Moving Towards Broadband Ubiquity in U.S. Business Markets

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Moving Towards Broadband Ubiquity in U.S. Business Markets"

Transcription

1 Moving Towards Broadband Ubiquity in U.S. Business Markets April 2001 Mark Kirstein, VP - Research Kneko Burney, Director - ebusiness Infrastructure & Services Mike Paxton, Senior Analyst - Multimedia Ernie Bergstrom, Senior Analyst - Advanced Carrier Strategies Report NO: BB0101UB A joint project produced by: Sponsored by:

2 Copyright Cahners In-Stat Group All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission from Cahners In-Stat Group. The contents of this report represent the interpretation and analysis of statistics and information that is either generally available to the public or released by responsible agencies or individuals. The information contained in this report is believed to be reliable but is not guaranteed as to its accuracy or completeness. Cahners In-Stat Group reserves all rights herein.

3 Table of Contents Table of Contents i List of Figures iii Executive Summary Introduction Broadband Defined About The Broadband Ubiquity Study Methodology Survey Process Respondent Demographics Broadband Access Segments DSL Cable Modems Fixed Wireless Satellite G Wireless Consumer (MPEG) Broadband Broadband End-Users Broadband in the Residential Market Broadband in the U.S. Business Market Overview of the U.S. Business Market Number of Remote Branch Offices Broadband Perceptions: Users & Providers What is Broadband? Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB i

4 Current Broadband Services End-Users Embrace Variety Service Providers Generally Align With Users Preferred Broadband Services DSL and T1 Get Top Marks Broadband Availability Service Providers Target Wireless, Easy Deployment; Plans Outpace Users Awareness...23 Business-Level Connectivity at Home Becoming More Important Service Providers Aren t Using Their Footprints Broadband Importance & Applications Broadband: No Passing Fancy Service-Provider, End-User Perceptions Differ on Broadband Market Drivers Perceptions of Broadband Service Providers Users: Current Providers Aren t Their Ideal Choice for Broadband Availability, Affordability and Quality Earn Business Customers Broadband Barriers Summary Broadband Ubiquity Partners and Sponsors About Cahner s In-Stat About CED Magazine About Broadband Week Broadband Ubiquity Sponsors ii 2001 Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB

5 List of Figures Figure 1. In-Stat s Broadband Framework Figure 2. Broadband Infrastructure Figure 3. Vertical Industries Represented Business Respondents, Figure 4. Type of Service Provider Service Providers, Figure 5. Size of Business Represented Business Respondents, Figure 6. Title or Job Function Business Respondents, Figure 7. Consumer Access Technology For Year Figure 8: Penetration of Broadband Access (including T1) - U.S. Businesses, Figure 9: Number of Firms by Size of Business U.S. Businesses, Figure 10: Number of Remote Branch Offices by Size of Business, Figure 11. Broadband Perceptions: Business Respondents Figure 12. Broadband Perceptions: Service Provider Respondents Figure 13. Current Broadband Usage: Business Respondents Figure 14. Current Broadband Usage: Business Respondents Figure 15. Current Broadband Services: Service Provider Respondents Figure 16. Current Broadband Services: Service Provider Respondents Figure 17. Preferred Broadband Service: Business Respondents Figure 18. Criteria for Their Preferred Broadband Solution: Business Respondents Figure 19. User Criteria by Broadband Solution Selected Figure 20. Broadband Plans for 2002: Service Provider Respondents Figure 21. Broadband Plans for 2002: Service Provider Respondents Figure 22. Broadband Availability: Business Respondents Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB iii

6 Figure 23. Broadband Availability: Business Respondents Figure 24. Broadband Service Area Utilization: Service Provider Respondents Figure 25. Broadband Service Area Utilization: Service Provider Respondents Figure 26. Broadband Importance 2001: Business Respondents Figure 27. Broadband Importance 2002: Business Respondents Figure 28. Broadband Importance to Customers in 2001: Service Provider Respondents Figure 29. Broadband Importance to Customers in 2002: Service Provider Respondents Figure 30. Characteristics Driving Broadband Demand: Business Respondents Figure 31. Characteristics Driving Broadband Demand: Business Respondents Figure 32. Characteristics Driving Broadband Demand: Service Provider Respondents Figure 33. Characteristics Driving Broadband Demand: Service Provider Respondents Figure 34. Current Broadband Service Providers: Business Respondents Figure 35. Most Capable Broadband Service Providers: Business Respondents Figure 36. Most Important Factors in Selecting Broadband Service Providers: Figure 37. Most Important Factors in Selecting Broadband Service Providers: Figure 38. Broadband Barriers: Business Respondents Figure 39. Broadband Barriers: Business Respondents Figure 40. Customer Broadband Barriers: Service Provider Respondents Figure 41. Customer Broadband Barriers: Service Provider Respondents Figure 42. Customer Broadband Barriers: Service Provider Respondents Figure 43. Service Provider Barriers: Service Provider Respondents iiii 2001 Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB

7 Executive Summary In technology circles today, no term is more overused than broadband, and no concept more over-hyped. Broadband encompasses the technology and equipment for the digital delivery of voice, video, and data services. It s clear that in a short time, broadband has become a driver for technology, equipment and service provider industries. Certainly within these industries, broadband as a market driver has reached ubiquity. Yet, end-users are still in the early adoption stages of broadband. Excluding T1 services, U.S. business broadband subscribers amount to only about 1 Million. While end-users have initiated their adoption of broadband, they still have a long way to go before achieving broadband ubiquity. To borrow an old adage, broadband is in the eye of the beholder. Perceptions don t always reflect reality. By examining broadband from the viewpoints of both service providers and end-users, Moving Towards Broadband Ubiquity reveals the perceptions and examines the reality of broadband in the current business environment. Broadband s importance is certainly on the rise. It plays a critically important role in the success of business today something on which about 40% of service providers and endusers agree. And more than 60% of these respondents foresee broadband as being critical to business success in This assessment is shared by organizations of all sizes, from SOHO to enterprise. Broadband technologies are becoming essential and are on their way to ubiquity. But what is broadband? It means many things to many people. When it comes to mindshare among the business users in our survey, DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) wins hands down. DSL is also considered the most available technology, although it is not necessarily the most widely used. When naming their preferred solutions, users again selected DSL over all other categories, with 32% listing DSL as their broadband access mode of choice. Cable modem and T1 services also rank high, though neither commands the across-the-board enthusiasm of DSL in the business community. Broadband may now be a business standard, but end-users understanding remains relatively fundamental. When it comes to broadband s capabilities, our research revealed a significant discrepancy in perceptions between business end-users and service providers. For most end-users, broadband is about speed and always-on access. Service providers also rate these attributes highly, but their focus is less exclusive; they identify value-added services as important attributes of broadband as well. Among service providers, 30% rated integrated data, voice and video services, CRM/customer service, and streaming media as critical applications driving broadband demand. Only about 20% of end-users shared this perception, demonstrating that service providers haven t yet established the association in users minds between value-added services and the broadband access that enables them. Wireless is another area in which end-users and service-providers perceptions differ conspicuously. While wireless broadband access is a common element in service-providers plans, end-users have not yet come to terms with wireless as a broadband option. The disparity in perceptions between service providers and end-users is particularly apparent when considering the still nascent 3G wireless in the context of broadband. Understanding broadband usage may help to explain some of these discrepancies. Growth in small business markets, remote branch offices and telecommuting are playing a crucial 2001 Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB 1

