TOPIC 2B: MNE ENTRY AND EXPANSION STRATEGIES

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "TOPIC 2B: MNE ENTRY AND EXPANSION STRATEGIES"

Transcription

1 TOPIC 2B: MNE ENTRY AND EXPANSION STRATEGIES 1. By strategy, we mean a deliberate choice taken by the owners or managers of firms to organize the resources and capabilities within their control to achieve an objective or a set of objectives, over a specified time period, which extends beyond the day-to-day operations of the firm. 2. A strategy-driven internationalization of a firm, a process that may lead to an MNE creation and growth, involves the use of the concept of a value-added chain, or simply value chain, which identifies the various stages of economic activity that make up a production sequence of a specific product or service from start to finish. 3. At each stage, up to the point at which the product or service is sold to the final consumer, an intermediate product is produced, which then becomes an input into the next stage of the process. 4. This is subject to the qualification that some intermediate products are not used by the firm sequentially but jointly at various stages of the production process. 5. The process of an internationalization of a firm may be conveniently portrayed as that of an internationalization of its value-added activities, although this does not imply that any given firm necessarily follows it. 6. Phase 1: Exports and foreign sourcing. Firms initially engage in cross-border transactions for one or two reasons. 7. The first is to acquire income-generating assets, or inputs into their value chain, at a lower real cost than they can from domestic sources. 8. The second is to protect existing, or seek out new, markets for the output of their domestic value-adding activities. 9. In both cases, however, the decision to become international is normally just one of several strategic options a firm may pursue. 10. Although phase 1 does not involve any FDI, there are nevertheless a number of possible ways a firm may become linked to cross-border activity. Four examples are worth highlighting. 11. The first is where a firm wishes to outsource the production of intermediate inputs, or the final product itself, to a firm in a foreign country that enjoys a cost advantage as compared to domestic production. Indeed, the growth of contractual outsourcing is a hallmark of the contemporary form of globalization, and it encompasses not just the outsourcing of intermediate manufacturing inputs, such as components or subassemblies, but all that of services, such as call centers. 12. The second example is where a firm wishes to export its goods to a new market. However, because of its relative ignorance or the uncertainties about the local demand conditions, a new entrant, particularly if it is a small firm, may wish to avoid the risks in making an investment in a foreign sales or purchasing outlet. Instead, it may prefer to buy the services of a local sales agent, that is, to make use of an external market. 13. On the other hand, where a market has be created for a product, where the product needs to be adapted to the requirements of local buyers, where multiple products are being marketed and there are net benefits to coordinating the sales of these products, or where an efficient aftersales usage, repair, and maintenance service is a key ingredient of the product s appeal, the firm 1

2 may decide that the risk that a foreign sales agent would not adequately meet its needs is likely to outweigh any setting up costs of marketing and distribution facilities from the start. 14. The third example of value-added activity consists of the production of goods or services, the buying or selling of which requires a regular and continuing association between the parties to the exchange. This is the case where the product is idiosyncratic, is sold in small quantities, or is irregularly traded. Here, the initial market entry may take place directly with a supplier or a customer, even though the firm may use the services of a foreign broker to help it search for, or negotiate with, suppliers or customers. 15. The fourth example is one where the firm generates an output which is difficult or impossible to trade across space. Since some products and services cannot be transported over space, a foreign entry must take the form either of an FDI or, if the intermediate products are tradable, of a contractual agreement with a producing firm in that country. 16. Such contractual agreements include turnkey construction projects, licensing agreements, and franchising arrangements. In phase 1 entry, the construction company has no permanent presence in the foreign location, while the license or franchise owner has little or no involvement in the day-to-day management of its licenses or franchises, but instead earns income due to the exchange of an intermediate product (for example, codifiable knowledge). 17. However, if the construction company in the previous example set up a marketing office for the purposes of obtaining new contracts, this would constitute a Phase 2 entry, and if it set up an office that coordinated at least some aspects of project management for a variety of different projects, this would constitute a Phase 3, 4 or 5 entry, depending on the complexity and range of tasks handled by the local affiliate. 18. Similarly, whenever a franchiser actually owns and operates its affiliates abroad, this represents a Phase 3-5 entry. 19. In terms of resources transferred abroad, Phase 1 involves a minimal commitment, and relies heavily on contractual modes. 20. While a firm selling its output to intermediaries may, in due course, wish to expand its activities by investing in foreign marketing and distribution, or by expanding the stages of value added performed abroad, a firm sourcing inputs from abroad may be content with long-term contractual arrangements with suppliers, or it may wish to exert control and to invest in its own facilities for foreign production either via an acquisition or a greenfield investment. Much would depend on the characteristics of the targeted market, the kind of goods and services being produced and traded, the markets structures in which firms compete, and the nature of the cross-border transactional mechanisms. 21. Phase 2: Investment in marketing and distribution. Apart from firms for whom the purchasing or selling of their products may only be achieved through some kind of physical presence in a foreign market, those seeking to acquire an existing foreign company, or those who are selling or buying in specialized or unfamiliar markets where local expertise is particularly valuable, most firms regard the use of foreign agents and distributors as a first step toward both market- and resource-seeking (but usually not efficiency- or asset-seeking) FDI. The reasons why firms wish to internalize the market for selling the output of their value-added activities reduce to a trade- 2

