submit your project in class or at DT Submit a 8-10 page analysis paper that expands on your proposal and the feedback received, and also provides a brief description of your intent for the accompanying creative project. This is an academic analytical paper that should reflect your research and thinking on the topic. You should have at least 14 references, 4 of which can be from course materials. - Submit a creative project that is informed by the analysis paper and illustrates the social justice issue. Your project can use a variety of formats, such as photo, video, audio, music, or other media; blog, script, zine, ezine, poem, editorial or other writing; dance, skit, play, or other performance; or another format of your choice. It can focus on a case study; describe an advocacy or resistance initiative; present an overview of the issue; or another focus of your choice. Examples will be shown in class and posted on the course website. We will take time in class during week 7 to discuss your initial ideas for the creative project. Important note: speak to the instructor before involving people other than your group members in the creative project, as ethical issues may be involved (confidentiality, anonymity, safety, etc.). You need to complete all the components of all the assignments in order to pass the course. All papers should be double-spaced, using 12 Times New Roman or Garamond font and 1 inch margins. Anything that exceeds the page limits will not be read, and the paper will be graded accordingly. Title pages are not necessary; please print double-sided to the extent possible. Evaluation criteria for final projects Paper - Analysis (80% of the grade) - Well organized with subheadings where appropriate - Has a strong introduction with rationale and objectives of the paper clearly stated - Has strong concluding comments that clearly address issues raised in the paper - Has a clearly articulated and logical argument, - The argument is supported by a critical analysis of the literature on the topic - Course material has been integrated into the paper - Reflects completion of appropriate research to come to terms with your topic - Your social/cultural/economic/etc locations and their influence on your exploration of the topic are clearly articulated - Data sources are accurate and comprehensive - Proper and selective quotes used to support arguments Paper - Style (20% of the grade) - Proper grammar, sentence structure, punctuation etc. - Complete references and proper use of footnotes/endnotes Page 4 of 11

5 - Appropriate bibliography (complete and in APA or another format, used consistently) - Absence of typing and spelling mistakes - Inclusion of title with relevant information (name, course, date, professor s name, authors etc.). Title pages are not necessary. - Proper margins and layout of paper - Pagination & following expectations on the number of pages Presentation - Well organized and comprehensive; it covers points 1-5 of the proposal - Clear description of the topic and any topic-specific concepts - Good time management (not going overtime, leaving sufficient time for discussion, not rushing, balanced time for each part of the topic) - Engaging the audience (eye contact, speaking to rather than reading, inviting participation) - All group members are active participants - Handouts (if used) are well organized, dated, titled, and authored, and without typos - Audio-visual aids (if used) are well organized and support rather than detract from the presentation (slides are clean, clear and not text heavy, audio is clear, content matches the topic, etc.) - Ability to take in feedback in a constructive manner Creative project - Shows careful planning as opposed to last minute preparation - Reflects an understanding of the selected format and a rationale for using that format - Reflects an exploration of the format s potential to bring out new understandings and experiences for the audience - The audience can understand what is being explored through the project - It is informed by the group s research on and analysis of the social justice issue rather than independent from it - Reflects a strong conceptual understanding of the social justice issue Grading Guidelines - An A essay has a polished style, sound judgment, effective organization, and an argument of substance. It often has a special flair, a something extra which distinguishes it from a competent B+ paper: originality or profundity, a special way with words, or exceptionally sound research. An A paper is rich in content and has a sophisticated analysis. The reader has the sense of being taught by the author, sentence after sentence, paragraph after paragraph. Stylistic finesse is another keynote: the title and opening paragraph are engaging, the transitions are artful, and the phrasing is tight, fresh and highly specific. Because of its careful organization and development, an A essay imparts a feeling of wholeness and unusual clarity. -A B paper displays a good job of meeting all the criteria of the assignment. It is competent and sound in content, style and organization, but it lacks the stylistic finesse and richness of the content characteristic of an A paper. The paper demonstrates an ability to analyze as well as describe the subject matter. The paper expresses sound ideas and imparts substantial information, which is by no means devoid of interest. It will state a reasonably clear thesis or organizing principle early in the argument; subsequent points will support that thesis or principle and be ordered logically. Page 5 of 11