8 role in driving broadband demand. The result is that the line between business needs and consumer connectivity is blurring and broadband is encompassing both requirements. Although cable-modem services target consumers primarily, some 34% of our business respondents indicate that their companies use cable modems, with cable ranking in the top three, at 12%, among preferred broadband solutions. Not surprisingly, when assessing the capability of broadband service providers, users rate cable companies highly (51%), along with long-distance service providers (52%). Broadband technologies are increasingly important to the success of businesses of all sizes. Underlying trends in the business market, including growth of small businesses, telecommuters and remote branch offices, are accelerating the demand for broadband and driving a convergence between broadband access in the home and in the office. As broadband demand turns into actual subscribers and as businesses integrate broadband into their business processes, the business community will accelerate its progression to broadband ubiquity Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB

9 Introduction The broadband era is here...and is only growing in importance as it makes its way from emerging technology to ubiquity. For many, broadband is no longer an option; it is a standard for doing business. This recognition of the value of broadband has occurred in a very short time, a clear indication that broadband technology is on track for significant adoption in businesses large and small. More than that, broadband s rapid uptake indicates something else that those who underestimate broadband s impact do so at their peril. In the process of evolving to ubiquity, broadband s impact will be felt far beyond how companies do business. As broadband s capabilities come to be expected and assumed by businesses and consumers alike, broadband will not only pervade consumer entertainment activities, but penetrate to the most profound level of human activity: how people communicate. For broadband encompasses a wide variety of technologies video, voice and data services which are converging to support users needs. Each of these converging market segments includes participating companies providing the technology, the client equipment, the infrastructure, the content, services and applications. The opportunity is enormous. Moving Towards Broadband Ubiquity, prepared by Cahners In-Stat Group, is the industry s definitive examination of broadband s transition from an early-adopter set of technologies to a required standard for businesses nationwide. This research builds on and extends In- Stat s revolutionary 2000 broadband whitepaper, Entering The Broadband Era. Before examining the broadband market in detail, a definition of terms is in order. Broadband Defined The term broadband means many things to many people. In-Stat has defined broadband by its most significant aspects, and to capture the technology and network alternatives that will have the greatest impact over the next five years. According to In-Stat, broadband includes all flavors of high-speed digital voice, data and video services, as well as the underlying infrastructure, clients and technologies that enable these services. From a technical standpoint, our broadband definition has four requirements: Digital content Data rate of 384 Kbps A data rate of 384 Kbps is widely accepted as the minimum required for full-frame-rate digital video. This speed is the bandwidth specification for H.323 videoconferencing. Interactivity A broadband delivery mechanism must allow at least a minimum level of interactivity. This includes the ability to perform purchases and control the selection of content. Packet-based Packet-based technology is the foundation of broadband networks, allowing increased efficiency and enabling network convergence. Note: throughout this report, we use the terms bandwidth and data rate relatively interchangeably. While we acknowledge the technical distinction between them, common industry usage has blurred this distinction Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB 3

10 In-Stat s broadband framework is broken out into three primary segments based on protocols implemented over the network: MPEG, 3G wireless (UMTS) and IP. MPEG is a standard for compressing motion pictures (including audio and video). It is the underlying protocol for DVD, digital cable TV, digital satellite TV, and digital terrestrial broadcast. Not surprisingly, broadband using the MPEG protocol is focused primarily on the consumer video market. The second, UMTS, is a set of protocols for a third-generation wireless network. It includes W-CDMA and CDMA-2000, and 3 other protocols. IP is well known as the protocol for the Internet and is the language of the Internet-based broadband network. Underlying all of these networks is the backbone, which is the primary path for traffic between networks. The backbone is typically based on ATM, Frame Relay, or optical technology. Figure 1 presents In-Stat s broadband framework. Figure 1. In-Stat s Broadband Framework With this brief review of broadband technologies and protocols, it is important to be aware that broadband transforms these neat, segmented definitions at a very basic level. With the emergence and adoption of broadband which accelerates network and content convergence these distinctions will continue to diminish. Figure 2 presents a picture of the overall broadband infrastructure and illustrates the emerging network convergence. In Moving Towards Broadband Ubiquity, In-Stat is primarily concerned with the deployment by and impact of broadband on U.S. businesses. Understanding the study s focus and methodology is critical before reporting research results Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB

11 Figure 2. Broadband Infrastructure About The Broadband Ubiquity Study Because the broadband industry is extremely diverse, encompassing a wide variety of technologies and delivery systems, many misconceptions exist. Moving Towards Broadband Ubiquity draws out these misconceptions by measuring, comparing and contrasting the perceptions of service providers and end-users in the broadband market. Our analysis puts these perceptions and misconceptions into perspective, considering the key elements of the broadband market as it exists today, including but not limited to: actual number of broadband subscribers, service availability and service provider plans. Moving Towards Broadband Ubiquity focuses on three key areas examined over a time horizon: The availability of broadband services; Awareness of and demand for these services by end-users; and Present and future relevance of broadband in the business environment. To get a more complete picture of the industry, In-Stat gathered the opinions of end-user decision-makers in U.S. businesses, from small ventures to enterprises, along with service providers nationwide. Our research focused on assessing where the industry is today and where it s going in the near future. To view broadband over time, In-Stat identified current broadband perceptions and usage, then explored both end-user and service providers intentions for the future. Armed with the greater understanding this research brings about, service providers can better target customers through specific education and awareness campaigns Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB 5

12 Moving Towards Broadband Ubiquity was prepared by market research firm Cahners In-Stat Group in conjunction with industry publications Broadband Week and CED. Study results are distributed to the industry at no charge, thanks to the leading broadband companies who sponsored this research. Methodology Survey Process Moving Towards Broadband Ubiquity is based on structured questionnaires administered over the Internet from January through March In-Stat recruited potential respondents from a variety of sources, including advertisements in multiple publications, newsletters and web sites. In addition, a substantial direct campaign was conducted, inviting broadband professionals to participate in the study. Two separate surveys were administered: one among broadband service providers and one among broadband service end-users. One thousand sixty-four (1,064) service-provider surveys were completed, and 326 end-user surveys were conducted. To participate in the research, respondents were required to meet specific criteria. Service-provider respondents had to work for a company that currently provides broadband services to other businesses or consumers or have plans to provide broadband services within the next 12 months. In addition, qualified participants were required to be knowledgeable about the broadband services their company provided. End-user respondents had to work for companies that do not provide broadband services to other businesses or consumers, with no plans to do so in the future. Their companies also must either currently purchase or have plans to purchase broadband services in the next 12 months. Finally, end-user respondents must be broadband decision-makers and involved in decisions regarding the purchase of broadband services for their companies. Data was cleaned, deduped and cross-tabulated. Random verifications were conducted with participants to insure the validity of responses. Respondent Demographics Respondents were asked to categorize their companies by number of employees and type of business (according to categories supplied by In-Stat). In-Stat also required respondents to provide information about their work parameters, including their title. Respondents were primarily U.S.-based, which included 94% of business respondents and 88% of service providers Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB

13 Figure 3. Vertical Industries Represented Business Respondents, 2001 Figure 4. Type of Service Provider Service Providers, Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB 7

14 Figure 5. Size of Business Represented Business Respondents, 2001 Figure 6. Title or Job Function Business Respondents, Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB

15 Broadband Access Segments In-Stat questioned business respondents about their broadband perceptions. What follows are descriptions of what we consider to be the most important broadband access technologies, either due to their current levels of deployment or implications for the future. DSL DSL (Digital Subscriber Line), which brings high data rate information over ordinary copper telephone lines, is currently the most widely deployed two-way broadband access method targeted at business users. Used for Internet access primarily by homes and small businesses because of the convenience and cost-efficiency of using existing phone lines, DSL offers T1-level Internet connection speeds for a fraction of the cost. DSL transports both data and voice signals, and of substantial importance to business users always-on access, by maintaining continuous connection on the line s data portion. Because it comes in different flavors, DSL is among the most flexible of broadband technologies. XDSL refers to these different variations, such as: ADSL (Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line), the most popular form of DSL, which provides downstream speeds of 144 Kbps to 2.2 Mbps and upstream speeds from 90 to 640 Kbps, depending on the distance from the CSO. SDSL (Symmetric Digital Subscriber Line), a form of DSL that transfers data upstream and downstream at symmetric rates of up to 2.3 Mbps. HDSL (High Bit-rate Digital Subscriber Line), primarily used as a substitute for T1/E1 lines, providing Mbps of data symmetrically over two copper twisted-pair lines. RADSL (Rate Adaptive Digital Subscriber Line) usually refers to any rate-adaptive DSL modem. VDSL (Very High Speed Digital Subscriber Line), an evolving form of DSL that can deliver data at a rate of 13 to 52 Mbps downstream and 1.5 to 2.3 Mbps upstream DSL s major drawback is that line performance degrades with an office or home s distance from the telephone company s central switching office (CSO). At best, if the residence or small business is close, data may be received at rates up to 6.1 Mbps (millions of bits per second, out of a theoretical Mbps), enabling continuous transmission of motion video, audio and 3-D effects. More typically, individual connections provide from 512 Kbps to Mbps downstream and about 128 Kbps upstream. All else being equal, users 5,000 feet from the CSO will experience better throughput than those 15,000 feet away. Performance limitations result in providers reluctance to deploy beyond about 15,000 feet from the CSO. ILECs (Incumbent Local Exchange Carriers), for example, are sometimes unwilling to offer service beyond 15,000 feet, hoping to avoid the increased support issues that come with the extreme ranges. Beyond 18,000 feet, the service is generally unavailable. DSL has grown substantially since installations began in By year-end 2000, subscribers totaled 4.9 million worldwide. In-Stat expects the number of DSL subscribers to grow continually throughout the next decade Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB 9

16 While DSL commands the business space, consumers are overwhelmingly supporting another technology for their broadband Internet access: cable modems. Cable Modems Cable modems, which provide Internet access via the coaxial cable used to furnish cable TV services, are DSL s closest competition. Almost twice as many consumers use cable modems as DSL for their broadband access. As Internet users accustomed to dial-up speeds embrace the service, cable modems have become the most popular high-speed/broadband Internet access vehicle in the residential market. More than 77 million homes currently subscribe to cable television, and 110 million homes in North America are passed by broadband coaxial cable plants. In theory, the top cable modem speed is about 30 Mbps, but a more realistic expectation is around 1 Mbps. Uploading is somewhat slower, generally averaging between 300 Kbps and 500 Kbps. The largest cable modem service providers are with over 3 million customers, and Road Runner, which has approximately 1.3 million subscribers. Worldwide subscriber growth over the past two years has been impressive. Cable modem subscribers numbered some 2.2 million at the end of By the end of 2000, that number had skyrocketed to 6.3 million. One drawback of cable is that the vast majority of cable systems were designed only for oneway data transport to send video to the home. To upgrade their systems and provide the two-way capabilities needed for Internet access, cable providers are investing significant capital to upgrade their infrastructure. Due to cable s near-ubiquitous coverage, coaxial cable connections provide a potentially powerful platform for providing residences and small business with high-speed data access. We believe cable will remain one of the dominant methods of consumer broadband connectivity throughout the next few years, in part because cable already passes by such a large number of households worldwide. No other broadband Internet-access technology comes close to cable modems and DSL in public acceptance, but other solutions are being examined very closely by service providers, in large part due to their ease and speed of deployment. Fixed Wireless Even though fixed-wireless broadband services have been touted as an efficient alternative to wired or cable-based services for years, subscribership remains a distant third to cable modem access and DSL. Originally called wireless cable for its emphasis on pay-tv services (transmitting voice and video at high speeds), the fixed wireless industry is now focused on providing high-speed Internet services to business and residential subscribers. The industry s focus changed in September 1998, when the Federal Communications Commission authorized MMDS (Multichannel Multipoint Distribution Service) for two-way services. The FCC s action paved the way for the wireless cable industry to provide Internet service, which was then rapidly gaining popularity in homes and offices nationwide. Industry mentality became much more data-centric, and the direction of wireless broadband s applications soon changed Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB

17 Wireless broadband most often refers to LMDS (Local Multipoint Distribution Service) as well as MMDS. LMDS operates in the 28 GHz and 31 GHz bands, with theoretical data rates up to 1.5 Gbps to 2 Gbps downstream; more realistic speeds average around 38 Mbps. Generally, frequencies above 10 GHz are known as LMDS. MMDS, which operates in the 2.5 GHz band, reaches speeds up to 27 Mbps over unlicensed channels or 1 Gbps over licensed channels. Other frequencies in use are the 24 GHz, 26 GHz, 38 GHz and 39 GHz bands. In the past few years, MMDS and LMDS activity has increased. Major telecommunications companies such as WorldCom and Sprint have initiated MMDS-based residential broadband service in several U.S. cities. Led by companies such as Winstar and Teligent, LMDSbased services targeting businesses have increased their annual worldwide revenues to over $1 billion. Even AT&T is rolling out fixed wireless broadband services. Despite increased awareness, fixed wireless broadband services have been slow to develop compared to other broadband-access technologies. In addition to its distant third-place standing after DSL and cable modems, fixed wireless faces challenges that threaten to further slow its development and service deployment. The challenges include the need for greater technology standardization, a broader base of hardware manufacturers and greater consolidation among fixed-wireless service providers. Satellite The satellite solution is largely about accessibility. The satellite industry offers broadband access for homes and businesses that are inaccessible to cable modems and DSL connections. In North America, the main suppliers of satellite Internet access are DirecPC and Starband. Using a telephone modem backchannel, Internet surfing via satellite has been available from DirecPC for several years. In the fall of 2000, two-way broadband satellite services became available in North America when Starband whose investors include Gilat, EchoStar, and Microsoft launched its service. The maximum speed Starband advertises is 400 Kbps, but because its networks are shared, the average data throughput may be significantly less. At year-end 2000, DirecPC had about 100,000 subscribers in North America. Starband announced in March 2001 that they had signed up 25,000 North American subscribers. In Europe, Strato s SkyDSL service is the single commercial broadband satellite service available. Another provider on the continent, Europe Online, changed its business model to that of an entertainment service whose content is downloaded to user PCs on demand. Developing a network in the sky has advantages beyond simple availability. When the shared network is bogged down, the satellite provider simply arranges to use another transponder at the same orbital location. New satellites are launched when existing transponder capacity is saturated. Still, challenges abound. The receiving equipment needed by users costs about $400. Speeds are low compared to cable and DSL, though within the next year, the next generation of KA-band satellites and spot-beam technology will be launched, providing speeds over 1 Mbps. Suppliers include Hughes, which is developing its Spaceway project, and EchoStar, which invested in WildBlue, a new operator scheduled for launch in Since satellite is the only option for many, In-Stat expects that by the end of 2005, over 9 million homes worldwide will access the Internet via satellite Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB 11

