ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN Town of Newmarket

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1 Town of Newmarket December 23, 2014

2 1 Acknowledgements The development of the Town of Newmarket s first Asset Management Plan was based on the contributions of many Town staff. This acknowledgement is to thank all who contributed to the Plan and to recognize the various municipal departments for their assistance and collaboration along the way. Strategic Leadership Team Bob Shelton, Chief Administrative Officer Anita Moore, Commissioner, Corporate Services Peter Noehammer Commissioner, Development and Infrastructure Services Ian McDougall, Commissioner, Community Services Steering Group Membership Peter Noehammer (Strategic Leadership Team Sponsor), Commissioner, Development and Infrastructure Services Chris Kalimootoo, Director, Public Works Services Mike Mayes, Director, Financial Services Rachel Prudhomme, Director, Engineering Services Working Group Membership Mike Mayes (Project Lead-Operational Leadership Team), Director, Financial Services Cindy Wackett, Corporate Project Consultant, Strategic Initiatives Lisa Ellis, Business Performance Coordinator, Development and Infrastructure Services Key Stakeholder Interviews Steve Hill, Database Administrator, Engineering Services Gord MacMillan, Manager, Capital Projects, Engineering Services Meredith Goodwin, Manager, Special Projects, Engineering Services Rod Smith, Manager, Operations, Public Works Services Bill Wilson, Manager, Water/Wastewater, Public Works Services Rick Bingham, Manager, Engineering Services Staff Resources Kevin Yaraskavitch, MFOA Intern Ted Horton, AMTCO Intern Nancy Herckimer, Administrative Assistant, Financial Services Support Departments Corporate Communications Information Technology - GIS

3 2 Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY What we provide What we will do What It Will Cost? Plan Life Next Steps... 8 INTRODUCTION Importance of Infrastructure Recent Regulatory Changes General Municipal Asset Replacement Practices Public Expectations for Municipal Services Asset Management Plan Relationship to Strategic Plan Asset Management Plan Relationship to other Plans & Programs Purpose of the Asset Management Plan Infrastructure Assets Timeframe Review Timeframe and Updates Development of the Plan Limitations in Plan Development Methodology Timelines Infrastructure Replacement Triggers Desired Service Levels Continuing Evaluation and Improvement Software Considerations...19 STATE OF LOCAL INFRASTRUCTURE Background Historic Costs Replacement Cost Overall Evaluation Roads Roads Needs Study (RNS) Funding Requirements Bridges and Culverts...27

4 Funding Requirements Water System Database Funding Requirements Wastewater System Database Funding Requirements Updates of Values and Condition of Assets Data Verification Policy Condition Assessment Policy Conclusion...35 DESIRED LEVELS OF SERVICE Strategic and Corporate Goals Legislative Requirements Best Practices and Standards Key Performance Indicators Road and Bridge Services Water Services Wastewater Timeframes to Achieve Targets External Trends and Issues Affecting Service Levels Performance...41 ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY Objective Existing Asset Management Activities Current Asset Management Practices for Roads, Bridges and Culverts Current Asset Management Practices for Water Current Asset Management Practices for Wastewater System Current Decision Making Process Current Asset Management Practices for Roads, Bridges and Culverts Current Asset Management Practices for Water Current Asset Management Practices for Wastewater Future Asset Management Activities Procurement Methodologies Evaluation of Risks Associated with the Plan and Strategy...55

5 4 Financing Strategy Context Operating and Capital Budgeting Policy Guidelines for the Use of Reserves and Reserve Funds Asset Replacement Fund Capital Financing Sustainability Strategy (CFSS) Roads Needs Study (RNS) General Position Funding Objective Expenditures Non-infrastructure Solutions Maintenance Activities Disposal Activities Expansion Activities Funding Grants Development Charges (DC s) Dedicated Revenues Internal Cost Savings Reserves and Reserve Funds Property Taxes and Utility Rates Debt Financing Funding Gap and Alternative Scenarios Tax-Supported Rate-Supported...71 LIST OF APPENDICES Appendix A - Road Surfaces Appendix B - Road Bases Appendix C - Bridges Appendix D - Culverts Appendix E - Watermains Appendix F - Wastewater Sewers

6 5 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1: Structure and Reporting Relationships Figure 2: Value of Assets by Remaining Useful Life Figure 3: Internal Information Flow of Newmarket s Capital Assets Figure 4: Newmarket s Target Capital Asset Information Flow Structure Figure 5: Interactions for Road and Bridge Assets Figure 6: Interactions for Water and Wastewater System Assets Figure 7: Call Volume Pertaining to Assets Compared to Population, Figure 8: Percent of Paved Lane Kilometres Exhibiting a Good to Very Good Rating Figure 9: Number of wastewater sewer backups per 100 kilometres of wastewater main in a year Figure 10: Number of water main breaks per 100 kilometers of water main in a year Figure 11: Contingency Analysis Figure 12: Contingency Analysis Cont'd Figure 13: Newmarket s Average Capital Expenditure Breakdown

