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1 I L I N I S UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN PRODUCTION NOTE University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library Large-scale Digitization Project, 27.

2

3 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY PUBLIC SERVICE DEPARTMENTS ANNUAL REPORTS

4 CONTENTS University Librarian's Report (Missing) Director of Public Services Report Circulation Reference Department Undergraduate Library Residence Halls Agriculture Library Applied Life Studies Architecture Library Biology Library Chemistry Library City Planning and Landscape Architecture Library Classics Library Commerce Library Communications Library Documents Library Education and Social Sciences Library Engineering Library English Library Geology Library Health Sciences Library History and Philosophy Library Home Economics Library Illini Union Browsing Room Illinois Historical Survey Library Interlibrary Lending Division Labor and Industrial Relations Library Law Library Library and Information Science Library Map and Geography Library Mathematics Library Modern Languages Library Music Library Natural History Survey Library Newspaper Library Physics Library Rare Book Room University Archives University High School Library Veterinary Medicine Library

5 PUBLIC SERVICES Annual Report FY 198/81 Accomplishments of 198/81 1. Administrative reorganization. On April 1, 1981 the new organizational structure of Public Services became effective. The organization plan is the result of the work of a faculty task force which was appointed to study the structure of the division and to recommend an organizational arrangement which would improve communication and the effectiveness of the Public Services Departments. An implementation committee appointed by the Director was responsible for planning and implementing the recommendations of the task force. Both committees discharged their responsibilities with care and dispatch and the structure was in place and operational on the scheduled date. A copy of the organizational structure is attached to this report. 2. Library instruction. Increased coordination and cooperation between the Reference Department and the Undergraduate Library has made it possible to continue the extensive library instruction program despite decreased staffing. Reference and Undergraduate Library staffs provided library instruction to freshmen in Speech Communication 111, Rhetoric 15 and Rhetoric 18. Library Research Skills sessions were presented to a total of 174 sections of these classes. Additionally, 19 orientation sessions were presented to 4,5 students in the Residence Halls, and more than 2, students attended the tours of the Main and Undergraduate Libraries during New Student Week. 3. On-line bibliographic services. A total of 5,195 on-line bibliographic searches were performed for students and researchers in the nine locations which are equipped to conduct this service. The potential for expanding on-line search services is great. Each year additional subject related data bases become available on-line; only an insufficient number of terminals restricts the availability of this service throughout the library system. 4. Departmental libraries. The annual reports of each Departmental Librarian document improved services and operations and increases in circulation as well as service oriented priorities for the future. These achievements are due to the dedication and hard work the professional librarians and support staff who provide quality library service to the University community. Major Issues and Priorities for FY 1981/82 1. Improved library service during evenings and weekend hours. It is a recognized fact that many of the libraries are heavily used during evening and weekend hours and, in general, the professional staff is available to provide library service only during the normal daytime working hours. Most libraries are staffed during the busy evening and

6 weekend hours by student assistants. The Public Services Directors Council has identified as a major priority the establishment of training programs and an integrated referral system to meet the needs of the evening and weekend users.of the libraries. 2. Improved promotion of library services. Another major goal of Public Services is to increase the awareness of the campus of the scope and breadth of library services available to support educational and research activities. Information brochures which publicize library services must be prepared and distributed. Cable TV also offers a potent medium for the promotion of library service. Continual campus support of the library is dependent upon the visibility and quality of library services, and both these areas are primary areas for attention in the next year. Circulation Public Services - Statistical Summary of Activities FY 198/81 General: (Students, Faculty, Staff, Others; July 198 through July 1981) Manual = 158,846 LCS = 842,164 Non-Print = 32,73 Total = 1,33,74 Reserves: Special Charges: 513, ,747 Interlibrary Loan (July 198 through July 1981) Borrowed: 1,97 Illinois Research and Reference Center (IRRC) (July 198 through July 1981) Loans = 66,684 Photocopy Orders = 35,593 Total = 12,277