3 off between the advantages of securing control over the form, the quality, and terms of those activities, and the risks associated with the commitment of the resources involved. 22. It is difficult to identify the internal and external factors affecting the strategies of firms which may cause to switch from using foreign sales or purchasing agents to setting up or acquiring marketing or purchasing facilities of their own. Clearly, if a firm did not choose the latter route in the first place, its post-entry country-specific learning experiences and its growth in sales or purchases might cause the balance of advantages between using an internal and external market to shift in favor of the former. While there is nothing inevitable about this process, it is likely that the more familiar and experienced a firm is, and the larger the buying or selling stake it has in a particular country (e.g., with respect to the volume and type of products traded), the more it might prefer to own its marketing and distribution networks. 23. One the other hand, it could be deterred from pursuing this course of action by the presence of switching costs, in the form of contractual restrictions and possible loss of customers ( takedown costs), as well as the cost of setting up an own marketing and distribution affiliate. 24. Trade- and marketing-related FDI covers a wide spectrum of functions, and a firm may choose different entry routes for organizing different functions. Advertising responsibilities, for example, might be subcontracted to a specialist foreign firm while after-sales servicing might be internalized. Broadly speaking, the greater the presence or likelihood of market failure in the various trading functions the more likely these are to be internalized within MNEs. 25. Another case of a Phase 2 entry is that of a firm which, in order to efficiently exploit any competitive advantage it may possess, must combine these advantages with others possessed by a firm or groups in a foreign country (e.g., access to appropriate distribution channels). 26. It should also be noted that investment in trade-related activities may sometimes be a first step to the foreign production of goods and services. Indeed, a firm may already be engaged in such activities in other countries. Warehousing is an example. It is only a small step from the storage of finished goods to the holding of intermediate products or kits of parts, which require some inspection, assembling, and packaging before being sold to the domestic or export market. 27. Moreover, a trade-related presence may provide a firm with a better idea of its own capacity for foreign production, or that of local firms to supply its intermediate inputs. 28. It might also offer the firm an insight into the kind of foreign technology, institutions, and organizational structures, and also the kind of product adaptations that need to be made to meet the demands of foreign customers. 29. At the same time, it is also possible that instead of the exporter expanding from the provision of goods and services such as warehousing, this might better be undertaken by other specialist firms in the exporting country. 30. It is also necessary to consider a type of global firm whose internationalization process has been accelerated, the so-called born global firm. These are often technology-intensive start-up firms serving niche markets that have adopted flexible structures that can reach suppliers and customers around the world from their very inception. 31. Judging the full-impact of such firms is complicated by the fact that there is no agreed-upon definition of what length of time born refers to, and how exactly the global nature of these firms is to be interpreted. To the extent that they normally supply a narrow range of goods or 3

4 services, have low level of resources committed outside their domestic borders, and engage in exports as their primary cross-border activity, such global firms have attributes associated with Phases 1-3 of the scheme relied upon here. Indeed, while born globals are typically earn a significant proportion of their revenue from abroad in the first few years, evidence suggests that, in many other ways, these firms are following a relatively conventional process of gradually increasing resource commitment to foreign markets, where the establishment of marketing affiliates abroad is an essential step in their internationalization process. 32. Phase 3: Foreign production of intermediate goods and services. While phase 2 is a critical step in the evolution of an MNE, both in its own right and because it may lead to further FDI, he amount of resources and capabilities committed is normally quite modest. This is likely to change quite dramatically as and when a firm starts to engage in the foreign production of goods and services, as opposed to facilitating the sale or purchase of goods and services already produced. 33. For many (but not all) manufacturing firms, initial greenfield (but not acquired) market-seeking activity tends to be in the comparatively low-value adding activities, which are normally at the final assembling or initial processing stage of the value-adding chain. As and when local or regional markets grow large, the economic viability of setting up or acquiring a foreign production facility is likely to increase. 34. The extent to which this actually leads to FDI largely depends on the types of intermediate or final products supplied, the nature of production processes utilized, and the quality of the local supply capabilities. 35. If the domestic production process is capital intensive, or demands much specialized equipment and highly trained labor, and if it cannot be easily scaled down, then it may be a long time before local production is started. 36. If the optimum scale of plant is modest and local inputs are readily and cheaply available, then foreign production may not only replace exports at an early stage but also be the initial modality of entry into the foreign market. 37. It should be noted that the optimum level and locational requirements of production are likely to vary between the different stages of value-added activity as, indeed, may the cross-border transport and transaction costs associated with these and other value-added activities. 38. Phase 4: Deepening and widening the value-added network. While firms in Phase 3 perform intermediate processing, such as assembly abroad, firms in Phase 4 undertake all the tasks related to producing a final good, and engage in in the marketing and distribution of the final product, whether in the host market or for export. 39. Using local technology and creative inputs to develop new products, the affiliate can gain what is known as a product mandate, giving it a more important role in the multinational network as compared to a simple assembly operation. 40. In Phase 4, foreign affiliates control most stages of the value chain, engage in their own sourcing, and may begin to develop the kinds of contractual and cooperative connections that make them insiders in the host in the host market. 4

5 41. In general, while Phase 4 internationalization is more focused on the capabilities of the affiliates themselves, in Phase 5 more attention is paid to the integration of the affiliates into the MNE network. 42. One factor that generally separates Phase 4 affiliates from those in Phase 5 is the role of innovative activities. Affiliates in Phase 4 would normally rely on R&D carried out in the home country of the MNE, or in an affiliate center of excellence in another host country. 43. Entry into Phase 4 often represents a continuation of the process of maturing of the foreign affiliate which was previously engaged in intermediate processing in Phase 3. Such activities normally require the least investment in in human competences, physical capital, and institutional infrastructure, and thus involve the least risk. 44. If successful, and if and when markets expand, local supply capabilities improve, or host governments offer more incentives, then more of the upstream higher value-added activities may be transferred from the home to the host country. 45. The more value-added activities may be adapted to the particular supply capabilities and market needs of the foreign country, and may benefit from a congenial innovative environment, the more foreign production is likely to start earlier than it otherwise would. 46. Moreover, over time, many of these capabilities may be elevated by improved training and education, upgrading the quality of resources, devolving more4 entrepreneurial responsibilities to local managers, networking with indigenous firms, as well as by the provision of appropriate support facilities (e.g., roads, utilities, telecommunications) and the development of more efficient production methods and organizational techniques. 47. If successful, an initial act of foreign production crates its own momentum, and is likely to lead to sequential investment in the form of either (or both) vertical integration or (and) horizontal diversification, as well as the encouragement of related and supporting activities. 48. A possible exception to this general statement is where one firm acquires another to gain certain strategic assets, but sheds others which add little to its competitive advantages. 49. Attention should also be drawn to a phenomenon that is the counterpart to the focus on international expansion. This is divestment, which may take place either as a result of the poor performance of a foreign affiliate, or due to a strategic reorganization within the MNE. 50. Phase 5: The integrated network multinational. In their foreign market entry and expansion strategies, most MNEs coordinate, at least to some extent, their foreign and domestic operations. If they did not, there would be no point in their undertaking the FDI in the first place. 51. In Phase 5, the parent and the foreign affiliate produce different products, each of which is sold in world or regional markets and, in practice, frequently traded within the MNE. 52. Part of the R&D for each product is also undertaken at the location of the subsequent stages of production. 53. This phase is thus different from the preceding four, each of which was concerned with the allocation of the stages of production of a particular product along the value chain. 54. Clearly, if and when this fifth phase in the evolution of an MNE is reached depends on a variety of factors. These include the range and types of products produced, the extent to which product or process specialization may lead to economies of scale or scope, the opportunities for such economies offered by countries in which such investment is currently being made, or 5

