School Psychology MA/CAGS Program Handbook School Year

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1 School Psychology MA/CAGS Program Handbook School Year

2 About this Handbook The School Psychology Program Handbook is in effect for academic year and beyond. It supplements and elaborates upon the material in the MSPP Institutional Policy and Procedures Manual, providing information that is specific to the School Psychology MA/CAGS Program. If there are apparent inconsistencies between this Handbook and the Policy and Procedures Manual, or other program information, please consult the Program Director or the Registrar for clarification. All policies and procedures of the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology are subject to change, in response to the evolving needs or demands of the institution and its programs. Appropriate notification of any such changes will be made. ii

3 Table of Contents PAGE I. Philosophy and Mission II. Program Goals and Objectives.. 1 III. Program Requirements and Description. 3 A. Academic Requirements. 3 B. Evaluation of Student Performance.. 5 C. Professional Behavior. 9 D. Graduation Requirements for the M.A. in Professional Psychology 10 E. Transition From MA to CAGS Degree Program F. Graduation Requirements for the CAGS in School Psychology G. Interest Area. 12 H. Concentration in Latino Mental Health.. 13 I. Tenure Limits J. Transfer of Credit 14 K. Course Waiver. 14 L. Electives 15 M. Continuing Education.. 15 N. Transfer to the PsyD in School Psychology Program. 15 IV. Competency Areas. 16 V. Field Placements. 18 A. Field Training Contract. 18 B. Description of Field Placements. 18 C. Field Placement Eligibility 19 D. Evaluation of Field Work VI. Course Sequence 21 VII. Course Descriptions.. 22 VIII. Class Schedule, IX. Student Advising 29 X. Professional Credentials XI. School Psychology Program Faculty XII. Admissions 35 A. Admission Requirements iii

4 B. Application for Advanced Standing.. 36 C. Concurrent Application to Other MSPP Programs D. Part-time Enrollment XIII. Financial Information APPENDICES 39 Appendix 1. Competency Areas Evaluated in School Psychology Courses 40 Appendix 2. Student Course Evaluation 41 Appendix 3 Portfolio.. 47 Appendix 4. Assessment and Planning Conference. 54 Appendix 5. Leadership Activities. 69 Appendix 6. Transition from MA to CAGS Degree Program 70 Appendix 7. Assessment Rubric Appendix 8. Consultation Case Study Rubric Appendix 9. Counselling Case Study Rubric Appendix 10. Field Placement Overview Appendix 11. Field Placement Contract and Internship Agreement. 90 Appendix 12. Practicum Application Procedures. 97 Appendix 13. Internship Application Procedures. 100 Appendix 14. Practicum Competency Evaluations Appendix 15. Internship Competency Evaluations Appendix 16. Requirements for Licensure as a School Psychologist 122 Appendix 17. Pre-Service Performance Assessment for Internship MSPP reserves the right to make any changes to its academic requirements, admission requirements, schedule and other policies which it considers necessary from time to time. The School reserves the right to withdraw, modify or add to the courses it offers at any time. iv

5 I. Philosophy and Mission Graduate training in school psychology at the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology is grounded in an integrative philosophy of training and education, with ongoing application of classroom instruction in structured, closely supervised field experiences. Underlying this approach to professional training is a sustained focus on the development of the personal and professional self, an orientation towards community service, and respect for colleagues and clients. This is in accord with the MSPP mission statement: MSPP strives to be a preeminent school of psychology that integrates rigorous academic instruction with extensive field education and close attention to professional development. We assume an ongoing social responsibility to create programs to educate specialists of many disciplines to meet the evolving mental health needs of society. The MSPP School Psychology Program is proud to offer exceptional training in a supportive environment for learning and growth. The program s competency-based curriculum and experienced faculty provide the future school psychologist with an enduring foundation for a career in school-based mental health services. II. Program Goals and Objectives The MSPP School Psychology Program prepares future practitioners to develop proficiency in a comprehensive range of essential skills and professional behaviors that promote healthy development and reduce barriers to learning, and to confidently practice a comprehensive model of school psychology. Program goals and objectives are as follows: Goal 1. Trainees acquire essential knowledge, skills, and attitudes that have a positive lifelong impact on psychoeducational outcomes, broadly defined including academic competence, personal-social well-being, success in the workplace, and healthy development. Objectives for achieving this goal are: a. To successfully complete coursework by meeting the expectations for the relevant MSPP School Psychology Program competency areas, as specified by the rubrics provided in course syllabi (see Appendix 1). b. To demonstrate progress toward attainment of essential competencies through evaluation of fieldwork and the portfolio, self-evaluation at assessment and planning conferences, and performance on examinations (First Year Examination, Praxis II). Goal 2. Trainees develop proficiency in the skills introduced in coursework through supervised practice in the field. Objectives for achieving this goal are: a. To apply professional practice skills introduced in coursework in the field specifically, in practicum placements over the first two years that incorporate structured, applied assignments associated with concurrent coursework; and 1

6 b. To practice a comprehensive model of school psychological services, with an appreciation of institutions as systems, in field placements in particular, during the culminating (third-year) internship Goal 3. Trainees work effectively and respectfully with diverse types of students and families, school personnel, other professionals, and members of the community. Objectives for achieving this goal are: a. To thoughtfully engage in coursework involving diversity and cultural competence; b. To appreciate and contribute to the capacity of institutions (MSPP, field settings, service organizations) to respect and recognize the value of cultural and individual differences; and c. To foster and help sustain a learning environment that values acceptance, collaboration, humility, and equality. Goal 4. Trainees develop the skills and inclination to assume leadership roles in the field. Objectives for achieving this goal are: a. To develop skills that enhance one s capacity and confidence to assume leadership roles as a professional, such as public speaking, formal and informal presentations, staff training, and team facilitation; b. To access opportunities to contribute to governance, public policy, and systemic improvements at MSPP and in service-providing agencies (e.g., schools, training sites, non-profits) and professional communities (e.g., NASP, MSPA). Goal 5. Trainees, graduates, and the local professional community are supported as they engage in school and community improvement and lifelong professional development. Objectives for achieving this goal are: a. To access high quality professional development programs designed for practicing school psychologists and professionals in related fields. b. To establish and maintain collaborations between MSPP and partnering schools districts, including, but not limited to, field training, professional development, consultation, and community service project arrangements 2

7 III. Program Requirements and Description In keeping with the MSPP training model, the School Psychology Program emphasizes development of advanced clinical skills through the integration of formal studies and diverse field experiences. The full sequence includes two graduate degrees: the M.A. in Professional Psychology and the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) in School Psychology. There are several reasons for the two separate degrees: 1. The student s progress toward competency development and commitment to graduate training in school psychology are reviewed in multiple ways over the course of the program. The transition between the M.A. and CAGS degree is a key point at which to assess progress to date and to consider future plans. 2. A student who, for personal or academic reasons, does not complete the full program can exit with the Master s degree. 3. Requirements for the CAGS (i.e., specialist level) degree exceed that of master s degrees in other fields. This distinction may translate into higher pay levels in the salary schedules of school systems and mental health agencies. 4. The M.A., earned after one year of full-time study, enhances the status of trainees while they are enrolled in the program. 5. The two-degree structure enables a student with a master s degree or doctorate in a related area (e.g., counseling, special education) to be admitted with advanced standing and matriculate directly into the CAGS program. A. Academic Requirements The MSPP School Psychology Program is a specialist level program that consists of two full years of coursework and related practica, and a full year of internship (1200 minimum. In addition, students demonstrate attainment of requisite knowledge, skills, and attitudes by compiling a portfolio and by earning passing scores on the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL) and the national Praxis II test in school psychology. 1. Coursework Students earn a Master's Degree (M.A.) in Professional Psychology after completing 30 or more credits, including the core courses listed in Table 1. Students receive the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) in School Psychology after completing the remaining program requirements, as listed in Table 2, to total 66 or more credits for the M.A. and CAGS combined. Students who have coursework waived (rather than transferred in, thereby receiving credit toward degree completion) may choose from electives identified by the School Psychology Program faculty to fulfill degree credit requirements. Students may opt to take elective courses that exceed the credit requirements for the program at a reduced tuition rate. The standard course load is credits per semester. Students who need to work part-time or who are contending with competing demands may opt to take 11 credits per semester and 3

8 still be considered full-time. A course load reduction during the second year is strongly advised. This can be done by taking core courses during the summer or as a non-matriculated student prior to enrolling in the program. The program is designed to be completed in this manner, with students earning their M.A. in Professional Psychology by the end of the summer after the first year in the program. Alternatively, a student may begin the program on a part-time basis, as described in Section XI (Admissions). Table 1 Core Course Requirements for the M.A. in Professional Psychology Course Course Title Credit Number Hours CP 501 Orientation to the Profession and Its Practice 0 IA 520 Instructional Assessment and Intervention 3 RS 526 Statistics 3 LS 659 Life Span Development 3 SN 512 Children and Adolescents with Special Needs 3 FP 501 Practicum I: School Environment and Educational Assessment 2 PA 500 Psychoeducational Assessment 3 BC 521 Behavioral Assessment, Intervention, and Consultation 3 PY 521 Child & Adolescent Psychopathology 3 RS 555 Research and Evaluation Methods 3 FP 502 Practicum II: Psychoeducational Assessment and Intervention 3 Table 2 Core Course Requirements for the CAGS in School Psychology Course Number Course Title Credit Hours CC 522 Diversity and Cross-Cultural Psychology 3 PH 501 Preventive Mental Health in Schools 2 PA 600 Social-Emotional Assessment 3 CX 610 Counseling and Psychotherapy in Schools 3 PS 630 Ethical, Legal and Professional Issues in School Psychology 3 FP 601 Practicum III: Clinical Practice 2 BL 622 Biological Bases of Behavior and Learning 3 CO 650 Consultation in Schools 3 GR 611 Group Process and Group Therapy 3 4

9 FP 602 Practicum IV: Clinical Practice 2 CS 701 Internship Seminar A 2 FP 701 Internship A 3 CS 702 Internship Seminar B 2 FP 702 Internship B 3 Table 3 Course Requirements for the Concentration in Latino Mental Health Course Number Course Title Credit Hours CC 549 LMH1: The Hispanic/Latino Experience 1 CC 550 LMH2: The Experience of Latinos in the U.S. 1 CC 551 LMH3: Clinical Work with Latinos 1 CC 552 LMH4: Professional Practice in Latino Mental Health 1 2. Field Placements Students complete a 300-hour practicum in the first year, a 500-hour practicum in the second year, and a 1200-hour full-time internship in the third year. Each field placement is supported by a seminar course that provides support for skill development, opportunities for reflection, and supplementary instruction. Field placements are described in detail in Section V. 3. Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL) Students must obtain passing scores on the Communications and Literacy Skills test of the MTEL, which consists of two subtests (Reading and Writing). This is a requirement for educator licensure. The passing scores must be obtained as a requirement for transition from the MA to the CAGS level of the program. (See for test information.) 4. Praxis II Students must take the Praxis II test in school psychology prior to the internship year (see CAGS degree requirements, p. 11). B. Evaluation of Student Performance In 2011, the faculty adapted the domains of the 2010 NASP Model for Integrated and Comprehensive School Psychological Services to establish 11 competency areas that represent the essential knowledge, skills, and attitudes that are the focus of the MSPP School Psychology Program curriculum. These competency areas are used as the basis for evaluating of coursework, field work, and overall training progress, as indicated below. The competency areas and their components are outlined in Section IV. 5

10 1. Course grades Students must meet the assessment standards described in the respective syllabus for each course to receive credit. Grading is done on a Credit/No Credit basis using the following designations: CR Credit: Course requirements have been satisfactorily completed. Performance equivalent to A (90 100) or B (83 89). INC Incomplete: Course requirements have not been completed by the end of the semester in which they were assigned. W Withdraw without Evaluation: The student withdraws from the course after the drop/add period, but before the eighth week of the semester. CP Credit Problematic: Course requirements have been completed and credit granted, but work done has been marginal or problematic. Performance equivalent to B- (80-82) NC No Credit: Course requirements have not been satisfactorily completed. Performance equal to or below C ( 79) NOTE: As of the school year, the School Psychology Program will undergo the conversion to letter grades. Field placement seminars, however, will continue to be assessed on a Credit/No Credit basis. Please refer to the Institutional Policy and Procedures Manual (IPPM) for further elaboration of grading criteria. The guidelines in the IPPM regarding a grade of Incomplete are fully applicable to the School Psychology Program. An instructor should file a Notice of Academic Difficulty as soon as performance on an individual assignment or a combination of assignments indicate that a student is at heightened risk of receiving a Credit Problematic or No Credit grade. Resubmission for credit of problematic work is at the discretion of the course instructor. Students are encouraged to consult with the instructor and/or their advisor about problematic performance. 2. Course competency ratings Students are rated on a four-point scale (Exemplary, Expected, Needs Improvement, Unsatisfactory) on each of the competencies that are substantially addressed by a given course. Appendix 1 identifies the relevant competencies for each core course. The competencies are described in Section IV. 6

11 3. Individualized student evaluations MSPP uses an evaluation system in which students receive ratings and a narrative evaluation from the instructor on their performance in each course (see Appendix 2). Instructors address professional work characteristics, as described in Section III.C., as well as the following areas in the narrative section of this evaluation: a. achievement (i.e., degree to which student has grasped the material and met course objectives; strengths and weaknesses); b. quality of written and oral work; c. effort, attendance, initiative, attitude, participation; d. development of the professional self; and e. interpersonal relations and respect for others. 4. Portfolio The portfolio includes résumé, goals, work samples, and materials through which students demonstrate their progress toward development of professional attitudes and behaviors, and their progress toward learning the knowledge and skills defined by the 10 domains of practice set forth in the NASP Model for Comprehensive and Integrated School Psychological Services. Guidelines for the development and evaluation of the portfolio can be found in Appendix 3. In addition to demonstrating progress towards competencies, the portfolio is intended to serve as a career-long vehicle for storing and organizing essential professional material. It should be of value as a personal archive for application and credentialing purposes, and when compiling information in pursuing employment and other professional opportunities. Field training seminar instructors review and provide feedback as the portfolio evolves. The portfolio is reviewed and evaluated by the advisor using the Portfolio Evaluation form (see Appendix 3), with additional input from the second faculty member who attends the A&P Conference. The portfolio serves as a resource for the student s annual Assessment and Planning Conference at the MA/CAGS level of the Program. 5. Evaluation of field work Evaluation of field work experiences (i.e., practica and internship) is primarily based on evaluations by the field supervisor and the training program supervisor (i.e., the practicum or internship seminar instructor). Field work evaluation procedures and measures are described in Section V (Field Placements). These evaluations are organized according to the School Psychology Program competency areas. 6. Assessment and Planning Conference Each student has an individual review at the end of each year in the program in the form of an Assessment and Planning (A&P) Conference. The A&P Conference is typically held in June for continuing students, and in May for interns that are scheduled to graduate in June. A minimum of three participants attend the A&P Conference: the student, the advisor, and a second faculty member. The student may invite the primary field supervisor from the concluding year or the following year to attend. While the current field supervisor is not required to attend, the supervisor s input must be represented in the form of the year-end competency evaluation. 7

12 The student s advisor and a second faculty member selected by the student are the other regular participants. A&P Conferences serve two essential functions: (1) overall assessment of the student's performance in all aspects of the program and (2) individualized degree program and career planning. The A&P Conference provides an opportunity to recognize students strengths and to provide constructive feedback in assessing their progress toward the development of relevant knowledge, skills, attitudes, and professional behaviors. This includes a collaborative rating of current progress toward Program competencies, with conjoint input by the student and the participating faculty members. A&P conferences establish and assure clear academic and professional standards, while identifying and enabling feedback and reflection on the a student s interests, learning goals, areas for further development, and professional aspirations. Another purpose of this conference is to provide an opportunity for general feedback and discussion. The student is expected to reflect upon personal and professional development. A&P Conference participants use this occasion to recognize the student s accomplishments and leadership activities. An outline of A&P Conference proceedings and the A&P Conference forms are provided in Appendix 4. There are two versions of the form, as an abbreviated version is used at the A&P Conference prior to graduation. In preparation for the A&P Conference, the advisor brings the partially-completed Portfolio Evaluation form to the conference. Following the conference, the completed Portfolio Evaluation becomes part of the A&P Conference record. Leadership activities are reviewed for program assessment purposes (see sample form, Appendix 5). An intermediate A&P Conference may be convened by the advisor to address deficiencies in academic performance, field training, and/or professional behavior during the course of the school year. 7. First Year Examination The written First Year Examination is given within the first two weeks after the end of Spring semester of Year of the program. The primary purposes of the exam are: a. to promote review and retention of important information; b. to ensure essential foundational skills and knowledge, and to provide formative evaluation for the individual student c. to provide feedback to the student and to the faculty about what has been learned and what needs more attention; d. to provide feedback to the student in preparing for the national school psychology exam; and e. to inform future instruction by faculty members. The First Year Examination draws upon material from required first year fall and spring semester courses. Students may take the examination after having completed 25 or more credits towards the Master s degree. The exam is written and scored by the School Psychology Program faculty. In preparing for the exam, students should refer to course goals and objectives plus any specific guidance provided by the faculty. Students are provided with a general description of the examination and a clear description of exam procedures in advance. 8