7 6 LIST OF TABLES Table 1: Infrastructure Assets Table 2: Infrastructure Replacement Triggers Table 3: Tangible Capital Assets, December 31, Table 4: Historic vs. Replacement Cost Table 5: Estimated Current Replacement Costs Table 6: Actual Average Unit Replacement Costs incurred by the Town Table 7: Consumption Ratios Table 8: Length of Linear Assets Reported in MPMP Table 9: Roads Risk Assessment (km. of road by condition and use) Table 10: Projected Annual Funding up to Table 11: Area of Linear Assets Reported in MPMP Table 12: Bridges and Culverts - Annual Funding Requirements Table 13: Length of Linear Water Assets Reported in MPMP Table 14: Risk Assessment of Newmarket s Water System Table 15: Length of Linear Assets Reported in MPMP Table 16: Risk Assessment of Newmarket s Wastewater System Table 17: Priority of Funding Sources Table 18: Major Expenditures 2011 to Table 19: Annual and Project Roads Maintenance Costs 2011 to Table 20: Asset Replacement Activities 2011 to Table 21: Average Annual Asset Replacement Requirements Table 22: Summary of Historic and Projected Funding Table 23: Projected ARF requirements for Roads (including bridges and culverts) Table 24: Projected ARF requirements for Road-related infrastructure funded from the Roads ARF Table 25: Adjusted Projected ARF balance for Roads Table 26: Projected ARF requirements for the Water System Table 27: Projected ARF balance for the Water System Table 28: Projected ARF requirements for the Wastewater System Table 29: Projected ARF balance for the Wastewater System... 74

8 7 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1.1 What we provide The initial emplacement, maintenance and eventual replacement of infrastructure has always been one of the most important responsibilities of a municipality. The asset pool of local governments is quite different to that of most large businesses. It comprises of a diverse array of asset types, which perform a critical function for thousands of residents and workers. The total value of the assets is immense. In recent years, asset management has been linked to fiscal sustainability The Town of Newmarket is responsible for a variety of capital assets. These include: Linear infrastructure such as roads, bridges, sidewalks, trails, water and wastewater and storm sewers. Buildings including recreation centres, fire halls, pumping stations, library, operations centre and Town hall. Land improvements such as sports fields, parking lots and stormwater management (SWM) ponds. Vehicles and equipment including fire trucks, ploughs, ice resurfacers and mowers. The asset classes addressed in this Plan include: 1. Roads. 2. Bridges and Culverts. 3. Water System: watermains and valves. 4. Wastewater System: wastewater sewers, manhole covers and pumping stations. 1.2 What we will do The Town of Newmarket will use this Asset Management Plan (AMP) to help maintain its infrastructure and provide services to the community. This Asset Management Plan: Facilitates efficiency and effectiveness for the capital program and related operating costs. Includes consideration of risk management, service levels, and condition assessments to inform capital investments. And has a financing strategy to make it all happen.

9 8 Newmarket s Asset Management Plan (AMP) fulfills the provincial requirements outlined in the Building Together Guide for Municipal Asset Management Plans published by the Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure. 1.3 What It Will Cost? Over the next 10 years, Newmarket will require $64.7 million in funding to replace the existing assets included in this Pan. The breakdown of which is as follows: $33.0 million in funding for the road system. $6.0 million in funding for bridges and culverts. $6.7 million to fund the water system. $19.0 million to fund the wastewater system. Please note that these values are in current dollars and do not reflect construction price increases over the next 10 years. Over that time period, the total cost could escalate by about 50%. 1.4 Plan Life This plan covers 10 years of asset maintenance. However, the plan is only as useful if the information contained in it is current. Therefore, the Plan will be updated on an annual basis to include revisions of the asset inventory, replacement costs, expected revenues, and procedural and policy changes. Finally, the updates should reflect other changes to the supporting data and assumptions that form the basis to the plan. Considering the timing of the annual audit, budget and Roads Need Study, an annual update could be provided to Council along with the preliminary draft budget. A more thorough re-examination of the plan could be undertaken with each new term of Council, perhaps in their second year. 1.5 Next Steps Recommendations: 1. Address the recommendations from Hemson s Capital Financing Sustainability Strategy that have not been separately identified, such as: a. Move to condition-based asset management (see Section 2: Introduction). b. Create asset management report cards (see Section 4: Desired Levels of Service). c. Review and update the Town s Corproate Debt Policy (see Section 6: Financing Strategy). 2. Communicate the Asset Management Plan to the community (see Section 4: Desired Levels of Service).

10 9 3. Consolidate infrastructure inventory databases (see Section 3: State of Local Infrastructure). 4. Update the accounting for Tangible Capital Assets on the Financial Statements. 5. Schedule annual updates of the plan (see Section 2: Introduction). 6. Schedule a re-examination of the plan with each term of Council (see Section 2: Introduction). 7. Consult with Council and the Community to further develop Desired Levels of Service (see Section 4: Desired Levels of Service). 8. Expand the Asset Management Plan to other asset classes, beyond 10 years, and align more with operational and maintenance data (see Section 6: Financing Strategy). 9. Create an Asset Management function and determine where it fits in the organizational structure. 10. Investigate, purchase and implement Asset Management software (see Section 2: Introduction).