6 contemplated, the ease with which intermediate or final products can be traded across national boundaries, the intra-firm transaction costs involved, and the attitude and strategy of the MNE toward the management of its value-added activities. Such intra-firm product specialization and integration of markets is likely to be accompanied by a sharp increase in the trade between the various production units of the MNE. 55. An important component of Phase 5 activity is strategic asset-seeking investment, which may take the form of both joint ventures and M&As. 56. We may identify two strands of this type of FDI. 57. In the first case, which often combines efficiency- and strategic asset-seeking motivations, the acquiring firm desires to acquire control of an intact package of knowledge, capabilities, and productive assets that the target firm has to offer. 58. In the second case, asset-seeking investment is specifically related to the sourcing of knowledge abroad. Such investment is often prompted by the fact that many knowledge assets are geographically confined, and may only be accessed by having presence in the area. 59. If knowledge-seeking investment occurs via acquisitions, acquiring firms have to achieve integration within the firm, while in the case of joint ventures and strategic alliances integration is largely accomplished largely at the inter-firm level. 60. The general impression is that M&As seldom increase share-holder value in the long-run, and often contribute to ongoing managerial problems within the firm. 61. There are comparatively few MNEs that practice a globally integrated product and/or process strategy and hardly any of them have developed a genuine reciprocal resource and organizational relationship between their various production units. 62. Moreover, product strategy is likely to be based on intra- rather than interregional allocation of resources. The question of whether the regionalization of production by MNEs is a step toward globalization, or is a substitute for it in the presence, or likelihood, of intraregional trade and investment barriers, is still under investigation. 63. As noted, in Phase 4, some foreign affiliates acquire a special status within the MNE of which they are part by receiving a product mandate, and by virtue of having become insiders in the host market. 64. In Phase 5, such affiliates are more likely to achieve strategic importance as specialized centers of excellence. This means that the affiliate has global responsibility for developing and advancing excellence in one area of competence within the firm. However, transferring and utilizing the localized knowledge and institutions accessed or created by the affiliate to the rest of the firm strongly depends on the ability of the MNE to set appropriate incentives to achieve integration. 65. A novel solution to the question of knowledge integration is offered by the metanational firm, which is born in the wrong place and needs to break free of geography. While established competitors may try to redesign their existing organizations by cultivating centers of excellence and by investing heavily in in better information systems and in knowledge management, metanational firms are more likely to focus on identifying and accessing new technologies, turning them into innovative products, and finally scaling up the innovations globally. Their key 6

7 advantage is an unconventional process of prospecting for knowledge from everywhere in the firm s operating environment. 66. An idea similar to that of the metanational is that of the so-called dragon multinational, which uses its network connections for leverage. Several East Asia firms fall into this category. These latecomer firms have managed to overcome their peripheral locations and lack of specific capabilities by deftly identifying, accessing, and combining resources and capabilities globally and leveraging them within their operational ambits. What is distinctive about the dragon multinationals is their accelerated rate of internationalization, and although they are generally quite large, in this sense they are also akin to the born globals described earlier. These are firms that are very global and have grown to a substantial size in spite of a limited home market and severely restricted domestic resources and capabilities. They have accomplished this growth by maximizing the utility of their network relationships and by not expanding the core of the firm uncontrollably. 7

Chapter 11: The Strategy of International Business

Chapter 11: The Strategy of International Business Chapter 11: The of International Business Localization : Local country managers have the power of manufacturing and marketing Global : Corporate center exercise more control over manufacturing, marketing

More information

Seminar. The Organization of International Business Chapter 15. 11 Kasım 14 Salı 15-

Seminar. The Organization of International Business Chapter 15. 11 Kasım 14 Salı 15- Seminar The Organization of International Business Chapter 15 Learning Objectives p Profile the evolving process of organizing a company for international business p Describe the features of classical

More information

Globalization & Economic Geography

Globalization & Economic Geography 2013-10-30 Globalization & Economic Geography Ramsin Yakob, PhD ramsin.yakob@liu.se IEI/Linköpings Universitet What is Globalization or the Globalization process? What is International Business or the

More information

Fair Competition Commission. THE FAIR COMPETITION COMMISSION PROCEDURE RULES, 2013 Rule 33(2) MERGER NOTIFICATION (Application for Merger Clearance)

Fair Competition Commission. THE FAIR COMPETITION COMMISSION PROCEDURE RULES, 2013 Rule 33(2) MERGER NOTIFICATION (Application for Merger Clearance) FCC.8 Fair Competition Commission THE FAIR COMPETITION COMMISSION PROCEDURE RULES, 2013 Rule 33(2) To: The Fair Competition Commission MERGER NOTIFICATION (Application for Merger Clearance) Application

More information

Best Connected Software from Ireland

Best Connected Software from Ireland Best Connected Software from Ireland A strategy for development of the indigenous software industry 2009-2013 Irish Software a Modern Success Story Over the past thirty years, Ireland has built an international

More information

Chapter Twelve Marketing Channels: Delivering Customer Value

Chapter Twelve Marketing Channels: Delivering Customer Value Chapter Twelve Marketing Channels: Delivering Customer Value Marketing Channels: Delivering Customer Value Topic Outline Supply Chains and the Value Delivery Network The Nature and Importance of Marketing

More information

Marketing Channels: Delivering Customer Value

Marketing Channels: Delivering Customer Value Chapter Twelve : Delivering Customer Value : Delivering Customer Value Topic Outline Supply Chains and the Value Delivery Network Channel Decisions Public Policy and Distribution Decisions Supply Chains

More information

International Strategy

International Strategy International Strategy Ramsin Yakob, PhD ramsin.yakob@liu.se IEI/Linköpings Universitet What is it? The field of international strategy concerns the study of international activities of firms and their

More information

A primer in Entrepreneurship. Chapter 3: Feasibility Analysis

A primer in Entrepreneurship. Chapter 3: Feasibility Analysis Chapter 3 Feasibilty Analysis Prof. Dr. Institute for Strategy and Business Economics Chapter 3: Feasibility Analysis Table of Contents A. What is feasibility analysis? C. Industry/Market Feasibility D.