13 The First Year Examination consists of several sections, each covering a portion of the Year 1 coursework. Each section of the exam is graded by the faculty member who taught the relevant course(s). Borderline scores are graded by two faculty members. All grading is done without knowledge of the individual students name. Scores are reported to students by the end of June. Students are required to meet the criterion performance level for each section of the exam. Students who do not meet passing criterion on a particular section are required to take a second exam consisting of the sections that the student did not pass initially. The second exam date is typically in late July; the specific date is determined by the First Year Exam Committee and announced to students in the Spring. A student who does not obtain a passing score on the second exam may, by decision of the faculty, be given the opportunity to demonstrate competency in the deficient area during the following semester by meeting the requirements of a remediation plan. A passing score on the exam is not required in order to receive the M.A. in Professional Psychology. However, a student must demonstrate competency in each exam area with a passing score or equivalent demonstration of competency (e.g., through additional assignments, instruction, and/or re-examination) in order to be recommended for transition from the M.A. to the CAGS degree program. C. Professional behavior As described in the Institutional Policies and Procedures Manual (see Guidelines on Professional Behavior, p.39), MSPP students conduct themselves in a receptive, respectful and responsible manner as they relate to others and invest in their personal and professional growth. These expectations are applicable in classes, fieldwork, and in routine dealings with faculty, administration, and other students. NASP standards refer to these behaviors as professional work characteristics. They include: Respect for human diversity Communication skills Effective interpersonal relations Ethical responsibility Adaptability Initiative/dependability Professional work characteristics are evaluated in students course evaluations, field work evaluations, and at A&P Conferences. An advisor who has significant concerns about a student s professional behavior should address them in an individual meeting or at an intermediate A&P Conference rather than wait until the end-of-year A&P Conference. In addition to the NASP-identified professional work characteristics, the MSPP School Psychology Program values and encourages the development of leadership skills broadly defined as including, but not limited to, involvement in the professional community and MSPP academic and extra-curricular activities (see Appendix 5). In keeping with professional behavior as described in the Institutional Policies and Procedures Manual, in-class use of laptop computers during class should be limited to reasonable and respectful course-related purposes. Course instructors may establish more specific guidelines. 9

14 D. Graduation Requirements for the M.A. in Professional Psychology In addition to completing 30 or more credits as specified in Table 1, students must take the First Year Examination, as described in Section B.5., above. Students are expected to complete all requirements for the Master s degree within two years from the first semester of enrollment. Student progress toward program completion is reviewed on an annual basis with the major advisor. E. Transition to the CAGS Degree Program A student who meets the requirements for the M.A. in Professional Psychology is reviewed by the faculty prior to the start of the following semester for approval of transition to the CAGS degree program. For the usual progression through the program, this determination is made prior to the start of Fall semester of the second year, The faculty makes this determination based on the student s performance in the M.A. degree program, with consideration of the following inputs: 1. Coursework: credits, grades, evaluations 2. MTEL: passing scores 3. Portfolio 4. A&P Conference Summary rating (see below) 5. Field placement competency evaluations 6. First Year Examination: passing scores in all areas The advisor summarizes these data on the Transition to CAGS Degree Program form (see Appendix 6) for review by the faculty. Prior to matriculation into the CAGS program, the student must obtain passing scores on the Communication and Literacy Skills test of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL), as required for licensure as a school psychologist in Massachusetts. A student not meeting the criteria listed above must satisfactorily resolve the deficiency within one semester following the First Year Examination (usually, by the last day of Fall semester) in order to transition to the CAGS degree and continue in the School Psychology Program. This includes successful remediation of any area of the First Year Examination in which the student did not receive a passing score. Prior feedback to students is of paramount importance. Although students receive various types of feedback during the first year that provide insight into their standing in the program, the A&P Conference Summary rating has special significance with respect to prior notice: 1. As a general rule, a student who receives an A&P Conference Summary rating of A ( Satisfactory ) can expect a timely transition to the CAGS degree program. 2. As a general rule, a student who receives an A&P Conference Summary rating of B should regard this as a signal that there is a possibility of not being recommended for 10

15 transition to the CAGS degree program immediately upon completion of the M.A. degree program. 3. A student who receives an A&P Conference Summary rating of C or D is not eligible for consideration of transition to the CAGS program at the beginning of the second year. (Note: a C or D rating results in Academic Council action.) The program director notifies students of faculty approval for transition to the CAGS degree program. If the faculty decision is Not at this time, the advisor shall notify the student prior to the beginning of Year 2 Fall semester classes and expedite an A&P Conference to clarify issues, consider options, and/or identify what conditions or corrective actions must be met to qualify for CAGS degree program transition. F. Graduation Requirements for the CAGS in School Psychology The CAGS degree requires completion of a planned program that includes all remaining program requirements, as listed in Table 2, plus an internship of at least 1200 hours. CAGS degree requirements are as follows: (1) Coursework The student must complete a planned program of 30 or more semester credits that constitute the remainder of the 66 credits for the total program, after completion of the M.A. degree). This includes the ten required courses and internship-related coursework listed in Table 2. The student s planned program must be approved by the faculty advisor. (2) Praxis II The Praxis II School Psychologist test, administered by ETS, assesses pre-service level knowledge and skills in school psychology. Students must take the Praxis II test in school psychology prior to the internship year. A passing score (i.e., 165 or higher) on the Praxis II is a requirement for the professional, but not initial, license as a school psychologist in Massachusetts. It is also requirement to qualify for the Nationally Certified School Psychologist designation upon graduation from the School Psychology Program. A student who does not pass the Praxis II on the first administration must arrange to take the test again prior to graduation. Although passing the Praxis II is not a requirement for earning the CAGS degree, all program graduates to date have earned a passing score. Passing the Praxis II is a meaningful accomplishment. Students are strongly encouraged to prepare conscientiously. NASP resources for Praxis II preparation are available at (3) Internship The student must successfully complete a 1200 hour internship, which is the culminating training activity. Satisfactory completion of the internship is determined by the field supervisor and the MSPP internship seminar instructor, and verified by the field placement director for the School Psychology Program. 11

16 (4) Case Studies The student must successfully complete the required three case studies as part of the clinical seminars accompanying the internship: Case Study 1 This case study demonstrates attainment of competency in completing a comprehensive psychological evaluation by submitting a psychological report suitable for school based practice. This case study is evaluated by the seminar instructor using the MSPP Assessment Rubric (see Appendix 7); Case Study 2 - This case study demonstrates attainment of competency in consultation and problem-solving by providing consultation on an academic, behavioral or systems level problem. The case study is evaluated by the seminar instructor using the MSPP Consultation Case Study Rubric (see Appendix 8); and Case Study 3 - This case study demonstrates attainment of competency in counseling by providing a social-emotional intervention. The case study is evaluated by the seminar instructor using the MSPP Counseling Case Study Rubric (see Appendix 9). G. Interest Area Students are encouraged to select an area of personal interest in which to develop advanced expertise through independent study, class assignments, elective coursework and/or field experience. There are several purposes for this optional program component: To make students more competitive for field placements and jobs by having expertise in a niche for which there is a demand To foster students capacity to function at a high level and assume a leadership role as an intern or new school employee To reinforce and exercise an orientation towards self-study and self-directed lifelong learning. An interest area is more flexible, and has less extensive requirements than a concentration area. The topic may be broad or narrow. Examples of interest areas include: Children with autism/autism spectrum disorders Children with behavior and emotional disorders Children with low-incidence disabilities Development of social skills/life skills Early childhood assessment & intervention Instructional assessment and consultation Neuropsychology/advanced cognitive assessment Positive behavioral interventions and supports School-wide mental health promotion/prevention The interest area may impact a student s choice of a practicum or internship setting, or decision to pursue elective coursework, although neither is a required component. The requirements associated with the interest area are as follows: (1) The student has a separate section of the portfolio dedicated to the topic 12

17 Contents of this section may include reflections on trends and issues, description of field experiences and special activities, relevant projects or work products, commentary on workshops or conferences attended, etc. The section includes an annotated bibliography of leading publications and resources in the field. (2) The student gives an oral presentation on the topic in Practicum Seminar IV or Internship Seminar. H. Concentration in Latino Mental Health Students participating in the Latino Mental Health Program (LMHP) have a unique opportunity to develop the knowledge and skills to become culturally and linguistically competent mental health service providers for Spanish speaking children and families. The shortage of professionals, Latino and non-latino, who are capable of serving Latino populations is already critical and is expected to increase in the coming years. The need for bilingual practitioners in public schools is particularly acute. School Psychology LMHP students have coursework and field work requirements in addition to the M.A./CAGS core curriculum. Completion of the concentration area is formally recognized on the student s final degree transcript, but is not a separate degree program (i.e., the earned degree is the same as for other School Psychology Program students). The prerequisites for participation in the Latino Mental Health Program are as follows: Serious interest in the area of Latino mental health Some prior Spanish language studies (students possessing various levels of Spanish fluency will be considered) Serious commitment to devoting a significant amount of professional time postgraduation working with members of US Latino groups Commitment to participate in required LMHP activities Required program activities are as follows: A course sequence of four 1-credit courses (schedule permitting, but minimum of two). The courses are: - LMH-I (CC 549): Introduction to Latino Culture (in English; some Spanish) - LMH-II (CC 550): The Experience of Latinos in the U.S. (Spanish & English) - LMH-III (CC 551): Clinical Work with Latinos in the U.S., (exclusively in Spanish) - LMH-IV (CS 822/823): Clinical Seminar in Latino Mental Health (exclusively in Spanish). Two 5-week summer immersion programs (summers between year 1 and 2, and between year 2 and 3) focusing on linguistic and cultural training, as well as involvement in local mental health and social services activities An Interest Area in a topic related to Latino mental health services or educational practices with Latinos (see Section III.G. above) A field placement serving a substantially Spanish-speaking population encouraged for the Year 2 Practicum and required for the internship year In addition, students are encouraged to participate in various LMHP activities including: Tertulias: Conversational Spanish Language Support Groups (no credit, no cost) Regular LMHP meetings (at least quarterly) 13

18 Lucero 5K Walk/Run (fall) Latino Mental Health Conference (bi-annual) LMHP social events I. Tenure limits Students are expected to complete all requirements for the CAGS within four years from the first semester of enrollment. Student progress toward program completion is reviewed periodically with the major advisor, and at the annual Assessment and Planning Conference (described in the MSPP Institutional Policy and Procedures Manual). J. Transfer of Credit Up to 20 percent of the total credits for the degree may be transferred in and credited towards the degree. Therefore, students admitted to the MA/CAGS program may transfer in up to 13 credits, and students admitted to the MA/CAGS/PsyD program may transfer in up to 23 credits. To qualify for transfer of credit, the prior coursework must be equivalent to required courses in the MA/CAGS program. The determination of coursework equivalence is made by the program director or designated faculty committee. Please refer to the MSPP Institutional Policies and Procedures Manual for detailed information. As described therein, qualifying courses must: Have been taken at a regionally accredited institution; Have been taken at the graduate level; Have been taken within 10 years of the student s date of matriculation; and Have received a grade or B or better. The determination of coursework equivalence is made by the School Psychology Program director or designated faculty committee. Prior graduate coursework that does not meet these criteria may be credited at the discretion of the program director or designated committee through a formally documented supplementary learning experience (e.g., auditing some or all classes, completing specified course readings and/or assignments, obtaining a passing score on course examinations). Students who are admitted with advanced standing may receive credit for higher amounts of prior coursework. Please refer to Section XII.B. for the policy regarding admission with advanced standing. K. Course Waivers A course waiver exempts the student from the course requirement, but no academic credit is granted. In rare situations, a student who does not quality for transfer of credit for a prior advanced level learning experience may be granted a course waiver. This may apply if the student can demonstrate having met the course objectives, or can do so by supplementing prior learning activities with a formally documented learning experience (e.g., an independent assignment or directed study). Students who have coursework waived without transfer of credit will typically make up this credit shortfall with a directed study or an elective. 14

19 L. Electives Students who take the complete sequence of required courses do not need electives to fulfill the 66 credit requirement for the M.A./CAGS program. Electives that result in a surplus of credits (over 66) may be taken at a 1/2 tuition rate for those course credits that exceed the MA/CAGS program requirement. Registration for an elective requires advisor approval, and should be discussed with the advisor in advance (ideally, at the annual A&P Conference). M. Continuing Education Students are welcome and encouraged to attend MSPP Continuing Education programs, many of which are designed primarily for practicing school psychologists. MSPP students can attend most CE programs, space permitting, at no cost. However, students must reserve space in advance, and must cancel their reservation if unable to attend. Information about CE offerings can be found on the MSPP website at N. Transfer to the PsyD in School Psychology Program A student in the School Psychology MA/CAGS Program who has transitioned from the MA to the CAGS degree phase may apply for admission to the MA/CAGS/PsyD program. Students who wish to do so should follow the instructions for Internal Applicants on MyCampus. 15

20 IV. Competency Areas The curriculum of the MSPP School Psychology Program systematically addresses the domains of training and practice established by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), as described in the NASP (2010) Model for comprehensive and integrated school psychological services (see The NASP model is used as the basis for organizing the portfolio. In other respects, however, student performance and progress are evaluated using the curricular framework that follows, which was developed by the School Psychology Program faculty in The competency areas listed below were determined to best synthesize the essential knowledge, skills and attitudes that are the focus of the MA/CAGS level of training in the MSPP School Psychology Program. These competency areas provide the organizing structure for evaluating performance in coursework and fieldwork, and for summarizing progress at the student s annual assessment and planning (A&P) conference. Professional Behavior Preparation for courses and learning experiences Timely and conscientious completion of assignments Active and constructive participation in class & learning experiences Self-reflection/self-awareness Receptivity to supervision & instruction Responsibility/dependability Initiative Professional identity; involvement in professional community Community service Leadership skills & experiences Self-care Relationships Interpersonal skills Effective collaboration Communication skills Respect for classmates, instructors, administrative staff, clients Compassion; concern for and support of others Diversity & Individual Differences Awareness of, respect for, and effectiveness regarding Cultural differences race, ethnicity Linguistic differences Cognitive and physical disabilities Gender differences Socio-economic differences Ethical, Legal, Professional Issues Ethical practices Legal standards/regulations Professional standards Current issues and controversies in the field of education 16

21 Scholarship/Research APA style Familiarity with and use of professional literature Descriptive and inferential statistical methods Research methods; research design Use of data for accountability, evaluation of services/practices Statistical analysis software: SPSS, Excel Educational Foundations and Interventions Academic instruction Learning principles Curriculum & instruction Response to intervention (RTI) Assistive technology Psychological/Developmental Foundations Theories and principles of development Influence of biological factors Psychopathology Neuropsychology Assessment & Measurement Psychometric methods & principles Psychoeducational assessment o Cognitive/neuropsychological o Social-emotional/behavioral o Educational, including curriculum-based assessment Counseling/Mental Health/Behavioral Intervention Individual & group counseling Behavior management techniques Primary Project Positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) Consultation Consultation models, roles Problem-solving process Communication skills Parent/family contact Home-school collaboration System Intervention Program development Social-emotional learning Crisis prevention and response School climate assessment & intervention School-wide/classroom level supports & interventions Large scale/school-wide PBIS, RTI 17

22 V. Field Placements Integration of field experience and classroom instruction is a cornerstone of MSPP School Psychology Program training. As a rule, full-time students have field placements each semester. Field placements are collaborations between the MSPP School Psychology Program and the field site. The field supervisor and the MSPP supervisor (i.e., practicum or internship seminar instructor) collaborate in providing supervision and guidance. The field supervisor, however, has ultimate responsibility for the trainee s activities in the field placement. A. Field Training Contract A Field Training Contract must be on file for every student who has a field placement through MSPP. This contract clarifies the terms of the placement, including (a) beginning and end dates, (b) time commitment, (c) supervisory responsibilities, and (d) activities in which the trainee is engaged. The contract also serves to ensure that the student s practice-related field site activities are covered under MSPP s liability insurance policy. The contract may designate an additional supervisor who also provides regular support and/or supervision to the trainee. The contract is signed by the primary field supervisor, the student, the student s advisor, the field placement director, and by an administrator from the host school district or agency. B. Description of Field Placements There are two types of field placements: practica and internships. A practicum placement provides an opportunity to apply specific skills and complete assignments associated with concurrent or previous coursework. The internship is the culminating training experience in the MA/CAGS program. It affords the student the opportunity to apply and integrate the full range of competencies and domains that are essential to the practice of school psychology. This is a minimum 1200-hour placement, completed on a full-time basis in one year or (less commonly) on a half-time basis over two years. Students in the MSPP School Psychology Program are in field placements each semester of full-time enrollment. As described in Appendix 10, these include a 1-1/2 day (10 hour) per week) practicum in an elementary school setting in the first year, a 2-1/2 day (15 hour) per week practicum in a secondary school setting in the second year, and a full-time internship in the third and final year. In addition, first year students serve as child associates in Primary Project, a nationally recognized preventative mental health program. Child associates facilitate weekly individual child-led play sessions with primary grade students who are at risk for adjustment problems. This supplementary field experience is of value for both the school psychology trainee and the host school district. Students learn and practice essential skills that serve as a foundation for subsequent training in counseling and consultation. Primary Project training experiences are, in large part, incorporated into the first year practicum seminars. First and second year practicum placements are arranged or facilitated for students. Alternatively, students may choose to apply competitively for second year practicum placements that are not exclusive to a given training program, or may investigate prospective new sites. Placements initiated by students, however, must be reviewed by the School Psychology Program's field placement director and determined to meet program standards. In order to meet program standards, a practicum placement: 18