11 10 INTRODUCTION Newmarket s Asset Management Plan (AMP) fulfills the provincial requirements outlined in the Building Together Guide for Municipal Asset Management Plans published by the Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure. The Plan contains the following six key sections: 1. Executive Summary. 2. Introduction. 3. State of the Local Infrastructure. 4. Desired Levels of Service. 5. Asset Management Strategy. 6. Financing Strategy. The four asset classes addressed in this Plan include: 1. Roads. 2. Bridges & Culverts. 3. Water System. 4. Wastewater System. Additional asset classes will be included in future iterations of the AMP. This Asset Management Plan will serve Newmarket as a strategic, planning, and financial management document to ensure that Newmarket is well-equipped and managed in meeting existing and future operational demands and desired levels of service. It will guide Newmarket s processes to reflect sound and accountable governance of its municipal infrastructure. At the strategic level, Section 3: State of the Local Infrastructure of this document outlines current and future challenges to be addressed to sustainably maintain municipal infrastructure services for the long-term using a lifecycle approach. The Plan also identifies desired levels of service in Section 4 for each asset class through the use of key performance indicators. At the practical level, Section 5: Asset Management Strategy identifies current and future strategies to manage the Town s asset base with the goal of maintaining the assets in an acceptable condition. Recognizing that asset management is evolving to a service based focus that optimizes asset lifecycle costs considering quantifiable risk and level of service, the Town will develop a more fulsome corporate asset management program and strategy in At the financial level, Section 6: Financing Strategy depicts how the Town intends to implement a financial strategy which indicates how the Town will pay for the Plan and include details on expenditures, revenue sources and projections, and possible solutions for any funding gaps. 2.1 Importance of Infrastructure The Town is responsible for a diverse array of capital assets. The initial construction and/or commissioning of infrastructure, its maintenance, and eventual replacement, has

12 11 always been among the most important responsibilities of a municipality. The asset pool of local governments is quite different to that of most large, private sector businesses. It is comprised of asset types which perform critical functions for thousands of residents, workers and visitors, and forms part of a higher order of systems, such as the transportation, water, wastewater and storm water networks. The total value of these assets is significant. Since governments have long held a role of administering assets, the formal concept of asset management is not new; however, the linking of asset management to fiscal sustainability principles has become more prevalent in recent years. The capital assets Town of Newmarket is responsible for include, but are not limited to the following: Linear infrastructure: o Roads. o Bridges. o Sidewalks. o Trails. o Watermains. o Wastewater sewers. o Storm water sewers. Buildings: o Recreation centres. o Fire halls. o Library. o Operations centre. o Museum. o Arts and culture centre. o Administrative offices. Fields and Parks: o Sports fields. o Parks and playgrounds. o Equipment and furniture. o Outdoor ice rinks and pools. o Parking lots. o Stormwater management ponds. Fleet Vehicles and Equipment: o Automobiles, such as by-law enforcement vehicles. o Trucks, such as fire trucks and dump trucks. o Operational trucks and specialized equipment. o Ice re-surfacers. o Mowers. Although the long-range planning of replacement and growth related capital is not new, there are three important factors that have arisen recently which contribute to the heightened need for a comprehensive, capital financing strategy as noted in the following three sub-sections:

13 Recent Regulatory Changes Over the last decade, important regulatory changes have occurred in Ontario that have increased the need for a municipality s emphasis on capital planning. Firstly, starting in 2007, the Public Sector Accounting Board (PSAB 3150) introduced new accounting standards for tangible capital assets owned by governments in Canada. Accrual accounting was required for government services and many capital assets needed to be depreciated for the purposes of financial reporting. Although acquisition and depreciation costs are not ideal for financial planning, PSAB 3150 helped municipalities to better understand the magnitude of asset funding gaps. Secondly, municipalities need to prepare asset management plans (AMPs) as a requirement for certain grant applications, such as the Ontario Community Infrastructure Fund. In 2012, the Ontario Ministry of Infrastructure released the Building Together: Guide for Municipal Asset Management Plans, a how-to guide to assist municipalities in preparing an AMP. Municipalities have been given discretion by the Ministry in terms of the precise form of their asset management plan. However, four key components must be included: an analysis of existing infrastructure, a description of the desired level of service, an asset management strategy, and a financing strategy. This Plan has all four components General Municipal Asset Replacement Practices The Town of Newmarket, like many other Greater Toronto Area (GTA) municipalities, experienced its largest growth during the 1980 s and 1990 s. During this period, a large percentage of the capital investment made by GTA municipalities went into development-related assets since the bulk of the existing asset base was relatively new and in good condition and therefore did not need replacing. More recently however, municipalities like Newmarket have started to see the need for more infrastructure replacements for water, wastewater and buildings in the older village areas of their communities. Additionally, many of the roads that were built during the peak growth period are now over 30 years old and are getting closer to the end of their calculated useful lives. Older municipalities such as Toronto, Ottawa and Hamilton are further along the asset age curve and are experiencing cases where several important assets need to be replaced concurrently. For example, the Toronto Subway signalization and track beds require concurrent replacement, causing many lost hours of transit service and delays for residents. This experience in older cities has drawn attention to the situation that will eventually arise in many York, Peel, and Halton Region municipalities unless measures are taken to proactively address the situation. It is for this reason that the Town has begun to address the issue through the establishment of the Asset Replacement Fund (ARF) and other policies Public Expectations for Municipal Services Newmarket, like many municipalities in the GTA, delivers a consistently high level of service to its residents and businesses. These services depend to a large degree on the Town s complex range of assets, which for many years it has managed without major failures, during a period when technology was less advanced and capital reserve funding activities were minimal. The challenge facing municipalities today is to convince