More information

GLOBALIZATION INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

GLOBALIZATION INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS GLOBALIZATION INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS OBJECTIVES To define globalization and international business and how they affect each other To understand why companies engage in international business and why international

More information

GLOSSARY OF STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT TERMS

GLOSSARY OF STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT TERMS GLOSSARY OF STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT TERMS Acquisition: When one company, the acquirer, purchases and absorbs the operations of another, the acquired. Barriers to Entry/Exit: Economic or other characteristics

More information

Contents. Part- I: Introduction to Services Marketing. Chapter 1 Understanding Services 3-22. Chapter 2 The Nature of Services Marketing 23-38

Contents. Part- I: Introduction to Services Marketing. Chapter 1 Understanding Services 3-22. Chapter 2 The Nature of Services Marketing 23-38 Contents Part- I: Introduction to Services Marketing Chapter 1 Understanding Services 3-22 Chapter 2 The Nature of Services Marketing 23-38 Part- II: The Customer Experience Chapter 3 Consumer Behavior

More information

Technology Transfer Principle & Strategy

Technology Transfer Principle & Strategy Technology Transfer Principle & Strategy Chapter 1: The Fundamental Principle & Strategy of Technology Transfer Understanding the necessity of technology transfer & the importance of technology outsourcing

More information

The emerging global market for Management System Certification Perspective of QHSE professionals

The emerging global market for Management System Certification Perspective of QHSE professionals The emerging global market for Management System Certification Perspective of QHSE professionals This point of view represents a sanitised summary of the key market findings following the interview process

More information

1 The business of healthcare innovation

1 The business of healthcare innovation 1 The business of healthcare innovation in the Wharton School curriculum Lawton R. Burns Innovation and the value chain in healthcare The technological imperative in healthcare The innovation challenge

More information

CIPS POSITIONS ON PRACTICE PURCHASING AND SUPPLY MANAGEMENT: SUPPLIER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT

CIPS POSITIONS ON PRACTICE PURCHASING AND SUPPLY MANAGEMENT: SUPPLIER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT CIPS POSITIONS ON PRACTICE PURCHASING AND SUPPLY MANAGEMENT: SUPPLIER RELATIONSHIP MANAGEMENT INTRODUCTION The CIPS' practice documents are written as a statement in time. They are a collection of views

More information

CHAPTER 11 INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY AND ORGANIZATION

CHAPTER 11 INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY AND ORGANIZATION CHAPTER 11 INTERNATIONAL STRATEGY AND ORGANIZATION LEARNING OBJECTIVES: 1. Explain the stages of identification and analysis that precede strategy selection. 2. Identify the two international strategies

More information

Once a company determines it has exportable products, it must still consider other factors, such as the following:

Once a company determines it has exportable products, it must still consider other factors, such as the following: EXPORT STRATEGY ASSESSING A PRODUCT'S EXPORT POTENTIAL There are several ways to gauge the overseas market potential of products and services. (For ease of reading, products are mentioned more than services

More information

Strategy & the firm. Value creation. Value creation

Strategy & the firm. Value creation. Value creation 1 Strategy & the firm Strategy: actions that managers must take to attain the goals of the firm Main goal usually to maximize long- term profit (П)( Profitability defined by return on sales or return on

More information

E-Commerce Business Models and Concepts

E-Commerce Business Models and Concepts Copyright 2002 Pearson Education, Inc. Slide 2-1 E-Commerce Business Models and Concepts Created by, David Zolzer, Northwestern State University Louisiana Learning Objectives! Identify the key components

More information

GLOSSARY OF TERMS. Capitalist: A person who owns shares in a business enterprise.

GLOSSARY OF TERMS. Capitalist: A person who owns shares in a business enterprise. GLOSSARY OF TERMS A Accountant: A person who carries out bookkeeping, auditing, and other financial reporting and analysis. This is a generic term referring to a wide range of skills from semi-clerical

More information

Marketing channels exist to create utility for. Customers

Marketing channels exist to create utility for. Customers Channel Objectives Global Marketing Channels and Physical Distribution Global Marketing Chapter 12 1 Marketing channels exist to create utility for customers Place utility availability of a product or

More information

Portfolio Management

Portfolio Management Portfolio Management Portfolio Management It is top management responsibility that requires the assessment of strengths and weaknesses of the current portfolio of businesses, in order to define the priorities

More information

HOW IMPORTS IMPROVE PRODUCTIVITY AND COMPETITIVENESS

HOW IMPORTS IMPROVE PRODUCTIVITY AND COMPETITIVENESS HOW IMPORTS IMPROVE PRODUCTIVITY AND COMPETITIVENESS May 2010 How important is trade in intermediate goods and services? Why are firms outsourcing and offshoring? What is the role of regional trade flows?

More information

MKTG 680. Chapter 15 Strategic Elements of Competitive Advantage. Porter s Five Forces. Industry Analysis: Forces Influencing Competition

MKTG 680. Chapter 15 Strategic Elements of Competitive Advantage. Porter s Five Forces. Industry Analysis: Forces Influencing Competition MKTG 680 Chapter 15 Strategic Elements of Industry Analysis: Forces Influencing Competition Industry group of firms that produce products that are close substitutes for each other Porter s Five forces

More information

Supplier Relationships Lecture 7. Briony Boydell Managing Business Relationships

Supplier Relationships Lecture 7. Briony Boydell Managing Business Relationships Supplier Relationships Lecture 7 Briony Boydell Managing Business Relationships Objectives of lecture Identify the types of relationships within the supply chain Discuss the benefits of improved relations

More information

Strategic Elements of Competitive Advantage. PPT 6 (First ppt slides after the mid-term) Assist. Prof. Dr. Ayşen Akyüz

Strategic Elements of Competitive Advantage. PPT 6 (First ppt slides after the mid-term) Assist. Prof. Dr. Ayşen Akyüz Strategic Elements of Competitive Advantage PPT 6 (First ppt slides after the mid-term) Assist. Prof. Dr. Ayşen Akyüz Industry Analysis: Forces Influencing Competition Industry group of firms that produce

More information

Introduction. Learning Outcome

Introduction. Learning Outcome Introduction The SBP Entrepreneurship course provides schools, colleges, and study centers with a highly flexible programme that can be delivered via full-time, part-time, and distance learning. This advanced

More information

INFO1400. Define an organization and compare the technical definition of organizations with the behavioral definition.