23 Must provide opportunities to practice key skills associated with concurrent coursework, as specified by the Field Placement Contract (see Appendix 11); Must be supervised by a well qualified field supervisor who agrees to (1) provide at least the minimum required amount of weekly supervision, (2) complete and submit periodic evaluations, and (3) collaborate with the MSPP field placement supervisor in arranging site visits and maintaining communication. Students are advised to have a balance in the demographic character (e.g., suburban plus urban, lower socioeconomic status plus higher socioeconomic status) in their first year and second year practicum placements. Students in the Latino Mental Health Program are expected to work in placements with a substantial Spanish-speaking population for their second year practicum, and required to do so for their internship. As a rule, practicum placements run from the beginning of the school year through at least the beginning of June and include some regularly scheduled time prior to the beginning of Spring semester in January. Some flexibility during the final month may be necessary to accommodate the change in schedule with summer session courses. Most important, the practicum student should make every effort to meet ongoing responsibilities and to reach closure in a professional manner, for example, by bringing counseling cases to an appropriate conclusion or stopping point, or presenting the findings of one s psychoeducational assessment at a team meeting. Students seek out their own internships, with assistance from MSPP. An internship must meet standards of the National Association of School Psychologists. Three critical requirements are (1) a minimum of 1200 hours, of which at least 600 must be in a school setting, (2) the opportunity to practice and integrate a wide range of competencies across the domains of training and practice in school psychology, and, (3) two or more hours of field-based supervision per week from a certified school psychologist with at least three years of experience. See Appendix 13 for MSPP procedures on applying for internships. General information and recommendations about pursuing school psychology internships can be found on the NASP website at: The period for actively seeking and applying for Year 2 practicum and internship placements begins on February 1 st. Prior to that date, students are advised to prepare cover letters, update resumes, and (for internships) request letters of recommendation. If students are interested in a site that is not a current MSPP placement, their activity before Feb. 1 st must be limited to (a) determining who the appropriate contact person is (typically, but not always, the pupil services/ special education director) and (b) verifying that MSPP can follow up by contacting the site to determine whether it is an acceptable field placement and, if so, at what level. Out-of-state internships are exempted from the February 1 st initiation date. C. Field Placement Eligibility The determination of readiness for the Year 2 practicum or internship is made by the faculty at the Assessment and Planning Conference prior to internship. This is formally documented as part of the A&P Conference form (see Appendix 4). The student s advisor should convene an intermediate A&P Conference as early as possible during the school year if there is uncertainty as to whether the student will be ready for practicum or internship the following year. A student must have completed all required Year 1 and Year 2 coursework and be in good academic standing to be eligible for internship. 19

24 D. Evaluation of Field Work Formative and summative evaluation of the student s performance in practicum and internship is conducted by the field supervisor using a competency evaluation form. (See Appendix 14 for the Practicum Competency Evaluation form and Appendix 15 for the Internship Competency Evaluation form.) These forms are used to structure an informal progress review between the student and the field supervisor at the middle of each semester. No data from these interim reviews are submitted to MSPP. The competency evaluation forms are completed by the field supervisor and submitted to the MSPP Field Placement Office at the end of each semester. In addition, the MSPP seminar instructor evaluates the student by completing a course evaluation that includes evaluative criteria pertinent to field experiences. As described in Appendix 10, the MSPP seminar instructor holds conferences with the field supervisor and trainee a minimum of three times a year, either on site or with a conference call. While the primary focus of field site conferences is to evaluate the site and the quality of training provided, conferences also provide an opportunity for addressing issues related to the student s preparedness, skills, or work characteristics. These conferences are documented with a site visit form. This and other field placement documents and forms can be found in the MSPP School Psychology Program Field Supervisors Handbook on MyCampus. 20

25 VI. Course Sequence Fundamentals Week Credits CP 501 Orientation to the Profession and Its Practice 0 Year 1, Fall Semester IA 520 Instructional Assessment & Intervention 3 LS 659 Lifespan Development 3 RS 526 Statistics 3 SN 512 Educating Children & Adolescents with Special Needs 3 FP 501 Practicum I: School Environment and Educational Assessment 2 Year 1, Spring Semester BC 521 Behavioral Assessment, Intervention, and Consultation 3 PA 500 Psychoeducational Assessment 3 PY 521 Psychopathology of Childhood and Adolescence 3 RS 555 Research and Evaluation Methods 3 FP 502 Practicum II: Psychoeducational Assessment and Intervention 3 Summer Session 1 CC 522 Diversity and Cross-Cultural Psychology 3 PH501 Preventive Mental Health in the Schools 2 Year 2, Fall Semester CX 610 Counseling and Psychotherapy in Schools 3 PA 600 Social-Emotional Assessment 3 PS 630 Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in School Psychology 3 FP 601 Practicum III: Clinical Practice 2 Year 2, Spring Semester BL 622 Biological Bases of Behavior and Learning 3 CO 650 Consultation in Schools 3 GR 611 Group Process and Group Therapy 3 FP 602 Practicum IV: Clinical Practice 2 Year 3 CS 701 Internship Seminar A 2 FP 701 Internship A 3 CS 702 Internship Seminar B 2 FP 702 Internship B 3 TOTAL CREDITS 66 1 Students are expected to take summer courses to earn the Master s degree after Year 1 and reduce their Year 2 course load. Under special circumstances, students may request to take CC 522 and PH 501 in Year 2. 21

26 VII. Course Descriptions CP501 Orientation to the Profession and Its Practice (0 credits) This non-credit short course provides an orientation to important concepts and skills that serve as a basis for the initiation of professional training and early clinical/professional practice. Year 1, Fall Semester IA 520 Instructional Assessment & Intervention (3 credits) This course examines essential principles of classroom instruction, and methods of screening and assessing academic performance, critical learning skills, and the classroom environment. Data collection methods include structured observation, standardized educational testing, formal and informal skill inventories, curriculum based assessment and curriculum based measurement. Students apply these data to the design and evaluation of instruction and academic interventions, as guided by scientific evidence. Particular emphasis is placed on the acquisition of early reading skills. Field assignments for this course are arranged through the concurrent Practicum I. RS 526 Statistics (3 credits) This course covers descriptive and inferential statistical methods applied to educational and psychological research. Students learn how and when to use various statistical procedures; how to use data analysis software to analyze data and test assumptions; how to interpret and report data; and how to measure individual progress in clinical and educational settings. Students learn to critically examine published research. The course also covers foundations of psychometrics, including measurement scales, reliability and validity, standardized scores, and basic concepts of test construction. LS 659 Lifespan Development (3 credits) This course examines various theories of human development and considers the process of development through various life phases across the lifespan. Theories of biological, cognitive, social, and emotional development are explored to understand the interplay of nature and nurture from infancy through aging. Students examine the psychological and environmental contexts required to support normal development and adaptation in all stages of life. The primary focus of the course is to consider the range of possibilities of normal development and to explore multiple developmental pathways in the course of the lifespan. Individual differences as well as general trends are discussed. Current controversies in development are also addressed through the use of relevant research. SN 512 Educating Children & Adolescents with Special Needs (3 credits) This course provides an overview of students with learning and behavior difficulties that require special education, Section 504 accommodations and/or other specialized educational supports. The course devotes significant attention to characteristics and educational needs of children and adolescents with high incidence disabilities (i.e., learning disabilities, mental retardation, emotional and behavioral disorders, and speech and language impairment), and provides an introduction to children with low incidence disabilities. Historical developments, legal mandates, and research are examined for an understanding of how they have shaped current practices. Particular emphasis is placed on (1) issues and methods for establishing positive relationships with families, and (2) alternative service delivery systems (e.g., collaborative problem-solving teams, multi-tiered model) that emphasize prevention and foster collaboration between general and special education. Other topics include identification accuracy, efficacy of special education, inclusion, early intervention, preschool-to-school and school-to-work transitions, parental notification and consent, procedural safeguards, and assistive technology. FP 501 Practicum I: School Environment and Educational Assessment (2 credits) This seminar supports and complements the 10 hour/week first year practicum, a field experience designed to orient the student to the general school environment and to provide opportunity to apply skills introduced in the Instructional Assessment & Intervention and Educating Children & Adolescents with Special Needs courses. Students receive training in the implementation of Primary Project interventions. Assignments and class discussion help students understand the field of school psychology and how it is 22

27 practiced on a daily basis. Assignments orient the student to school culture and operations, the classroom environment, instructional practices, and types of special classrooms and programs. The course also provides opportunities for practicing skills in administration and scoring of curriculum-based measures and nationally normed educational achievement tests. Opportunities to practice initial counseling skills are provided. Students begin to plan and compile their portfolios as a means of demonstrating competence and organizing work products and information sources. Year 1, Spring Semester PA 500 Psychoeducational Assessment (3 credits) This course covers the knowledge and skills required to conduct individual assessment of educationally relevant cognitive functions and special abilities. Emphasis is placed on using multiple types of data, including structured observation, interviews, rating scales, and standardized tests. Students are expected to achieve a high level of proficiency in administration and scoring of standardized tests, and initial skills in analysis and integration of assessment data, report writing, and oral communication of assessment results. Historical influences and theoretical models for conceptualizing cognitive and neuropsychological functions and special abilities are presented. The course also addresses major issues and controversies in assessment of children and adolescents. Practice assignments for this course are arranged through the concurrent Practicum II. BC 521 Behavioral Assessment, Intervention, and Consultation (3 credits) This course examines major theoretical models and strategies for addressing behavior and emotional problems in the classroom setting, including principles of learning theory and behavior modification, and positive behavioral supports. Foundational skills will emphasize selection of target behaviors, techniques for increasing and decreasing behaviors, contingency contracting, and group management strategies. Cross-cultural perspectives will provide a context for understanding and addressing student behavior. Students will learn to problem-solve, anticipate and prevent problem behaviors, plan and implement interventions, and evaluate and modify interventions based on monitoring data. Students will apply these skills as they conduct a functional behavioral assessment. Students will generate a repertoire of strategies and learn to analyze appropriate approaches for individuals or groups of children. PY 521 Psychopathology of Childhood and Adolescence (3 credits) This course provides an overview of psychopathology in childhood and adolescence from multiple perspectives: biological, developmental, psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, cultural, and situational. DSM diagnosis is taught and the major disorders are covered, including conduct and oppositional-defiant disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, anxiety and depression, pervasive developmental disorders, eating disorders, disorders of young children, personality disorders, and psychosis. Attention is paid to developmental trajectories, that is, the ways in which early development affects later functioning. RS 555 Research and Evaluation Methods (3 credits) This course provides students with an understanding of how productive research and evaluation questions are formulated, the critical distinction between empirical observation and inference, and factors governing the types of conclusions which can be drawn from empirical data. Issues such as sample size and type, correlational vs. experimental research designs, objective vs. subjective data are addressed. Special issues of qualitative research and single case studies are addressed, including the use of phenomenological research to generate research hypotheses. The material is presented with the primary intent of training student to be discriminating consumers of research. Students are introduced to program evaluation, and design an evaluation of a school program or service. FP 502 Practicum II: Psychoeducational Assessment and Intervention (3 credits) This seminar provides instructional and supervisory support for the 10 hour/week first year practicum, which enables the student to apply knowledge and skills introduced in concurrent courses, namely (1) Psychoeducational Assessment, (2) Behavioral Assessment, Consultation, and Collaboration, and (3) Research Methods and Evaluation. The seminar provides the forum to reflect on specific situations that occur in field work, and to address practice issues of general interest. Development of the professional 23

28 self (e.g., attitudes, habits, ethics, relational behaviors) is an ongoing theme and goal. The Practicum seminar provides opportunities to develop psycho-educational assessment skills and demonstrate requisite proficiency. Supervised training experience in preventive mental health as a Primary Project child associate is incorporated into this practicum. Year 1, Summer Session PH 501 Preventive Mental Health in the Schools (2 credits) Schools offer a unique and invaluable opportunity for delivery of mental health services. While the majority of mental health services for children are currently provided in school settings, they are often delivered in an inefficient and ineffective manner to select subsets of the school population (i.e., students with disabilities and those severe behavioral and emotional disorders). This course focuses on prevention and early intervention strategies, delivered within a continuum of services model that addresses the needs of all students. Evidence-based practice, positive behavioral interventions and supports, and school-community partnerships are major topics of study. CC 522 Diversity and Cross-Cultural Psychology (3 credits) This course provides an overview of the study of culture, education and mental health. It presents different frameworks to understand children and families from various cultural backgrounds, stressing their SES, the ways in which they typically understand themselves (e.g., gender roles, self-definitions, culture-bound syndromes), and their strengths. Implications for the school environment, including strategies for providing educational and psycho-social supports, are examined. Year 2, Fall Semester PA 600 Social-Emotional Assessment (3 credits) This course covers the history and use of personality and social-emotional measures with children and adolescents. The focus is on assessing social and emotional aspects of individuals with reference both to familial and cultural context and to traditional notions of emotional impairment and psychiatric diagnosis. Students learn methods of observation and interview as well as objective measures (e.g., BASC II, ASEBA, Conners 3, CDI, MMPI-A) and projective measures (e.g., drawings, sentence completion, structured story telling). Projective and objective measures are compared and contrasted with respect to value and appropriate use of each. Impact of cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic factors are addressed. Legal and ethical implications are explored. Supervised experience in social-emotional assessment is arranged through the concurrent Practicum III. CX 610 Counseling and Psychotherapy in the Schools (3 credits) This course explores theoretical foundations and practical interventions involved in counseling and psychotherapy with children adolescents, particularly as applied in school settings. Topics include establishing rapport, ethical responsibilities, intervention planning, psychodynamic techniques, behavioral techniques, treatment of selected disorders, relationships with social services and other providers, transference and counter-transference, and the influence of social and cultural factors. Supervised experience in counseling of individual students is arranged through the concurrent Practicum III. PS 630 Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in School Psychology (3 credits) This course broadens and deepens students knowledge and appreciation of historical, legal, ethical, and professional issues in providing psychological services in schools. In addition to relevant laws, and ethical and professional standards, the course addresses roles and priorities, use of supervision, professional development, and technology. Practical issues include use of the personal computer and the internet to organize and process information, write reports, network with other professionals, and find resource materials. These skills and perspectives are applied to the study of current issues and controversies in the field of school psychology. Particular emphases are conceptual, professional, legal, and ethical issues; and, emerging problems and opportunities in school psychology including service delivery models and methods. 24

29 FP 601 Practicum III: Clinical Practice (2 credits) This seminar provides support for the second year (15 hour/week) secondary level school-based practicum, which is linked with concurrent coursework in Social-Emotional Assessment; Counseling and Psychotherapy in Schools; and Group Process and Group Therapy. The practicum seminar integrates the material learned in these courses with the practical aspects of providing treatment and educational interventions at the secondary level. Students are expected to be providing assessments, treatment and educational interventions in their school placements. Discussions address how to use the total available resources to provide mental health and academic benefits for students and their families, with a focus on data-based decision-making and the three-tiered model. The practicum seminar provides a forum for students to discuss complex cases that they have encountered in the field from an ecological perspective. Additionally, students explore an area of special interest over the course of the year. This will be coordinated with the presentations and readings that students do during the seminar. Year 2, Spring Semester BL 622 Biological Bases of Behavior and Learning (3 credits) This course examines the biological bases of behavior and learning through the lifespan, including the fundamentals of neuroanatomy, brain development, neuropsychology, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, psychopharmacology and temperament. Interactions between genes, brain, environment and lifestyle (including effects of diet, exercise, and sleep) will be emphasized, and how these impact brain development, learning and memory, and mental health. This knowledge is applied towards understanding typical maturation, as well as developmental conditions such as learning disabilities, ADHD and autism, and clinical mental health conditions such as anxiety, depression, and psychosis. Students will critically examine a variety of intervention approaches with the goal of becoming lifelong critical consumers of new information in these areas. Principles and theories of learning, motivation and neuropsychologically based interventions are also discussed. CO 650 Consultation in Schools (3 credits) This course provides the theoretical foundations and fundamental skills for the delivery of consultation services in schools using a problem solving approach. Students are introduced to several models, such as mental health, behavioral, and instructional and systems-level consultation. Applicable interventions in consulting with parents, teachers, and other staff members are reviewed. Ethical and diversity issues are also explored. Students practice consultation skills through assignments conducted in their practicum placements. GR 611 Group Process and Group Therapy (3 credits) This course provides a basic understanding of groups and teaches skills for leading task-oriented groups in school and child clinical settings. Critical facets of group functioning are studied through key concepts that are applicable to all groups, including boundaries, task/maintenance, content and process, levels of group functioning, phases of group development, cohesiveness, conflict management, and working alliances. These principles are studied with reference to both leading student groups, and participating with other adults in school/community teams and committees. The course provides an introduction to theory, research and practice in the area, and focuses on key decisions associated with planning and leading a group. The assignment of conducting a student group is arranged through the concurrent Practicum IV. FP 602 Practicum IV: Clinical Practice (2 credits) This seminar provides support for the concurrent second year (15 hour/week) school-based practicum, which provides continued opportunity to practice the skills and functions introduced in previous courses and in the School and Family Systems. The practicum seminar integrates the material learned in these courses with the practical aspects of providing treatment and educational interventions at the secondary level. Students are expected to be providing assessments, treatment and educational interventions in their school placements. Discussions address how to use the total available resources to provide mental health and academic benefits for students and their families, with a focus on data-based decision-making and the three-tiered model. The practicum seminar provides a forum for students to discuss complex 25

30 cases that they have encountered in the field from an ecological perspective. Additionally, students explore an area of special interest over the course of the year. Year 3 CS 701 Internship Seminar A (2 credits) This seminar supports the first segment of the 1200-hour internship, which provides the opportunity to refine and integrate skills, and develop the professional self and professional work characteristics. The internship enables interns to practice a comprehensive model of school psychological services that includes data-based decision making, counseling, consultation, and group facilitation and leadership. The seminar addresses issues that surface during internship, such as ethical and practice dilemmas, use of supervision, and interactions with administration and staff. Guest presenters offer special sessions on featured topics. CS 702 Internship Seminar B (2 credits) This seminar supports the second segment of the 1200-hour internship, which provides the opportunity to refine and integrate skills, and to develop the professional self and professional work characteristics. The internship enables interns to practice a comprehensive model of school psychological services that includes data-based decision making, counseling, consultation, and group facilitation and leadership. The seminar addresses issues that surface during internship, such as ethical and practice dilemmas, use of supervision, and interactions with administration and staff. FP 701 & FP 702 (3 credits each semester) In addition to the Internship Seminar, students register for the internship itself each semester. Satisfactory performance is determined by field supervisor evaluations and by submission of the Field Placement Log to document fulfillment of time (i.e., 1200 hours) and breadth requirements. Course Evaluation Instructors obtain formative course evaluation feedback from students mid-way through the semester using a standard written form and, if desired, by informal means (e.g., discussion). Students complete a confidential institution-wide course evaluation electronically at the end of each semester. Compiled evaluation data are provided to the instructor and to the program director. Students must complete course evaluations in order to continue to have access to their records on SSIG. 26