6 Language will be much more concise and precise than that of the C essay and the text will be relatively free of grammatical and stylistic errors. -A C essay is an average or acceptable piece of work that does a good job of meeting some, but not all of the requirements. It often exhibits lapses in style, organization and content. The essay has shortcomings which suggest that although it has something to say, it has not fully come to terms with its subject or expressed its insights clearly enough. It generally demonstrates a good ability to describe the subject matter but is weak in the area of analysis. A number of papers fit the C classification: those in which the ideas and information, though present, seem thin and commonplace; those in which the writing style falls short of reasonable expectations; those which stray from the assigned topic; those which deal with the topic, but are too perfunctory; those which are rambling and disorganized; those which involve a good deal of padding; etc. -A D paper is fair. It shows a weak comprehension of the concepts, and/or the topic may not be relevant, and/or it has weak links to the material and/or no critical analysis, a weak or unclear description, poor organization or citation of sources. -An F essay has considerable faults in style, organization and content. There may be glimmerings of an argument, but these will be obscured by faulty logic, garbled prose, frequent mechanical errors, and lack of any discernible principle of organization. Papers that require the marker to guess at the meaning behind the writer s words are F papers. So do papers that bear little or no relation to the topic. Other possibilities: slapdash papers that make one or two points, but are superficial efforts with no serious thought behind them, or papers which do little more than string quotations together with a few lines of introduction. Rewrites The opportunity to rewrite a paper will only be given in exceptional circumstances and at the professor s discretion. If such an option is provided, the student will have one week from the time the paper is returned to resubmit their work. The grade on the second version will be the final grade. If the rewrite is not submitted within a week, the original grade will stand. Referencing You will be graded on your ability to follow a reference style accurately and consistently as part of the overall quality of the papers. Concise guides to APA and MLA styles can be found here https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/. Deadlines Handing in assignments late is unfair both to other students who hand them in on time and the instructor who must submit grades on time. In exceptional circumstances such as illness or family emergency, you must contact the instructor before the assignment is due. Extensions to the due date will only occur with appropriate documentation. Work submitted after the final date, without prior discussion and approval of the instructor, will be penalized with 5% off the grade for each day the assignment is overdue (including weekends). If you would like your final projects returned to you, please provide a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Alternatively, we can make arrangements for you to pick it up during the Winter term. Extra Copies You are expected to keep a copy of all assignments that you submit for this course. Page 6 of 11

7 COURSE SCHEDULE & READINGS Week 1 - September 5, Getting Started Introductions and course overview Sign up for reflective questions Week 2 - September 12, A Brief History of the Profession Blackstock, Cindy. (2009). The Occasional Evil of Angels: Learning from the Experiences of Aboriginal Peoples and Social Work. First Peoples Child & Family Review, 4(1), Lundy, Chapter 3 Historical Developments in Social Work, Week 3 - September 19, The Current Context Final project groups formed Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedom at Lundy, Chapter 1 Social Work, Social Welfare, and the Global Economy, Lundy, Chapter 2 Pursuing Social Justice, Human Rights, and Peace, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights Lundy, Appendix A Week 4 September 26, Radical and Structural Social Work Approaches Baines, Donna. (2001). Everyday Practices of Race, Class and Gender. Journal of Progressive Human Services, 11(2): Lundy, Chapter 4 Structural Social Work: Theory, Ideology, and Practice Principles, Week 5 October 3, Social Location, intersectionality Carbado, Devon W. (2013). Colorblind Intersectionality. Signs. 38(4): Lundy, Chapter 5 The Importance of Inequality and Social Location, Week 6 - October 10, Legal and Ethical Social Work Practice Project proposals due beginning of class Midterm review of the course CASW Code of Ethics (2005) Lundy, Appendix B. Lundy, Chapter 6 Legal and Ethical Social Work Practice, Weinberg, Merlinda. (2014). The Ideological Dilemma of Subordination of Self versus Self-care: Identity Construction of the Ethical Social Worker. Discourse & Society, 25(1): Page 7 of 11