INFO1400. Define an organization and compare the technical definition of organizations with the behavioral definition. Chapter 3 INFO1400 Review Questions 1. Which features of organizations do managers need to know about to build and use information systems successfully? What is the impact of information systems on organizations?

More information

Guide to Market Research and Analysis

Guide to Market Research and Analysis The Orangeville & Area Small Business Enterprise Centre (SBEC) 87 Broadway, Orangeville ON L9W 1K1 519-941-0440 Ext. 2286 or 2291 sbec@orangeville.ca www.orangevillebusiness.ca Supported by its Partners:

More information

International Business Environment THE MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS ARE ALSO KNOWN AS:

International Business Environment THE MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS ARE ALSO KNOWN AS: Chapter No. 4 Page No. 210 MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS / ORGANIZATIONAL MODELS THE MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS ARE ALSO KNOWN AS: INTERNATIONAL CORPORATIONS. TRANSNATIONAL CORPORATIONS. GLOBAL CORPORATIONS.

More information

Strategic Management: Concepts and Cases 9e

Strategic Management: Concepts and Cases 9e Strategic Management: Concepts and Cases 9e Part II: Strategic Actions: Strategy Formulation Chapter 8: International Strategy 2011 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be scanned, copied or

More information

Management and Marketing Course Descriptions

Management and Marketing Course Descriptions Management and Marketing Course Descriptions Management Course Descriptions HRM 301 Human Resources Management (3-0-3) Covers all activities and processes of the human resources function that include recruitment,

More information

1. Planning - Establishing organizational goals and deciding how to accomplish them

1. Planning - Establishing organizational goals and deciding how to accomplish them 1 : Understanding the Management Process Basic Management Functions 1. Planning - Establishing organizational goals and deciding how to accomplish them SWOT analysis - The identification and evaluation

More information

Global Marketing. Fourth Edition. Kate Gillespie and. H. David Hennessey. 13 Routledge % Taylor & Francis Croup NEW YORK AND LONDON

Global Marketing. Fourth Edition. Kate Gillespie and. H. David Hennessey. 13 Routledge % Taylor & Francis Croup NEW YORK AND LONDON Global Marketing Fourth Edition Kate Gillespie and H. David Hennessey 13 Routledge % Taylor & Francis Croup NEW YORK AND LONDON Detailed Contents Preface Acknowledgments xix xxv 1 Introduction to Global

More information

RECOMMENDATIONS ON BUSINESS PLAN PREPARATION

RECOMMENDATIONS ON BUSINESS PLAN PREPARATION RECOMMENDATIONS ON BUSINESS PLAN PREPARATION 1. General provisions Business plan must contain: name of the investment project, as well description of its essence and feasibility; substantiation of the

More information

Principles of Marketing. by Jeff Tanner and Mary Anne Raymond

Principles of Marketing. by Jeff Tanner and Mary Anne Raymond Principles of Marketing by Jeff Tanner and Mary Anne Raymond Chapter 8 Using Marketing Channels to Create Value for Customers 2010 Flat World Knowledge, Inc. Marketing Channels and Channel Partners Learning

More information

Chapter 6. Transfer Pricing Methods. 6.1. Introduction to Transfer Pricing Methods

Chapter 6. Transfer Pricing Methods. 6.1. Introduction to Transfer Pricing Methods Chapter 6 Transfer Pricing Methods 6.1. Introduction to Transfer Pricing Methods 6.1.1. This part of the Chapter describes several transfer pricing methods that can be used to determine an arm s length

More information

ROLE OF INTERNATIONAL MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS IN CORPORATE INTEGRATION

ROLE OF INTERNATIONAL MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS IN CORPORATE INTEGRATION Lucia P. BLĂJUȚ Doctoral School of Economics and Business Administration, Al. I. Cuza University, Iași ROLE OF INTERNATIONAL MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS IN CORPORATE INTEGRATION Literature review Keywords

More information

This course is about how to manage change in organizations. It shows the importance of having the right balance between:

This course is about how to manage change in organizations. It shows the importance of having the right balance between: Change Management Course outline Change Management refers to the coaching process of organizational changes at a human level. Companies are facing intensive changes in order to remain competitive and sustainable,

More information

4 What Are the Exit Options for

4 What Are the Exit Options for CHAPTER 4 What Are the Exit Options for your Business? Choosing the optimum exit option for your business is a vital part of exit strategy planning. In this chapter we: examine briefly the various exit

More information

Economic Development and Gains from Trade

Economic Development and Gains from Trade Economics Education and Research Consortium Working Paper Series Economic Development and Gains from Trade Georgi Trofimov Working Paper No 98/06 This project (No 96-161) was supported by the Economics

More information

MERCATI E COMPETITIVITA n. 3/2016 SPECIAL ISSUE. Driving international business research forward: Emerging themes and insights

MERCATI E COMPETITIVITA n. 3/2016 SPECIAL ISSUE. Driving international business research forward: Emerging themes and insights MERCATI E COMPETITIVITA n. 3/2016 SPECIAL ISSUE Driving international business research forward: Emerging themes and insights The broad internationalization trend of the recent years, asks for significant

More information

Want to Buy a Construction Company?