31 VIII. Class Schedule, YEAR 1 Year 1, Fall Semester Credits Instructor Day Time RS 526 Statistics 3 Murphy M 9:30 am-12:30 p.m. FP 501 Practicum I: Section 1 2 Brown M 1:00-3:20 p.m. FP 501 Practicum I: Section 2 2 Miller M 1:00-3:20 p.m. IA 520 Instructional Assessment & Intervention 3 Axelrod Tu 1:00-3:50 p.m. SN 512 Educating Children & Adolescents with Special Needs 3 Goodale Tu 4:10-7:00 p.m. LS 659 Life Span Development 3 Ecker W 4:00-6:50 p.m. Year 1, Spring Semester Credits Instructor Day Time RS 555 Research and Evaluation Methods 3 Murphy M 9:30 am-12:30 p.m. FP 502 Practicum II: Section 1 3 Brown M 1:00-3:30 p.m. FP 502 Practicum II: Section 2 3 Miller M 1:00-3:30 p.m. PA 500 Psychoeducational Assessment 3 Lichtenstein Tu 1:00-3:50 p.m. BC 521 Behavioral Assessment, Intervention & Consultation 3 Goodale Tu 4:10-7:00 p.m. PY 521 Psychopathology of Childhood and Adolescence 3 Jacobs W 4:00-6:50 p.m. Year 1, Summer Semester Credits Instructor Day Time PH 501 Preventive Mental Health in the Schools 2 Macklem M, W 12:30 p.m.-3:00 p.m. CC 522 Diversity and Cross-Cultural Psychology 3 TBD M, W 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. 27

32 YEAR 2 Year 2, Fall Semester Credits Instructor Day Time PA 600 Social-Emotional Assessment 3 Kaplan Tu 3:30-6:20 p.m. FP 601 Practicum III: Clinical Practice, Section 1 2 Bowman Tu 6:40-8:30 p.m. PS 630 Ethical, Legal & Professional Issues in School Psych. 3 Macklem Th 1:30-4:20 p.m. CX 610 Counseling and Psychotherapy in Schools 3 Abblett Th 4:40-7:30 p.m. Year 2, Spring Semester Credits Instructor Day Time CO 650 Consultation in Schools 3 Wolkoff Tu 3:45-6:35 p.m. FP 602 Practicum IV: Clinical Practice 2 Bowman Tu 6:50-8:40 p.m. GR 611 Group Process and Group Therapy 3 Hannah Th 1:30-4:20 p.m. BL 622 Biological Bases of Behavior and Learning 3 Vega Th 4:40-7:30 p.m. YEAR 3 Year 3, Fall Semester Credits Instructor Day Time CS 701 Internship Seminar A 2 Silva M 2:30-4:30 p.m. FP 701 Internship 3 Silva Year 3, Spring Semester Credits Instructor Day Time CS 702 Internship Seminar B 2 Silva M 2:30-4:30 p.m. FP 702 Internship 3 Silva 28

33 IX. Student Advising Students in the program are assigned to an advisor who is a core faculty member. Assignments are made so as to equalize advisors responsibilities, although consideration is also given to minimizing multiple relationships (e.g., a student who works with a faculty member as a project assistant or clinical supervisee might be assigned to a different faculty member) and matching subject area interests. Faculty advisors meet with advisees at least once per semester (not including the A&P Conference) and more often as needed to discuss program planning, professional interests and any matters of academic or personal concern. The advisor chairs the student s annual A&P Conference and reviews his/her portfolio in advance. In addition, the Dean of Students and Associate Dean of Students are available to students to discuss personal and interpersonal concerns of a confidential manner. For matters concerning academic matters or relationships with faculty, students should first make reasonable efforts to resolve the matter with the party in question and/or the faculty advisor. Program-wide meetings for students and faculty generally are held twice per year, at the beginning of Fall and Spring semesters. Advising issues of general concern (e.g., curriculum options, field placement search, obstacles to meeting program requirements) are addressed with students as a group, either in clinical seminars or program-wide meetings. Of particular importance, information regarding professional credentials and school psychology licensure are routinely addressed in the Internship Seminar. 29

34 X. Professional Credentials All graduates of the School Psychology Program will have met requirements to qualify for licensure as a school psychology in Massachusetts and in other states, and to apply to become a nationally certified school psychologist (NCSP). Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education requirements for licensure as a school psychologist are provided in Appendix 16. Program graduates must document completion of internship requirements with the Pre-Service Performance Assessment form (Appendix 17), which is kept on file by MSPP. After meeting subsequent requirements (i.e., two years of experience as a school psychologist and 60 hours of clinical supervision by an approved supervisor), program graduates may apply for Allied Mental Health and Human Services licensure as an educational psychologist in Massachusetts.. Requirements and the application for licensure as an educational psychologist can be found at: The MSPP School Psychology Program prepares and strongly encourages all program graduates to apply for the NCSP credential. Information on become an NCSP can be found at: The following information is provided to facilitate applications for Massachusetts school psychologist and NCSP licensure upon program completion: Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) licensure: 1. Complete the ELAR application online and send in your official undergraduate transcript months in advance of program completion; 2. At or shortly before the final A&P Conference, submit the completed Pre-service Performance Assessment form to the School Psychology Program field placement director; 3. Upon conclusion of the internship, submit your final Internship Log spreadsheet, with totals for overall hours and supervisory hours, to the School Psychology Program field placement director; 4. For graduates who have completed steps 2 and 3 above, MSPP will submit the program completion endorsement to DESE in late June and send final official transcripts to DESE. (Note: if you have not submitted all required documentation by this time, your Massachusetts licensure as a school psychologist will be delayed.) NCSP Application: 1. Complete the Internship Verification form, obtaining necessary information and signatures from your internship field supervisor and the MSPP supervisor (i.e., seminar instructor). a. In the Education and Training section, you can indicate: CAGS degree in School Psychology, 36 Semester hours, and MA in Professional Psychology, 30 Semester hours b. Below that, indicate 60 Total Hours in School Psychology (excluding internship) and 6 Total Internship Credit Hours for a Total of 66. If you took electives above and beyond the 66 hours, indicate these as Total Other Graduate Hours. 2. After you submit your final Internship Log, submit your Verification of Completion of School Psychology Program form to be completed by the School Psychology Program director. 3. Submit all application materials together to NASP. 30

35 XI. School Psychology Program Faculty The School Psychology Program faculty is composed of experienced practitioners who are trained in the fields of school psychology, clinical psychology, neuropsychology, special education, and counseling. Core faculty and teaching faculty serve as student advisors. All faculty members are active in program planning and coordination. The faculty meets monthly on the second Wednesday evening of each month. Students are welcome and encouraged to attend faculty meetings. Mitchell Abblett, Ph.D. Mitchell Abblett completed his doctorate in Clinical Psychology at Florida State University, and his predoctoral internship at the Boston Consortium for Clinical Psychology. He is currently the Clinical Director of the Manville School, a private therapeutic day school program in Boston, serving children and adolescents with emotional, behavioral and learning difficulties. Prior to coming to Manville, Dr. Abblett worked in residential and correctional settings with youth and families, focusing on the treatment of significant risk behaviors. In addition to his direct clinical services to Manville students and families, as well as his supervision, training and administrative roles at Manville, Dr. Abblett maintains a private practice as a licensed psychologist. He has written in professional periodicals regarding children s mental health needs and has written on how to do the best work when clinical work becomes difficult, including a book for clinicians on this topic: The Heat of the Moment in Treatment: Mindful Management of Difficult Clients (Norton Professional Books, in press). Dr. Abblett has conducted numerous trainings nationally and internationally on mindfulness and its applications in clinical work. Joan Axelrod, M.Ed. Joan Axelrod is a psychoeducational specialist in private practice in Lexington MA. She conducts psychoeducational evaluations of students with special needs and assists in developing and monitoring educational programs for those students. She also consults to several public school systems and educational collaboratives on curriculum design and individual educational planning for students with learning disabilities. Prior to moving into private practice, Ms. Axelrod was the Clinical Director of the evaluation center at North Shore Children s Hospital. She holds a Masters degree in special education from Boston University and completed doctoral coursework in educational psychology at Clark University. June S. Bowman, Ed.D. June Bowman, who has been practicing in Massachusetts since 1977, is a Nationally Certified School Psychologist and licensed educational psychologist. She has worked in urban schools (Brockton, MA), more rural (Rockport, MA), and suburban (Concord, MA) school settings. She is currently a school psychologist at Brookline High School, where she is co-leader of the crisis intervention team for the Brookline Schools. She is also a member of the College Board Advisory Panel for Services for Students with Disabilities, responsible for reviewing documentation and advising on requests for accommodations on the SAT s. She is presently an adjunct instructor at Northeastern University and has taught at UMass, Boston. She received her master s from Harvard University in counseling psychology and her doctorate from Boston University in developmental psychology. Charles Brown, Ph.D. Charles Brown is a licensed psychologist and nationally certified school psychologist. He received his Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from Boston College and his clinical training from the Kennedy Hospital in Boston (now The Franciscan Children s Hospital) and from the Human 31

36 Relations Service in Wellesley, MA. A member of the National Register of Health Care Providers in Psychology, he has been in private practice since 1981, specializing in therapy for individuals, couples, families, children and adolescents. He served for 28 years as a school psychologist for the Belmont Public Schools, where he developed the Belmont School Psychology Internship Program, and has taught in the School Psychology Program at Tufts University. Bruce Ecker, Ph.D. Bruce Ecker is a licensed clinical and educational psychologist and certified school psychologist with 30 years experience in clinics, schools, and hospitals. He has a private practice in Springfield and consults regularly with schools and agencies. He was trained in school psychology at the University of Minnesota, and received his Ph.D. from the Clinical Psychology Training Program at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He was a Clinical Fellow at Harvard Medical School and has been on the clinical faculties of Tufts University School of Medicine and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Bruce was awarded the MSPP Excellence in Teaching Award in Ronda Goodale, Ph.D. Ronda Goodale is a licensed educational psychologist and certified school psychologist who earned her doctorate in educational psychology at Boston College. She has worked in the Boston Public Schools for over 30 years where she supervised school psychologists, served as a program advisor for litigation, private placement, as well as facilitating support teams, and acting as a literacy coach for the Boston Public Schools for students with severe emotional/behavioral disorders. She currently works for Wediko Family Services as a consultant to the Malden schools in special education and RTI, as well as a consultant to the McKinley school in Boston, that serves a K-12 population of students with severe emotional/behavioral disorders. Her particular expertise is in behavior management, consultation, RTI, and CBM. She is also an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Special Education at University of Massachusetts, Boston and Northeastern University s Graduate School of Education. Margaret Hannah, M.Ed. Margaret Hannah is the Executive Director of the Freedman Center for Child and Family Development at MSPP. She received her master s degree in education with a concentration in community counseling and psychology from the University of Miami. She has worked in schools and agencies for over 25 years, providing teacher and parent education programs and facilitating support groups. She has also taught at the elementary level. She has served as a project director for three federal grants for the delivery of mental health services within schools, and a grant to integrate mental health services between schools and community agencies. She serves on many Massachusetts committees and task forces advocating for mental health services, including the Massachusetts Academy of Pediatrics Mental Health Task Force and the City of Newton City-wide Emergency Response Team (CERT). In her position at MSPP, Margaret manages the Freedman Center for Child and Family Development, which includes direction of Primary Project (a school-based preventive mental health initiative). She teaches in both the School Psychology and Counseling Psychology programs. Daniel Jacobs, Psy.D. Dan Jacobs is a licensed psychologist with a private practice, Jacobs Psychological and Consulting Services, in Andover, MA. He trains nationally on a variety of mental health, substance abuse and systemic change topics and consults with schools and residential programs around curriculum and behavioral incident issues. Before going into private practice Dr. Jacobs was the Director of the Adolescent and Adult Partial Hospital Programs at Salem Hospital in Salem, MA. He has a master s in education from Harvard University, a master s in 32

37 business administration from Salem State University, and he earned his doctorate from MSPP in Jason Kaplan, Ph.D. Jason Kaplan is a Nationally Certified School Psychologist and a Massachusetts Licensed Educational Psychologist. He received his Ph.D. in School and Counseling Psychology from Northeastern University and his M.Ed. and CAGS from the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Jason is currently a school psychologist in the Newton Public Schools where he has worked since 2001 and supervises school psychology graduate students. Prior to working in Newton, Jason taught high school students with learning, emotional, and behavioral disabilities for three years. Jason is an active member of the Massachusetts School Psychologists Association, for which he serves as co-chair of the Ethics, Professional Standards and Credentialing Committee. His research interests include RTI implementation and the assessment and treatment of children with social and emotional disabilities. Bob Lichtenstein, Ph.D. (Program Director)* Bob Lichtenstein is a nationally certified school psychologist and licensed psychologist with formal training in the areas of school psychology, clinical psychology, elementary education, school administration, and neuropsychology. He has worked as a school psychologist in Minnesota, Delaware and Massachusetts, as a staff psychologist and director of training at North Shore Children's Hospital in Salem, Massachusetts, and as director of psychological services for the New Haven Public Schools. He designed the School Psychology Program at the University of Delaware and served as its first coordinator. He worked for the Connecticut Department of Education from 1994 to 2006, serving as the state consultant for school psychology and school social work. He represents the National Association of School Psychologists on the National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities. Gayle L. Macklem, M. A., LEP Gayle Macklem is a Nationally Certified School Psychologist and a Massachusetts Licensed Educational Psychologist. She has served in the field of education for over 30 years, serving as a school psychologist/team chairperson and as an adjunct instructor in school psychology. She has developed a number of prevention programs including The Structured Learning Program, The Reading Initiative, The Math Merits Program, Project Link, Bullying Prevention and a multi-tiered program for social/emotional development. She has taught in the Counseling and School Psychology Program at the University of Massachusetts Boston for a number of years. A former president of the Massachusetts School Psychologists Association (MSPA), she currently serves as the Technology Chairperson and edits the websites of the state association, including monitoring an online course. Gayle has worked as a curriculum developer and writer for the Open Circle Social Competency curriculum, and is the author of Bullying and teasing: Social power in children s groups (2003), A practitioner s guide to emotion regulation in school-aged children (2008), and Evidence-based school mental health services: Affect education, emotion regulation training and cognitive behavioral therapy (2011). Gayle is a frequent presenter at workshops and conferences, and provides in-service training to schools. Barbara Miller, Ph.D. Barbara Miller is a licensed educational psychologist and a nationally certified school psychologist. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from McGill University and during her course of studies her interest in learning disorders was kindled. She worked in the public schools (Concord and Concord-Carlisle) as a school psychologist for 34 years and served for many years as a field supervisor for graduate students in school psychology. She also coordinated professional development for the school psychologists who were part of the 33

38 regional educational collaborative. The later part of her public school career was focused on middle school education, as she served as the department chairperson for student support services and the team chairperson for special education. She has been very active in the Massachusetts School Psychologists Association, of which she is a past president. She was the recipient of the Massachusetts School Psychologist of the Year award. Her current interests include advocating for the expanded role of the school psychologist and developing a curriculum for school-based mental health teams. She also teaches in the Department of Counseling and School Psychology at the University of Massachusetts, Boston and in the Department of Counseling and Applied Educational Psychology at Northeastern University. Craig Murphy, Ph.D.* Craig Murphy is a nationally certified school psychologist. He received his PhD and MS from the Pennsylvania State University, both in school psychology. He has spent his last eleven years working for the Newton Public Schools, three of which he served as the Project Director for the Elementary Counseling Grant; this was a federally-funded program to increase and improve the mental health services provided to children demonstrating challenging behaviors and/or fragile emotions. Craig also maintains a private practice providing counseling, advocacy, consultation, and assessments to families and local school districts. His research interests include understanding, evaluating, and supporting behavioral/social-emotional functioning in children; bridging the gap between research and practice in school psychology; statistics; and research methodology. Arlene Silva, Ph.D. * Arlene Silva is a Nationally Certified School Psychologist and Licensed Educational Psychologist. A graduate of Amherst College, she received her doctorate in School Psychology in 2007 from the University of Maryland, College Park, where she also interned with the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP). Arlene completed her pre-doctoral internship in the Nashua, NH School District while employed as an Associate School Psychologist. Since earning her doctorate, Arlene has garnered a broad range of professional experiences, including Assistant Professor in the Tufts University School Psychology Program, Consultant to the Nashua, NH School District, Clinician at Brighton-Allston Mental Health Association, and Bilingual School Psychologist at Gardner Pilot Academy in the Boston Public Schools. Arlene s research interests include consultee-centered consultation, supervision, and culturally relevant practice. She has been involved in NASP Leadership since 2006, serving as Chair of the Student Development Workgroup ( ) and the inaugural Chair of the Early Career Workgroup ( ). She continues to serve as a Member of the NASP Early Career Workgroup. Clemente Vega, Ph.D. Clemente Vega is a licensed psychologist with specialty training in neuropsychology. He currently has appointments as assistant professor in the Neurology Department at the Children s Hospital in Boston, and as instructor in the Psychiatry Department at Harvard School of Medicine. He received his Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology from Carlos Albizu University in Miami, Florida, and his clinical training from Miami Children s Hospital (internship) and Yale University School of Medicine (fellowship). *Core faculty Teaching faculty 34