18 3G Wireless Distinct from the other broadband alternatives, 3G wireless holds perhaps the largest potential. Unlike DSL, Cable, and fixed wireless, which are still relatively computing-centric, 3G wireless combines high-speed data access with the mobility of handsets. This puts 3G in a different context than the other alternatives. Yet with over 384 Kbps of bandwidth, and the promise of streaming video media and videoconferencing, 3G is decidedly broadband. Cellular has been in use for almost 20 years, but only recently has the vision of using cellular for broadband data access become a reality. Third-generation, or 3G wireless as it s often known, is composed of not a single technology but of several, each an evolutionary enhancement over existing second-generation (2G) technology. The two most popular 3G technologies that carriers will deploy commercially are CDMA2000 and Wideband CDMA (W-CDMA). CDMA2000 is an evolutionary enhancement to CDMA being promoted by Qualcomm. This digital spread-spectrum cellular standard will be available with data rates ranging from 384 Kbps for mobile applications to well over 2 Mbps for stationary applications. W-CDMA is the evolutionary path for GSM, the standard with the majority of worldwide cellular subscribers. W-CDMA s promised data rates compare to CDMA2000, ranging from 384 Kbps to over 2 Mbps in some situations. Both CDMA2000 and W-CDMA are sharedresource technologies, meaning that these transmission levels are shared across all users within one RF carrier per sector. In heavily trafficked areas, the data rates received by any one user could be substantially less. Typically, speeds also will slow as the mobile user s speed increases, with the highest data rates available only to stationary users. Consumer (MPEG) Broadband The broadband technologies discussed so far are primarily focused on Internet-based (IP) data services. Broadband itself will enable these IP services to broaden and include telephony and streaming media applications. However, entertainment-based broadband is already flourishing on the MPEG network. In fact, from an overall broadband perspective, MPEG services lead the market in deployment and existing service revenue. These existing digital networks are incorporating data access and interactivity, which will transform the traditional experiences in this segment. The vast range of MPEG services (digital video, audio and data) can be delivered over a variety of digital TV networks including cable, satellite or terrestrial broadcast systems. DBS (Direct Broadcast Satellite) services have great market penetration, yet are often overlooked by broadband insiders. DBS clearly qualifies as broadband, with 52 Mbps bandwidth, fully digital content and support for interactive purchases and content selection. In terms of market clout, DBS cannot be overlooked. With nearly $15 billion in worldwide service revenues for 2000, DBS is the largest existing market for broadband services. Not only is it the definitive leader today, DBS will hold this place for the foreseeable future. In- Stat research reveals that DBS had 37 million subscribers worldwide in 2000, a number that will rise to 95 million by Digital cable is also on a run. Last year worldwide users numbered 11.7 million, a number that nearly doubled from 1999 and is expected to grow to 48.6 million in Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB

19 Finally, digital terrestrial television holds tremendous promise, but is still struggling to establish a foundation for broader adoption by consumers. While broadcasters are now serving major metropolitan areas throughout the U.S. and in select regions worldwide, the total number of consumers with digital TV sets stands at a bit over 1M. This will grow to over 30 Million by Broadband End-Users Broadband in the Residential Market IP-based broadband access in the residential market is becoming increasingly available as fixed wireless, satellite, cable and DSL services are deployed. Regardless of which consumers choose, each service provides around 1 Mbps of bandwidth and unprecedented access to the Internet and entertainment services. Yet, less than 5% of all U.S. households are using broadband access today. Currently, cable and DSL have the highest IP broadband penetration rates by far, levels that are expected to increase exponentially over the next three years. Almost twice as many consumers use cable modems as DSL for their broadband Internet access. Cahners In-Stat Group forecasts that consumer cable modem and DSL access subscribers will grow 77% between 1999 and Subscription revenues from these two segments will also grow from just over $1 billion in 1999 to $13.3 billion by Of the 101 million households in the United States, roughly 52% were accessing the Internet from home by midyear Of these Internet-connected households, approximately 9% had migrated to some form of broadband access. As Figure 7 shows, dial-up remains the primary mode of consumer Internet access, but consumers also report using Web accessible TV, wireless and satellite. Figure 7. Consumer Access Technology For Year 2000 When consumers gain bandwidth, they gain new habits of Internet activity as well. Broadband users reported spending on average 22 hours a week online, or twice the average time spent online by dial-up users. But thinking only of the Internet ignores the greatest opportunity broadband brings to the residential market. Ultimately, the rollout of broadband IP services to the home enables new revenues from bundled value-added services, including voice, entertainment, e-commerce and home management and control Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB 13

20 Of these services, entertainment represents the biggest opportunity in the consumer segment. However, IP-based entertainment services will hit squarely into the MPEG-based, entertainment-centric, broadband segment. As cable, satellite, and terrestrial TV segments transition from their legacy analog distribution system to the new digital network, the very nature of content as well as its variety will change. Most fundamental will be the addition of interactivity to the traditionally passive viewing experience. The broadband entertainment experience will also encompass: A dramatic increase in video quality and selection; The large audiences of traditional media combined with the ability to make instantaneous purchases in response to advertising; and The emergence of a flurry of new MPEG services, including such pay-per-play services as contests, gambling and multi-play video games. Changes such as these, and the convergence between the IP and MPEG content, will profoundly transform the entertainment experience on every level. The impact will be equally far-reaching, far beyond entertainment alone. Broadband will be just as influential and widespread on the business side. Broadband in the U.S. Business Market As Figure 8 shows, high-speed data access pervades the main office locations of larger firms, but it is still lagging in remote locations and among small companies. Not only do cost and availability factor into existing penetration rates, but business customers are just now beginning to recognize the importance of high-speed access. Figure 8: Penetration of Broadband Access (including T1) - U.S. Businesses, 2001 Looking forward, In-Stat s research shows that decision-makers are very aggressive in their expectations regarding future levels of broadband usage Cahners In-Stat Group - BB0101UB

Technical Paper. Digital Subscriber Line (DSL): Using Next Generation Technologies to Expand Traditional Infrastructures

Technical Paper. Digital Subscriber Line (DSL): Using Next Generation Technologies to Expand Traditional Infrastructures Technical Paper Digital Subscriber Line (DSL): Using Next Generation Technologies to Expand Traditional Infrastructures USB ADSL Modem Contents Digital Subscriber Line (DSL): Using Next Generation Technologies

More information

Cable subscribers are connected directly to high speed lines while ADSL subscribers are connected directly to medium speed lines

Cable subscribers are connected directly to high speed lines while ADSL subscribers are connected directly to medium speed lines ADSL vs Cable Cable subscribers are connected directly to high speed lines while ADSL subscribers are connected directly to medium speed lines Cable subscribers share the line connecting them to neighbourhood

More information

Telephone Service: A Natural Monopoly?

Telephone Service: A Natural Monopoly? Box 6-2 continued By June 2003, this had grown to 88 percent. A recent study indicates that the introduction of satellite TV led to substantial gains for consumers. However, ongoing antitrust oversight

More information

US Business Services 2015

US Business Services 2015 US Business Services 2015 Executive Summary CMR Market Research May 2015 Reproduction without permission 1 The contents of this report represent CMR s analysis of the information available to the public

More information

Appendix A: Basic network architecture

Appendix A: Basic network architecture Appendix A: Basic network architecture TELECOMMUNICATIONS LOCAL ACCESS NETWORKS Traditionally, telecommunications networks are classified as either fixed or mobile, based on the degree of mobility afforded

More information

Analysis of xdsl Technologies

Analysis of xdsl Technologies International Journal of Electronics and Computer Science Engineering 897 Available Online at www.ijecse.org ISSN- 2277-1956 Analysis of xdsl Technologies Dimple Saproo 1, Megha Goyal 2, Asha Bhagashra

More information

Dwindling DSL services give rise to new options

Dwindling DSL services give rise to new options Charter Business : White paper Dwindling DSL services give rise to new options WHITE PAPER There is no question a company s high-speed data connection has become a business lifeline in the Internet age,

More information

Getting Broadband. FCC Consumer Facts. What Is Broadband?

