WORLD POPULATION TO 2300

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "WORLD POPULATION TO 2300"

Transcription

1 E c o n o m i c & S o c i a l A f f a i r s WORLD POPULATION TO 2300 United Nations

2

3 ST/ESA/SER.A/236 Department of Economic and Social Affairs Population Division WORLD POPULATION TO 2300 United Nations New York, 2004

4 The Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat is a vital interface between global policies in the economic, social and environmental spheres and national action. The Department works in three main interlinked areas: (i) it compiles, generates and analyses a wide range of economic, social and environmental data and information on which States Members of the United Nations draw to review common problems and take stock of policy options; (ii) it facilitates the negotiations of Member States in many intergovernmental bodies on joint courses of action to address ongoing or emerging global challenges; and (iii) it advises interested Governments on the ways and means of translating policy frameworks developed in United Nations conferences and summits into programmes at the country level and, through technical assistance, helps build national capacities. NOTE The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion on the part of the Secretariat of the United Nations concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. The designations of more developed regions and less developed regions are intended for statistical convenience and do not necessarily express a judgment about the stage reached by a particular country or area in the development process. The term country as used in the text of this publication also refers, as appropriate, to territories or areas. The present report has been reproduced without formal editing. ST/ESA/SER.A/236 UNITED NATIONS PUBLICATION Sales No. ISBN Copyright United Nations 2004 All rights reserved Printed in United Nations, New York

5 PREFACE Every two years the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs Population Division prepares the official United Nations estimates and projections of world, regional and national population size and growth, and demographic indicators. The results from the most recent set of estimates and projections were published in World Population Prospects: The 2002 Revision, a three-volume set issued over the period The estimates and projections in the 2002 Revision cover the period The United Nations also prepares supplementary world population projections covering a much longer period, referred to as long-range projections. The United Nations previously published long-range projections on six occasions, each being consistent with the population projections of the following revisions of the World Population Prospects: 1968, 1978, 1980, 1990, 1996 and These publications presented long-range projections for the world and its major areas, and since the 1990 set of projections, the long-range time horizon was until The Population Division has adopted two major innovations for this new set of long-range population projections based on the 2002 Revision. For the first time, the long-range projections are made at the national level, that is, for each of the 228 units constituting the world. In addition, the time horizon for the projections is extended to 2300, so as to allow for the eventual stabilization of the population in at least one scenario. In order to address the technical and substantive challenges posed by the preparation of long-range projections at the national level, the Population Division convened two meetings of the Technical Working Group on Long-Range Population Projections at United Nations Headquarters in New York. The purpose of the meetings was to discuss the assumptions, methodology and preliminary results of the national population projections to This volume presents the results of the long-range projections,, and includes a detailed analysis. A series of essays on the issue of long-range projections have also been incorporated in this report, enriching the debate on this important topic. Experts from outside the United Nations, many of whom took part in the technical working group meetings, authored these essays. The United Nations Population Division is grateful to the National Institute on Aging of the United States of America (NIA) whose grant help support this study. Acknowledgement is also due to Rodolfo A. Bulatao, who assisted the Population Division in the preparation of this report. The Population Division extends its appreciation to all the experts for their suggestions and contributions to the preparation of the long-range projections. This publication, as well as other population information, may also be accessed on the Population Division world wide web site at For further information about the long-range projections, please contact the office of Mr. Joseph Chamie, Director, Population Division, United Nations, New York, NY 10017, USA, tel: and fax: iii

6

7 CONTENTS Page PREFACE... EXPLANATORY NOTES... iii x PART ONE. REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY... 1 INTRODUCTION... 3 Chapter I. PROJECTIONS TO A. World population... 4 B. Major areas C. Assumptions... 7 D. Long-range possibilities... 9 II. PROJECTIONS AFTER 2050: LONG-RANGE GROWTH AND DECLINE A. Scenarios B. World population C. More developed and less developed regions D. Major areas E. Africa F. Asia G. Latin America and the Caribbean H. Oceania I. Northern America J. Europe III. COUNTRY RANKINGS A. Size B. Growth C. Fertility D. Mortality IV. POPULATION DENSITY V. AGEING POPULATIONS A. Major areas B. Historical periods C. Dependency thresholds D. Countries VI. CONCLUSION A. Consequences B. Limitations C. The long view REFERENCES v

8 No. Page PART TWO. ESSAYS I. TOWARDS AN UNDERSTANDING OF THE EMOTIONS IN THE POPULAITON OF 2300 Alaka Basu II. AN INTERGENERATIONAL RATIONALE FOR FERTILITY ASSUMPTIONS IN LONG-RANGE WORLD POPULATION PROJECTIONS Herwig Birg III. THE IMPLICATIONS OF THE UNITED NATIONS LONG-RANGE POPULATION PROJECTIONS John Caldwell IV. COMPARING LONG-RANGE GLOBAL POPULATION PROJECTIONS WITH HISTORICAL EXPERIENCE Joel Cohen V. WORLD POPULATION IN 2300: A CENTURY TOO FAR? David Coleman VI. POPULATION FUTURES FOR THE NEXT THREE HUNDRED YEARS: SOFT LANDING OR SURPRISES TO COME? Paul Demeny VII. WHY THE WORLD S POPULATION WILL PROBABLY BE LESS THAN 9 BILLION IN 2300 Timothy Dyson VIII. REFLECTIONS ON THE NEXT FEW CENTURIES François Héran IX. THE FUTURE OF HUMAN LIFE EXPECTANCY S. Jay Olshansky X. PROJECTING THE UNKNOWABLE: A PROFESSIONAL EFFORT SURE TO BE MISINTERPRETED Michael Teitelbaum XI. THE IMPLICATIONS OF THE UNITED NATIONS LONG-RANGE POPULATION PROJECTIONS: CONTINUING RAPID POPULATION GROWTH Charles F. Westoff XII. FORETELLING THE FUTURE John R. Wilmoth TABLES No. Page 1. Population and average annual rate of change of the world and development groups, estimates and three scenarios: Population, average annual rate of change, and distribution of world population, by major area, estimates and medium scenario: Population by major area and region, estimates and medium scenario: Average annual rate of change for 50 year-year periods, by major area and region, estimates and medium scenario: vi