39 XII. Admissions Admission to the MSPP School Psychology requires evidence of potential for academic success, personal and professional qualities deemed necessary to function as a school psychologist, and motivation for professional excellence and leadership in the field. Eligible applicants must hold a four year college degree. They should have prior coursework and/or work experience in psychology, education, or a closely related field. 2 Admissions information and application instructions can found on the MSPP website at: A. Admission Requirements Application materials are enumerated in the current School Psychology Program application. The following are requirements for application to the program at the M.A. Degree level: 1. Earned B.A. or B.S. degree; 2. Completed application form; 3. Letters of recommendation; 4. Resume; 5. Work sample; 6. Autobiographical statement, including a statement of purpose and goals; 7. Financial plan; 8. Official transcript(s); 9. Non-native speakers of English may be required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).as evidence of their level of English as spoken and written in North America; 10. The general Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is recommended, but not required. In selecting among candidates, the following qualifications are considered: 1. Prior coursework and work/volunteer experience in psychology or education; 2. Academic achievement at the undergraduate level; Although there is no strict cutoff, a GPA of 3.0 or better is expected. 3. Communication skills (including expository writing); 4. Effective interpersonal relations; 5. Respect for human diversity; 6. Ethical behavior; 7. Adaptability; 8. Initiative; 9. Dependability. 10. Combined TOEFL score (listening, structure and writing expression, speaking and reading) of 550 or higher (paper-based), 213 or higher (computer-based), or 92 (internet-based). 11. Applicants whose undergraduate GPA or other qualifications are marginal may be requested to submit GRE scores as evidence of their academic capabilities. There is no strict cutoff, but the following levels are expected: GRE combined score (Verbal and Quantitative) of 1000 or higher. GRE-A score (Analytical Writing) of 4 or higher. 2 If this criterion is not met, a matriculating student may be assigned a compensatory learning activity at the discretion of the School Psychology Program Director or Admissions Committee. 35

40 Completed application packets are thoroughly reviewed by members of the MSPP faculty, who decide whether the applicant will be granted an interview. Each component of the application is an important piece of this process. The Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is not required, but applicants with marginal qualifications are advised to submit GRE scores as evidence of capacity to do graduate level work. Applicants who do not meet these standards are encouraged to address extenuating circumstances in their autobiographical statement. B. Application for Advanced Standing Applicants with a Master s degree may qualify for advanced standing, that is, as a candidate for the CAGS degree only. To be eligible, applicants must: Hold a Master s degree in school psychology, or an earned Master s degree or doctoral degree in a closely related field (e.g., clinical psychology, counseling, special education); Have a GPA of 3.0 or better in the qualifying graduate program Have completed at least 18 graduate semester credits of coursework that matches, or is equivalent to, required courses in the MSPP School Psychology Program. Qualifying coursework is credited toward requirements for program completion. At least 12 of the 18 credits must have been earned as part of the qualifying graduate degree program. The determination of coursework equivalence is made by the School Psychology Program director or designated faculty committee. Up to 12 credits earned as a non-matriculated student at MSPP or another regionally accredited institution may also be credited toward the CAGS degree in accordance with the transfer of credit policy, as described in the MSPP Institutional Policy and Procedures Manual and in this document (see III.J.). The determination of coursework equivalence is made by the School Psychology Program director or designated faculty committee. Coursework that does not meet these criteria may be credited at the discretion of the program director or designated committee under contracted conditions (e.g., auditing some or all classes, completing specified course readings and/or assignments, obtaining a passing score on course examinations). Prior to acceptance into the CAGS program, applicants must obtain a passing score on the Communication and Literacy Skills test of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure (MTEL), which is required for licensure as a school psychologist in Massachusetts. (See for details.) To earn the CAGS degree, program graduates must complete all School Psychology Program requirements for the M.A. and CAGS degrees, with the exception of the First Year Examination (see Section III.A., Academic Requirements). Therefore, the overall CAGS degree program for advanced standing students may significantly exceed the 31 credit minimum. The qualifications listed in Section III.A. are used to evaluate the merits of an application for advanced standing. C. Concurrent Application to Other MSPP Programs Other graduate programs at MSPP involve distinctly different graduate experiences and career opportunities. It is possible, however, that an applicant s interests fall within the realm of more than one program. Application may be submitted to more than one program, in which case 36

41 each application will be evaluated separately. If applying to more than one program, each application should be submitted by its respective deadline. The application review process for each program is separate, including the interview. If the applicant is offered, and accepts, admission to another MSPP program, the School Psychology Program application will no longer be considered. An applicant should not enroll in one program with the expectation of transferring to another program. Admission to the School Psychology M.A./CAGS Program does not assure acceptance as a transfer student into a different MSPP program. Program requirements are distinctly different, and few credits will transfer (with the notable exception of course credits from the MA/CAGS program transferring to the School Psychology PsyD program). D. Part-time Enrollment The program is primarily designed for full-time students. Some required courses are offered during daytime hours, and field experiences require students to be available during significant amounts of time during grade school hours. Applicants who wish to extend their current employment, or who have significant competing demands of a short-term nature, may apply for part-time enrollment during the first year of the program. This will extend total time in the program, and may be paramount to completing the first year over a two year period. 37

42 XIII. Financial Information Program tuition for the school year is based on the rate of $1,130 per credit. In addition, a student service fee of $360 per semester is assessed for audio-visual, technology, and library services; test materials; and photocopying. A one-time graduation fee of $350 is assessed the semester prior to graduation. Please consult the Policy and Procedures Manual for Financial Aid information. Applicants for MSPP financial aid are required to be registered on a full-time basis. For the School Psychology Program, full-time enrollment is 11 or more credits per semester. 38

43 Appendices 39

44 Professional Behavior Relationships Diversity/Individual Differences Ethical/Legal/Professional Issues Scholarship/Research Educational Foundations Psychological/Develop. Foundations Assessment & Measurement Counseling/Behavioral Intervention Consultation System Invention Appendix 1 Competency Areas Evaluated in School Psychology Program Courses Instructional Assessment and Intervention X X X Statistics X X X Life Span Development X X X Educating Children and Adolescents with Special Needs X X X Practicum I - School Environment and Educational Assessment X X X Psychoeducational Assessment X X X Behavioral Assessment, Intervention, and Consultation X X X X X Research and Evaluation Methods X X Psychopathology of Childhood and Adolescence X X X X Practicum II - Psychoeducational Assessment and Intervention X X X X Diversity and Cross-Cultural Psychology X X X Preventive Mental Health in Schools X X X X Social-Emotional Assessment X X Counseling and Psychotherapy in Schools X X Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in School Psychology X X X Practicum III - Clinical Practice X X X Group Process and Group Therapy X X X Consultation in Schools X X X Biological Basis of Behavior and Learning X X Practicum IV - Clinical Practice X X X Internship Seminar A X X X Internship Seminar B X X X X NOTE: The basis for the determination to formally evaluate a competency for a given course is that (1) the competency area is substantially addressed, and (2) there is sufficient student performance data to meaningfully evaluate the area. 40

45 Appendix 2 Student Course Evaluation Welcome to MSPP Student Evaluation System You are completing this student evaluation as STEP 3: Please complete the following - 1. Faculty Member, Course ID, Section Number, Course Name 2. Student Name* (Make sure you select the right student before submission) - Please Select - 3. Grade Given (If you haven't done so, please click HERE to log into SSIG to submit your course grades) 4. On what basis are you evaluating the student? Oral Presentations Examinations Class Participation Written Work Applied Exercises Liaison Field Contact Case Presentations Course Content 5. Student demonstrates satisfactory understanding of theory taught in this course. Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 6. Student demonstrates satisfactory performance in applications (e.g. skills, formulation, integration) taught in this course. Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA Written and Verbal Communication 7. Student demonstrates satisfactory competence in writing mechanics as applicable to course 41

46 material Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 8. Student demonstrates satisfactory competence in written articulation of concepts, theory, and observations relevant to course material. Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 9. Student demonstrates satisfactory competence in researching, organizing, preparing and presenting formal oral presentations. Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 10. Student demonstrates satisfactory competence in verbal articulation of concepts, theory, and observations relevant to course material through sufficiently active and effective class participation. Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA Professional Conduct in the Classroom 11. Student treats clients and colleagues in a respectful and considerate manner. Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 12. Student understands and follows professional codes of ethics (APA, NASP, ACA) Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 13. Student demonstrates an awareness of his/her functioning including his/her personal impact on others in professional and academic settings. Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 14. Student meets professional obligations in a timely and responsible manner Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 42

47 15. Student is receptive to constructive criticism and suggestions and shows responsibility in taking appropriate action. Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 16. Student assumes responsibility for his/her own learning, using available resources (e.g. consultation, supervision, literature) to fulfill professional and academic obligations. Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA Professional Conduct in Practicum and Internship Settings. This section is to be completed by faculty members teaching Clinical Seminar and any courses where the field work component is regularly addressed. All other faculty, please check N/A for questions Student treats clients and colleagues in a respectful and considerate manner. Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 18. Student understands and follows professional codes of ethics (APA, NASP, ACA) Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 19. Student demonstrates an awareness of his/her functioning including his/her personal impact on others in professional and academic settings. Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 20. Student meets professional obligations in a timely and responsible manner Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 21. Student is receptive to constructive criticism and suggestions and shows responsibility in taking appropriate action. Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 22. Student assumes responsibility for his/her own learning, using available resources (e.g. consultation, supervision, literature) to fulfill professional and academic obligations. 43

48 Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 23. Student demonstrates competence in establishing and maintaining working relationships with clients and colleagues. Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 24. Student demonstrates cultural sensitivity and strives towards cultural competence. Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA 25. Student demonstrates an awareness of the relevant scientific literature and empirically based treatment approaches and draws on this literature in making assessment and treatment/intervention plans. Meets expected standard Minimally meets standard Fails to meet expected standard NA Narrative Summary 26. Comment on and include any information appropriate to understanding the criteria used for the ratings above. Elaborate on the degree to which the student has met the competencies and/or objectives identified in this course. NOTICE OF ACADEMIC/PROFESSIONAL DIFFICULTY 27. In the event that work done for this course was in any way substandard, marginal or problematic, this is to be indicated by checking the appropriate item below. CREDIT PROBLEMATIC INCOMPLETE A GRADE BELOW B- Other, Elaborate in the narrative (Question 26) 44

49 28. Date by which work to be completed (unless instructor determines an earlier date, the deadline for completing coursework is on or before the first day of the semester following that in which it was assigned. Specify the alternate date agreed on, if any Comment: If your course addresses one or more of the competencies, please choose from the following competencies and rate the student accordingly: For Students in Psy.D / Couseling Psychology / Forensic Psychology Programs 29. Relationship -- None Assessment -- None Intervention -- None Ethics -- None Research -- None Consultation -- None Supervision -- None Diversity -- None -- For Students in School Psychology Programs 45

50 37. Data-Based Decision Making -- None Enhancing Cognitive and Academic Skills -- None Enhancing Mental Health and Social Skills -- None System-Based Service Delivery -- None Legal, Ethical, Professional Responsibility -- None Technological Applications -- None Diversity Awareness -- None Interpersonal and Collaborative Skills -- None -- This evaluation is complete? (This evaluation will not be official until you click "Yes") Yes No Submit This Evaluation Reset 46

51 Appendix 3 Portfolio Students in the MSPP School Psychology Program develop and maintain a portfolio that represents their best work and reflects their development as a professional. The portfolio provides evidence of their knowledge, skills, progress, and experience in the field of school psychology. The process begins when students enter the School Psychology Program, and ideally continues throughout one s training and subsequent professional career. The portfolio supplements evidence of competency from course and fieldwork evaluations. The portfolio serves multiple purposes: (1) To document progress toward developing skills, competencies and professional work characteristics per program expectations; (2) To showcase examples of quality work and noteworthy accomplishments to a prospective employer or field supervisor; (3) To compile and organize resources, materials, and work samples that will be of ongoing use to you as a professional. The portfolio is intended to encourage you to establish a lifelong pattern of self-evaluation and reflection. It serves as documentation of your work, progress, sense of professional self, and interests at the annual assessment and planning (A & P) conference. You are encouraged to maintain and expand upon your professional portfolio throughout your career. Portfolio Review Your portfolio will be reviewed periodically by your seminar instructor, as well as by your advisor prior to your A&P conference at the end of each year. In Years 1 and 2, the main emphasis of the portfolio will be personal essays and reflections. While students will be encouraged to begin adding domain-specific evidence, advisors will only review evidence that was not previously evaluated, as well as personal essays and reflections, prior to the annual A&P conference. In Year 3, the advisor will evaluate the portfolio at the end of the spring semester prior to the A&P conference. It is expected that interns will have predominantly internship-level evidence in each domain by the end of the year, including all three case studies. Portfolio Requirements At each stage of the program, the portfolio should reflect successively higher levels of competence, as follows: Spring, Year 1: Spring, Year 2: Spring, Year 3: Demonstrate steady progress toward development of competencies and satisfactory professional work characteristics, as required for transition to the CAGS degree program. Demonstrate further progress, increased capacity for independent functioning, and readiness for internship. Demonstrate competencies across domains of training and practice, and readiness to enter the field as a certified/licensed school psychology. (Please refer to the NCSP application for further details.) 47

52 Portfolio Organization and Content The portfolio should include a section for each of the NASP domains of training and practice. Each domain should begin with a brief introduction that includes: your reflection about your professional growth and activities in the domain and reference to supporting evidence from the field; and, a list of documents included and their relationship to achieving domain competence. Documents may include papers, presentations, etc. developed as part of academic course requirements; activities completed in field placements; brief summaries of work examples (i.e., summary of groups led, counseling sessions, behavioral and consultation interventions, etc.) and evidence of continuing professional development such as attendance certificates or logs of presentations attended. Most important, students should reflect on training and practice based on their own experience, their perceptions of practice in schools, and the status of K-12 education. Reflections from previous years can be kept in the portfolio, as their juxtaposition with more recent reflections can provide evidence of development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Your portfolio should include the following material: A personal preamble or mission statement. A resume or vita, updated annually, that reflects training, experience, professional affiliations, accomplishments, presentations/publications, etc. Personal essay(s) and reflections that addresses: a. Achieved and Desired Personal/Professional Growth b. Strengths/Areas of Interest in School Psychology/Education c. Professional Development Plans d. Statement of Theoretical Orientation (expectation by internship year) e. Career Goals (expectation by internship year) A section for each NASP domain of training and practice, with an introduction that addresses domain-specific reflections (fall and spring for Year 3 portfolios), and evidence included. Clearly label any evidence that has not been previously reviewed by an MSPP instructor. (Note: Advisors of Year 1 and 2 students will only review new, previously unevaluated domain-specific evidence). A log of major activities and assignments undertaken at your field placement each week, noting time on site for the day, week, and school year. A summary of leadership and service activities within the MSPP community and/or professional communities. Three case studies that meet NASP standards, as presented and evaluated in the Internship Seminar (internship year only). Case studies should be included as evidence in the appropriate domain. Other material that might be included in the portfolio: Pre- and post-field placement self-analysis of professional competencies Field supervisor evaluations of your competencies 48

53 Evidence of participation in professional development activities (attendance at workshops, conferences, and presentations; presentations at workshops, conferences, parent groups) Transcript(s) or evaluations of graduate work at MSPP and other universities Letters of thanks/recognition (e.g., from field supervisors, principals, other school personnel, parents) Honors/awards/recognitions Selected, work-related photographs (with appropriate permission) Showcase of special skills and interest areas (e.g. computer skills, behavioral interventions, early childhood emphasis) Portfolio Preparation The appearance and quality of the portfolio should be in keeping with its importance to your training and as a reflection of your professional self. Please attend to the following guidelines: Include a Title Page and Table of Contents Layout of materials should be clear and legible Products should be free of spelling/grammar errors, instructor comments, and any confidential information Be selective: include 1-2 work products per domain as the best exemplars of your work, not everything you ve ever done! For electronic compilation (preferred): Include identifying information on the Title Page Use an LCD projector to display the portfolio at your A & P Conference For binder compilation (not applicable to students entering the program after 2012: Use 8-1/2 x 11 inch format in 3-ring binder with clearly labeled section tabs. Include identifying information on the front and/or spine of the binder. Use clear plastic inserts or other system, as needed, to protect and display photos and nonstandard work samples 49

54 MSPP School Psychology Program Portfolio Evaluation Student: Year 1: Year 2: Year 3: Primary reviewer (advisor): Second faculty reviewer: A&P Conference date: Instructions: 1. The faculty advisor, with input from the second faculty member at the Assessment and Planning (A&P) Conference, evaluates the portfolio by using the following ratings: A Absent no relevant material found. N Needs improvement Written material is superficial or elementary, poorly written, has significant errors, neglects evidence-based practices or authoritative information sources, and/or relies excessively on the work of others. Other evidence (documents, evaluations of work) reflects minimal effort or level of competence. S Satisfactory Written material and other evidence is commensurate with the student s level of training. O Outstanding Written material clearly surpasses expectations with respect to quality (clear, well organized, thorough, informative), depth of analysis, creativity or original thought, extensive use of references and incorporation of evidence-based practices) or reference to authoritative information sources. Other evidence (documents, evaluations of work) reflects superior effort or level of competence. 2. Section E domains marked with an asterisk are not routinely rated for first year students. These areas are either rated as S or O, or left blank. Section G is only rated for students on internship. 3. If a content area that is an expectation at the student s level of the program receives a rating of A (absent), the student must address this gap and resubmit the portfolio. The advisor may require revision of a section rated as N (needs improvement). 50

55 A. Preamble/Mission Statement A N S O Comments / What needs improvement? B. Personal Essays and Reflections (Front Sections) 1. Achieved and Desired Personal/Professional Growth A N S O 2. Strengths/Areas of Interest A N S O 3. Professional Development Plans A N S O 4. Statement of Theoretical Orientation A N S O (expectation by internship year) 5. Career Goals A N S O (expectation by internship year) Comments / What needs improvement? C. Résumé 1. Presentation/Formatting A N S O 2. Up to date A N S O 3. Describes training and experiences A N S O 4. Reflects emerging professional identity: affiliations, community A N S O service, accomplishments, presentations/publications Comments / What needs improvement? D. Professional Development 1. Evidence of Professional Development A N S O and Extracurricular Learning 2. Leadership, Community Service, and Volunteer Activities A N S O (See Program Handbook Appendix 5) Comments / What needs improvement? 51