Want to Buy a Construction Company? Why Would Anyone Want to Buy a Construction Company? If You re Thinking of Selling Your Company or Buying Your Competitor, You Need to Read This Article By Hugh L. Rice and Andrew W. Arnold Acquisitions

More information

International Expansion for a U.S. Firm: Initial Thoughts

International Expansion for a U.S. Firm: Initial Thoughts International Expansion for a U.S. Firm: Initial Thoughts Markus Hill MH Services & Partner 27.7.2010 markus.hill.cologne@t-online.de www.markus-hill.com Phone: 0049 (0) 69 280 714 The International Proposition

More information

Primary Logistics Activities

Primary Logistics Activities 1 TOPIC 1: OVERVIEW OF BUSINESS LOGISTICS AND PLANNING Topic Outcomes: You should be able: 1. Define logistics 2. Define activity mix in logistics business 3. Determine the importance of business logistics

More information

All available Global Online MBA routes have a set of core modules required to be completed in order to achieve an MBA. Those modules are:

All available Global Online MBA routes have a set of core modules required to be completed in order to achieve an MBA. Those modules are: All available Global Online MBA routes have a set of core modules required to be completed in order to achieve an MBA. Those modules are: Management and Organizational Change (P.4) Leading Strategic Decision

More information

OUTSOURCING A WAY TO MAXIMIZE PROFIT

OUTSOURCING A WAY TO MAXIMIZE PROFIT OUTSOURCING A WAY TO MAXIMIZE PROFIT Irina DURAN 1, Dan DURAN 2, 1 TIBISCUS UNIVERSITY OF TIMIŞOARA, FACULTY OF ECONOMICS 2 POLITEHNICA UNIVERSITY OF TIMIŞOARA, FACULTY OF MANAGEMENT IN PRODUCTION AND

More information

Advanced Financial Management

Advanced Financial Management Progress Test 2 Advanced Financial Management P4AFM-PT2-Z14-A Answers & Marking Scheme 2014 DeVry/Becker Educational Development Corp. Tutorial note: the answers below are more comprehensive than would

More information

THE STUDY ON NEW MARKET DEVELOPMENT& DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL MANAGEMENT FOR AIRCEL LIMITED, MANGALORE

THE STUDY ON NEW MARKET DEVELOPMENT& DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL MANAGEMENT FOR AIRCEL LIMITED, MANGALORE THE STUDY ON NEW MARKET DEVELOPMENT& DISTRIBUTION CHANNEL MANAGEMENT FOR AIRCEL LIMITED, MANGALORE S. Saravanan Assistant Professor, Justice K S Hegde Institute of Management, Nitte, India Email: saravanansnr@gmail.com

More information

Cooper Energy and the East Coast Gas Market

Cooper Energy and the East Coast Gas Market Cooper Energy and the East Coast Gas Market Cooper Energy is an ASX-listed oil and gas company that is engaged in: developing new gas supply projects; marketing gas directly to eastern Australian gas users;

More information

PART VI METHODS OF PROCUREMENT AND THEIR CONDITIONS FOR USE

PART VI METHODS OF PROCUREMENT AND THEIR CONDITIONS FOR USE PART VI METHODS OF PROCUREMENT AND THEIR CONDITIONS FOR USE Selection of a method of procure ment 63.-(1) Except as otherwise provided for by these Regulations, a procuring entity engaging in procurement

More information

Tentative Translation

Tentative Translation Tentative Translation GUIDELINES TO APPLICATION OF THE ANTIMONOPOLY ACT CONCERNING REVIEW OF BUSINESS COMBINATION May 31, 2004 Japan Fair Trade Commission Revised as of May 1, 2006 Revised as of March

More information

BUS 478: Seminar on Business Strategy SYNOPSIS PROJECT: AMAZON.COM. Group G. Group Members: Tristan Landrecht. Jessica Zhang. John Chen.

BUS 478: Seminar on Business Strategy SYNOPSIS PROJECT: AMAZON.COM. Group G. Group Members: Tristan Landrecht. Jessica Zhang. John Chen. BUS 478: Seminar on Business Strategy SYNOPSIS PROJECT: AMAZON.COM Group G Group Members: Tristan Landrecht Jessica Zhang John Chen Jin Can Chen Jae Kim 0 Company Background When Amazon was founded in

More information

MODERN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND ORGANIZATIONAL THINKING OPEN A WINDOW OF OPPORTUNITY FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL SMES

MODERN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND ORGANIZATIONAL THINKING OPEN A WINDOW OF OPPORTUNITY FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL SMES MODERN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND ORGANIZATIONAL THINKING OPEN A WINDOW OF OPPORTUNITY FOR ENTREPRENEURIAL SMES by Tor Jarl Trondsen, Ph.D. Associate Professor Norwegian School of Management PO Box 580,

More information

Summary of responses to the public consultation on Cloud computing run by CNIL from October to December 2011 and analysis by CNIL

Summary of responses to the public consultation on Cloud computing run by CNIL from October to December 2011 and analysis by CNIL Summary of responses to the public consultation on Cloud computing run by CNIL from October to December 2011 and analysis by CNIL 1. Definition of Cloud Computing In the public consultation, CNIL defined

More information

Application of Porter s Five Forces Model Paper

Application of Porter s Five Forces Model Paper Application of Porter s Five Forces Model Paper Example 1: Fast Casual Industry The Porter s Five Forces Model illustrates how the competitive landscape in an industry is impacted by five prominent forces.

More information

Master in International Marketing & Sales Management International Marketing Strategy

Master in International Marketing & Sales Management International Marketing Strategy Master in International Marketing & Sales Management International Marketing Strategy Credits: Professor: Campus : 6 ECTS (compulsory) Athina Sismanidou, PhD IQS School of Management (Barcelona) OBJECTIVES

More information

MODEL SCHEDULE OF WTO COMMITMENTS FOR INVESTMENT BANKING, TRADING, AND ASSET MANAGEMENT Explanatory Memorandum

MODEL SCHEDULE OF WTO COMMITMENTS FOR INVESTMENT BANKING, TRADING, AND ASSET MANAGEMENT Explanatory Memorandum March 8, 2005 MODEL SCHEDULE OF WTO COMMITMENTS FOR INVESTMENT BANKING, TRADING, AND ASSET MANAGEMENT Explanatory Memorandum I. INTRODUCTION Internationally active securities companies are working together

More information

Distributor/Reseller Marketing A Riddle Wrapped in a Mystery Inside an Enigma

Distributor/Reseller Marketing A Riddle Wrapped in a Mystery Inside an Enigma Distributor/Reseller Marketing A Riddle Wrapped in a Mystery Inside an Enigma 2006 Frank Lynn & Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved 0 Distributor/Reseller Marketing Over the last 50 years, changes in

More information

Availability of substitute products places limits on the prices market leaders can charge High prices induce buyers to switch to the substitute

Availability of substitute products places limits on the prices market leaders can charge High prices induce buyers to switch to the substitute Strategic Elements of Competitive Advantage Industry Analysis: Forces Influencing Competition Power of Suppliers Global Marketing Chapter 15 Power of Buyers Substitute Products Barriers to Entry Industry