7 CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 Accomplishments: The most important accomplishments of the past year: 1) Maintenance of service 12 hours per week with a circulation increase of 17%. Shelving incoming books (81,533), transfers (7,388), and re-shelving circulated items. 2) Coordination of circulation desk and telephone center has allowed additional flexibility in staffing patterns and efficiency in use of staff. Development of an Administrative Clerk position is in process and has served as. a substitute for an academic position. 3) Addition of a full-time LC II position and centralizing the functions of billing and cancellations has improved service to users, departmental libraries, Student Accounts and the University Business Office. 4) By shifting, remote storage, a serials weeding program and duplicate withdrawals for credit, space has been provided for a net increase of 46,63 volumes plus the space to re-distribute an overcrowded deck 1. 5) State-wide service has increased with 2,336 courtesy borrowers (393 Courtesy I; 1,943 Courtesy II). Of these, 2,177 were Illinois and 159 out-of-state users. 6) LCS corrections totaled 6,518 compared to 4,98 the previous year. In addition, the U.S. Census on microfilm was broken out on LCS to make them individually chargeable. The Binding department also made progress on reconciling summary statements with serial holdings on high use items. 7) Reduction of the manual file has been dramatic. Last year, 26.6 percent of circulation was manual; this year it is approximately 2%, consisting primarily of M-sets, serial holdings and items requiring data correction. Arrangements have been made to accommodate renewals by phone from/the manual file. A special project in May has decreased manual/charging by about 5%. 8) A 12 month inventory of snags for a 2 year period was completed. Of 2,581 items, 862 or 33.4 percent were found. Only.6 of 1 percent of requested items were considered lost books. Since an inventory of the stacks has never been done, these may represent losses over many years which have come to our attention because of circulation requests.

8 Circulation Department Annual Report - p. 2 Issues and Opportunities: Some major issues and opportunities this year: 1) Desk remodeling to save turnstile personnel. It is estimated that an annual reduction in student wages of 1-12, dollars could be realized by redesign to coordinate staffing of the three service points at the desk. 2) Job reassignment and restructuring of functions to adjust to personnel budget reductions. (Change of F.T.E. graduate assistants to F.T.E. and F.T.E. and reduction to clerical staff by 1.5 F.T.E) 3) Extension of use of LCS state-wide to U. of I. extramural classes in other Illinois communities and participation of extension course instructors in selection of books for this reserve collection are underway. 4) Planning for compact storage and establishment of criteria and selection of items or collections for the 6th addition will require library-wide participation. 5) Collection preservation issues continue to need attention: Binding policies, a replacement program and additional emphasis on microforms for stored collections must be considered. 6) LCS corrections, M-set and serial holdings reconciliation will continue to require major commitments. Priorities for the coming year: 1) Maintenace of staffing to service 12 hours per week for paging, reshelving and shifting to provide access to the collections. 2) Continued efficient us.e of space and planning compact storage. 3) Minimum estimated binding needs for recently acquired or used materials: Serial binding of heavily used materials Monographic and serials rebinds Paperback binding 6 items 2,5 items 4, items 4) Shelf reading will require more student hours than previously allocated: In March, 55 ranges were read using 1 student hours. There are about 15 ranges. It is estimated that 3, student hours are required to shelf read the entire stacks in one year. Additional reading is needed in heavily used areas. This program requires an additional 1, dollars. Gene K. Rinkel Circulation Librarian

9 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Personnel Academic Employees Professionals Rinkel, Gene K. 8/21/75 Graduate Assistants Haney, Kathy 8/21/79 Hasko, John Larue, James. Lewis, John 8/21/8 1/27/8 8/21/8 Mason, Newman, Deborah Harriet 8/21/8 12/8 Non Academic Employees Allen, Christine 5/8 Andrews, Bacon, Steve Charles 8/8-7/81 1/8-5/81 Bays, Cleis 9/15/78 Bieniek, Georgia Blaine, Valerie 1/1/79-7/3/81 9/13/76-6/2/81 Burton-Eldeeb, Cynthia 3/31/8 Cheryan, Leela 3/3/8-1/31/81 Collins, Helen Kris Curly, Helen 1/19/78 6/29/81 Davis, Ruth 12/3/78

10 Non Academic Employees Davis, Sarah Drake, Danita Dover, Doretta Emling, Violet Fox, Neil Haas, Jamie Halton, Anne Hill, Susan Jennings, Laura Jeter, Leon Johnson, Susan Joyce, Sue 8/18/77 3/2/81 1/11/79-3/81 8/15/81 6/13/8 9/15/8-6/12/81 9/8 8/23/77 1/16/78-9/13/8 11/28/78 9/4/79 5/2/8 Kraus, Sue 2/4/8 Martin, Glen Moran, Karen Miller, MaryBeth- O'Hanl on, Nancy Obery, Alice 11/8-5/28/81 1/8 9/16/79 9/13/79 2/23/81 Paden, Shelley 8/18/79 Pelg, Marcia Reid, Joe Sander, Nancy Schelhorn, Pam Stocum, Laura, Trost, Steve 9/18/79 8/8 6/26/78-5/3/81 2/1/8-8/8/8 8/27/8 8/11/8