9 No. Page 5. Twenty largest countries and their populations, selected years Countries with the highest and lowest average annual rate of change over 50-year periods Countries with the largest increases and decreases over 50-year periods Population in 2000 and 2100, minimum and maximum size up to 2300, and percentage change to these points from 2000, by country Highest and lowest average annual rate of population change in any five-year period, by country: Countries with the highest and lowest total fertility, estimates and medium scenario, selected periods Countries with the lowest and highest life expectancy at birth, selected periods Countries with the smallest and largest gap between female and male life expectancies, selected periods Density in persons per square kilometer of land, by major area and region: Population in broad age groups and percentage change over long periods, major areas Percentage in different age groups, by major area: Start and end of the demographic window phase and corresponding dependency ratio, by major area and region, estimates and medium scenario Dependency threshold ages and post-retirement duration, by major area and region, selected years Countries with the lowest and highest median ages, selected years Starting date for entering the demographic window phase by country, classified by major area FIGURES 1. Estimated world population, , and projections: Average annual rate of population change, major areas: Total fertility, major areas: World total fertility and life expectancy at birth: Maximum and minimum country values in each period for net reproduction rate and average annual rate of population change: Estimated world population: , and projections: Change in world population over 50-year periods, estimates and three scenarios: Average annual rate of change of the world population and total fertility, estimates and three scenarios: Comparison of world population and net reproduction rate with previous long-range projections, estimates and medium scenario: Crude birth and death rate and rate of natural increase for the world, estimates and medium scenario: Significant world demographic events between 2000 and Total population, more developed and less developed regions, estimates and medium scenario: Average annual rate of population change, more developed and less developed regions, estimates and three scenarios: Total fertility, more developed and less developed regions, estimates and three scenarios: Crude birth and death rate, more developed and less developed regions, estimates and three scenarios: Male and female life expectancy at birth, more developed and less developed regions: Population in major areas, estimates and medium scenario: Average annual rate of population change, major areas, estimates and medium scenario: Total fertility, major areas, estimates and medium scenario: Periods when net reproduction rate is below 1, major areas, estimates and medium scenario: Crude death rate and points of intersection with crude birth rate, major areas, estimates and medium scenario: Difference between life expectancy at birth in each major area and in Latin America and the Caribbean: vii

10 No. Page 23. Total population, African regions: Average annual rate of population change, African regions: Total fertility, African regions: Life expectancy at birth, African regions: Total population, Asian regions: Average annual rate of population change, Asian regions: Total fertility, Asian regions: Life expectancy at birth, Asian regions: Total population, Latin American and Caribbean regions: Life expectancy at birth, Latin America and the Caribbean: Average annual rate of population change, with and without migration, Northern America: Life expectancy at birth, United Sates of America compared to Japan and Western Europe: Total population, European regions: Average annual rate of population change, European regions: Total fertility, European regions: Life expectancy at birth, European regions: Population trends in selected high-growth and low-growth countries: Percentage distribution of countries by total fertility level: Total fertility in Niger and Latvia, estimates and three scenarios: Life expectancy at birth by sex in Botswana, Japan, Sierra Leone and Suriname: Gap between female and male life expectancies at birth, selected major areas and regions: Density, major areas: Density in relation to land area by region and for selected countries: Density in relation to land area, 192 countries: Median age, major areas: Distribution of population by age, more developed and less developed regions: Distribution of the population in three broad age groups, major areas: Dependency ratio during the demographic window phase, major areas Dependency ratio during the demographic window phase, regions of Oceania and Northern American countries Dependency thresholds, life expectancy at birth, and expected working life, more developed and less developed regions: Percentage of population at older ages, Japan and Liberia: World population, estimates and three scenarios: Average annual rate of change of the world population, estimates and three scenarios: ANNEX TABLES A1. Population of the world by development group and scenario: A2. Average annual rate of change of the population of the world by development group and scenario: A3. Total fertility of the world by development group and scenario: A4. Life expectancy at birth of the world by development group and sex: A5. Total population by major area, estimates and medium scenario: A6. Average annual rate of population change by major area, estimates and medium scenario: A7. Total fertility by major area, estimates and medium scenario: A8. Life expectancy at birth by major area and sex: A9. Total fertility of the world by development group, major area and region, estimates and medium scenario: selected periods A10. Life expectancy at birth of the world by development group, major area, region and sex: selected periods A11. Total population by country, estimates and medium scenario: viii

11 No. Page A12. Average annual rate of population change by country, estimates and medium scenario: A13. Total fertility by country, estimates and medium scenario: selected periods A14. Male life expectancy at birth by country: selected periods A15. Female life expectancy at birth by country: selected periods A16. Population density by country, estimates and medium scenario: selected years A17. Median age by country, estimates and medium scenario: A18. Proportion of broad age groups of the world by development group, major area and region, estimates and medium scenario: A19. Start and end of the demographic window phase and corresponding dependency ratio, by country, estimates and medium scenario ix

12 Explanatory notes Tables presented in this volume make use of the following symbols: Two dots (..) indicate that data are not available or are not separately reported. An em dash ( ) indicates that the amount is nil or negligible. A hyphen (-) indicates that the item is not applicable. A minus sign (-) before a figure indicates a decrease. A full stop (.) is used to indicate decimals. Years given start on 1 July. Use of a hyphen (-) between years, for example, , signifies the full period involved, from 1 July of the first year to 1 July of the second year. Numbers and percentages in tables do not necessarily add to totals because of rounding. Countries and areas are grouped geographically into six major areas: Africa; Asia; Europe; Latin America and the Caribbean; Northern America; and Oceania. These major areas are further divided into 21 geographical regions. In addition, for statistical convenience, the regions are classified as belonging to either of two categories: more developed or less developed. The less developed regions include all the regions of Africa, Asia (excluding Japan), and Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia. The more developed regions comprise Australia/New Zealand, Europe, Northern America and Japan. x

13 PART ONE. REPORT xi

14

15 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Long-range population projections are reported to 2300, covering twice as long a period as ever covered in previous United Nations projections. These projections are not done by major area and for selected large countries (China and India), as was the previous practice, but for all countries of the world, providing greater detail. In these projections, world population peaks at 9.22 billion in Population therefore grows slightly beyond the level of 8.92 billion projected for 2050 in the 2002 Revision, on which these projections are based. However, after reaching its maximum, world population declines slightly and then resumes increasing, slowly, to reach a level of 8.97 billion by 2300, not much different from the projected 2050 figure. This pattern of rise, decline, and rise again results from assumptions about future trends in vital rates: that, country by country, fertility will fall below replacement level though in some cases not for decades and eventually return to replacement; and that, country by country, life expectancy will eventually follow a path of uninterrupted but slowing increase. With alternative assumptions about fertility, long-range trends could be quite different. With long-range total fertility 0.3 children above replacement, projected world population in 2300 is four times as large as the main projection; with total fertility 0.2 children below replacement, world population in 2300 is one-quarter of the main projection. Regions and countries will follow similar demographic paths in the long run, given similar assumptions for different countries about longrange vital rate trends. However, because initial assumptions differ, and because this gives rise to slight variations in trends, countries and regions will not be exactly alike, even by In fact, what are today considered more developed and less developed regions will still be demographically distinguishable, with regard, for instance, to life expectancies and proportions at advanced ages. In addition, regions and countries will go through critical stages of growth zero growth, subreplacement fertility, a return to positive growth at different points in the future, giving rise to a global demographic map with areas that shrink and stretch at different times in the next three centuries. Europe and Africa will be particularly out of phase. Europe will hit its low point in growth in 2050, Africa not till 80 years later, after all other major areas. From 2000 to 2100, Europe s share of world population is cut in half, 12.0 to 5.9 per cent, while Africa's almost doubles, from 13.1 to 24.9 per cent. While shares of world population for major areas will rise and fall over the following two centuries, the distribution by 2300 will resemble that in Smaller regions within continents exhibit divergent patterns. For instance: Three African regions Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, and Western Africa will grow unusually fast in comparison to every other region through 2100, even though total fertility will be close to replacement by Southern Africa is seeing a decline in life expectancy to a lower level than anywhere else, but life expectancy will rebound, rise quite rapidly, and overtake other African regions. Asian regions will grow fastest to the west, slowest to the east, but in every case with growth rates, at least up to 2100, below Eastern, Middle and Western Africa. By 2100, Asia, instead of being four-and-a half times as populous as Africa, will be only 2.2 times as populous. Latin America and the Caribbean is the most homogenous major area, with most of its regions following relatively parallel fertility and life expectancy paths. Northern America is unusual as the only region that will not experience negative growth, mainly due to projected migration up to (No migration is incorporated in projections beyond that date.) Europe, like Asia, will experience higher growth to the west, lower growth to the east. East- United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division 1