56 E. Domains of Training and Practice This section includes both the domain introductions and evidence. In assigning ratings at the A&P Conference, faculty members will focus on the domain introductions and evidence from sources other than MSPP coursework. 1. Domain-specific reflections (fall and spring for Interns) A N S O 2. Data-Based Decision-Making and Accountability A N S O 3. Consultation and Collaboration A N S O 4. Interventions and Instructional Support to Develop Academic Skills A N S O 5. Interventions and Mental Health Services to Develop Social/Life Skills A N S O 6. School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning A N S O 7. Preventive and Responsive Services* A N S O 8. Family-School Collaboration Services* A N S O 9. Diversity in Development and Learning A N S O 10. Research and Program Evaluation A N S O 11. Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice A N S O Comments / What needs improvement? F. Field placement log of activities 1. Thorough and appropriate documentation; identity of clients protected A N S O 2. Contractual obligations met? Yes No Comments / What needs improvement? Not expected for first year students rate as S or O, or do not rate. 52

57 G. Internship Field Activities (Internship year only) 1. Log of activities reflecting experiences across the full range of A N S O school psychology competencies and domains 2. Projected to meet 1200 hour internship requirement Yes No (e.g., 550 hours by Week 15; 1100 by Week 30) 3. Projected to meet weekly supervision time requirement Yes No (e.g., 30 hours by Week 15; 60 hours by Week 30) 4. Case studies (N =3) A N S O Comments / What needs improvement? H. Interest Area (Optional) A N S O QUALIFYING INTEREST AREA: Comments I. Presentation/Organization 1. Attractive format; easy to read A N S O 2. Accurate and complete table of contents A N S O 3. Sections include introductions and/or summaries A N S O 4. Labeling and organization; required materials easily found A N S O Comments / What needs improvement? OVERALL COMMENTS: Primary Reviewer: Second reviewer: Review Date: Review Date: Reviewer: Resubmit review Date: Revised 9/30/13 53

58 Typical length: minutes Purpose and Focus: Appendix 4 Assessment & Planning Conference Guide (1) Assessment of the student's performance in all aspects of the program. Reflections on academic performance, professional behaviors, growth, effort, etc. Progress toward program competencies Interests and strengths Leadership and community service activities Competence and sensitivity regarding diversity, cultural differences Growing edges Skill improvement Development of the professional self. (2) Individualized program planning. Status re: MSPP program (credits, MTEL, praxis, electives, etc.) Goals and objectives, professional aspirations, interests (3) For graduating students: Goal setting for continued professional development Agenda: 1. Student s self-assessment (see #1 above): approx minutes Focus on reflections, meaningful learning experiences, best work Refer to portfolio, where appropriate Propose ratings for Competencies Summary (Part B) 2. Faculty assessment/response: approx minutes Coursework and field work performance Professional behaviors, attitude, effort Role in, and contributions to, the MSPP community 3. Student and faculty discussion of plans and goals (see #2 above): approx minutes Note implications for Field Training Contract, interest area, extracurricular learning opportunities, etc. ADVANCE PREPARATION Advisor: Bring field placement evaluations, portfolio evaluation form, current year course evaluations Student: Schedule conference with Amanda using instructions provided in A&P Submit portfolio to advisor 2 weeks before conference Bring partially completed A&P forms IMMEDIATELY FOLLOWING CONFERENCE Make copy of A&P Summary form and Portfolio Evaluation form for yourself, and submit the originals to School Psychology Program administrative assistant. 54

59 MSPP School Psychology Program Assessment & Planning Conference SUMMARY RECORD OF A & P CONFERENCE Student: Date of Conference: Year in program: Date submitted to office: Conference Participants: NAME ROLE 1. Student 2. Advisor 3. MSPP Faculty Member/Instructor Courses taught in past year 4. Other: Instructions to the student: 1. Prior to the A&P Conference, complete this cover sheet and Parts A, E.1., E.2., and E.3. of this packet. 2. When you receive the completed packet after the A&P Conference, sign the last page of the A&P form and of the Portfolio Evaluation and retain copies for your records. 3. Submit the completed packet, including Portfolio Evaluation form, to the School Psychology Program administrative assistant within one week of the date of the conference. It will become part of your student record. 55

60 A. PROGRESS AND PLANNING IN COMPLETING DEGREE REQUIREMENTS NAME: DATE: ENTERING YEAR: Please indicate when courses were taken or (if in progress) are being taken, and the grade received. COURSES Semester/Year Grade RS 526 LS 659 IA 520 SN 512 FP 501 PA 500 BC 521 PY 521 RS 555 FP 502 PH 501 BL 622 CC 522 PA 600 CX 610 PS 630 GR 611 FP 601 CO 650 FP 602 CS 701 FP 701 CS 702 FP 702 Statistics Lifespan Development Instructional Assessment and Intervention Educating Children & Adolescents with Special Needs Practicum I: School Environment and Educational Assessment Psychoeducational Assessment Behavioral Assessment, Intervention, and Consultation Psychopathology of Childhood and Adolescence Research and Evaluation Methods Practicum II: Psychoeducational Assessment and Intervention Preventive Mental Health in the Schools Biological Bases of Behavior and Learning Diversity and Cross-Cultural Psychology Social-Emotional Assessment Counseling and Psychotherapy in Schools Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in School Psychology Group Process and Group Therapy Practicum III: Clinical Practice Consultation in Schools Practicum IV: Clinical Practice Internship Seminar A Internship A Internship Seminar B Internship B Elective: Elective: MTEL requirement: (indicate date taken or scheduled) PRAXIS II requirement: (indicate date taken or scheduled) 56

61 B. COMPETENCIES SUMMARY FORM The Competencies Summary Form tracks and documents a student s demonstration of progress toward development of competencies. The data to make these determinations come from various inputs, including the Field Placement Competency Evaluation, coursework evaluations, performance on examinations (MA comprehensive exam, Praxis II), and the portfolio. These inputs are reviewed by the student, the advisor, and other attendees at the A&P Conference. This process is a critical part of advising, and should never be used in a pro forma manner. The determination of competency in each area is made by the advisor, after a careful and thoughtful review and discussion of all sources of data. If competencies are not progressing at an acceptable rate, the issues should be clearly stated in the A&P summary along with the appropriate remediation or referral(s). The Professional Development, Behavior, and Responsibility area incorporate the professional work characteristics defined by NASP (i.e., communication skills, effective interpersonal relations, ethical responsibility, adaptability, initiative and dependability, respect for human diversity) and the MSPP Guidelines on Professional Behavior (see Institutional Policy and Procedures Manual, pp ). Evaluation of these behaviors considers interactions with faculty, students, and MSPP administrative personnel, in addition to the inputs listed above. 57

62 Competencies Summary Form A. Competency Areas Progress Rating 1. Professional Behavior 2. Relationships 3. Diversity/Individual Differences 4. Ethical/Legal/Professional Issues 5. Scholarship/Research 6. Educational Foundations 7. Psychological Development Foundations 8. Assessment & Measurement 9. Counseling/Mental Health/Behavioral Intervention* 10. Consultation* 11. System Intervention* * Note: competency areas indicated by asterisks are not evaluated at the Year 1 A&P Conference Unsatisfactory Needs Improvement Satisfactory Exemplary 58

63 C. SUMMARY RECORD OF A & P CONFERENCE Academic Standing 1. Please note any Academic Council action, Notice of Academic Difficulty, and/or Intermediate A&P Conferences that may have been filed or occurred during the past academic year, or that are still unresolved from prior year(s). 2. How have these issues been addressed or resolved? 3. Is the student recommended for practicum or internship next year? Yes No Please describe reservations or reason(s) for not being recommended: With reservations Current Evaluation of Professional Development/Competence: 4. Areas of Strength: 5. Progress towards competencies: 6. Areas Needing Further Development (via coursework, field experience, etc.): 7. Recommendations for facilitating further development. (Please indicate with an asterisk those which the committee feels to be essential to continuation toward earning the degree): 59

64 D. PROGRESS TOWARD DEGREE: Based on the above assessments (Sections A through C), please check one of the following and provide comments as needed. Please use the reverse side of form, if needed. A. Satisfactory progress towards meeting degree for this phase of the program B. Adequate, with reservations. There is some question about progress, but the student should continue in the program under the following conditions: C. Questionable. There is serious question about the student being able to successfully complete the program. Continuation may be considered with conditions such as those described below. (This recommendation will be reviewed by Academic Council, which will determine any conditions that must be met prior to program continuation or internship. Note any questions or considerations for the Council to address, such as transfer of credit or remedial arrangements for instruction.) D. Unsatisfactory. The student has not made satisfactory progress. Recommendation is for dismissal, or leave of absence with conditions for return as stated below. NOTE: Checking C or D above results in the recommendation to the Registrar and the Academic Council that the student be placed on probation and/or additional action(s). If this occurs, it is the advisor s responsibility to notify the Academic Council and the Registrar of the circumstances involved. Filling out the A&P form does not satisfy this responsibility. A Notice of Academic Difficulty must be filed with the Academic Council and the Registrar. 60

65 E. PROPOSED PROGRAM PLAN FOR (Next School Year) 1. Please state your proposed plan of study for the following school year. Indicate whether each is a required (R) or elective (E) course. FALL Course Instructor # Credits R, E SPRING Course Instructor # Credits R, E SUMMER Course Instructor # Credits R, E 61

66 2. Please provide basic information about your field placement for next year (field site, supervisor(s), hours/week or hours/year, status of Field Training Contract). 3. Please list personal goals and objectives for the coming year. (These should be considered for inclusion in the Field Training Contract.) a. b. c. 4. Please check one of the following and add comments as needed. ( aproposed program approved. ) ( bproposed program approved with modifications/suggestions. )(Recommendations the committee considers essential indicated by *.) ( c Not Approved unless the recommendations/actions indicated below are ) satisfactorily resolved Comments and Recommendations on Overall Plan: Date: Date: (Advisor s Signature) Program approved by the Committee - This approval does not constitute a binding contract. (Student s Signature) 7/12 62

67 Final (Third Year) Assessment & Planning Conference SUMMARY RECORD OF A & P CONFERENCE Student: Date of Conference: Year in program: Date submitted to office: Conference Participants: NAME ROLE 1. Student 2. Advisor 3. MSPP Faculty Member/Instructor Courses taught in past year, if any 4. Other: Instructions to the student: 1. Prior to the A&P Conference, complete this cover sheet and Parts A, E.1., E.2., and E.3. of this packet. 2. When you receive the completed packet after the A&P Conference, sign the last page of the A&P form and of the Portfolio Evaluation and retain copies for your records. 3. Submit the completed packet, including Portfolio Evaluation form, to the School Psychology Program administrative assistant within one week of the date of the conference. It will become part of your student record. 63

68 A. PROGRESS AND PLANNING IN COMPLETING DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CAGS NAME: DATE: GRADUATION DATE Please indicate date when MA was awarded Please indicate date when all required pre-internship courses were completed Please indicate below semester and grade for internship year courses (include prior summer): Semester/Year Grade CS 701 Internship Seminar A FP 701 Internship A CS 702 Internship Seminar B FP 702 Internship B Other (electives): Other (electives): MTEL requirement: indicate completion date (all areas passed) PRAXIS II requirement: (indicate date taken) 64

69 B. COMPETENCIES SUMMARY The Competencies Summary Form tracks and documents a student s demonstration of progress toward development of competencies. The data to make these determinations come from various inputs, including the Field Placement Competency Evaluation, coursework evaluations, performance on examinations (MA comprehensive exam, Praxis II), and the portfolio. These inputs are reviewed by the student, the advisor, and other attendees at the A&P Conference. This process is a critical part of advising, and should never be used in a pro forma manner. The determination of competency in each area is made by the advisor, after a careful and thoughtful review and discussion of all sources of data. If competencies are not progressing at an acceptable rate, the issues should be clearly stated in the A&P summary along with the appropriate remediation or referral(s). The Professional Development, Behavior, and Responsibility area incorporate the professional work characteristics defined by NASP (i.e., communication skills, effective interpersonal relations, ethical responsibility, adaptability, initiative and dependability, respect for human diversity) and the MSPP Guidelines on Professional Behavior (see Institutional Policy and Procedures Manual, pp ). Evaluation of these behaviors considers interactions with faculty, students, and MSPP administrative personnel, in addition to the inputs listed above. 65

70 Competencies Summary A. Competency Areas Progress Rating 1. Professional Behavior 2. Relationships 3. Diversity/Individual Differences 4. Ethical/Legal/Professional Issues 5. Scholarship/Research 6. Educational Foundations 7. Psychological Development Foundations 8. Assessment & Measurement 9. Counseling/Mental Health/Behavioral Intervention 10. Consultation 11. System Intervention Unsatisfactory Needs Improvement Expected Exemplary 66

71 C. SUMMARY RECORD OF A & P CONFERENCE Academic Standing 1. Please note any Academic Council action, Notice of Academic Difficulty, and/or Intermediate A&P Conferences that may have been filed or occurred during the past academic year, or that are still unresolved from prior year(s). 2. How have these issues been addressed or resolved? 3. Has the student met academic requirements for graduation? Yes No Conditionally Please describe conditions, or reason(s) for not being recommended: Current Evaluation of Professional Development/Competence: 4. Areas of Strength: 5. Progress towards competencies: 6. Recommendations for further development: 67

72 D. PROGRESS TOWARD DEGREE: Based on the above assessments (Sections A through C), please check one of the following and provide comments as needed. Please use the reverse side of form, if needed. A. Satisfactory progress towards meeting degree for this phase of the program B. Adequate, with reservations. There is some question about progress, but the student should continue in the program under the following conditions: C. Questionable. There is serious question about the student being able to successfully complete the program. Continuation may be considered with conditions such as those described below. (This recommendation will be reviewed by Academic Council, which will determine any conditions that must be met prior to program continuation or internship. Note any questions or considerations for the Council to address, such as transfer of credit or remedial arrangements for instruction.) D. Unsatisfactory. The student has not made satisfactory progress. Recommendation is for dismissal, or leave of absence with conditions for return as stated below. NOTE: Checking C or D above results in the recommendation to the Registrar and the Academic Council that the student be placed on probation and/or additional action(s). If this occurs, it is the advisor s responsibility to notify the Academic Council and the Registrar of the circumstances involved by filing a Notice of Academic Difficulty. E. PROPOSED PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN FOR Please list personal goals and objectives for the next phase of your professional development: a. b. c. Date: Date: (Advisor s Signature) (Student s Signature) 4/23/13 68

73 Appendix 5 MSPP School Psychology Program Leadership Activities Student s Status (circle one): Yr 1 Yr 2 Yr 3 School Year: Brief describe nature of leadership activity: MSPP governance committee Student Coordinating Council Attendance at faculty meetings Continuing education MSPA involvement NASP involvement Professional presentations or publications Participation in community service activities Voluntary Freedman Center/Warm Lines activities (e.g., parent meetings, website contributions) Participation in Open Houses Participation in Interview Day Event planning (e.g., M.A. awards event) Active role as buddy for incoming student Participation in MSPP extra-curricular activities Other: Other: Advisor: 69

74 Appendix 6 Transition from MA to CAGS Degree Program Student s Name: Advisor: 1. Completion of required coursework for the M.A. in Professional Psychology degree? 2. MTEL: passing scores 3. Satisfactory progress towards competency on the portfolio? 4. A & P Conference rating (Part D): A B C D 5. First Year Examination: number of passing scores (of 7 areas): Submitted to Faculty by advisor Date Action of Faculty (check one of the following): Approved Denied Request for additional information Specify what: Advisor signature Date Program director signature Date 70

75 Appendix 7 MSPP School Psychology Program Assessment Rubric PROFICIENCY (3) 1. Organization Provides identifying information fully and accurately, protecting identity when used for coursework 2. Organization Includes all report sections pertinent to the assessment. 3. Organization Report is organized by areas of functioning, with sections ordered in a commonly accepted sequence 4. Organization Organization of data by area is conceptually sound; relative emphasis 5. Behavioral Observations 6. Behavioral Observations 7. Background Information is appropriate for the given case Observations are low inference, and meaningfully and clearly distinguish the child from others Observations address referral question and illustrate key findings where possible, and provide an enhanced sense of the child s personality Background information is relevant, clear, consistent, properly attributes sources, and protects privacy NEAR PROFICIENCY (2) Minor omission or slight inaccuracy in identifying information; identity insufficiently protected Missing a section, or one or two sections fail to address their intended purpose Reports fluctuate between contentbased and test-based organization, or presents data out of sequence Organization of data by area has minor flaws, or relative emphasis of areas is not well suited to the case Some observations are overly inferential, or fail to distinguish the child from others Observations provide only minimal insights into referral question, key findings, and child s personality Some background information is irrelevant, confusing, inappropriate, or fails to attribute source, or is insufficient IN NEED OF ATTENTION (1) Significant errors in identifying information; birthdate incorrectly computed; clear failure to protect identity of child Missing a critical section, multiple sections fail to address intended purposes Report is organized by tests administered or lacks an organizational framework Organization of data by area has major flaws or is badly matched to the given case Observations are lacking, generic or lack objective supporting data Observations are lacking or irrelevant; fail to address referral question and illustrate key findings where possible Background information is highly irrelevant, glaringly missing, or fails to respect privacy This rubric, rather than the Report Writing Rubric, is used in Year 2 and Year 3. 71

76 8. Selection of measures Selected measures are clinically and technically appropriate, and cover the breadth and depth of referral question(s) and hypotheses 9. Data Reporting Findings are presented in a clear and meaningful manner 10. Data Reporting Test results are presented in a manner that appropriately considers measurement error 11. Interpretation Reported findings and interpretations are educationally relevant 12. Interpretation Inferences and interpretations are supported by low inference or convergent data 13. Summary Summary is relatively brief, addresses referral question, and highlights key, educationally relevant findings 14. Summary Summary appropriately integrates findings across domains of functioning. 15. Summary Summary applies assessment findings to the examinee s life such that the reader gains greater understanding of the examinee s functioning as regards 16. Recommendations 17. Recommendations all referral questions and hypotheses. Recommendations are empirically and clinically sound, and avoid procedural dilemmas. Recommendations address key findings and are individualized, meaningful, and practical. Selected measures are lacking in clinical or technical appropriateness, or do not adequately address referral question(s) and hypotheses Findings are presented with some imprecision or confusion Test results are presented with minor confusion or inaccuracy regarding measurement error Some findings and interpretations lack relevance or are incorrect; or very limited interpretation Data in support of inferences and interpretations does not meet sufficiently high standards Summary is excessively long or short, fails to highlight referral questions or key findings; includes material introduced for the first time Summary incorrectly or insufficiently integrates findings. Summary applies assessment findings to the examinee s life such that the reader gains greater understanding of the examinee s functioning as regards some referral questions or hypotheses Recommendations are limited, weak, or pose procedural dilemmas. Recommendations do not adequately address key findings, or are insufficiently individualized, meaningful, or practical. 72 Tests selected are not clinically and technically appropriate, or significantly fail to address referral question(s) and hypotheses Findings are presented in a misleading or incomprehensible manner Test results are presented with no recognition of measurement error Many reported findings and interpretations lack relevance or are incorrect; or no interpretation Inferences and interpretations are not supported by low inference or convergent data Summary fails to address referral question or key findings Findings are reported in separate domains, with no attempt at integration. Summary does not apply assessment findings to the examinee s life in such as way that the reader s understanding is increased. Recommendations are missing significantly unfounded, or pose major procedural problems Recommendations fail to address key findings, or are not meaningful, or practical.