8 October No Class - Fall Break Week 7 October 24, The helping process, empowerment and change Class discussion of creative project ideas Lundy, Chapter 7 The Helping Process: Assessment and Intervention, Lundy, Chapter 8 Facilitating Empowerment and Change, Week 8 October 31, Hope, resilience, and self-care in practice Beddoe, Liz; Davys, Allyson Mary; Adamson, Carole. (2014). Never Trust Anybody Who Says 'I Don't Need Supervision': Practitioners Beliefs about Social Worker Resilience. Practice, 26(2), Rogers, Kathe. (2013). Hope Springs Fraternal: Engendering Hope in Anti-Poverty Activism. Canadian Social Work Review, 30(2): Week 9 - November 7, Social Justice Project presentations Week 10 - November 14, Social Justice Project presentations Week 11 - November 21, Social Justice Project presentations Week 12 November 28, Social Justice Project presentations If the presentations are completed the week before, for this class we will select a topic of common interest to explore, with readings to be determined. Week 13 December 5, Wrap-up and Celebration Final projects due Page 8 of 11

9 ACCOMMODATIONS You may need special arrangements to meet your academic obligations during the term. For an accommodation request the processes are as follows: Pregnancy obligation: write to me with any requests for academic accommodation during the first two weeks of class, or as soon as possible after the need for accommodation is known to exist. For more details visit the Equity Services website: Religious obligation: write to me with any requests for academic accommodation during the first two weeks of class, or as soon as possible after the need for accommodation is known to exist. For more details visit the Equity Services website: Academic Accommodations for Students with Disabilities: The Paul Menton Centre for Students with Disabilities (PMC) provides services to students with Learning Disabilities (LD), psychiatric/mental health disabilities, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), chronic medical conditions, and impairments in mobility, hearing, and vision. If you have a disability requiring academic accommodations in this course, please contact PMC at or for a formal evaluation. If you are already registered with the PMC, contact your PMC coordinator to send me your Letter of Accommodation at the beginning of the term, and no later than two weeks before the first in-class scheduled test or exam requiring accommodation (if applicable). After requesting accommodation from PMC, meet with me to ensure accommodation arrangements are made. Please consult the PMC website for the deadline to request accommodations for the formally-scheduled exam (if applicable) at You can visit the Equity Services website to view the policies and to obtain more detailed information on academic accommodation at STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES There are several services for students on campus, some of them listed below: The Centre for Aboriginal Culture and Education (CACE) supports Aboriginal (First Nations, Inuit and Métis) students through their academic journeys at Carleton University. CACE aims to increase the recruitment and retention of Aboriginal students, faculty and staff at Carleton by ensuring Aboriginal cultures, traditions, and worldviews are respected and represented on campus. CACE is located in 503 Robertson Hall. Check out the renovated Aboriginal Lounge located in the Tory Building room T27. For health and counselling issues you can visit the Health and Counselling Services; 2600 CTT Centre; ; Student Academic Success Centre (SASC); 302 Tory; ; assists students with academic planning, understanding academic rules & regulations, finding a tutor, choosing or changing a major, polishing study skills, and referrals to other services. Academic Writing Centre and Writing Tutorial Service (4th Floor, Library, ; can help you learn to write better papers. Tutors are graduate students in many different departments, with plenty of experience writing. They are trained to assist you at any stage in the writing process. To make an appointment, simply call , or come in person between 9:00 am and 4:30 pm Monday through Friday. Page 9 of 11