14 13 taxpayers that despite the fact that services are still running well, more funding may be required than in the past. Due to the expectation of high performance levels and the greater awareness of health, safety and environmental issues, the public generally has a low tolerance for service disruptions. This expectation makes proactively addressing capital deficiencies essential on both technical and political grounds to avoid major service failures. Newmarket s prosperity, economic development, competitiveness, image, and overall quality of life are inherently and explicitly tied to the performance of its infrastructure. 2.2 Asset Management Plan Relationship to Strategic Plan Newmarket s Strategic Plan includes vision and mission statements, as well as key organizational areas of focus. Newmarket has a vision to be a community Well beyond the ordinary. This vision is complemented by the employee mission of making Newmarket even better. Together these elements provide the visionary framework for an AMP through Town Council`s focus on making Newmarket a well-equipped and managed corporation. Newmarket s AMP aligns with the Town s Strategic Plan, providing direction for the management of its assets. The Strategic Plan also provides direction on how municipal tax dollars and revenues are invested into the future through the Asset Replacement Fund. 2.3 Asset Management Plan Relationship to other Plans & Programs Newmarket s AMP will be a key component of the municipality s strategic planning process, linking with multiple other corporate plans and documents. Six examples are listed below: 1. Official Plan the AMP will influence land use policy directions in the Town s Official Plan and Secondary Plan for long-term growth and development as provided through coordination with the budget process. 2. Long Term Financial Plan the Town retained the services of Hemson Consulting to prepare a Capital Financing Sustainability Strategy (CFSS). The CFSS forms the basis for the AMP, which will in turn, influence the further development of a long-term financial plan, financial forecasts, and multi-year budgeting for the Town. 3. Roads Needs Study the inventory and condition appraisal of the Town s road network, bridges, major culverts, guide rail installations, trails, and paths over the next 10 years. The current year s appraisals consist of 25% of the Town s road and 100% of the Town s bridges, culverts, guiderail, paths, and trails. The Town retained the services of the MMM Group Limited (MMM) in 2013 to carry out the study. 4. By-laws, Standards, and Policies the AMP will influence policies and by-laws related to infrastructure management practices and standards. 5. Regulations the AMP must recognize and abide by industry and senior government regulations.

15 14 6. Business Plans the service levels, policies, processes, and budgets defined in the AMP will be incorporated into business plans as budgets, management strategies, and performance measures. Updates to existing and future municipal plans and programs having a direct or indirect impact on municipal assets, including municipal properties and facilities should reference the Town s AMP and consider the impact on capital planning and future projections. 2.4 Purpose of the Asset Management Plan The purpose of the Town s Asset Management Plan is threefold: 1. To be a strategic work plan for corporate capital assets which reflects the municipality s need for planning, building, operating, maintaining and financing its infrastructure in a sustainable way. 2. To fulfill provincial requirements, enabling the Town to apply for capital funding grants such as the provincial Gas Tax allocation and Ontario Community Infrastructure Fund (OCIF). 3. To make recommendations for further work towards a more robust corporate asset management system. 2.5 Infrastructure Assets The following chart lists the infrastructure assets included in this Asset Management Plan. Table 1: Infrastructure Assets Historic Cost Accumulated Net Book Amortization Value Roads $133,847,794 $61,888,646 $71,959,148 Bridges and Culverts 5,835,380 2,070,523 3,764,857 Water System 67,592,078 26,374,212 41,217,866 Wastewater System 87,370,269 34,469,318 52,900,951 SUBTOTAL $294,645,521 $124,802,699 $169,842,822 Other Assets 371,103, ,787, ,316,618 TOTAL $665,749,356 $237,589,916 $428,159,440

16 Timeframe The Plan is based on data as of December 31, 2013 and covers the 10 year period from 2014 to Review Timeframe and Updates In subsequent updates to this AMP, the actual project implementation method will be reviewed and measured through established performance metrics to quantify whether the desired level of service is achieved or achievable for each infrastructure class. If shortfalls in performance are observed, these will be discussed and alternate financial models or service level target adjustments will be presented. The Plan should be updated on an annual basis to include additions to the asset inventory, to update projected replacement costs and expected revenues, procedural and policy changes, and to reflect other changes to the supporting data and assumptions that form the basis of this Plan. Considering the timing of the annual audit, budget and Roads Need Study, an annual update is recommended to be provided to Council, along with the preliminary draft budget. A more thorough re-examination of the plan is recommended to be undertaken with each new term of Council, perhaps in their second year. RECOMMENDATIONS: Schedule annual updates of the plan. (5) Schedule a re-examination of the plan with each term of Council. (6) 2.8 Development of the Plan This Asset Management Plan has been developed with the contributions from key staff and reference documents. Under the direction of the Chief Administrative Officer, the Town s first AMP has been implemented through an AMP Task Force comprised of a senior level staff Steering Group and Working Group. The Steering Group and Working Group were represented by the Development & Infrastructure Services and Corporate Services Commissions, and the Office of the CAO. The Task Force was comprised of management and non-management staff under the following structure and reporting relationships.