Getting Broadband. FCC Consumer Facts. What Is Broadband? Getting Broadband FCC Consumer Facts What Is Broadband? Broadband or high-speed Internet access allows users to access the Internet and Internetrelated services at significantly higher speeds than those

More information

ECE 510 -- Chapter 1

ECE 510 -- Chapter 1 ECE 510 -- Chapter 1 Definition: Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) Public network technology that delivers high bandwidth over conventional copper wiring at limited distances. There are four major types of

More information

Connection Services. Hakim S. ADICHE, MSc

Connection Services. Hakim S. ADICHE, MSc Connection Services Hakim S. ADICHE, MSc adiche@ccse.kfupm.edu.sa Department of Computer Engineering King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Dhahran, Saudi Arabia Connection Services Different connectivity

More information

ADSL or Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line. Backbone. Bandwidth. Bit. Bits Per Second or bps

ADSL or Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line. Backbone. Bandwidth. Bit. Bits Per Second or bps ADSL or Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line Backbone Bandwidth Bit Commonly called DSL. Technology and equipment that allow high-speed communication across standard copper telephone wires. This can include

More information

US Data Services 2014-2019

US Data Services 2014-2019 US Data Services 2014-2019 Executive Summary CMR Market Research April 2015 Reproduction without permission 1 The contents of this report represent CMR s analysis of the information available to the public

More information

Introduction to ADSL. NEXTEP Broadband White Paper. Broadband Networks Group. A primer on Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line transmission technology.

Introduction to ADSL. NEXTEP Broadband White Paper. Broadband Networks Group. A primer on Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line transmission technology. NEXTEP Broadband White Paper Introduction to ADSL A primer on Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line transmission technology. A NEXTEP Broadband White Paper May 2001 Broadband Networks Group Introduction to

More information

Dwindling DSL services give rise to new options

Dwindling DSL services give rise to new options Charter Business : White paper Dwindling DSL services give rise to new options WHITE PAPER There is no question a company s high-speed data connection has become a business lifeline in the Internet age,

More information

Fiber to the Home. Definition. Overview. Topics

Fiber to the Home. Definition. Overview. Topics Fiber to the Home Definition Fiber to the home (FTTH) is the ideal fiber-optics architecture. In this architecture, fiber deployment is carried all the way to the customer s home (premises). Overview Today

More information

6.0Mb Max Digital DSL/ 56K Modem (G.DMT/G.Lite/V.90)

6.0Mb Max Digital DSL/ 56K Modem (G.DMT/G.Lite/V.90) 6.0Mb Max Digital DSL/ 56K Modem (G.DMT/G.Lite/V.90) Technology Description: Compaq's 6.0 Mb Max Digital DSL/ 56K Modem (G.DMT/G.Lite/V.90) builds on Compaq's commitment to provide the latest communications

More information

Global Consumer Satellite Broadband Internet Market

Global Consumer Satellite Broadband Internet Market Global Consumer Satellite Broadband Internet Market The Beginning of Global Ka-band Coverage and its Growing Impact on the Global Market November 2011 Contents Introduction 7 Executive Summary 17 Market

More information

Intel System Engineers Documents. DSL General Overview

Intel System Engineers Documents. DSL General Overview Intel System Engineers Documents DSL General Overview Alex Lattanzi SC LAR Whatt IIs Brroadband? Broadband describes a number of different technologies that deliver digital data to homes and businesses

More information

Table 1: Comparison of different types of DSL Technologies

Table 1: Comparison of different types of DSL Technologies Table 1: Comparison of different types of DSL Technologies DSL Type Symmetric/Asymmetric Loop Range (kft) Downstream (Mbps) Upstream (Mbps) IDSL symmetric 18 0.128 0.128 SDSL symmetric 10 1.544 1.544 HDSL

More information

Satellite Broadband Services

Satellite Broadband Services Satellite Broadband Services Report to the UK Space Leadership Council by the Satellite Broadband Steering Group June 2011 Summary Satellite broadband services are likely to be part of the infrastructure

More information

C20.0001 Information Systems for Managers Fall 1999

C20.0001 Information Systems for Managers Fall 1999 New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business C20.0001 Information Systems for Managers Fall 1999 Networking Fundamentals A network comprises two or more computers that have been connected in

More information

Broadband 101: Installation and Testing

Broadband 101: Installation and Testing Broadband 101: Installation and Testing Fanny Mlinarsky Introduction Today the Internet is an information superhighway with bottlenecks at every exit. These congested exits call for the deployment of broadband

More information

Introduction to City of Seattle Business Survey

Introduction to City of Seattle Business Survey Introduction to City of Seattle Business Survey The City of Seattle is sending you this survey as part of our research into how businesses use Internet services. We at the City understand that, as a business

More information

INTERNET CONNECTIVITY

INTERNET CONNECTIVITY INTERNET CONNECTIVITY http://www.tutorialspoint.com/internet_technologies/internet_connectivity.htm Copyright tutorialspoint.com Here in this tutorial, we will discuss how to connect to internet i.e. internet

More information

AT&T Rural Broadband Coverage in North Carolina

AT&T Rural Broadband Coverage in North Carolina AT&T Rural Broadband Coverage in North Carolina AT&T Services, Inc. April 07, 2008 2007 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T and the AT&T logo are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property.

More information

Business Services Market Share 2015

Business Services Market Share 2015 Business Services Market Share 2015 Executive Summary CMR Market Research March 2015 Reproduction without permission 1 The contents of this report represent CMR s analysis of the information available

More information

VDSL (VERY HIGH DATA BIT RATE DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LINE)

VDSL (VERY HIGH DATA BIT RATE DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LINE) 1 VDSL (VERY HIGH DATA BIT RATE DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LINE) INTRODUCTION 1. Recent events in the telecommunications environment are giving rise to a new class of service providers, setting the stage for how

More information

ADSL over ISDN, DAML, and Long Loops

ADSL over ISDN, DAML, and Long Loops Avi Vaidya Vice President and Chief Technology Officer Charles Industries, Ltd. over ISDN, DAML, and Long Loops As new technologies evolve, new challenges arise for telephone companies. Some of these challenges

More information

HSPA, LTE and beyond. HSPA going strong. PRESS INFORMATION February 11, 2011

HSPA, LTE and beyond. HSPA going strong. PRESS INFORMATION February 11, 2011 HSPA, LTE and beyond The online multimedia world made possible by mobile broadband has changed people s perceptions of data speeds and network service quality. Regardless of where they are, consumers no

More information

Video Bandwidth Will MPEG Video Kill Your Network?

Video Bandwidth Will MPEG Video Kill Your Network? Will MPEG Video Kill Your Network? The thought that more bandwidth will cure network ills is an illusion like the thought that more money will ensure human happiness. Certainly more is better. But when

More information

Broadband Access Technologies

Broadband Access Technologies Broadband Access Technologies Chris Wong Communications Engineering Sector Analysis & Reporting Branch International Training Program 23 October 2007 Presentation Outline What is broadband? What are the

More information

Appendix 1: Satellite broadband service providers

Appendix 1: Satellite broadband service providers Appendixes Appendix 1: Satellite broadband service providers In 2005 06, satellite broadband services were provided by the following companies: Australian Private Networks (ACTIV8me) Be Communications

More information

Information and communication technology use: Are small firms catching up?