16 ern Europe stands out with low life expectancy, and even in the long run does not catch up with other regions. Growth patterns depend on assumptions about vital rates. Total fertility is assumed to decline, at a varying pace dictated by country circumstances, to a below-replacement level of 1.85 children per woman. Countries already at this level or below, and other countries when they reach it, eventually return to replacement over a period of a century and stay at replacement indefinitely. All countries are projected to have reached replacement fertility by 2175, but past fertility trends continue to affect population trends for another 50 years. Life expectancy is assumed to rise continuously, with no upper limit, though at a slowing pace dictated by recent country trends. By 2100, life expectancy is expected to vary across countries from 66 to 97 years, and by 2300 from 87 to 106 years. Rising life expectancy will produce small but continuing population growth by the end of the projections ranging from 0.03 to 0.07 per cent annually. Growth patterns affect the balance between population and land. Density, in people per square kilometer of land, will continue to be especially variable in Oceania, where by 2100 it will range from 504 persons per sq. km. in Micronesia to 3.6 persons per sq. km. in Australia/New Zealand. Some large countries in South-central Asia will also be unusually dense by 2100, with India having 491 persons per sq. km., Pakistan 530 persons per sq. km., and Bangladesh 1,997 persons per sq. km. These populations pressing on the land will be old by current standards. Where the world median age in 2000 is 26 years, by 2100 it will be 44 years, and by 2300, 48 years. Before they reach the point where those over 40 are half the population, countries go through a period labelled here the demographic window, when the proportion of children and youth under 15 years falls below 30 per cent and the proportion of people 65 years and older is still below 15 per cent. For a year period, the proportion of the population in between, of working age, is particularly prominent in the population. Europe entered the demographic window before 1950 and is now leaving it and entering a third age when older people are particularly prominent in the age distribution. Much of Africa will not enter the demographic window until 2045 or later. Beyond the demographic window, population ageing becomes a predominant demographic feature. Between 2100 and 2300, the proportion of world population 65 years and older will increase by one-third (from 24 to 32 per cent); the proportion 80 years and older will double (from 8.5 to 17 per cent); and the proportion 100 years and older will increase nine times (from 0.2 to 1.8 per cent). Assuming that the retirement age worldwide in 2000 is 65 years, people retire on average only two weeks short of their life expectancy. Assuming that retirement age stays unchanged, by 2300 people will retire 31 years short of their life expectancy. 2 United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division

17 INTRODUCTION Projections recently issued by the United Nations suggest that world population by 2050 could reach 8.9 billion, but in alternative scenarios could be as high as 10.6 billion or as low as 7.4 billion. What will population trends be like beyond 2050? No one really knows. Any demographic projections, if they go 100, 200, or 300 years into the future, are little more than guesses. Societies change considerably over hundreds of years as one can readily see if one looks back at where the world was in 1900, or 1800, or Demographic behaviour over such long time spans, like behaviour in many spheres of life, is largely unpredictable. Nevertheless, this report presents projections of world population, and even of the populations of individual countries, over the next 300 years. Given the inherent impossibility of such an exercise, these projections have a special character. They are not forecasts. They do not say that population is expected to reach the projected levels. Rather, they are extrapolations of current trends. They give what paths population would follow if, and only if, historical trends and trends previously forecast up to 2050 continue. Of course one cannot expect these trends to continue as is, and certainly not country by country. But the implications of current trends are important and often can only be seen by looking far enough into the future. These projections are presented, therefore, as a means of drawing out the long-range implications of shorter-run trends that are known or somewhat predictable. Constructing long-range projections such as these is a little like predicting the outcome of a basketball game after the first five minutes. No one can do that reliably. Why should it even be attempted? Probably for the same reason that a coach might call a timeout after five minutes: because the trends may look unfavourable and team play may require adjustment if the game is to be on. Similarly, to see if current population trends require adjustment, their implications are worked out over a long period. This should not be taken to imply that these trends are actually expected to continue. To some extent, the reverse is true. The projected long-range path for population is reported partly to facilitate thinking about how to prepare for it, but also to encourage action to modify this path, to make it more favourable, if that is possible, for collective welfare. These long-range projections are based on and extend the recent United Nations projections, designated the 2002 Revision (United Nations, 2003b, 2003c, 2004). Long-range projections have been reported before, the most recent having been based on the 1998 Revision (United Nations, 2000a). Unlike earlier long-range projections, these projections go further, not just to 2150 but to These projections also are constructed not by major area but by country, providing a more detailed picture of long-range prospects. This report reviews briefly some findings from the 2002 Revision and the procedures used discusses the methodology used to extend population trends up to 2300 describes the projected population growth or decline, beginning with the world as a whole and proceeding to major areas, regions, and countries that stand out discusses consequences of growth patterns, focusing on population density and changing age structures concludes with a brief reference to consequences of population change and the limitations of this work presents a series of essays produced by a group of experts. An annex contains detailed tables, giving age structures and vital rates over time. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division 3

18 I. PROJECTIONS TO 2050 Projections to 2050, together with historical population estimates back to 1950, constitute the 2002 Revision of the official United Nations population projections, the eighteenth and latest such revision. Reviewing these projections provides hints about what to expect in long-range projections and poses questions for them. Some results from the 50-year projections in the 2002 Revision are illustrated; more results and analyses are available in other publications (United Nations, 2003b, 2003c, 2004). A. WORLD POPULATION World population is projected to grow from 6.1 billion in 2000 to 8.9 billion in 2050, increasing therefore by 47 per cent. The average annual population growth rate over this half-century will be 0.77 per cent, substantially lower than the 1.76 per cent average growth rate from 1950 to In addition, growth is projected to slow the further the projections go. For , the annual growth rate is estimated at 1.22 per cent; by , it will be only 0.33 per cent. Although growth rates will fall, the annual increase in world population will remain large: 57 million a year on average between 2000 and This is smaller than the 71 million people added annually between 1950 and 2000 but still substantial. It means that, on average each year for 50 years, world population will expand by about as many people as now live in Italy. The increase, over 50 years, will be more than twice the current population of China, or more than twice the current population of all more developed regions combined. Although population growth will eventually subside, and a variety of countries will see little or no population growth, for the world as a whole the next 50 years can hardly be characterized as demographically tranquil. How good are these figures? The estimate for the 2000 population, based on a greater number of well-executed national censuses than ever before, may well be more accurate than most estimates of current world population that have been made in the past. Projected figures for the near term (say up to around 2010) benefit from the accuracy of base data and are unlikely to be off by much. Projected figures for 2050, in contrast, are much less certain. To hedge its bets, the 2002 Revision includes alternative projection scenarios, particularly high-growth and low-growth scenarios, according to which world population would reach 10.6 billion or 7.4 billion by 2050 (figure 1). Between the high and low scenarios, average annual growth rates for range from 1.12 to 0.40 per cent, and annual increments range from 91.3 to 26.8 million. B. MAJOR AREAS Much of the demographic change up to 2050 will take place in the less developed regions. Collectively, these regions will grow 58 per cent over 50 years, as opposed to 2 per cent for more developed regions. Less developed regions will account for 99 per cent of the expected increment to world population in this period. Nevertheless, population growth in the less developed regions is expected to slow down in the future. The current annual growth rate of 1.6 per cent (for ) will be halved in a little over 25 years and will be roughly halved again by mid-century. This will be due to falling fertility. Current total fertility of 3.11 children per woman (about double the rate in more developed regions) will fall to 2.04 by midcentury just below replacement level but still above the current rate in more developed regions. Among the less developed regions, demographic prospects vary. Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean are considered less developed; Oceania, which has a relatively small population, is mixed, while Northern America and Europe are considered more developed. 2 Population growth in Asia looks impressively large, at 1.5 billion over 50 years. However, Asia s share of world population actually dips slightly, from 61 per cent in 2000 to 59 per cent in Growth will be much faster in Africa, which will add 1.0 billion and rise from 13 to 20 per cent of world population. 4 United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division