More information

Multinational Intercompany Funds Flow Mechanisms Exposure

Multinational Intercompany Funds Flow Mechanisms Exposure Presented at the 17 th Annual Convention of the Global Awareness Society International, May 2008, San Francisco, CA, USA Multinational Intercompany Funds Flow Mechanisms Exposure WOLD ZEMEDKUN SCHOOL OF

More information

E-commerce in India Response to Discussion Paper circulated by DIPP. Amit Prabhu

E-commerce in India Response to Discussion Paper circulated by DIPP. Amit Prabhu E-commerce in India Response to Discussion Paper circulated by DIPP Amit Prabhu Disclaimer The author is a Chartered Accountant, working as senior finance executive in a Private Enterprise. The views expressed

More information

International Entrepreneurship: Competing and Learning in a Flat World

International Entrepreneurship: Competing and Learning in a Flat World International Entrepreneurship: Competing and Learning in a Flat World Celebration of the 10 th Anniversary of Department of Management Science and Technology Athens University of Economics and Business

More information

Achieving Competitive Advantage with Information Systems

Achieving Competitive Advantage with Information Systems Chapter 3 Achieving Competitive Advantage with Information Systems 3.1 Copyright 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES How does Porter s competitive forces model help companies develop

More information

Market entry strategy and distribution channels

Market entry strategy and distribution channels Market entry strategy and distribution channels Market entry strategies To select the most effective route to market you ll need a clear understanding of your target market and the needs and preferences

More information

White Paper: The Basics of Contract and Commercial Management IACCM White Paper: The Basics of Author Contract and Commercial IACCM Management

White Paper: The Basics of Contract and Commercial Management IACCM White Paper: The Basics of Author Contract and Commercial IACCM Management White Paper: The Basics of Contract and Commercial Management Author IACCM IACCM White Paper: The Basics of Contract and Commercial Management Executive Summary With all the changes in the way that customers

More information

Organizing for Sourcing Excellence Insights for impact on profitability and revenue.

Organizing for Sourcing Excellence Insights for impact on profitability and revenue. Organizing for Sourcing Excellence Insights for impact on profitability and revenue. The Transformation of Procurement Strategic decision making opportunities that can have immediate impact on profitability

More information

Chapter 2: Analyzing a Dealership s Financial Statements & Operations

Chapter 2: Analyzing a Dealership s Financial Statements & Operations Chapter 2: Analyzing a Dealership s Financial Statements & Operations To analyze a dealership s operations, a close look must be taken at the day to day operations as well as examining the dealership s

More information

Manufacturing Planning and Control

Manufacturing Planning and Control 1 Chapter Manufacturing Planning and Control The manufacturing planning and control (MPC) system is concerned with planning and controlling all aspects of manufacturing, including managing materials, scheduling

More information

Cost and Value in Sales and Distribution Channels

Cost and Value in Sales and Distribution Channels Cost and Value in Sales and Distribution Channels Situation More and more companies are discovering that their accustomed approaches to selecting and managing sales and distribution channels no longer

More information

Bond Street Capital London

Bond Street Capital London Bond Street Capital London Management and Solutions for International Expansion WHO we ARE Bond Street Capital London is an alternative professional services firm, specifically formulated to capitalise

More information

Market Research. What is market research? 2. Why conduct market research?

Market Research. What is market research? 2. Why conduct market research? What is market research? Market Research Successful businesses have extensive knowledge of their customers and their competitors. Market research is the process of gathering information which will make

More information

Organization architecture and profitability. Organizational architecture. Organizational architecture. Organizational architecture

Organization architecture and profitability. Organizational architecture. Organizational architecture. Organizational architecture 13-1 Organization architecture and profitability Organizational architecture 13-2 Totality of a firm s organization, including structure, control systems, incentives, processes, culture and people. Superior

More information

Skills Knowledge Energy Time People and decide how to use themto accomplish your objectives.

Skills Knowledge Energy Time People and decide how to use themto accomplish your objectives. Chapter 8 Selling With a Strategy Strategy Defined A strategy is a to assemble your resources Skills Knowledge Energy Time People and decide how to use themto accomplish your objectives. In selling, an

More information

Global Supply Chain Management. Ecosystem Aware. ZARA-Fast Fashion (HBS 9-703-497) N. Viswanadham

Global Supply Chain Management. Ecosystem Aware. ZARA-Fast Fashion (HBS 9-703-497) N. Viswanadham ZARA-Fast Fashion N. Viswanadham (HBS 9-703-497) Contents l Apparel Supply Chain l Zara s Business System l Zara s internationalization strategy l IT at Zara l The risks of failure of the Zara business

More information

Advancing with e-commerce

Advancing with e-commerce Advancing with e-commerce September 2001 A summary of 34 case studies of small business e-commerce ventures. Introduction Early in 2001 the National Office for the Information Economy (NOIE) commissioned

More information

Chapter 12. Equity Globally

Chapter 12. Equity Globally Chapter 12 Sourcing Equity Globally Sourcing Equity Globally: Learning Objectives Design a strategy to source equity globally Analyze the motivations and goals of a firm issuing new equity shares on foreign

More information

Information Systems and Business Strategy. Chapter 3 (9E) Ch 3 & Questions

Information Systems and Business Strategy. Chapter 3 (9E) Ch 3 & Questions Information Systems and Business Strategy Chapter 3 (9E) 10/7/2007 Laudon & Laudon 1 Ch 3 & Questions 1. What are information systems? Explain the nature and interaction of technology, people, and organizational

More information

Learning Objectives: Quick answer key: Question # Multiple Choice True/False

Learning Objectives: Quick answer key: Question # Multiple Choice True/False 0 Learning Objectives: 11.1 Describe the advantages and disadvantages of the most common forms of business ownership. 11.2 Identify the stakeholders of a business and describe why they are important. 11.3

More information

Guide to Public and Private Funding

Guide to Public and Private Funding Guide to Public and Private Funding Introduction to public and private funding Key Public Funding Opportunities Key Private Funding Opportunities Which funding opportunity is right for my business? Do

More information

Planning, Strategy, and Competitive Advantage

Planning, Strategy, and Competitive Advantage Planning, Strategy, and Competitive Advantage Chapter 6 website Mark Gosling Office: D404 Phone: 5417 Learning Objectives LO1 Identify the three main steps of the planning process and explain the relationship