17 16 Figure 1: Structure and Reporting Relationships Limitations in Plan Development The Town s desire for having an Asset Management Plan in place by the end of 2014 which satisfied the provincial guidelines in Building Together: Guide for Municipal Asset Management Plans proposed challenges for staff and staffing resources amongst the Town s current priorities. Consequently, a decision was made to prepare a Plan containing the essential components over the short term. In the development of the Plan, staff determined all key stakeholders of information and assessed current available data versus the extended time and effort required to collect data. Upon establishing these basics (time limitations and data availability), the Task Force proceeded to develop the Plan, deferring additional asset classes to future AMP updates.

18 Methodology The general approach to the development of an Asset Management Plan for the Town was to employ minimal resources and capitalize on the existing work being done in order to prioritize infrastructure investment in the areas of roads, bridges and culverts, water, and wastewater for a 10 year period. Understanding that there may be some opportunities for further work, the Working Group set forth to develop terms of reference for the Asset Management Plan Task Force. These terms defined the mandate, scope of work, governance structure, and staff, as well as other resources available in order to build an initial Asset Management Plan Timelines Development of a comprehensive AMP commenced in the fall of The initial AMP Task Force meeting was held on October 6, Working Group meetings were held on a weekly basis, reported back to the Steering Group biweekly, and worked toward having a draft Asset Management Plan to present to the Strategic Leadership and Operational Leadership Teams by December During the data collection stage, key staff were interviewed to determine information availability on asset classes, data type, ownership of data, etc. The framework for the plan was based on the Ministry of Infrastructure`s Building Together: Guide for Municipal Asset Management Plans, as well as a review of published municipal asset management plans Infrastructure Replacement Triggers There are indicators and metrics for the replacement of infrastructure assets. They may predict immanent failure or some other trigger. This AMP was developed with strong reliance on the Town s Roads Needs Study (RNS) for data on roads, bridges and culverts. The RNS uses a condition-based assessment, which is the preferred methodology; unfortunately, it does not extend to For that year, and for the water and wastewater systems, the Capital Financing Sustainability Strategy was used. It s methodology was age-based, which is generally considered to be not as reliable. The need to employ and consolidate both of these methodologies has resulted in some minor anomalies in the forecasts, but do to materially affect the results. Recommendation: Move to condition-based asset management The following chart identifies a theoretical basis for developing criteria to assess the need for asset replacement.

19 18 Table 2: Infrastructure Replacement Triggers State of Good Repair Health and Safety Capacity and Efficiency Intergration and Impact Professional Judgement Roads Roads Needs Study Roads Needs Study Bridges and Structures Ontario Structure Inspection Manual Ontario Structure Inspection Manual Water Breaks, Core Samples Adverse Water Quality Incidents Engineering Standards and Financial Analysis Community Effect Case by Case Wastewater Backups Sink Holes State of Good Repair (SoGR) and Health & Safety are general indicators or predictors of a system s condition, or its signs of failure, and are used for the Municipal Performance Measurement Program (MPMP). Health & Safety indicators tend to be very low frequency (e.g. boil water advisory) to be useful. Failure in one of these factors indicates that the infrastructure can no longer do the job it was designed for. The SoGR/MPMP will be used as the main initial AMP metrics, or key performance indicators. Assets can also be replaced for capacity or efficiency reasons, or reducing risk. Although an asset may still be performing its intended function, there are other drivers that would suggest maintenance or replacement of the asset. For example, new development may require additional capacity in watermains and wastewater sewers to accommodate a development project resulting in increased population density. On the other hand, downsizing capacity may be beneficial should there be a decline in use based on a lower density redevelopment. Infrastructure replacements may also be undertaken for efficiency reasons to reduce the risk of ongoing or higher maintenance costs. In this case, asset replacement decisions are based on fiscal responsibility and a result of financial operational necessity to efficiently manage the Town s capital assets. Although capacity and efficiency may initiate asset replacement, neither of these will be covered extensively in this Plan. The next criteria used to assist with prioritizing infrastructure investment, build upon the findings from above include: integration and impact, and professional judgement. Integration refers to the consideration that is given to adjacent assets both within and outside of the same class/system. Impact is the adjustment of priorities by staff based on the quantum of use. High usage could either increase an item`s priority or defer its maintenance or replacement. And finally, professional judgement is applied to all of the above factors, as intangibles may be determining factors as well Desired Service Levels Establishing desired levels of service cannot be fully completed within the project s timeframe and shall be deferred to a subsequent iteration of the AMP. Work has