19 Figure 1. Estimated world population, , and projections: High Medium Low Population (billions) Average annual rates of population change show that Africa has experienced considerably faster growth than any other major area, for most of the period (figure 2). Growth rates reached a higher peak in Africa (2.86 per cent) than anywhere else in the early 1980s, at least 15 years after growth had begun to decline in every other major area. The projection for Africa, consequently, shows growth declining belatedly, though nevertheless following a downward path similar to that in other major areas. Europe is at the other end of the spectrum, with growth rates having just turned negative and continuing to fall up to Though growth rates are at different levels, their decline is projected to be similar across major areas. The more developed regions show slightly slower decline in growth rates than the less developed regions, mainly because of international migration. If net migration were set to zero, the lines would be more nearly parallel. International migration is particularly important for Northern America (i.e., the United States and Canada), accounting for 0.5 percentage points of the growth rate for For Europe, migration boosts the growth rate by points, and for Oceania by around 0.25 points. (For Australia alone, migration adds about twice that to the growth rate.) Growth rate declines are parallel (international migration aside) largely because assumptions about fertility change are similar. Figure 3 shows the substantial gap that currently exists but is projected to narrow between total fertility in Africa and total fertility in every other major area. A gap in fertility levels also exists between the other major areas of the world, but by 2050 levels are expected to converge in a narrow band between 1.84 and 1.92 children per woman. Europe will take the longest to enter this band, and will do so through rising fertility, in contrast to falling fertility in other major areas. Mortality exerts some additional influence on the growth rate. Across major areas, its effect on growth largely counteracts that of fertility, since where fertility is higher, mortality also tends to be higher. Over time, life expectancy is expected to rise fairly smoothly. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division 5

20 Figure 2. Average annual rate of population change, major areas: Africa Asia 2.5 Latin America and the Caribbean Oceania Northern America 2.0 Europe Annual population growth (percent) Figure 3. Total fertility, major areas: Africa Asia Latin America and the Caribbean Oceania Northern America Europe 5 Total fertility United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs/Population Division

WORLD POPULATION IN 2300

WORLD POPULATION IN 2300 E c o n o m i c & DRAFT S o c i a l A f f a i r s WORLD POPULATION IN 2300 Highlights United Nations ESA/P/WP.187 9 December 2003 DRAFT Department of Economic and Social Affairs Population Division WORLD

More information

Replacement Migration

Replacement Migration Population Division Department of Economic and Social Affairs United Nations Secretariat Replacement Migration United Nations ST/ESA/SER.A/206 Population Division Department of Economic and Social Affairs

More information

PRESS RELEASE WORLD POPULATION TO EXCEED 9 BILLION BY 2050:

PRESS RELEASE WORLD POPULATION TO EXCEED 9 BILLION BY 2050: PRESS RELEASE Embargoed until 12:00 PM, 11 March, 2009 WORLD POPULATION TO EXCEED 9 BILLION BY 2050: Developing Countries to Add 2.3 Billion Inhabitants with 1.1 Billion Aged Over 60 and 1.2 Billion of

More information

Global Demographic Trends and their Implications for Employment

Global Demographic Trends and their Implications for Employment Global Demographic Trends and their Implications for Employment BACKGROUND RESEARCH PAPER David Lam and Murray Leibbrandt Submitted to the High Level Panel on the Post-2015 Development Agenda This paper

More information

NET INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION

NET INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION II. NET INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION A. GLOBAL TRENDS During the period 195-21, the developed regions experienced population gains from positive net international migration while the developing regions were

More information

World Population to reach 10 billion by 2100 if Fertility in all Countries Converges to Replacement Level

World Population to reach 10 billion by 2100 if Fertility in all Countries Converges to Replacement Level UNITED NATIONS PRESS RELEASE EMBARGOED UNTIL 3 MAY 2011, 11:00 A.M., NEW YORK TIME World Population to reach 10 billion by if Fertility in all Countries Converges to Replacement Level UNITED NATIONS, 3

More information

E c o n o m i c. S o c i a l A f f a i r s THE IMPACT OF AIDS. United Nations

E c o n o m i c. S o c i a l A f f a i r s THE IMPACT OF AIDS. United Nations E c o n o m i c & THE IMPACT OF AIDS S o c i a l A f f a i r s United Nations ST/ESA/SER.A/229 Department of Economic and Social Affairs Population Division THE IMPACT OF AIDS United Nations New York,

More information

WORLD POPULATION IN 2300

WORLD POPULATION IN 2300 WORLD POPULATION IN 2300 E c o n o m i c & S o c i a l A f f a i r s Proceedings of the United Nations Expert Meeting on World Population in 2300 United Nations Headquarters New York United Nations ESA/P/WP.187/Rev.1

More information

IV. DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF THE OLDER POPULATION

IV. DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF THE OLDER POPULATION World Population Ageing 195-25 IV. DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE OF THE OLDER POPULATION A. AGE COMPOSITION Older populations themselves are ageing A notable aspect of the global ageing process is the progressive

More information

Population Change and Public Health Exercise 1A

Population Change and Public Health Exercise 1A Population Change and Public Health Exercise 1A 1. What is not true of demographic transition in European countries A. The pre-transition fertility and mortality rates were as high as seen in developing

More information

World Population Growth

World Population Growth 3 World Population Growth Why is world population growing faster than ever before? Population dynamics are one of the key factors to consider when thinking about development. In the past years the world

More information

New South Wales State and Regional Population Projections 2001-2051. 2004 Release TRANSPORT AND POPULATION DATA CENTRE

New South Wales State and Regional Population Projections 2001-2051. 2004 Release TRANSPORT AND POPULATION DATA CENTRE New South Wales State and Regional Population Projections 21-251 251 24 Release TRANSPORT AND POPULATION DATA CENTRE THE TRANSPORT AND POPULATION DATA CENTRE (TPDC) The TPDC is located in the NSW Department