77 18. Writing Avoids jargon; terms unfamiliar to teacher or parent are accompanied by definitions or clarifications Occasional use of jargon or terminology, without definitions or clarifications Includes terms and language that will puzzle teachers, parents, and some school psychologists 19. Writing Writing is clear and concise; well constructed paragraphs, simple declarative sentences, proofread for mechanical errors and typos Writing is unclear or awkward in parts; some poorly constructed sentences, problematic paragraph structure, mechanical errors Writing is unclear or awkward in many parts; poorly constructed sentences, problematic paragraph structure, mechanical errors 20. Follow-Up Effectiveness of recommendations is assessed by progress monitoring or consultation with implementers Efforts to assess recommendations are limited or inadequate No effort to assess effectiveness of recommendations STUDENT S NAME: DATE REVIEWED: REVIEWER: SCORE: of_ 60_ COMMENTS: 73

78 Appendix 8 MSPP Consultation Case Study Rubric (Adapted from NASP NCSP Case Study Rubric) Total score = out of 40 points; % (32 points needed to pass) Very Effective (2) Effective (1) Needs Improvement (0) Section 0: General Presentation (out of 3 points) 0.1 Writing has been carefully proofread and checked for typos, spelling errors, and grammatical mistakes. Writing is clear, concise, and coherent. Writing has not been carefully proofread; writing is unclear or incoherent. 0.2 APA style is used for references and citations. APA style is not used for references and citations. 0.3 Body of case study report does not exceed 10 pages, including graphs but not including references and appendixes. Body of case study report exceeds 10 pages, including graphs but not including references and appendixes. Section 1: Problem Identification (out of 8 points) 1.1 The consultant introduces the consultation process and elicits the consultee s expectations for working together, including meeting schedule, non-evaluative collaboration, data collection, and expected outcomes. The consultant does not introduce the consultation process to the consultee and does not consider the consultee s expectations for the consultation process. 1.2 The consultee s initial concerns are collaboratively prioritized based on urgency (e.g., a safety issue) or importance as a prerequisite skill (e.g., being able to identify a letter before being asked to identify a letter sound). 1.3 The student s academic or behavioral problem is defined in observable/measurable terms and described in the context of appropriate grade and/or peer expectations (e.g., local norms). The student s academic or behavioral problem is defined in observable/measurable terms. The consultee s initial concerns are not collaboratively prioritized. The consultant may attempt to address all the initial concerns at the same time, or may not involve the consultee in prioritizing the concerns. The student s academic or behavioral problem is identified but not defined in observable/measurable terms. 74

79 1.4 The problem is collaboratively defined with the consultee (and parent and/or student if appropriate). 1.5 Appropriate baseline data (3+ data points) are collected and charted on a line graph, and trend lines are computed. Peer/grade norms and expectations are included if relevant. Appropriate baseline data (3+ data points) are collected and charted on a line graph. 1.6 An observable/measurable statement of current performance (e.g., what the student can presently do) is established based on baseline data. 2.1 Multiple hypotheses are collaboratively developed (i.e., with the consultee) to explain the observable/measurable statement of current performance. Section 2: Problem Analysis (out of 9 points) One hypothesis is collaboratively developed (i.e., with the consultee) to explain the observable/measureable statement of current performance. 2.2 Hypotheses consider multiple factors such as: instruction, curriculum, behavioral expectations, and classroom environment. 2.3 Hypotheses reflect an awareness of issues of diversity (e.g., physical, social, linguistic, cultural). English academic language proficiency should be verified for all English Language Learners (ELLs). The problem is not collaboratively defined with the consultee. Appropriate baseline data are not collected and/or graphed. An observable/measurable statement of current performance is not established based on baseline data. No hypotheses are developed, or hypotheses are not developed collaboratively with the consultee. Hypotheses consider student factors only. Hypotheses do not reflect an awareness of issues of diversity (e.g., physical, social, linguistic, cultural). 75

80 2.4 Appropriate data are collected and more than one data source converge on a proposed hypothesis. Appropriate data are collected to confirm or reject the proposed hypotheses. If the identified problem is behavioral, a functional behavioral assessment (FBA) is conducted to identify the functions that the behavior serves and/or the conditions under which the behavior occurs. If the identified problem is academic, instructional assessment, curriculum-based measurement, and/or review of work samples are collected to identify missing prerequisite academic skills and/or strategies (e.g., What does the student know? How does the student think? What does the student do when unsure?) When relevant, instructional level of reading material should be be verified. For reading comprehension, the student should know 93-97% of the reading material. For rehearsal and practice (e.g., flash cards), the student should know 70-85% of the material. Additional sources of data can include interviews, observations, student file and work sample reviews, previous evaluations or interventions, medical and social history, etc. 2.5 Hypotheses are confirmed or rejected based on collaborative examination of data. 2.6 The student s behavior is identified as a skill, performance, and/or fluency deficit within the context being examined. Appropriate data are not collected to confirm or reject the hypotheses. Hypotheses are not confirmed or rejected, or are evaluated without collaborative examination of data. The student s behavior is not identified as a skill, performance, and/or fluency deficit, and/or context is insufficiently considered. 76

81 3.1 The selected intervention addresses the student s baseline data (i.e., rubric 1.6) and is linked to a SMART goal. Both short- and long-term goals are set. Section 3: Intervention Design (out of 9 points) The selected intervention addresses the student s baseline data (i.e., rubric 1.6) and is linked to a SMART goal (i.e., specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, timely). 3.2 The selected intervention is based on data from problem analysis and hypothesis testing. 3.3 There is research literature supporting the selected intervention. Please cite using APA style. The intervention does not address the student s baseline data and is not linked to a SMART goal. The selected intervention is not based on data from problem analysis and hypothesis testing. There is no research literature supporting the selected intervention. 3.4 The following logistics of the intervention are collaboratively discussed and documented: Clear and concise description Materials needed Setting, dates and times Persons responsible Motivational strategies (if relevant) 3.5 Data collection plans are collaboratively discussed and documented: Specific academic or behavioral data to be recorded (should be the same as the baseline data collected in rubric 1.5) Persons responsible Setting, dates, and times (data should be recorded and graphed at least weekly) 3.6 Intervention selection considers unintended outcomes or limitations. 3.7 Treatment integrity monitoring tools and data are included as an appendix. Treatment integrity is monitored and data is collected at least weekly. Intervention logistics are not documented. Data collection plans are not documented. Intervention selection does not consider unintended outcomes or limitations. Treatment integrity is not monitored, or data is not collected at least weekly. 77

82 4.1 Progress-monitoring data are demonstrated on a line graph, including: Student performance trend lines Goal lines Phase lines marking intervention modifications (if relevant) 4.2 Progress monitoring data are demonstrated to be effective when compared to baseline data, based on the PND (percentage of non-overlapping data points) technique. 4.3 Single case design (e.g., ABAB reversal, multiple baseline, etc.) is used to inform problem solving and decision-making. Section 4: Intervention Evaluation (out of 11 points) Progress-monitoring data are demonstrated on a line graph that also includes baseline data. Progress monitoring data are demonstrated to be effective when compared to baseline data, based on student performance trend lines. Data are used to inform problem solving and decision-making (e.g., continue or modify intervention). 4.4 Effectiveness of intervention is shared (describe with whom and how) and, if suggested by the data, modifications are collaboratively identified and described. 4.5 Strategies for transfer/generalizing outcomes to other settings and/or identified concerns are addressed and documented as effective. 4.6 Strategies for followup are developed and implemented. Strategies for transfer/generalizing outcomes to other settings (e.g., from math class to reading class) and/or identified concerns (e.g., from sight words to multiplication facts) are addressed and a plan is documented. Suggestions for follow-up are developed (e.g., continued progress monitoring, transition planning). Progress-monitoring data are not demonstrated on a line graph. Progress monitoring data are not demonstrated to be effective, or data are not used to inform further problem solving and decision-making. Data are not used to inform further problem solving and decision-making. Effectiveness of intervention is not shared, and modifications (if needed) are not identified. Strategies for transfer/generalizing outcomes to other settings are not addressed. Suggestions for follow-up are not developed. 78

83 Appendix 9 MSPP Counseling Case Study Rubric (Adapted from NASP NCSP Case Study Rubric) Total score = out of 30 points; % (25 points needed to pass) Very Effective (2) Effective (1) Needs Improvement (0) Section 0: General Presentation (out of 3 points) 0.1 Writing has been carefully proofread and checked for typos, spelling errors, and grammatical mistakes. Writing is clear, concise, and coherent. Writing has not been carefully proofread; writing is unclear or incoherent. 0.2 APA style is used for references and citations. APA style is not used for references and citations. 0.3 Body of case study report does not exceed 10 pages, including relevant graphs but not including references and appendixes. Body of case study report exceeds 10 pages, including graphs but not including references and appendixes. Section 1: Problem Identification and Analysis (out of 7 points) 1.1 The counselor establishes rapport and explains the limits of confidentiality. 1.2 As part of the intake process, parents, teachers, and other relevant stakeholders are consulted regarding relevant history, and their perceptions of the presenting problem. 1.3 Appropriate data are collected and a hypothesis/formulation is developed to explain the client s presenting social/emotional problem. Sources of data can include rating scales and projective measures, previous psychological evaluations, interviews/clinical histories, observations, student file reviews, etc. If the problem includes a behavioral component, a functional behavioral assessment (FBA) is conducted to identify the functions that the behavior serves and/or the The counselor does not establish rapport and/or does not explain the limits of confidentiality. Parents, teachers, and other relevant stakeholders are not consulted regarding relevant history, and their perceptions of the presenting problem. Hypotheses/formulations are not developed, or appropriate data are not collected to support the hypotheses. 79

84 conditions under which the behavior occurs. 1.4 Hypotheses consider multiple factors such as: home and community environments, and behavioral expectations. 1.5 Hypotheses reflect an awareness of issues of diversity (e.g., physical, social, linguistic, cultural). 1.6 The client s social/emotional problem is defined in observable/measurable terms in the context of appropriate developmental expectations. Qualitative concerns are quantified using a Goal Attainment Scale (GAS) or other appropriate tool. 1.7 Appropriate baseline data are collected and visually represented (e.g., line graph, pie chart, GAS, etc). Section 2: Intervention Design (out of 9 points) 2.1 The intervention (e.g., treatment plan) addresses the student s baseline data (i.e., rubric 1.7), and is linked to a relevant measurable goal. 2.2 The selected intervention is based on data from problem analysis (i.e., rubric 1.3) and is applied in an individualized manner. 2.3 The counselor is able to articulate a professionally accepted theoretical approach and/or a set of empirically validated intervention procedures. Relevant supporting literature is cited. Please cite using APA style. 2.4 In addition to appropriate documentation of counseling intervention logistics, relevant documents such as process notes, worksheets, drawings, activity summaries, and other products The following logistics of the counseling intervention are documented: Clear and concise description Number, location, and duration of counseling sessions Materials needed Communication plan with parents and teachers Hypotheses consider client factors only. Hypotheses do not reflect an awareness of issues of diversity (e.g., physical, social, linguistic, cultural). The client s social/emotional problem is identified but not defined in observable/measurable terms. Appropriate baseline data are not collected and/or displayed. The intervention does not address the student s baseline data, and is not linked to a measurable goal. The selected intervention is not based on data from problem analysis (i.e., rubric 1.3), or it does not account for some of the relevant history or presenting problems. There is no research literature supporting the selected theoretical approach and/or intervention procedures. Counseling intervention logistics are not documented. 80

85 from the counseling sessions are included as appendices. 2.5 A progress monitoring plan is documented: Specific data to be recorded (should be the same as the baseline data collected in rubric 1.7) Persons responsible Setting, dates, and times 2.6 Intervention considers unintended outcomes or limitations. 2.7 Treatment integrity monitoring tools (e.g., case notes) are included as an appendix. Treatment integrity is monitored and weekly case notes describe adherence to treatment plan/goals. A progress monitoring plan is not documented. Intervention does not consider unintended outcomes or limitations. Treatment integrity is not monitored. Section 3: Intervention Evaluation (out of 11 points) 3.1 Progress-monitoring data are visually represented (e.g., line graph, GAS, pie chart) along with baseline data. 3.2 Progress monitoring data are demonstrated to be effective when compared to baseline data. Data are used to inform problem solving and decision-making (e.g., continue or modify treatment plan). 3.3 The client s reactions to and satisfaction with the treatment plan are considered when evaluating intervention effectiveness. 3.4 Parents, teachers, and other relevant stakeholders are consulted regarding their perceptions of the student s progress/change as a result of participating in counseling. 3.5 Counselor provides thoughtful reflection and self-critique of the basis for the success or failure of the intervention, including any contributing therapeutic errors or oversights. Progress-monitoring data are not visually represented. Progress monitoring data are not demonstrated to be effective, or data are not used to inform further problem solving and decision-making. The client s reactions to and satisfaction with the treatment plan are not considered when evaluating intervention effectiveness. Parents, teachers, and other relevant stakeholders are not consulted regarding their perceptions of the student s progress/change as a result of participating in counseling. Counselor does not provide thoughtful reflection and selfcritique of the basis for the success or failure of the intervention. 81

86 3.6 Effectiveness of intervention is shared (describe with whom and how). 3.7 Strategies for Strategies for transfer/generalizing transfer/generalizing outcomes to other settings (e.g., from outcomes to other counseling sessions to the lunch room) settings and/or and/or identified concerns (e.g., from identified concerns are test anxiety to performance anxiety) are addressed and addressed and a plan is documented. documented as effective. 3.8 Strategies for followup are developed and implemented. Suggestions for follow-up are developed (e.g., continued progress monitoring, check-ins, etc.). Effectiveness of intervention is not shared. Strategies for transfer/generalizing outcomes to other settings are not addressed. Suggestions for follow-up are not developed. 3.9 Appropriate termination is planned for. Appropriate termination is not planned for. 82

87 Appendix 10 MSPP School Psychology Program Field Placements Students in the MSPP School Psychology Program are in field placements each semester of full-time enrollment, and remain in the same placement for a given school year. Field placements are intended to be of value for both the trainee and the host school district. Field placements represent formal arrangements with the agency, as well as with the field supervisor. For school placements, it is important that school administrators support, approve, and recognize the value of the training activities in which the student is engaged. The Willingness to Participate form is used to determine the type of placement (first or second year practicum, or internship) for which the field site is appropriate, and to keep basic site information on file. Practicum placements and internships are distinctly different in character, as described below. Practicum Placements Practicum placements are intended to afford trainees the opportunity to practice specific coursework-related skills that promote positive student outcomes. Practicum placements are arranged or facilitated by the MSPP faculty to assure that the placement offers appropriate supervision and enables the student to engage in the requisite activities and training experiences. The practicum placement field supervisor must meet MSPP criteria (continuity of school site assignment, in particular) and agree to fulfill supervisory responsibilities as described in this document. The field supervisor schedules a regular time to meet weekly with the student. The Field Training Contract serves to formalize practicum placement arrangements. As a general rule, practicum placements run from the beginning of the school year, through at least the beginning first week of June. In concluding the placement, however, practicum students are expected to meet ongoing responsibilities to those they serve, for example, in following 83

88 through with counseling services, completing a program evaluation, or presenting the results of an assessment. The role of the field supervisor is both facilitative and supervisory. Key aspects of the field supervisor s facilitation role include orientation and monitoring students interactions with school personnel and arranging opportunities for them to complete assigned coursework. The field supervisor also ensures that the student is functioning in a manner that meets the performance standards and expectations of the setting, primarily through direct observation and individual supervision. Close collaboration between the MSPP faculty and field supervisors is central to the process. The MSPP practicum seminar instructor and other course instructors assume a significant role in assigning and monitoring course-related tasks, ensuring proficiency of course-related skills, and providing clinical supervision. Work products that are put to use by the field site (e.g., observation summaries, intervention monitoring data, test protocols) are routinely reviewed by an MSPP instructor. Each year of practicum has a distinct focus, as described below and as outlined in the Practicum Grid (see last page). First Year Practicum The first year practicum student is on site 1-1/2 days, (10 hours) per week, for a total of 300 hours over the course of the school year (i.e., from opening of school through the first week of June). The primary field supervisor must be able to provide a minimum of 1/2 hour per week of direct supervision. This practicum is best suited to early childhood and elementary level settings. The first year practicum placement is more prescriptive than the second year practicum or internship. The MSPP curriculum provides a substantial amount of structure for the first year practicum, with the inclusion of course-related assignments. These include structured observation, benchmark screening or progress monitoring of academic performance (i.e., curriculum based measurement), data collection to determine effectiveness of interventions, and conducting educational and cognitive assessments with individual students (see Practicum Grid). In addition, first year students serve as child associates in Primary Project, a nationally recognized preventative mental health program. Child associates facilitate weekly individual child-led play sessions with primary grade students who are at risk for adjustment problems. This supplementary field experience is of value for both the school psychology trainee and the host school district. Students learn and practice essential skills that serve as a foundation for subsequent training in counseling and consultation. Primary Project training experiences are, in large part, incorporated into the first year practicum seminars. The field supervisor and school administration must be supportive of the placement, and ensure that the school can provide opportunities for the student to practice the specific skills associated with the first year practicum. 84