20 19 commenced on desired service levels as identified by the Town s Capital Financing Sustainability Strategy consultant, however a thorough review is required to ensure the recommended service levels are appropriate for the community. As such, further consultation and public engagement should be undertaken upon receipt of Council direction in order to establish desired service levels. As part of the development of this Plan, consideration was given to using condition assessments as a measurement of service levels. However, staff experts consulted advised that condition assessments alone should not be relied upon to establish existing service levels or desired levels of services. Effective condition assessments can assist with improved planning, risk management and compliance yet have shortfalls where health and safety, capacity and efficiency, integration and impact, and professional judgement should be applied in addition to a condition assessment (refer to Table 2: Criteria for Prioritizing Asset Replacement) Continuing Evaluation and Improvement As a continuous improvement activity, the AMP will be evaluated and improved on a regular basis, including the review of the short-term actions and implementation timeframe. In subsequent updates to this AMP, actual project implementation will be reviewed and measured through the established performance metrics to quantify whether the desired level of service is achieved or achievable for each infrastructure asset class. If shortfalls in performance are observed, these will be discussed and alternate financial models or service level target adjustments will be presented for consideration. The Plan should be reviewed and updated on an annual basis to include additions to the asset inventory, to update projected replacement costs and expected revenues, to include procedural and policy changes, and to reflect other changes to the supporting data and assumptions that form the basis to the Plan. Considering the timing of the annual audit, budget process and Roads Need Study, an annual update could be provided to Council to coincide with the preliminary draft budget. As identified in Section 2.7 Review Timeframe and Updates, a comprehensive review of the plan should be undertaken with each new term of Council, preferably in the second year of the term Software Considerations Current software (Microsoft Excel and ArcView GIS) will continue to be used for all data collection, analysis, lifecycle projections, and budget models. It is recognized that there are software solutions that may result in further efficiency and effectiveness gains for managing the Town s capital assets. This was also identified in Hemson s Capital Financing Sustainability Strategy as some preliminary work was conducted. However, given the timeframe and the scope of this Plan, software recommendations will be deferred for future consideration and analysis.

21 20 RECOMMENDATION: Investigate, purchase and implement Asset Management. (1a)

22 21 STATE OF LOCAL INFRASTRUCTURE 3.1 Background The following seven definitions will assist in understanding the terminology used with reference to local infrastructure: Asset - anything tangible and of value owned or controlled by a corporation or individual. Capital Asset - infrastructure, land, buildings, machinery, equipment and other items that provide benefits to the community for several years. Tangible Capital Asset (TCA) capital assets as defined for financial reporting purposes. Infrastructure - capital assets that deliver essential public service to support community business, tourism and residential activities. (e.g. roads, bridges and culverts, water and wastewater systems). Local Infrastructure - infrastructure which is owned, operated and maintained by the local municipality. For the purposes of this Plan, the local municipality is the Town of Newmarket. This distinguishes local infrastructure from the upper tier levels of government infrastructure, including the Regional Municipality of York, Province of Ontario, and the Government of Canada. Public Sector Accounting Board (PSAB) - an independent body with the authority to set standards for the public sector, including all levels of government, agencies, boards and commissions. PS3150 the PSAB accounting standards that govern the reporting of Tangible Capital Assets Historic Costs In 2009, all municipalities were required to comply with PS3150 for the accounting and financial reporting of tangible capital assets. This was a huge undertaking as previously fund accounting entailed expensing these assets as they were purchased or built. Two significant challenges experienced were 1) the compilation of an asset inventory; and 2) the determination of historic costs for the tangible capital assets. At that time, it was recognized that many of these assets had lives that extended decades and that their cost records no longer existed. The starting points for the Town s infrastructure inventory and values, like most municipalities, were the TCA records. A TCA Policy was developed and approved by Council. The Policy established the methodology for costing, standard life spans, and thresholds all for accounting purposes. The thresholds established $40,000 as the minimum value for a Tangible Capital Asset 1. Consequently, anything below that value is expensed. 1 There is an exception for vehicles and equipment for which the threshold is $20,000.

23 22 The following table provides a breakdown of the Town s most current TCA information by class. PS3150 requires that Tangible Capital Assets be recorded at their historical cost the cost at which they were purchased or constructed, and not their current value or replacement cost. The column titled Accumulated Amortization refers to the total amount of the cost which has been expensed. This is an even allocation of the historic cost over the life cycle of the asset, in accordance with Town s TCA Policy. In common terms, this is often referred to as depreciation. The Net Book Value column is the data derived from the net of the two amounts the remaining amount to be amortized. Table 3: Tangible Capital Assets, December 31, 2013 Historic Cost Accumulated Amortization Net Book Value Roads $133,847,794 $61,888,646 $71,959,148 Bridges and Culverts 5,835,380 2,070,523 3,764,857 Water System 67,592,078 26,374,212 41,217,866 Wastewater System 87,370,269 34,469,318 52,900,951 SUBTOTAL $294,645,521 $124,802,699 $169,842,822 Land $ 90,730,708 - $ 90,730,708 Buildings 107,122,803 31,112,262 76,010,541 Storm Sewers 63,919,808 24,838,233 39,081,575 Land Improvements 32,894,240 17,857,493 15,036,747 Trails and Walkways 20,873,906 8,437,870 12,436,036 Sidewalks 15,783,767 10,744,449 5,039,318 Machinery and Equipment 10,793,839 6,297,771 4,496,068 Vehicles 7,299,678 3,067,375 4,232,303 Library Collections 2,569,565 1,446,868 1,122,697 Other Assets 19,115,521 8,984,896 10,130,625 Subtotal $371,103,835 $112,787,217 $258,316,618 TOTAL $665,749,356 $237,589,916 $428,159,440 Source: Town of Newmarket s 2013 financial statements and supporting analyses The asset classes covered by this Plan represent 44% of the costs and 40% of the net book value of the Town s tangible capital assets Replacement Cost While historic (TCA) costs are required for financial statement purposes, they have limited value in making infrastructure investment decisions. It is the replacement costs, the costs that will be incurred now or in the future, that are essential for decision-makers to be aware of. For example, the Old Town Hall, when it was new in 1860, cost $60,000 to construct. The current renovations, which are not even a full replacement, are estimated to cost