More information

United Nations INTRODUCTION. The World at Six Billion 1

United Nations INTRODUCTION. The World at Six Billion 1 INTRODUCTION According to the latest United Nations population estimates, world population reaches the six billion mark on 12 October 1999, an historic milestone in the growth of world population. The

More information

Dependency burdens in the developing world. John Bongaarts Population Council New York

Dependency burdens in the developing world. John Bongaarts Population Council New York December 1998 Dependency burdens in the developing world John Bongaarts Population Council New York Paper prepared for Symposium on Population Change and Economic Development, November 1998, Bellagio,

More information

I. DEMOGRAPHIC DETERMINANTS OF POPULATION AGEING

I. DEMOGRAPHIC DETERMINANTS OF POPULATION AGEING World Population Ageing 9- I. DEMOGRAPHIC DETERMINANTS OF POPULATION AGEING Underlying global population ageing is a process known as the demographic transition in which mortality and then fertility decline

More information

Overview. Main Findings

Overview. Main Findings This Report reflects the latest trends observed in the data published in June. Remittance Prices Worldwide is available at http://remittanceprices.worldbank.org Overview The Remittance Prices Worldwide*

More information

2. Germany. (a) Past trends

2. Germany. (a) Past trends 2. Germany (a) Past trends While the total fertility rate increased steadily from 2.1 to 2.4 children per woman between 15-155 and 1-15, Germany experienced a continuous decline afterwards, to 1. children

More information

III. CHANGING BALANCE BETWEEN AGE GROUPS

III. CHANGING BALANCE BETWEEN AGE GROUPS Population Ageing 195-25 III. CHANGING BALANCE BETWEEN AGE GROUPS A. BROAD AGE GROUPS The young-old balance is shifting throughout the world The increasing proportions of aged persons have been accompanied,

More information

Progress and prospects

Progress and prospects Ending CHILD MARRIAGE Progress and prospects UNICEF/BANA213-182/Kiron The current situation Worldwide, more than 7 million women alive today were married before their 18th birthday. More than one in three

More information

Street Smart: Demographics and Trends in Motor Vehicle Accident Mortality In British Columbia, 1988 to 2000

Street Smart: Demographics and Trends in Motor Vehicle Accident Mortality In British Columbia, 1988 to 2000 Street Smart: Demographics and Trends in Motor Vehicle Accident Mortality In British Columbia, 1988 to 2000 by David Baxter 3-Year Moving Average Age Specific Motor Vehicle Accident Death Rates British

More information

10. European Union. (a) Past trends

10. European Union. (a) Past trends . European Union (a) Past trends The total fertility rate in the 15 countries that presently constitute the European Union was on a rising curve until 196-65, when it attained 2.69 births per woman. Since

More information

1. TRENDS IN INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION

1. TRENDS IN INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION 1. TRENDS IN INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION This chapter provides a brief overview of global and regional patterns and trends in international migration since 199. It also describes selected characteristics of

More information

III. World Population Growth

III. World Population Growth III. World Population Growth Population dynamics are one of the key factors to consider when thinking about development. In the past 50 years the world has experienced an unprecedented increase in population

More information

JAPAN. Past trends. Scenario I

JAPAN. Past trends. Scenario I JAPAN Past trends The total fertility rate in Japan fell from 2.75 births per women in 195-1955 to 2.8 births in 1955-196. Total fertility remained at the near-replacement level between 196 and 1975, and

More information

WORLD. Geographic Trend Report for GMAT Examinees

WORLD. Geographic Trend Report for GMAT Examinees 2011 WORLD Geographic Trend Report for GMAT Examinees WORLD Geographic Trend Report for GMAT Examinees The World Geographic Trend Report for GMAT Examinees identifies mobility trends among GMAT examinees

More information

THE DEMOGRAPHY OF POPULATION AGEING

THE DEMOGRAPHY OF POPULATION AGEING THE DEMOGRAPHY OF POPULATION AGEING Barry Mirkin and Mary Beth Weinberger* An inevitable consequence of the demographic transition and the shift to lower fertility and mortality has been the evolution

More information

Unsafe abortion incidence and mortality

Unsafe abortion incidence and mortality Information sheet Information sheet Unsafe abortion incidence and mortality Global and regional levels in 08 and trends during 990 08 Unsafe abortion is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as

More information

Overview. Main Findings

Overview. Main Findings This Report reflects the latest trends observed in the data published in March 2014. Remittance Prices Worldwide is available at http://remittanceprices.worldbank.org Overview The Remittance Prices Worldwide*

More information

Global Urbanization: Trends, Patterns, Determinants, and Impacts. Abdullah Baqui, DrPH, MPH, MBBS Johns Hopkins University

Global Urbanization: Trends, Patterns, Determinants, and Impacts. Abdullah Baqui, DrPH, MPH, MBBS Johns Hopkins University This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License. Your use of this material constitutes acceptance of that license and the conditions of use of materials on this

More information

Ageing OECD Societies

Ageing OECD Societies ISBN 978-92-64-04661-0 Trends Shaping Education OECD 2008 Chapter 1 Ageing OECD Societies FEWER CHILDREN LIVING LONGER CHANGING AGE STRUCTURES The notion of ageing societies covers a major set of trends

More information

Mid-year population estimates. Embargoed until: 20 July 2010 14:30

Mid-year population estimates. Embargoed until: 20 July 2010 14:30 Statistical release Mid-year population estimates 2010 Embargoed until: 20 July 2010 14:30 Enquiries: Forthcoming issue: Expected release date User Information Services Tel: (012) 310 8600/4892/8390 Mid-year

More information

Scottish Independence. Charting the implications of demographic change. Ben Franklin. I May 2014 I. www.ilc.org.uk

Scottish Independence. Charting the implications of demographic change. Ben Franklin. I May 2014 I. www.ilc.org.uk Scottish Independence Charting the implications of demographic change Ben Franklin I May 2014 I www.ilc.org.uk Summary By 2037 Scotland s working age population is expected to be 3.5% than it was in 2013

More information

Population Aging in Developed Countries: Emerging Trends and Dynamics Wan He, Ph.D. Population Division U.S. Census Bureau

Population Aging in Developed Countries: Emerging Trends and Dynamics Wan He, Ph.D. Population Division U.S. Census Bureau Population Aging in Developed Countries: Emerging Trends and Dynamics Wan He, Ph.D. Population Division U.S. Census Bureau This presentation is released to inform interested parties of population aging

More information

UK application rates by country, region, sex, age and background. (2014 cycle, January deadline)

UK application rates by country, region, sex, age and background. (2014 cycle, January deadline) UK application rates by country, region, sex, age and background (2014 cycle, January deadline) UCAS Analysis and Research 31 January 2014 Key findings Application rates for 18 year olds in England, Wales