Information and communication technology use: Are small firms catching up? Catalogue no. 11-621-MIE No. 009 ISSN: 1707-0503 ISBN: 0-662-36101-6 Analytical Paper Analysis in Brief Information and communication technology use: Are small firms catching up? by Mark Uhrbach and Bryan

More information

General Questions about TC3Net Residential DSL:

General Questions about TC3Net Residential DSL: General Questions about TC3Net Residential DSL: DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) is broadband technology that provides high-speed data transmission (up to 7.1 Mbps) over an existing telephone line. Speeds

More information

DSL Variations. NEXTEP Broadband White Paper. Broadband Networks Group. Definitions and differences of Digital Subscriber Line variations.

DSL Variations. NEXTEP Broadband White Paper. Broadband Networks Group. Definitions and differences of Digital Subscriber Line variations. NEXTEP Broadband White Paper DSL Variations Definitions and differences of Digital Subscriber Line variations. A NEXTEP Broadband White Paper May 2001 Broadband Networks Group DSL Variations EXECUTIVE

More information

Internet Access Services: Status as of June 30, 2011

Internet Access Services: Status as of June 30, 2011 Internet Access Services: Status as of June 30, 2011 Industry Analysis and Technology Division Wireline Competition Bureau June 2012 This report is available for reference in the FCC s Reference Information

More information

High-speed Internet Access: Wireless and WiFi

High-speed Internet Access: Wireless and WiFi High-speed Internet Access: Wireless and WiFi Richard S. Wolff, Ph. D Montana State University Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. rwolff@montana.edu 406 994 7172 Wireless: lots of technologies

More information

Business Domains. Five Business Domains

Business Domains. Five Business Domains Business Domains Five Business Domains We are active in five business domains: broadcasting services; the broadband business; retail businesses; the karaoke business; and Internet services. The sales compositions

More information

Broadband Report November 2011

Broadband Report November 2011 Broadband Report November 2011 This publication is only available electronically: http://www.crtc.gc.ca This publication can be made available in alternative format upon request. Ce document est également

More information

E1-E2 (EB) Chapter 8A. Broadband Services

E1-E2 (EB) Chapter 8A. Broadband Services E1-E2 (EB) Chapter 8A Broadband Services 8A. Broadband and Broadband Services 8A.1 Introduction In toady s globally networked society through internet, there is always increasing demand for higher capacity

More information

Connecting Northumberland Rural Broadband Expansion Project Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ s)

Connecting Northumberland Rural Broadband Expansion Project Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ s) Connecting Northumberland Rural Broadband Expansion Project Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ s) PROJECT BACKGROUND 1) What is the objective of the project? In March 2008, the Government of Ontario announced

More information

The battle for the residential customer

The battle for the residential customer Fiber, Coax or DSL? Meeting Customer Demand for Bandwidth Only fiber will deliver the kinds of content customers will crave in a few years By David R. Kozischek Corning Cable Systems The battle for the

More information

Chapter 9. Internet. Copyright 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Inc 10-1

Chapter 9. Internet. Copyright 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Inc 10-1 Chapter 9 Internet Copyright 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Inc 10-1 Outline 9.2 - How the Internet Works - Basic Architecture - Connecting to an ISP - Internet Today 9.3 - Internet Access Technologies - DSL

More information

Broadband Definitions and Acronyms

Broadband Definitions and Acronyms The New Mexico Broadband Program Broadband Definitions and Acronyms Version 1, April 2013 Prepared for: The New Mexico Broadband Program NM Department of Information Technology http://www.doit.state.nm.us/broadband/

More information

Speed Matters: High Speed Internet for All

Speed Matters: High Speed Internet for All Speed Matters: High Speed Internet for All Communications Workers of America www.speedmatters.org The emergence of a new communications system one based on high speed interactive networks designed for

More information

Making Communities Better with Broadband

Making Communities Better with Broadband * Making Communities Better with Broadband So Many Choices!!!!!! Where Do I Even Start? *Where to Begin *Start With Your Community *Demographics *Current Needs *Vision for the Future *Strengths and Challenges

More information

Voice and Delivery Data Networks

Voice and Delivery Data Networks Voice and Delivery Data Networks Chapter 11 Learning Objectives After reading this chapter, you should be able to: Identify the basic elements of a telephone system Describe the composition of the telephone

More information

now as a Distribution Partner

now as a Distribution Partner W e l c o m e t o t h e b r o a d b a n d e r a Would you like to extend your current offering to the market, reduce churn amongst your customer base, increase customer loyalty by offering value-added

More information

Chapter 9A. Network Definition. The Uses of a Network. Network Basics

Chapter 9A. Network Definition. The Uses of a Network. Network Basics Chapter 9A Network Basics 1 Network Definition Set of technologies that connects computers Allows communication and collaboration between users 2 The Uses of a Network Simultaneous access to data Data

More information

BROADBAND DSL ACHIEVING HEALTHY GROWTH

BROADBAND DSL ACHIEVING HEALTHY GROWTH MEDEA+ News 28 October 2003 BROADBAND DSL ACHIEVING HEALTHY GROWTH There were more than 10 million new subscribers to broadband digital subscriber line (DSL) connections in the first half of 2003, according

More information

R2. The word protocol is often used to describe diplomatic relations. How does Wikipedia describe diplomatic protocol?

R2. The word protocol is often used to describe diplomatic relations. How does Wikipedia describe diplomatic protocol? Chapter 1 Review Questions R1. What is the difference between a host and an end system? List several different types of end systems. Is a Web server an end system? 1. There is no difference. Throughout

More information

What is OPENSKY? Join OPENSKY now as a Content Provider!

What is OPENSKY? Join OPENSKY now as a Content Provider! B r o a d e n y o u r a u d i e n c e! You have software, audio and video content for customers in Europe and elsewhere. Imagine using existing content in new markets, imagine larger audiences and new

More information

Enterprise Broadband Access:

Enterprise Broadband Access: Enterprise Broadband Access: What s Your Choice? Executive Summary Today, broadband access isn t just about making a connection to the Internet; it s about running bandwidth-intensive business and multimedia

More information

4G LTE Wireless Local Loop:

4G LTE Wireless Local Loop: 4G LTE Wireless Local Loop: Meeting the Challenges of a Changing Rural Marketplace NetAmerica Alliance Background Remarkable changes are taking place throughout the rural telecommunications industry. A

More information

EE3414 Multimedia Communication Systems Part I

EE3414 Multimedia Communication Systems Part I EE3414 Multimedia Communication Systems Part I Spring 2003 Lecture 1 Yao Wang Electrical and Computer Engineering Polytechnic University Course Overview A University Sequence Course in Multimedia Communication

More information

High Speed and Voice over I.P September 1, 2005

High Speed and Voice over I.P September 1, 2005 If your property is setup with high-speed Internet access, you can incur big savings on your outgoing calls by using Voice over I.P. services to replace your local telephone and/or long distance service.