89 Second Year Practicum The second year practicum encompasses a wide range of training experiences. The second year practicum student is on site 2-1/2 days, (15 hours) per week, for a total of 500 hours over the course of the school year (i.e., from opening of school through the first week of June). The primary field supervisor must be able to provide a minimum of 1 hour per week of direct supervision. The second year practicum is best suited to middle school or high school level. Clinical practice is the primary focus of the second year practicum. Essential training opportunities include individual and group counseling, comprehensive (including socialemotional) assessment, consultation, and intervention design and monitoring. The MSPP Field Placement Director works with students to facilitate second year practicum placements during the winter of the previous school year. All placements must be approved by the MSPP School Psychology Program Field Placement Director. To meet program standards, a practicum placement must provide appropriate field supervision and offer opportunities to practice key skills associated with concurrent coursework. The field supervisor assumes the primary role of supervising and evaluating training activities. Flexibility is afforded in the content and sequence of practicum activities, and field supervisors are encouraged to arrange activities above and beyond those required for concurrent coursework. To ensure that the field placement offers ample training experience in assessment as well as other domains of practice, it is recommended that the practicum student conduct from 8 to 12 comprehensive assessments. The number of assessment should not exceed 15. Internship The internship is the culminating training experience in the MSPP School Psychology Program. Three criteria are essential for a placement to qualify as an acceptable internship placement: A minimum of 1200 hours, of which at least 600 must be in a school setting; Two or more hours of field-based supervision per week from an appropriately licensed school psychologist or, for non-school settings, a psychologist appropriately credentialed for the setting; and Opportunity for the intern to practice and integrate a wide range of competencies across the domains of training and practice in school psychology. Additional requirements are as follows: The field supervisor reviews and counter-signs formal written work, such as evaluation reports and service summaries. Interns must receive a minimum of two hours of field-based supervision per full-time week from one or more qualified supervisors. 85

90 The field supervisor provides initial feedback to MSPP at the beginning of the year, informal feedback to the trainee in the middle of each semester, and a formal Competency Evaluation at the end of each semester using forms provided by MSPP. The field supervisor and internship site agree to three conferences (in-person visits or conference calls) with MSPP School Psychology Program faculty, which include the student. As is standard for school psychology internships nationally, and in keeping with the intern s level of prior training and field experience, MSPP strongly supports the expectation that full time interns receive a stipend. A student who wishes to accept an unpaid internship may request a waiver from the MSPP School Psychology Program. The primary supervisor assumes responsibility for the integrity and quality of the internship training. To ensure that the field placement offers ample training experience in assessment as well as other domains of practice, it is recommended that the intern conduct from 15 to 25 comprehensive assessments. The number of assessments should not exceed 30. The instructor for the MSPP Internship Seminar, which runs concurrently with the internship, serves as the training program supervisor for the internship. The MSPP supervisors works collaboratively with the field supervisor and the student to ensure the quality of the training experience. The MSPP Field Placement Office establishes institution-wide policies, and coordinates and monitors record-keeping of field placement documents (i.e., Field Placement Contract, Initial Feedback form, and Internship Competency Evaluation form). Interns are encouraged to select an area of personal interest in which to develop advanced expertise. The field supervisor is encouraged to propose an interest area that can be incorporated into the internship experience. Some examples of interest areas are as follows: Children with autism/autism spectrum disorders Children with behavior and emotional disorders Children with low-incidence disabilities Development of social skills/life skills Early childhood assessment and intervention Instructional assessment and consultation Positive behavioral interventions and supports School-wide mental health promotion/prevention Field Training Contract A Field Training Contract must be on file for every student who has a field placement through MSPP. This contract clarifies the terms of the placement, including (a) beginning and end dates, (b) time commitment, (c) supervisory responsibilities, (d) compensation, if any, and (e) activities in which the trainee is engaged. Having a contract on file is also for the protection of the student and the field site, as this ensures that the student is covered under MSPP liability insurance. 86

91 The Internship Agreement is an additional part of the Field Training Contract for internships only. The Internship Agreement addresses (a) the respective responsibilities of the internship site, the field supervisor, the training program, and the intern, (b) the work environment, including safety, privacy, and workspace needs, (c) provision for participation in professional development activities, on site or through release time, (d) assurance of diversified and advanced training experiences, as defined by the NASP domains of training and practice, (e) compliance with legal and ethical standards, (f) release time for the MSPP internship seminar, and (g) evaluation of the intern by the field supervisor. For school district placements, the contract must be signed by a school administrator typically a pupil services director or principal in addition to the field supervisor. This is to ensure that the supervisor s role and the trainee s proposed activities are understood and acceptable to the host institution. The contract may designate an additional supervisor who also provides regular support and/or supervision to the trainee. Separate contracts are required if the trainee s placement is divided among agencies (e.g., a school district and a mental health center). Evaluation of Field Work The field supervisor provides formative and summative evaluation of the student s field training performance. To provide MSPP with input about field placements in the early going, field supervisors complete a brief Initial Feedback form at approximately the six week mark. The field supervisor uses the Practicum Competency Evaluation or Internship Competency Evaluation form as a reference in providing informal feedback to the student through an informal feedback session in the middle of each semester, and submits the form to the MSPP Field Placement Office at the end of each semester. This information provides critical input for the student s annual Assessment and Planning Conference. The field supervisor is encouraged to address student training needs or other issues with the MSPP supervisor (i.e., the practicum or internship seminar instructor) during scheduled conferences or at any other point during the school year. The MSPP supervisor evaluates the student by completing a course evaluation, which incorporates evidence of practice in the field from field supervisor reports, work samples, and in-class reflections on field activities. MSPP students have an annual Assessment and Planning Conference at which their progress towards attainment of professional competencies and their professional work characteristics are reviewed by faculty. Roles of the Field Supervisor and the MSPP Supervisor A clearly designated, licensed school psychologist (or, in non-school settings, a psychologist with appropriate credentials for the setting) monitors and facilitates the student s experience on site. The field supervisor works collaboratively with the MSPP supervisor and the MSPP Field Placement Office to ensure that the student meets the quality standards and interpersonal expectations of the setting. It is acceptable and desirable to designate a secondary field supervisor, who need not be a school psychologist. 87

92 In keeping with professional and legal standards, the primary field supervisor has ultimate responsibility for the student s field placement activities. The field supervisor reviews and counter-signs formal written work, such as evaluation reports and service summaries. The MSPP supervisor provides information and support through the practicum or internship seminar, while maintaining professional standards of confidentiality. The MSPP supervisor and/or course instructors may review student work that will be used in the school setting (e.g., test protocols, psychoeducational assessment reports, progress monitoring charts), particularly for the first year practicum. The respective roles of the field supervisor and MSPP supervisor (i.e., the instructor for the practicum or internship seminar) can be flexibly determined to some degree, with the understanding that (1) the arrangement must be acceptable to the field supervisor, and (2) the trainee must meet both school district and MSPP standards. The MSPP supervisor maintains communication with the field supervisor, and is available to both the field supervisor and the trainee to help address issues or questions that arise. The MSPP supervisor monitors field placements through a minimum of three meetings per year with the field supervisor and trainee. The Field Supervision Orientation at the beginning of the school year serves as the first of these meetings. The other meetings may be either a site visit or a virtual conference (i.e., by conference call). The content of these meetings is outlined in the Field Site Visit form, which is included in the Field Supervisor s Handbook. The three meetings during the internship year are a requirement to qualify the student for Massachusetts school psychologist licensure. At least one meeting during the internship year is a site visit, unless prohibitive because of distance. Additional meetings or contacts are arranged as needed, for example, if issues arise regarding trainee competencies, professional work characteristics, or the supervisor-supervisee relationship. Summary of Expectations The field supervisor is expected to: Attend the field supervisor orientation program at MSPP in September (which includes an optional Continuing Education program); Complete and return an Initial Feedback form six weeks into the field placement Conduct an informal feedback meeting with the student midway through each semester Complete and return a field placement competency evaluation at end of each semester; Participate in a meeting with the MSPP supervisor and student 1-3 times per year. The MSPP supervisor is expected to: Be routinely available to the field supervisor and the trainee Make periodic site visits Promote quality assurance by addressing practice issue in seminar and reviewing students work as needed 88

93 MSPP School Psychology Program Practicum Grid Practicum Course Title Concurrent Coursework Key Coursework-Related Practicum Activities Year 1, Fall FP 501 Practicum I: School Environment and Educational Assessment Year 1, Spring FP 502 Practicum II: Psychoeducational Assessment and Intervention Children & Adolescents with Special Needs Instructional Assessment & Intervention Behavioral Assessment, Consultation, and Collaboration Psychoeducational Assessment Observe special programs and classrooms Observation of classroom instruction Assist with screening or monitoring of literacy skills, preferably using curriculum based measurement (CBM) Assist with early intervening services (i.e., students who need academic and behavioral support in general education) Administer standardized educational tests Collect functional behavioral assessment data Collect data to monitor effectiveness of individualized interventions. Conduct a structured classroom observation Conduct individual educational and cognitive assessments Year 2, Fall FP 601 Practicum III: Clinical Practice Year 2, Spring FP 602 Practicum IV: Clinical Practice Rev. 4/5/12 Counseling and Psychotherapy in Schools Social-Emotional Assessment of Children and Adolescents Group Process and Group Therapy Consultation in Schools Provide individual counseling Conduct comprehensive assessments, including social-emotional assessment; present results at team meetings Participate in teacher assistance/student support team process, and collect data to assess outcomes Lead or co-lead a counseling group Consult/collaborate with teacher(s) 89

94 Appendix 11 Field Placement Contract and Internship Agreement MSPP Field Training Contract School Psychology Program, The following Graduate Student Name: is placed as a school psychology trainee at: Site Name: Address: City: State: Zip: Please check one option: Unpaid Field Placement Paid Field Placement If paid, please indicate amount of stipend: $ per TERM OF CONTRACT: The field placement will begin: mm/dd/yy and end: mm/dd/yy (Minimum of 34 training weeks) (check one): Year 1 Year 2 Internship* Other 10 hours/week (minimum of 300 hours) 15 hours/week (minimum of 500 hours) 35 hours/week (minimum of 1,200 hours, unless multi-year or multiple sites) Please review and sign Internship Agreement as well. hours/week, subject to approval by MSPP Field Placement Coordinator The student will have experience in the following areas/activities: (check all that apply) SERVICES/TRAINING AREAS: SERVICES/TRAINING AREAS: SETTING: Structured observation Social-emotional assessment School Assessment of basic literacy skills Assessment feedback meetings Specialized population school Educational testing Individual counseling Clinic/Mental health center Preschool/kindergarten screening Group counseling Day treatment Instructional intervention Parent consultation/education Other: Intervention monitoring Community outreach POPULATION: Behavioral assessment/fba Professional development/in-service Preschool Designing/implementing behavior Family counseling/consultation Elementary plans Program evaluation/research Other: Secondary Cognitive assessment Other: Specific disability: Preschool assessment Other: Report Writing Consultation/collaboration Program planning/system intervention 90

95 Primary Supervisor must be a licensed school psychologist, or (for internship only) licensed psychologist. Primary field supervisor: (PLEASE PRINT full name and degree) Please indicate: (a) license/certificate type: State: Number: Secondary supervisor (if applicable): (PLEASE PRINT full name and degree) Other/additional supervisors: (PLEASE PRINT full name and degree) Field Site Personnel agree to the items below: 1. Primary Supervisor provides hours of direct supervision per week as part of the student's contracted hours. (INSERT # OF HOURS: minimum of 1/2 hour for year 1 Practicum, 1 hour for year 2 Practicum; 2 hours for internship) 2. Provide or arrange hours of additional supervision per week. 3. Provide or arrange hours of group supervision per week. 4. Provide supervision and/or coordinate with the MSPP seminar instructor to ensure support for: a) the student's field-related coursework at MSPP (student will provide the supervisor with relevant course information), b) the student's individual learning goals, as follows: I. II. III. 5. Provide site access to the MSPP School Psychology Field Placement Director or designee, and MSPP faculty. 6. Conduct mid-semester feedback sessions with the student, and complete and submit end-of-semester evaluations to the MSPP Field Placement Office in a timely fashion using the Field Placement Competency Evaluation form. Changes to this contract are subject to the approval of the Field Site Administrator and MSPP Field Placement Director. SIGNATURES: Primary Field Supervisor: Date: Field Site Administrator: Student: Advisor: MSPP School Psychology Field Placement Director: Date: Date: Date: Date: Rev. 3/25/13 91

96 MSPP Field Training Contract School Psychology Program, The following Graduate Student Name: is placed as a school psychology trainee at: Site Name: Address: City: State: Zip: Please check one option: Unpaid Field Placement Paid Field Placement If paid, please indicate amount of stipend: $ per TERM OF CONTRACT: The field placement will begin: mm/dd/yy and end: mm/dd/yy (Minimum of 34 training weeks) (check one): Year hours/week (minimum of 300 hours) Year 2 15 hours/week (minimum of 500 hours) Internship* 35 hours/week (minimum of 1,200 hours, unless multi-year or multiple sites) Please review and sign Internship Agreement as well. Other hours/week, subject to approval by MSPP Field Placement Coordinator The student will have experience in the following areas/activities: (check all that apply) SERVICES/TRAINING AREAS: SERVICES/TRAINING AREAS: SETTING: Structured observation Social-emotional assessment School Assessment of basic literacy skills Assessment feedback meetings Specialized population school Educational testing Individual counseling Clinic/Mental health center Preschool/kindergarten screening Group counseling Day treatment Instructional intervention Parent consultation/education Other: Intervention monitoring Community outreach POPULATION: Behavioral assessment/fba Professional development/in-service Preschool Designing/implementing behavior plans Family counseling/consultation Elementary Program evaluation/research Other: Secondary Cognitive assessment Other: Specific disability: Preschool assessment Other: Report Writing Consultation/collaboration Program planning/system intervention 92

97 Primary Supervisor must be a licensed school psychologist, or (for internship only) licensed psychologist. Primary field supervisor: (PLEASE PRINT full name and degree) Please indicate: (a) license/certificate type: State: Number: Secondary supervisor (if applicable): (PLEASE PRINT full name and degree) Other/additional supervisors: (PLEASE PRINT full name and degree) Field Site Personnel agree to the items below: 1. Primary Supervisor provides hours of direct supervision per week as part of the student's contracted hours. (INSERT # OF HOURS: minimum of 1/2 hour for year 1 Practicum, 1 hour for year 2 Practicum; 2 hours for internship) 2. Provide or arrange hours of additional supervision per week. 3. Provide or arrange hours of group supervision per week. 5. Provide supervision and/or coordinate with the MSPP seminar instructor to ensure support for: a) the student's field-related coursework at MSPP (student will provide the supervisor with relevant course information), b) the student's individual learning goals, as follows: I. II. III. 5. Provide site access to the MSPP School Psychology Field Placement Director or designee, and MSPP faculty. 7. Conduct mid-semester feedback sessions with the student, and complete and submit end-of-semester evaluations to the MSPP Field Placement Office in a timely fashion using the Field Placement Competency Evaluation form. Changes to this contract are subject to the approval of the Field Site Administrator and MSPP Field Placement Director. SIGNATURES: Primary Field Supervisor: Date: Field Site Administrator: Student: Advisor: MSPP School Psychology Field Placement Director: Date: Date: Date: Date: 93

98 MSPP School Psychology Program School Psychology Internship Agreement This internship agreement between the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology (MSPP) and (school/agency), hereinafter referred to as the Internship Site, establishes the following terms and conditions to be adhered to by the parties that sign the accompanying Field Training Contract. [Internship site administrator, primary field supervisor, and intern: please initial this form as well on the last page.] Responsibilities of the Internship Site The Internship Site designates a qualified professional to serve as the primary field supervisor. A qualified field supervisor is (1) a licensed/certified school psychologist with at least three years experience working as a a licensed/certified school psychologist, or, (2) in non-school settings, a psychologist appropriately credentialed for the internship setting. The Field Supervisor agrees: To provide the Intern with the opportunity to practice skills and demonstrate competency across the domains of school psychology training and practice defined by the National Association of School Psychologists; To ensure balance across these domains by limiting the number of psycho-educational assessments assigned to the Intern to 30, with a recommended range of 12 to 25; To provide the Intern with two or more hours of field-based supervision per week; To assume responsibility for the professional services provided by the Intern; To review and cosign all formal written work, such as evaluation reports and service summaries; To work collaboratively with MSPP faculty and the MSPP Field Placement Office to ensure that the Intern meets the quality standards and interpersonal expectations of the setting; To provide the Intern with the opportunity to conduct three case studies one each in the areas of assessment, counseling, and intervention for submission to the MSPP faculty for the purpose of demonstrating the Intern s capacity to deliver services that have a measurable positive impact on children, youth, families, and/or other consumers. To participate in an orientation for field supervisors provided by MSPP, either at MSPP or online; 94

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