More information

TRENDS IN INTERNATIONAL MIGRANT STOCK: THE 2013 REVISION - MIGRANTS BY AGE AND SEX

TRENDS IN INTERNATIONAL MIGRANT STOCK: THE 2013 REVISION - MIGRANTS BY AGE AND SEX E c o n o m i c & S o c i a l A f f a i r s TRENDS IN INTERNATIONAL MIGRANT STOCK: THE 2013 REVISION - MIGRANTS BY AGE AND SEX CD-ROM DOCUMENTATION United Nations POP/DB/MIG/Stock/Rev.2013/Age December

More information

GermanY'S Population by 2060. Results of the 12th coordinated population projection

GermanY'S Population by 2060. Results of the 12th coordinated population projection GermanY'S Population by 2060 Results of the 12th coordinated population projection Federal Statistisches Statistical Bundesamt Office GERMANY S POPULATION BY 2060 Results of the 12th coordinated population

More information

Current demographic trends are to lead Spain to lose one tenth of its population in the coming 40 years

Current demographic trends are to lead Spain to lose one tenth of its population in the coming 40 years 19 November 2012 Population Projections for 2012 Current demographic trends are to lead Spain to lose one tenth of its population in the coming 40 years From 2018 onwards, there will be more deaths than

More information

Canada Pension Plan Retirement, Survivor and Disability Beneficiaries Mortality Study

Canada Pension Plan Retirement, Survivor and Disability Beneficiaries Mortality Study f Canada Pension Plan Retirement, Survivor and Disability Beneficiaries Mortality Study Actuarial Study No. 16 June 2015 Office of the Chief Actuary Office of the Chief Actuary Office of the Superintendent

More information

Statistical Bulletin. National Life Tables, United Kingdom, 2011-2013. Key Points. Summary. Introduction

Statistical Bulletin. National Life Tables, United Kingdom, 2011-2013. Key Points. Summary. Introduction Statistical Bulletin National Life Tables, United Kingdom, 2011-2013 Coverage: UK Date: 25 September 2014 Geographical Area: Country Theme: Population Key Points A newborn baby boy could expect to live

More information

Who are the Other ethnic groups?

Who are the Other ethnic groups? Article Who are the Other ethnic groups? Social and Welfare David Gardener Helen Connolly October 2005 Crown copyright Office for National Statistics 1 Drummond Gate London SW1V 2QQ Tel: 020 7533 9233

More information

Lloyd Potter is the Texas State Demographer and the Director of the Texas State Data Center based at the University of Texas at San Antonio.

Lloyd Potter is the Texas State Demographer and the Director of the Texas State Data Center based at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Lloyd Potter is the Texas State Demographer and the Director of the Texas State Data Center based at the University of Texas at San Antonio. 1 2 Texas population in 2014 was just under 27 million and was

More information

Economic and Social Council

Economic and Social Council United Nations E/CN.9/2016/6 Economic and Social Council Distr.: General 27 January 2016 Advance unedited version Original: English Commission on Population and Development Forty-ninth session 11-15 April

More information

Projections of the Size and Composition of the U.S. Population: 2014 to 2060 Population Estimates and Projections

Projections of the Size and Composition of the U.S. Population: 2014 to 2060 Population Estimates and Projections Projections of the Size and Composition of the U.S. Population: to Population Estimates and Projections Current Population Reports By Sandra L. Colby and Jennifer M. Ortman Issued March 15 P25-1143 INTRODUCTION

More information

SAMA Working Paper: POPULATION AGING IN SAUDI ARABIA. February 2015. Hussain I. Abusaaq. Economic Research Department. Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency

SAMA Working Paper: POPULATION AGING IN SAUDI ARABIA. February 2015. Hussain I. Abusaaq. Economic Research Department. Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency WP/15/2 SAMA Working Paper: POPULATION AGING IN SAUDI ARABIA February 2015 By Hussain I. Abusaaq Economic Research Department Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency The views expressed

More information

Conference on Population and Development, Cairo, 5-13 September 1994 (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.95.XIII.7).

Conference on Population and Development, Cairo, 5-13 September 1994 (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.95.XIII.7). EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The General Assembly, in its resolution 54/262 of 25 May 2, decided to convene the Second World Assembly on Ageing in 22, coinciding with the twentieth anniversary of the first World

More information

Immigration Reform, Economic Growth, and the Fiscal Challenge Douglas Holtz- Eakin l April 2013

Immigration Reform, Economic Growth, and the Fiscal Challenge Douglas Holtz- Eakin l April 2013 Immigration Reform, Economic Growth, and the Fiscal Challenge Douglas Holtz- Eakin l April 2013 Executive Summary Immigration reform can raise population growth, labor force growth, and thus growth in

More information

Bank of Japan Review. Japanese Life Insurance Companies' Balance-Sheet Structure and Japanese Government Bond Investment. February 2013.

Bank of Japan Review. Japanese Life Insurance Companies' Balance-Sheet Structure and Japanese Government Bond Investment. February 2013. Bank of Japan Review 213-E-2 Japanese Life Insurance Companies' Balance-Sheet Structure and Japanese Government Bond Investment Financial System and Bank Examination Department Kazutoshi Kan, Yoshiyuki

More information

UNAIDS 2013 AIDS by the numbers

UNAIDS 2013 AIDS by the numbers UNAIDS 2013 AIDS by the numbers 33 % decrease in new HIV infections since 2001 29 % decrease in AIDS-related deaths (adults and children) since 2005 52 % decrease in new HIV infections in children since

More information

A Context for Change Management in the Capital Regional District

A Context for Change Management in the Capital Regional District A Context for Change Management in the Capital al District Future Population, Labour Force, Employment and Housing in the Capital al District URBAN FUTURES FINAL REPORT AUGUST 2009 A Context for Change

More information

Emerging Trends in Migration: Insights From Gallup. For the CSD of the Global Forum on Migration and Development Athens, November 2, 2009

Emerging Trends in Migration: Insights From Gallup. For the CSD of the Global Forum on Migration and Development Athens, November 2, 2009 Emerging Trends in Migration: Insights From Gallup For the CSD of the Global Forum on Migration and Development Athens, November 2, 2009 In today s global environment, leaders need easy access to timely,

More information

How Universal is Access to Reproductive Health?

How Universal is Access to Reproductive Health? How Universal is Access to Reproductive Health? A review of the evidence Cover Copyright UNFPA 2010 September 2010 Publication available at: http://www.unfpa.org/public/home/publications/pid/6526 The designations

More information

Long-term macroeconomic forecasts Key trends to 2050

Long-term macroeconomic forecasts Key trends to 2050 A special report from The Economist Intelligence Unit www.eiu.com Contents Overview 2 Top ten economies in 5 at market exchange rates 3 The rise of Asia continues 4 Global dominance of the top three economies

More information

Fire Death Rate Trends: An International Perspective

Fire Death Rate Trends: An International Perspective Topical Fire report SerieS Fire Death Rate Trends: An International Perspective Volume 12, Issue 8 / July 2011 These topical reports are designed to explore facets of the U.S. fire problem as depicted

More information

Executive summary. Global Wage Report 2014 / 15 Wages and income inequality

Executive summary. Global Wage Report 2014 / 15 Wages and income inequality Executive summary Global Wage Report 2014 / 15 Wages and income inequality Global Wage Report 2014/15 Wages and income inequality Executive summary INTERNATIONAL LABOUR OFFICE GENEVA Copyright International