More information

INCORPORATING SMALL PRODUCERS INTO FORMAL RETAIL SUPPLY CHAINS SOURCING READINESS CHECKLIST 2016

INCORPORATING SMALL PRODUCERS INTO FORMAL RETAIL SUPPLY CHAINS SOURCING READINESS CHECKLIST 2016 INCORPORATING SMALL PRODUCERS INTO FORMAL RETAIL SUPPLY CHAINS SOURCING READINESS CHECKLIST 2016 LSteinfield/Bentley University Authors: Ted London Linda Scott Colm Fay This report was produced with the

More information

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PLANNING CHECKLIST. For Development of Overall International Business Plan

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PLANNING CHECKLIST. For Development of Overall International Business Plan INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PLANNING CHECKLIST For Development of Overall International Business Plan Thomas B. McVey 1 Introduction: The following Checklist is designed to be used by a Company s senior management

More information

Feasibility Study Requirements. Qatar Development Bank

Feasibility Study Requirements. Qatar Development Bank Feasibility Study Requirements Qatar Development Bank i. Feasibility Study Requirements The Feasibility study should ideally encompass the following areas / sections A. Executive Summary. B. Project details

More information

Competitiveness Through Clustering / Collaborative Networks

Competitiveness Through Clustering / Collaborative Networks Competitiveness Through Clustering / Collaborative Networks Professor Michael J. Enright University of Hong Kong and Enright, Scott & Associates Belfast, May 2005 1 The competitiveness challenge Competitiveness*

More information

RE: ITI Comments on Korea s Proposed Bill for the Development of Cloud Computing and Protection of Users

RE: ITI Comments on Korea s Proposed Bill for the Development of Cloud Computing and Protection of Users August 19, 2012 Korean Communications Commission Via e-mail to: ycs@kcc.go.kr RE: ITI Comments on Korea s Proposed Bill for the Development of Cloud Computing and Protection of Users Dear Director Yang:

More information

Alliances and joint ventures

Alliances and joint ventures Alliances and joint ventures Patterns of internationalization for developing country enterprises Part one UNITED NATIONS INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATION Alliances and joint ventures Patterns of internationalization

More information

All available Global Online MBA routes have a set of core modules required to be completed in order to achieve an MBA.

All available Global Online MBA routes have a set of core modules required to be completed in order to achieve an MBA. All available Global Online MBA routes have a set of core modules required to be completed in order to achieve an MBA. Those modules are: Building High Performance Organisations Management and Organisational

More information

Marketing Software and Web Developer with Clients Nationwide

Marketing Software and Web Developer with Clients Nationwide Marketing Software and Web Developer with Clients Nationwide This web-development, marketing, and software company, founded in 2000, has developed a loyal, long-term client base, who appreciates its excellent

More information

Importance of Promotional and Marketing Strategies in Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSME)

Importance of Promotional and Marketing Strategies in Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSME) Importance of Promotional and Marketing Strategies in Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises (MSME) Satyendra Arya Avinash Rajkumar Dr. Rajiv Verma Sr. Lecturer (TMIMT) Lecturer (TMIMT) Associate Professor(TMIMT)

More information

Writing an Export Plan

Writing an Export Plan Writing an Export Plan EXPORT SERIES For more information, contact: The Business Link Business Service Centre 100 10237 104 Street NW, Edmonton, Alberta Tel: (780) 422-7722 or 1-888-811-1119 Fax: (780)

More information

How to develop and deploy European operations for high-end B2B software companies

How to develop and deploy European operations for high-end B2B software companies How to develop and deploy European operations for high-end B2B software companies Accelerating growth of US software companies September 2003 Agenda 1- Why build international operations 2- Opportunities

More information

DEUTSCHE BANK RESPONSE TO THE REPORT OF THE EXPERT GROUP ON CUSTOMER MOBILITY IN RELATION TO BANK ACCOUNTS

DEUTSCHE BANK RESPONSE TO THE REPORT OF THE EXPERT GROUP ON CUSTOMER MOBILITY IN RELATION TO BANK ACCOUNTS Deutsche Bank Dr. Bernhard Speyer/Dr. Stefan Schäfer Deutsche Bank AG/DB Research P.O. Box 60272 Frankfurt, Germany e-mail: stefan-a.schaefer@db.com Tel. +49 (0)69 910 31832 Fax +49 (0)69 910 31743 03.09.2007

More information

Impact of Foreign Direct Investment, Imports and Exports

Impact of Foreign Direct Investment, Imports and Exports Impact of Foreign Direct Investment, Imports and Exports Dr. A. Jayakumar, Professor of Commerce, Periyar University, Salem, India. Kannan.L, Research Scholar, Department of Commerce, Periyar University,

More information

WHO WE ARE GBDC Caucasus, Ukraine, Turkey, Central Asia, EMEA, CEE, CIS, Asia and South America GBDC GBDC

WHO WE ARE GBDC Caucasus, Ukraine, Turkey, Central Asia, EMEA, CEE, CIS, Asia and South America GBDC GBDC WHO WE ARE GBDC is non-governmental organization which provides companies with strategies, business solutions and information concerning match business partners to entry emerging markets of the Caucasus,

More information

M2M for Telecommunications Companies. Strategy Dimensions for Entering the M2M Market

M2M for Telecommunications Companies. Strategy Dimensions for Entering the M2M Market M2M for Telecommunications Companies Strategy Dimensions for Entering the M2M Market 62 Detecon Management Report blue 1 / 2015 Telecommunications companies find themselves facing the threat of stagnating

More information

Internet and competitive advantages

Internet and competitive advantages Internet and competitive advantages INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS STRATEGIES II December 10/12/2003 Morten Rask www.morten-rask.dk Agenda: Porter and the case Main message Five forces (can be very wrong) The

More information

International Business: An Overview

International Business: An Overview 1 International Business: An Overview International Business is all commercial transactions private and governmental between two or more countries. Private companies undertake such transactions for profit;

More information

DAILEY RESOURCES, INC.

DAILEY RESOURCES, INC. DAILEY RESOURCES, INC. PREPARING FOR THE SALE OF YOUR PRIVATELY HELD BUSINESS For an entrepreneur, selling his or her business can be the largest and most important deal of his or her career. Whatever

More information