24 23 over $9 million. On a smaller scale, the same applies to our watermains and wastewater which have a lifespan of over 75 years. Table 4: Historic vs. Replacement Cost ASSET CLASS Historic Cost Used for PSAB Estimated Replacement Cost Replacement Cost as a % of Historic Cost Roads $133,644,634 $308,272, % Bridges and Culverts 5,835,380 14,810, % Water system 67,592, ,459, % Wastewater system 87,370, ,314, % Hemson Consulting was hired by the Town to assist in developing a Capital Financing Sustainability Strategy. The consultant reviewed the Town s infrastructure records and financing practices (which will be addressed further in Section 6 - Financing Strategy). Hemson estimated the current replacement costs of the Town s infrastructure as of December 31, These costs are much more meaningful for the purposes of this Plan than historic costs and can be used for planning purposes. The asset classes covered by this Plan represent 58% of the replacement costs for all of the Town s tangible capital assets. The share is higher than than of historic costs due to longer life spans for these assets and the exclusion of land, which does not require replacement. Table 5: Estimated Current Replacement Costs Asset class Estimated Replacement Costs Road $308,272,732 Bridges and Culverts 14,810,991 Water 131,459,439 Wastewater 183,314,604 SUBTOTAL $637,857,766 Buildings 188,054,509 Storm Sewer 113,775,534 Sidewalks 35,522,464 Street Lighting 31,737,948 Vehicles and Equipment 28,451,256 Land Improvements 27,894,795 Trails & Walkways 26,822,367 Parking Lots 7,715,789 SUBTOTAL $459,974,662 TOTAL $1,097,832,428

25 24 Table 6 below details the basis for the replacement costs. The replacement costs are based on actual costs spent by the Town for the specific types of assets, indexed by the Construction Price Index. Table 6: Actual Average Unit Replacement Costs incurred by the Town ASSET CATEGORY Unit cost ($2014) Road Base $156 per sq. m. Road Surface $17 per sq. m. Sidewalks $145 per sq. m. Water Mains $613 per m. Wastewater Mains $861 per m. Stormwater Mains $439 per m. Bridges and Culverts n/a Note: this is a representative average per asset class and includes an allowance for engineering and project management costs. 3.2 Overall Evaluation As will be explained in Section 4 - Desired Levels of Service, there is no universally agreed upon metric for determining the adequacy of infrastructure. The Asset Consumption Ratio is an indicator used by BMA Consulting, a private firm that performs an annual review of the financial measurements for municipalities in Ontario. This ratio compares the net book value of infrastructure to its historic cost. A low percentage may indicate "new" assets while a high percentage may indicate depreciated assets that may need more repair and possibly replacement. The obvious limitation of this measurement is that it deals with historic costs and does not consider the ability to provide the intended service. Despite these limitations, it is a starting point. Table 7: Consumption Ratios YEAR Asset Consumption Ratio % % % % % The 2013 BMA report indicates that Newmarket is grouped with the majority of municipalities in the 30-40% range, and better than the local municipal average of 37.6%.

26 25 The Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing (MMAH) applies a similar indicator on its annual report card titled Net Book Value of Capital Assets as a percentage of Cost of Capital Assets. The MMAH considers Newmarket to be at a low risk level in this area. The following chart prepared by Hemson Consulting provides an alternative way of illustrating this data. Figure 2: Value of Assets by Remaining Useful Life $300,000,000 $250,000,000 $200,000,000 $150,000,000 $100,000,000 $50,000,000 $0 1 to 10 Years 11 to 20 Years 21 to 30 Years 31 to 40 Years 41 to 50 Years 51 or More Years Tax Supported Rate Supported 3.3 Roads The Town has 218 centreline road kilometres within its road network. As previously noted, at the end of 2013, roads had a historic cost of $134 million and a net book value of $72 million. The estimated replacement cost is $308 million, consisting of $278 million for the base and $30 million for the surface. In addition, there are 27 kilometers of road that has yet to be assumed from developers or are owned by the Regional Municipality of York. In total, Newmarket maintains 243 kilometres of road. The majority of the Town s 243 kilometres of road has a high class bituminous (HCB) surface. The rest have low class bituminous (LCB), gravel, asphalt, concrete and other materials. The following table contains information on the growth of the road network as reported under the Municipal Performance Measurement Program (MPMP). Note that the measurement used is lane kilometres (i.e. doubled for 2-lane roads, quadrupled for 4- lane roads). As such, actual comparisons are difficult to make as the indicator data differs from the Roads Needs Study.