More information

Chapter 6 Economic Growth

Chapter 6 Economic Growth Chapter 6 Economic Growth 1 The Basics of Economic Growth 1) The best definition for economic growth is A) a sustained expansion of production possibilities measured as the increase in real GDP over a

More information

Consumer Credit Worldwide at year end 2012

Consumer Credit Worldwide at year end 2012 Consumer Credit Worldwide at year end 2012 Introduction For the fifth consecutive year, Crédit Agricole Consumer Finance has published the Consumer Credit Overview, its yearly report on the international

More information

The International Migrant Stock: A Global View. United Nations Population Division

The International Migrant Stock: A Global View. United Nations Population Division The International Migrant Stock: A Global View United Nations Population Division International migration is increasingly recognized as an important issue in the modern world where economic globalization

More information

Global Population (1950-2100)

Global Population (1950-2100) Population and Global Migration Issues I. Issues & Concepts in Global Population II. Trends in Global Migration III. Explanations of Immigration IV. Paths of Immigration V. Immigration Policy Issues in

More information

Contents. What is an intergenerational report?

Contents. What is an intergenerational report? What is an intergenerational report? An intergenerational report assesses the long term sustainability of Commonwealth finances. It examines the impact of current policies and trends, including population

More information

Credit Card Market Study Interim Report: Annex 4 Switching Analysis

Credit Card Market Study Interim Report: Annex 4 Switching Analysis MS14/6.2: Annex 4 Market Study Interim Report: Annex 4 November 2015 This annex describes data analysis we carried out to improve our understanding of switching and shopping around behaviour in the UK

More information

Population, Health, and Human Well-Being-- Benin

Population, Health, and Human Well-Being-- Benin Population, Health, and Human Well-Being-- Benin Demographic and Health Indicators Benin Sub- Saharan Africa World Total Population (in thousands of people) 1950 2,046 176,775 2,519,495 2002 6,629 683,782

More information

The recession of 2007 2009, a

The recession of 2007 2009, a Employment outlook: Labor force projections to : a more slowly growing workforce The projected labor force growth over the next 10 years will be affected by the aging of the baby-boom generation; as a

More information

U.S. Population Projections: 2012 to 2060

U.S. Population Projections: 2012 to 2060 U.S. Population Projections: 2012 to 2060 Jennifer M. Ortman Population Division Presentation for the FFC/GW Brown Bag Seminar Series on Forecasting Washington, DC February 7, 2013 2012 National Projections

More information

Statistical release P0302

Statistical release P0302 Statistical release Mid-year population estimates 2011 Embargoed until: 27 July 2011 10:00 Enquiries: Forthcoming issue: Expected release date User Information Services Mid-year population estimates, 2012

More information

Statistical release P0302

Statistical release P0302 Statistical release Mid-year population estimates 2014 Embargoed until: 31 July 2014 11:30 Enquiries: Forthcoming issue: Expected release date User Information Services Mid-year population estimates, 2015

More information

About 870 million people are estimated to have

About 870 million people are estimated to have Undernourishment around the world in 212 Undernourishment around the world Key messages The State of Food Insecurity in the World 212 presents new estimates of the number and proportion of undernourished

More information

Insurance market outlook

Insurance market outlook Munich Re Economic Research 2 May 2013 Global economic recovery provides stimulus to the insurance industry long-term perspective positive as well Once a year, MR Economic Research produces long-term forecasts

More information

UN World Population Prospects, the 2015 Revision

UN World Population Prospects, the 2015 Revision UN World Population Prospects, the 2015 Revision Gerhard K. Heilig Presentation prepared for the International School on Energy Systems of the Forschungszentrum Jülich - organized at Kloster Seon, Germany

More information

www.pwc.co.uk/economics Global wage projections to 2030 September 2013

www.pwc.co.uk/economics Global wage projections to 2030 September 2013 www.pwc.co.uk/economics Global wage projections to 2030 Summary: Wage gap between emerging and advanced economies will shrink significantly by 2030 By 2030, our projections in this report suggest that

More information

Strong peak season anticipated for international tourism

Strong peak season anticipated for international tourism Volume 12 June 201 Contents Inbound tourism: short-term trends 201 Regional results 7 UNWTO s Panel of Tourism Experts 11 Air transport booking trends Forwardkeys 13 Statistical Annex Annex-1 to Annex-3

More information

WORLDWIDE RETAIL ECOMMERCE SALES: EMARKETER S UPDATED ESTIMATES AND FORECAST THROUGH 2019

WORLDWIDE RETAIL ECOMMERCE SALES: EMARKETER S UPDATED ESTIMATES AND FORECAST THROUGH 2019 WORLDWIDE RETAIL ECOMMERCE SALES: EMARKETER S UPDATED ESTIMATES AND FORECAST THROUGH 2019 Worldwide retail sales including in-store and internet purchases will surpass $22 trillion in 2015, up 5.6% from

More information

Q&A on methodology on HIV estimates

Q&A on methodology on HIV estimates Q&A on methodology on HIV estimates 09 Understanding the latest estimates of the 2008 Report on the global AIDS epidemic Part one: The data 1. What data do UNAIDS and WHO base their HIV prevalence estimates

More information

Chapter 2. Education and Human Resource Development for Science and Technology

Chapter 2. Education and Human Resource Development for Science and Technology Chapter 2 Education and Human Resource Development for Science and Technology 2.1 Evironment for Basic Human Resource Development... 53 2.1.1 Science education in primary and secondary schools... 53 2.1.2

More information

A TEACHER FOR EVERY CHILD: Projecting Global Teacher Needs from 2015 to 2030

A TEACHER FOR EVERY CHILD: Projecting Global Teacher Needs from 2015 to 2030 A TEACHER FOR EVERY CHILD: Projecting Global Teacher Needs from 2015 to 2030 UIS FACT SHEET OCTOBER 2013, No.27 According to new global projections from the UNESCO Institute for Statistics, chronic shortages

More information

4.0 3.5 3.0 M I L L I O N S 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0. Figure 2.1 Number of people newly infected with HIV

4.0 3.5 3.0 M I L L I O N S 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0. Figure 2.1 Number of people newly infected with HIV Figure 2.1 Number of people newly infected with HIV 4.0 3.5 3.0 M I L L I O N S 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

More information

The Supply and Demand for Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses in Nebraska

The Supply and Demand for Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses in Nebraska The Supply and Demand for Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses in Nebraska February 6, 2006 David I. Rosenbaum, Ph.D. 4103 South Gate Blvd Lincoln NE 68506 402-489-1218 Executive Summary Recent

More information

Trends in Foreign Direct Investment Inflows

Trends in Foreign Direct Investment Inflows Trends in Foreign Direct Investment Inflows This article briefly examines recent trends in foreign direct investment in Australia, both in the context of the longer-term perspective and relative to the

More information

FOCUS ON. People and Migration. The UK population: past, present and future. Chapter 1. Julie Jefferies

FOCUS ON. People and Migration. The UK population: past, present and future. Chapter 1. Julie Jefferies FOCUS ON People and Migration The UK population: past, present and future Julie Jefferies Chapter 1 Chapter 1: The UK population: past, present and future Focus on People and Migration: 2005 Introduction

More information

Short Analytical Web Note 3/2015

Short Analytical Web Note 3/2015 Short Analytical Web Note 3/2015 This analytical web-note contains an extensive update of the main demographic trends for the EU and a labour-market supplement which outlines the potential consequences

More information

How many students study abroad and where do they go?