More information

Broadband Wireless Access Overview

Broadband Wireless Access Overview Broadband Wireless Access Overview 2-way Wireless Internet Wireless Internet serves both business and residential customers using the same infrastructure 1.0 Background The fast paced demand for high-speed

More information

Broadband Primer. A Guide to High Speed Internet Technologies. Indiana Office of Utility Consumer Counselor

Broadband Primer. A Guide to High Speed Internet Technologies. Indiana Office of Utility Consumer Counselor Broadband Primer A Guide to High Speed Internet Technologies Indiana Office of Utility Consumer Counselor 100 N. Senate Av., Room N501 Indianapolis, IN 46204-2215 www.openlines.in.gov toll-free: 1-888-441-2494

More information

Definitions of the Telecommunication indicators used in the EUROSTAT telecommunications inquiry

Definitions of the Telecommunication indicators used in the EUROSTAT telecommunications inquiry Definitions of the Telecommunication indicators used in the EUROSTAT telecommunications inquiry Table 1 Operators (Unit: number (NBR)) Number of active operators (only active) offering publicly available

More information

James Barr III President and Chief Executive Officer, TDS Telecom. Driving growth through a reputation for

James Barr III President and Chief Executive Officer, TDS Telecom. Driving growth through a reputation for TDS Telecom is a successful wireline communications company because our customers know they can rely on us to provide excellent service and products, today and in the future. Taking advantage of the opportunities

More information

Office of Energy and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy. Comments of the Consumer Federation of America. September 22, 2011

Office of Energy and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy. Comments of the Consumer Federation of America. September 22, 2011 Office of Energy and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Energy Conservation Program for Consumer ) Products and Certain Commercial and ) Industrial Equipment: Determination ) Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-DET-0040

More information

Huawei Answer to ARCEP s public consultation on the challenges tied to new frequency bands for electronic communication services access networks

Huawei Answer to ARCEP s public consultation on the challenges tied to new frequency bands for electronic communication services access networks Huawei Answer to ARCEP s public consultation on the challenges tied to new frequency bands for electronic communication services access networks July 2007-26 September 2007 Question no. 1: What is your

More information

Wideband: Delivering the Connected Life

Wideband: Delivering the Connected Life White Paper Wideband: Delivering the Connected Life Subscribers are increasingly demanding many services to many screens. They want the convenience of having services available anytime, anywhere, and on

More information

Chapter 2 from Tanenbaum - modified. The Physical Layer. Ref: A.S. Tanenbaum, Computer Networks, 4 th Ed., Prentice-Hall, 2003, ISBN: 0-13-038488-7.

Chapter 2 from Tanenbaum - modified. The Physical Layer. Ref: A.S. Tanenbaum, Computer Networks, 4 th Ed., Prentice-Hall, 2003, ISBN: 0-13-038488-7. Chapter 2 from Tanenbaum - modified The Physical Layer Ref: A.S. Tanenbaum, Computer Networks, 4 th Ed., Prentice-Hall, 2003, ISBN: 0-13-038488-7. Data Communications over Wireless and Digital Wired Systems

More information

Speed bump. Acceleration-ramp blues on the information superhighway

Speed bump. Acceleration-ramp blues on the information superhighway Speed bump Acceleration-ramp blues on the information superhighway The signs on the Infobahn say, Full Speed Ahead... but some bumps in the road might send unlucky travelers hurtling off the edge and into

More information

How DSL Works. by Curt Franklin

How DSL Works. by Curt Franklin by Curt Franklin How DSL Works When you connect to the Internet, you might connect through a regular modem, through a localarea network connection in your office, through a cable modem or through a digital

More information

TC 856 Spring 2001 Case No.2 (30 points) Due: Thursday, April 5

TC 856 Spring 2001 Case No.2 (30 points) Due: Thursday, April 5 TC 856 Spring 2001 Case No.2 (30 points) Due: Thursday, April 5 Background In March 2001, Greenville Broadband, Inc. was poised to provide high-speed access to the Internet over its cable lines. Although

More information

Network+ Guide to Networks 6 th Edition. Chapter 7 Wide Area Networks

Network+ Guide to Networks 6 th Edition. Chapter 7 Wide Area Networks Network+ Guide to Networks 6 th Edition Chapter 7 Wide Area Networks Objectives Identify a variety of uses for WANs Explain different WAN topologies, including their advantages and disadvantages Compare

More information

Community Forum Agenda October 2012

Community Forum Agenda October 2012 Community Forum Agenda October 2012 Topic Welcome CEKC/WSUE LTPT Project Scope Forums Survey Data Results LTPT Next Steps Broadband 101/Map Q&A Websites Mapping Survey Complete Survey Close/Next Steps

More information

Broadband Mapping 2013

Broadband Mapping 2013 Broadband Mapping 2013 Broadband Mapping 2013 Summary Publisher: The Danish Business Authority A full Danish edition can be downloaded from the website of the Danish Business Authority: www.erst.dk BROADBAND

More information

Network support for tele-education

Network support for tele-education Network support for tele-education Aiko Pras Centre for Telematics and Information Technology University of Twente (UT) http://wwwtios.cs.utwente.nl/~pras This paper discusses the state of the art in networking,

More information

VoIP Growing Statistics

VoIP Growing Statistics VoIP Growing Statistics We often hear about VoIP services astonishing growth, internet telephony tremendous success and VoIP revolution. Today we will try to be more objective, avoid these emotional epithets

More information

CTS2134 Introduction to Networking. Module 07: Wide Area Networks

CTS2134 Introduction to Networking. Module 07: Wide Area Networks CTS2134 Introduction to Networking Module 07: Wide Area Networks WAN cloud Central Office (CO) Local loop WAN components Demarcation point (demarc) Consumer Premises Equipment (CPE) Channel Service Unit/Data

More information

1. INTRODUCTION. 1.1 Background and Motivation. 1.2 The Digital Television Era

1. INTRODUCTION. 1.1 Background and Motivation. 1.2 The Digital Television Era 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background and Motivation Despite unprecedented growth in the worldwide expansion of the internet, it is television that remains the most global and powerful of media. According to

More information

DSL White Paper. A new Nexans DSL Application Centre to help Telecom operators deploy Triple Play. March 2006 PRESS CONTACTS

DSL White Paper. A new Nexans DSL Application Centre to help Telecom operators deploy Triple Play. March 2006 PRESS CONTACTS DSL White Paper A new Nexans DSL Application Centre to help Telecom operators deploy Triple Play March 2006 PRESS CONTACTS Céline Révillon celine.revillon@nexans.com Tel. : + 33 1 56 69 84 12 Pascale Strubel

More information

The Cable Industry Today: A Quick Look at Where it Stands by Craig M. Clausen and Joseph J. Kestel

The Cable Industry Today: A Quick Look at Where it Stands by Craig M. Clausen and Joseph J. Kestel www.pipelinepub.com Volume 5, Issue 1 The Cable Industry Today: A Quick Look at Where it Stands by Craig M. Clausen and Joseph J. Kestel Following an okay 2005 and a stellar 2006, the cable sector was

More information

Future-Proofing Cable Networks: DOCSIS 3.0 and Provisioning

Future-Proofing Cable Networks: DOCSIS 3.0 and Provisioning Future-Proofing Cable Networks: 3.0 and Provisioning A white paper by Incognito Software August 14, 2009 2009 Incognito Software Inc. All rights reserved. Page 1 of 7 Future-Proofing Cable Networks: 3.0

More information

2014 Vermont Non-residential Telecommunications Survey Report

2014 Vermont Non-residential Telecommunications Survey Report 2014 Vermont Non-residential Telecommunications Survey Report Prepared for the Vermont Public Service Department by the Castleton Polling Institute Castleton College 6 Alumni Drive Castleton, Vermont 05735

More information

CONSIDERATIONS FOR DSL DEPLOYMENT INITIATIVES The following checklist will help you in your DSL planning process:

CONSIDERATIONS FOR DSL DEPLOYMENT INITIATIVES The following checklist will help you in your DSL planning process: Chapter 8 SOURCEBOOK IN REVIEW IN CLOSING The Sourcebook identified the DSL deployment opportunities available today. DSL-based services, emerging business-class applications, requirements and benefits

More information

Satellite Services for Internet Access in Rural Areas 1

Satellite Services for Internet Access in Rural Areas 1 Satellite Services for Internet Access in Rural Areas 1 Hans Kruse McClure School of Communication Systems Management Ohio University kruse@ohiou.edu Executive Summary This report examines the use of direct

More information

Broadband What is it?