27 26 Table 8: Length of Linear Assets Reported in MPMP Year Roads (Lane Kilometres) Roads Needs Study (RNS) The Town contracts out the preparation of a Roads Needs Study on an annual basis. The study inventories all of the Town s roads and provides a condition assessment of the roads over a 4-year cycle. It also provides the majority of information on the Town s roads for the Asset Management Plan. Appendices A and B to this Plan include the data from the RNS segregated as Road Surfaces (Appendix A) and Road Base (Appendix B). This includes a list of the road sections, their length, year of construction and condition. Road condition is assessed using a scale of 5 ranges as follows: 1 to 7 Replacement of the road surface and base is required. 8 to 11 Resurfacing is required as a high priority. 12 to 14 Resurfacing is required as a low priority. 15 to 17 Adequate, no current needs. 18 to 20 Road is or is like new. The following table is a risk assessment of the Town s roads. The condition or risk of failure is derived from the Roads Needs Study. The impact of failure is measured by the AADT, which is the annual average daily traffic. Table 9: Roads Risk Assessment (km. of road by condition and use) Road Needs Study Values Condition Value Kilometers Total Reconstruction Rehabilitation Rehabilitation Adequate New Total Impact Annual Average Daily Traffic

28 Funding Requirements As of the end of 2013, 80% of the Town s roads were adequate. The 20% that required work were projected to require $28 million in funding, $5.3 million in the first 5 years. This is an average of $2.8 million per year. For 2024, which is beyond the scope of the RNS, the Capital Financing Sustainability Strategy projected $6.0 million would be required for the year Table 10: Projected Annual Funding up to 2024 Annual Year Funding Requirement 2015 $1.0 million 2016 $1.0 million 2017 $1.0 million 2018 $1.0 million 2019 $4.6 million 2020 $4.6 million 2021 $4.6 million 2022 $4.6 million 2023 $4.6 million 2024 $6.0 million Source 2013 Roads Needs Study Capital Financing Sustainability Strategy Total $33.0 million 3.4 Bridges and Culverts The Town has 33 bridges and 39 culverts. As noted above, at the end of 2013 they had a historic cost of $5.8 million and a net book value of $3.8 million. The estimated replacement cost is $15 million, consisting of $10 million for bridges and $5 million for culverts. In accordance with the Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code, there are two factors differentiating culverts from bridges as follows: Being less than 3 metres in length. Having more than 0.6 metres of fill on top. The following table shows information on the growth of the bridge network as reported under the Municipal Performance Measurement Program (MPMP). Note that the measurement is area and not length. Data was not available for 2008.

29 28 Table 11: Area of Linear Assets Reported in MPMP Bridges (Square Metre of Surface Area) N/A 3,813 5,815 5,815 5,815 5,815 The Roads Needs Study also does an assessment of bridges and culverts over a 2-year period. This is mandated by Section 3 of the Public Transportation and Highway Improvement Act, Ontario Regulation 104/97 Standards for Bridges. Overall, the culverts are considered to be in fair condition and the bridges are in good condition. Details of these assets are included in Appendices C and D. Appendix C is a list of the Town s bridges and Appendix D is a list of the culverts Funding Requirements As of the end of 2013, according to the Roads Needs Study, the 10-year funding requirements were projected to be $6.6 million, with $3.5 million in the first 5 years. For 2024, which is beyond the scope of the RNS, the Capital Financing Sustainability Strategy projected an annual provision of $0.2 million would be required for the next 10 years. Table 12: Bridges and Culverts - Annual Funding Requirements Annual Year Funding Requirement 2015 $0.7 million 2016 $0.7 million 2017 $0.7 million 2018 $0.7 million 2019 $0.6 million 2020 $0.6 million 2021 $0.6 million 2022 $0.6 million 2023 $0 million 2024 $0.2 million Source 2013 Roads Needs Study Capital Financing Sustainability Strategy TOTAL $6.0 million

30 Water System The Town has 287 kilometres of watermain and 2,761 water valves. As noted above, at the end of 2013 they had a historic cost of $66 million and a net book value of $41 million. The estimated replacement cost for the water system is $131 million. The watermain distribution system is made from four primary materials, as follows: 185 km of PVC (polyvinyl chloride). 62 km of ductile iron. 34 km of cast iron. 6 km of copper. The following table shows information on the growth of the water system as reported under the Municipal Performance Measurement Program (MPMP). Note that this is the length maintained, which includes watermains not owned by the Town, unassumed or Regional. Table 13: Length of Linear Water Assets Reported in MPMP Length Water (Main Kilometers) Database While roads have the Roads Needs Study for external verification and condition assessment, there is nothing similar for the water system. For historic costs (PSAB), the water system was assumed to match the road network and was assigned segments and lengths on that basis. Since the initial inventory was established in 2009, a separate inventory has been established in the Town s GIS system. This was developed from the final as-built drawings of the underground works, improving the accuracy of the historic data. It includes segments that are independent of the road system and therefore has a greater overall length than the TCA records. Some preliminary reasonability checks have been made but a full reconciliation of the two sets of records still needs to be undertaken. Appendices E and F are the GIS inventories for the water system Appendix E is the watermain and Appendix F is water valves. The following table is a risk assessment of the Town s water system. The condition or risk of failure is derived from the age of the infrastructure. The impact of failure is measured by the capacity of the infrastructure which is determined by the relative size of the watermains. Most studies show the average age for replacement of watermains to be in the 60 to 80 year range. On this basis, and to be conservative, 50 years was deemed to be the trigger that an asset was approaching the end of its life. An asset

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