How many students study abroad and where do they go? From: Education at a Glance 2012 Highlights Access the complete publication at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/eag_highlights-2012-en How many students study abroad and where do they go? Please cite this chapter

More information

Policy Analysis Report

Policy Analysis Report CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO BOARD OF SUPERVISORS BUDGET AND LEGISLATIVE ANALYST 1390 Market Street, Suite 1150, San Francisco, CA 94102 (415) 552-9292 FAX (415) 252-0461 Policy Analysis Report To:

More information

Full report - Women in the labour market

Full report - Women in the labour market Full report - Women in the labour market Coverage: UK Date: 25 September 2013 Geographical Area: UK Theme: Labour Market Key points The key points are: Rising employment for women and falling employment

More information

Global payments trends: Challenges amid rebounding revenues

Global payments trends: Challenges amid rebounding revenues 34 McKinsey on Payments September 2013 Global payments trends: Challenges amid rebounding revenues Global payments revenue rebounded to $1.34 trillion in 2011, a steep increase from 2009 s $1.1 trillion.

More information

Economic Growth. (c) Copyright 1999 by Douglas H. Joines 1

Economic Growth. (c) Copyright 1999 by Douglas H. Joines 1 Economic Growth (c) Copyright 1999 by Douglas H. Joines 1 Module Objectives Know what determines the growth rates of aggregate and per capita GDP Distinguish factors that affect the economy s growth rate

More information

SOCIETY OF ACTUARIES THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ACTUARIES RETIREMENT PLAN PREFERENCES SURVEY REPORT OF FINDINGS. January 2004

SOCIETY OF ACTUARIES THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ACTUARIES RETIREMENT PLAN PREFERENCES SURVEY REPORT OF FINDINGS. January 2004 SOCIETY OF ACTUARIES THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ACTUARIES RETIREMENT PLAN PREFERENCES SURVEY REPORT OF FINDINGS January 2004 Mathew Greenwald & Associates, Inc. TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION... 1 SETTING

More information

A 10-year Investment Performance Review of. the MPF System. (1 December 2000 31 December 2010)

A 10-year Investment Performance Review of. the MPF System. (1 December 2000 31 December 2010) A 10-year Investment Performance Review of the MPF System (1 December 2000 31 December 2010) Acknowledgement The methodology and analysis of this report have been reviewed by Prof Kalok Chan, Synergis-Geoffrey

More information

Births and deaths in Kent - 2014

Births and deaths in Kent - 2014 Business Intelligence Statistical Bulletin July and deaths in - Related information The Population and Census web page contains more information which you may find useful. Population data presents the

More information

Development aid in 2015 continues to grow despite costs for in-donor refugees

Development aid in 2015 continues to grow despite costs for in-donor refugees OECD Paris, 13 April 2016 Development aid in 2015 continues to grow despite costs for in-donor refugees 2015 Preliminary ODA Figures In 2015, net official development assistance (ODA) flows from member

More information

Part 4 Burden of disease: DALYs

Part 4 Burden of disease: DALYs Part Burden of disease:. Broad cause composition 0 5. The age distribution of burden of disease 6. Leading causes of burden of disease 7. The disease and injury burden for women 6 8. The growing burden

More information

PROFILE OF THE SINGAPORE CHINESE DIALECT GROUPS

PROFILE OF THE SINGAPORE CHINESE DIALECT GROUPS PROFILE OF THE SINGAPORE CHINESE DIALECT GROUPS by Edmond Lee Eu Fah Social Statistics Section Singapore Department of Statistics INTRODUCTION The Singapore society is made up of different ethnic groups

More information

Challenges of the World Population in the 21st Century.

Challenges of the World Population in the 21st Century. Challenges of the World Population in the 21st Century. The changing age structure of population and its consequences for development Panel discussion Thursday, 12 October 2006 Dag Hammarskjold Library

More information

WORLD ROBOTICS 2006 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

WORLD ROBOTICS 2006 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2005 World Robot Market Total world-wide sales: 126,700 units, up 30% on 2004 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY World total stock of operational industrial robots: 923,000 units, 9% greater than 2004 World market surged

More information

World Population Ageing 2009

World Population Ageing 2009 E c o n o m i c & World Population Ageing 29 S o c i a l A f f a i r s United Nations ESA/P/WP/212 December 29 Department of Economic and Social Affairs Population Division World Population Ageing 29

More information

International tourism shows continued strength. Sustained growth amidst challenges

International tourism shows continued strength. Sustained growth amidst challenges Volume 1 October 01 Contents Inbound tourism: short-term trends 01 International tourism receipts 8 International tourism expenditure 9 Regional results 10 UNWTO s Panel of Tourism Experts 11 Air transport

More information

What Is the Funding Status of Corporate Defined-Benefit Pension Plans in Canada?

What Is the Funding Status of Corporate Defined-Benefit Pension Plans in Canada? Financial System Review What Is the Funding Status of Corporate Defined-Benefit Pension Plans in Canada? Jim Armstrong Chart 1 Participation in Pension Plans Number of Plans Number of Members Thousands

More information

EXTERNAL DEBT AND LIABILITIES OF INDUSTRIAL COUNTRIES. Mark Rider. Research Discussion Paper 9405. November 1994. Economic Research Department

EXTERNAL DEBT AND LIABILITIES OF INDUSTRIAL COUNTRIES. Mark Rider. Research Discussion Paper 9405. November 1994. Economic Research Department EXTERNAL DEBT AND LIABILITIES OF INDUSTRIAL COUNTRIES Mark Rider Research Discussion Paper 9405 November 1994 Economic Research Department Reserve Bank of Australia I would like to thank Sally Banguis

More information

PROJECTION OF THE FISCAL BALANCE AND PUBLIC DEBT (2012 2027) - SUMMARY

PROJECTION OF THE FISCAL BALANCE AND PUBLIC DEBT (2012 2027) - SUMMARY PROJECTION OF THE FISCAL BALANCE AND PUBLIC DEBT (2012 2027) - SUMMARY PUBLIC FINANCE REVIEW February 2013 SUMMARY Key messages The purpose of our analysis is to highlight the risks that fiscal policy

More information

ENGINEERING LABOUR MARKET

ENGINEERING LABOUR MARKET ENGINEERING LABOUR MARKET in Canada Projections to 2025 JUNE 2015 ENGINEERING LABOUR MARKET in Canada Projections to 2025 Prepared by: MESSAGE FROM THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Dear colleagues: Engineers

More information

UK application rates by country, region, constituency, sex, age and background. (2015 cycle, January deadline)

UK application rates by country, region, constituency, sex, age and background. (2015 cycle, January deadline) UK application rates by country, region, constituency, sex, age and background () UCAS Analysis and Research 30 January 2015 Key findings JANUARY DEADLINE APPLICATION RATES PROVIDE THE FIRST RELIABLE INDICATION

More information