Broadband What is it? What is it? FCC Definition 200 kbps is defined as Internet Access 200 kbps in at least one direction is defined as Hi Speed Access (1) 200 kbps in both directions is defined as Advanced Services (1) A

More information

COMPUTERS ARE YOUR FUTURE CHAPTER 8 WIRED & WIRELESS COMMUNICATION

COMPUTERS ARE YOUR FUTURE CHAPTER 8 WIRED & WIRELESS COMMUNICATION COMPUTERS ARE YOUR FUTURE CHAPTER 8 WIRED & WIRELESS COMMUNICATION Answers to End-of-Chapter Questions Matching g 1. whiteboard i 2. sending device o 3. streaming j 4. WiFi m 5. Webcam d 6. data transfer

More information

TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS ADVISORY COMMITTEE TSAC WORKING GROUP ON NEW STANDARDS AND POLICY (NSP)

TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS ADVISORY COMMITTEE TSAC WORKING GROUP ON NEW STANDARDS AND POLICY (NSP) TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS ADVISORY COMMITTEE TSAC WORKING GROUP ON NEW STANDARDS AND POLICY (NSP) Introduction Development of Digital Subscriber Line (DSL) Technology This paper introduces the development

More information

Canopy Wireless Internet Platform Frequently Asked Questions. August, 9 2002

Canopy Wireless Internet Platform Frequently Asked Questions. August, 9 2002 Canopy Wireless Internet Platform Frequently Asked Questions August, 9 2002 Frequently Asked Questions Technology Q: What is a Canopy system? A: A Canopy system is based on wireless broadband technology

More information

Economic Research & Analysis. CostQuest Associates (CQA) Bandwidth Assessment Tool Glossary of Terms: Words & Acronyms June 2014

Economic Research & Analysis. CostQuest Associates (CQA) Bandwidth Assessment Tool Glossary of Terms: Words & Acronyms June 2014 CostQuest Associates (CQA) Economic Research & Analysis Bandwidth Assessment Tool Glossary of Terms: Words & Acronyms June 2014 CostQuest Associates (CQA) Economic Research & Analysis For further information

More information

ASSESSING HIGH-SPEED INTERNET ACCESS IN THE STATE OF IOWA: SIXTH ASSESSMENT

ASSESSING HIGH-SPEED INTERNET ACCESS IN THE STATE OF IOWA: SIXTH ASSESSMENT ASSESSING HIGH-SPEED INTERNET ACCESS IN THE STATE OF IOWA: SIXTH ASSESSMENT A Report of the Iowa Utilities Board Utilities Board: John Norris (Chairman) Krista K. Tanner Darrell Hanson IUB Project Manager

More information

Harnessing The Internet s Multimedia Potential

Harnessing The Internet s Multimedia Potential Harnessing The Internet s Multimedia Potential by: S. Ann Earon, Ph.D. President, Telemanagement Resources International Inc. (TRI) Manahawkin, New Jersey The current state of the multimedia market is

More information

Broadband Wireless Access Technologies and Applications

Broadband Wireless Access Technologies and Applications Broadband Wireless Access Technologies and Applications Dr. Patrick Perini Emerging Technologies September 6, 2000 International Symposium pperini@qwest.com on Advanced Radio Technologies 1 Agenda The

More information

Residential Broadband: Technologies for High-Speed Access To Homes

Residential Broadband: Technologies for High-Speed Access To Homes Residential Broadband: Technologies for High-Speed Access To Homes The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210-1277 1277 http://www.cse.ohio-state.edu/~jain/ 1 Overview 56 kbps Modems, ISDN ADSL, VDSL

More information

FTTH Progress and Impact. Understanding the FTTH landscape to enable better business decisions

FTTH Progress and Impact. Understanding the FTTH landscape to enable better business decisions FTTH Progress and Impact Understanding the FTTH landscape to enable better business decisions Informational Objectives For Session Better FTTH planning The drivers for FTTH The direction of FTTH Better

More information

Public Network. 1. Relatively long physical distance 2. Requiring a service provider (carrier) Branch Office. Home. Private Network.

Public Network. 1. Relatively long physical distance 2. Requiring a service provider (carrier) Branch Office. Home. Private Network. Introduction to LAN TDC 363 Week 4 Connecting LAN to WAN Book: Chapter 7 1 Outline Wide Area Network (WAN): definition WAN Topologies Choices of WAN technologies Dial-up ISDN T1 Frame Relay DSL Remote

More information

Point Topic s Broadband Operators and Tariffs

Point Topic s Broadband Operators and Tariffs 1 Point Topic s Broadband Operators and Tariffs Broadband tariff benchmarks: Q1 2013 May 2013 Point Topic Ltd 73 Farringdon Road London EC1M 3JQ, UK Tel. +44 (0) 20 3301 3305 Email tariffs@point-topic.com

More information

Traffic Forecasting Models for the Incumbent Based on New Drivers in the Market

Traffic Forecasting Models for the Incumbent Based on New Drivers in the Market Traffic Forecasting Models for the Incumbent Based on New Drivers in the Market KJELL STORDAHL Kjell Stordahl (58) received his M.S. in statistics from Oslo University in 1972. He worked with Telenor R&D

More information

Traffic forecast models for the transport network

Traffic forecast models for the transport network Traffic forecast models for the transport network Kjell Stordahl Telenor Network, St Olavs plass PO Box 6701, N-0130 Oslo, Norway Phone: + 47 23 250535, + 47 900 99 820, Fax: + 47 23 250505, E-mail: kjell.stordahl@telenor.com

More information

Internet Access Services: Status as of December 31, 2012

Internet Access Services: Status as of December 31, 2012 Internet Access Services: Status as of December 31, 2012 Industry Analysis and Technology Division Wireline Competition Bureau December 2013 This report is available for reference in the FCC s Reference

More information

Current access technologies overview

Current access technologies overview White Paper Current access technologies overview In this paper, we explore six basic technology choices for deploying broadband services to the end customer xdsl, DOCSIS, G.fast, satellite, wireless and

More information

German Cable Market 2010

German Cable Market 2010 Executive Summary By 2010, revenues generated by German cable operators will increase from the current 2.3 billion to 3.4 billion. Growth triggers are digital Pay TV, the Internet and telephony. Prerequisite

More information

Emerging Wireless Technologies

Emerging Wireless Technologies Emerging Wireless Technologies QCHAT The Future of Push-to-Talk Communications Foreword: The Public Safety Wireless Network (PSWN) Program is conducting an ongoing assessment of advancements in the wireless

More information

why fixed.plan? We only connect to Tier 1 partners, including Openreach, BT and Talk Talk Business, ensuring a robust and reliable service.

why fixed.plan? We only connect to Tier 1 partners, including Openreach, BT and Talk Talk Business, ensuring a robust and reliable service. fixed.plan Operating directly with tier 1 suppliers including Openreach, BT and TalkTalk Business plan com provides you with access to the biggest and most reliable telecommunications networks in the UK.

More information

Telecommunications, Networks, and Wireless Computing

Telecommunications, Networks, and Wireless Computing Objectives Telecommunications, Networks, and Wireless Computing 1. What are the features of a contemporary corporate telecommunications system? On what major technology developments are they based? 2.

More information