10 The Learning Commons (4th Floor, Library, , ext.1125; See also Main Floor desk) is a one-stop study-shop that combines research, IT and learning support services under one roof to enhance the student experience. PLAGIARISM The information below is excerpted from the Undergraduate Calendar. For full details you can go to www4.carleton.ca/calendars//ugrad/current/regulations/acadregsuniv14.html. The University has adopted a policy to deal with allegations of academic misconduct. This policy is expressed in the document Carleton University Academic Integrity Policy, effective July 1, The policy describes in detail its scope of application, principles, definitions, rights and responsibilities, academic integrity standards, procedures, sanctions, transcript notations, appeal process, and records implications. The complete policy is available at: carleton.ca/studentaffairs/academic-integrity From the Academic Integrity Policy (Section VI): Effective adherence to academic integrity requires that students understand the meaning of academic dishonesty. The following list describes conduct that violates standards of academic integrity which may lead to the imposition of sanctions pursuant to this policy. It is important to note that this is not a comprehensive list and should not be viewed as exhaustive. 1. Plagiarism Plagiarism is presenting, whether intentional or not, the ideas, expression of ideas or work of others as one's own. Plagiarism includes reproducing or paraphrasing portions of someone else's published or unpublished material, regardless of the source, and presenting these as one's own without proper citation or reference to the original source. Examples of sources from which the ideas, expressions of ideas or works of others may be drawn from include but are not limited to: books, articles, papers, literary compositions and phrases, performance compositions, chemical compounds, art works, laboratory reports, research results, calculations and the results of calculations, diagrams, constructions, computer reports, computer code/software, and material on the Internet. Examples of plagiarism include, but are not limited to: using ideas or direct, verbatim quotations, paraphrased material, algorithms, formulae, scientific or mathematical concepts, or ideas without appropriate acknowledgment in any academic assignment; using another's data or research findings; failing to acknowledge sources through the use of proper citations when using another's works and/or failing to use quotation marks. 2. Unauthorized Resubmission of Work A student shall not submit substantially the same piece of work for academic credit more than once without prior written permission of the course instructor in which the submission occurs. Minor modifications and amendments, such as phraseology in an essay or paper do not constitute significant and acceptable reworking of an assignment. Page 10 of 11

11 3. Unauthorized Cooperation or Collaboration An important and valuable component of the learning process is the progress a student can make as result of interacting with other students. In struggling together to master similar concepts and problems and in being exposed to each other's views and approaches, group of students can enhance and speed the learning process. Carleton University encourages students to benefit from these activities. However, it is also critically important that each individual student's abilities and achievements form the basis of the evaluation of that student's progress. As result, while collaboration is supported as being beneficial for various components of course and is generally encouraged, instructors typically limit the amount of collaboration allowed and communicate this to students in the course outlines. To ensure fairness and equity in assessment of term work, students shall not cooperate or collaborate in the completion of an academic assignment, in whole or in part, when the instructor has indicated that the assignment is to be completed on an individual basis. Failure to follow the instructor's directions regarding which assignments, or parts of assignments, should be completed by the individual alone will be considered violation of the standards of academic integrity. 4. Misrepresentation Students shall not submit or present false assignments, research, credentials, or other documents or misrepresent material facts for any academic purpose. Examples of misrepresentation include but are not limited to: concocted facts or references; medical or compassionate certificates; misrepresenting the date or time of submission; changing a score or record of an examination result and/or altering graded work for resubmission. 11. Assisting in the Violation of the Standards of Academic Integrity To assist anyone in violating the standards of academic integrity is itself violation of academic integrity standards and subject to this policy. For example, giving another student an assignment that you have submitted for another class and allowing that student to copy parts of the assignment and submit it as his/her own work would be a violation of this policy. Instructors, advisors and/or supervisors must report all suspected cases of violation of the Academic Integrity Policy to the Faculty Dean. Details of the procedures to be followed in the event of a suspected violation can be found in Section VII, Procedures, of the Carleton University Academic Integrity Policy at carleton.ca/studentsupport Page 11 of 11

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