11 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Extramural Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT TYPE LAST, z "'m TOTAL of YEAR'S V AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL - JUNE 3 z z o CATALOGED VOLUMES 6, ,811 UNCATALOGED I VOLUMES PAMPHLETS 2 MICROFILM 3 41,97 1,147 1,147 42,244 MICROCARDSE 11,181 wxx 11,181 MICROPRINT4 174, ,152 MICROFICHE 147,261 5,462 5, ,723 PERIODICAL 6 TITLES COt,' INUAT ION 6 TITLES TOTAL SERIAL6 TITLES I L..2. Nature of Items Included as uncateloged volumes. VertIlcl file items. Report the number of reels. Report the number of Individual cards. Vacant Bpaces are for elidea, filstrip~e maps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates.

12 Ci rculation/bookstacks Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables 2 2. Carrel seats Lounge chairs none B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library (remote storage) 12, Linear feet of shelving 2S6, (does not include deck 7- C. Number of hours open weekly Asian) 1. Fall Spring Summer 77 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants,Q 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics F.T.E. 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 548 Remote Storage 4,966 hours b. Spring 76 Lost Book Billing 5,835 hours Paging & Shelving 17,63 hours c. Summer 696 Bookstacks Office 4,495 hours Desk & Office 3,225 hours 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic b. Nonacademic

13 REFERENCE DEPARTMENT ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 Accomplishments of : 1. Reference Questions: The Reference Department answered over 5h, questions in This represents an increase of 18, questions (5%) over (approx. 36,). This dramatic increase may be the result of several factors, some of which are identified below. The Reference Department paid (from student wages) for 2 hours of graduate assistant staffing on Monday-Thursday evenings to assist the Reference Librarian. The increased visibility and availability of reference assistance enhanced our ability to serve the public. As a result, the Reference staff answered over 7,8 questions from 6-1 p.m., Monday-Thursday evenings during the academic year. Very little of the 5% increase was due directly to the late hours (1-midnight, Sunday-Thursday). 1,8 questions (3.3%) were answered during these hours, although it seems reasonable to attribute some of the increase experienced from 6 to 1 p.m. to the expansion of research into the late evening hours. Another factor is the Research Skills Instruction Program as it was designed and implemented during The high visibility of the Reference Department and Reference librarians in that program increased the use of the Reference Room by freshman students markedly. More detail about this in the section on library instruction and on the reference survey. 2. Bibliographic Instruction Program marked a change in the overall Library Research Skills instruction program. Reference and Undergraduate library staffs cooperatively provided library instruction to freshmen in Speech Communications 111, Rhetoric 15 and Rhetoric 18. Library Research Skills sessions were presented to a total of 17h sections (18, Fall 198; 66 Spring, 1981) of these classes. The Reference Department provided 78 sessions with 96 provided by UGL staff. The program was an unqualified success. The cooperative program insured consistency of presentation and wider involvement as well as simpler logistics, The evaluation of the Spring Semester Library Instruction program is not available at this time. 3. Reference Survey In cooperation with Documents and the Undergraduate Library, Reference participated in a reference survey designed by Dana Smith, Spring, The survey examined types of questions, status of patron, and subject area of question, A few of the more interesting findings are included here. Over 9% of 6lh questions in the survey

14 page 2 were answered satisfactorily. The unsatisfactory category included referrals to the appropriate library. If these referrals were ineluded in the satisfactory category, the success rate rises to over 97%. The Reference Department clientele identified in the survey ranks as follows: Graduate students 2,%; Other (including Library staff), 23%; Freshmen, 18%; Faculty 12%; and other Undergraduate classes averaged 9% each. The high ranking of freshmen seems directly attributable to the Research Skills Instruction program. The subject coverage is universal with virtually no field omitted. The fields of highest concentration were: Education, Policital Science, Biography, Business and Economics and Publishing. The largest single category was "No Subject--Library related" which is defined as bibliographic identification and verification, e.g. patron's inquiry about existence and/or location of a 'known' book on biology was coded as "No Subject--Library Related." Verification constituted approximately 25% of the sample. b The Reference Department Liaison Activities. The Reference Department and the Undergraduate Library conducted an exchange program during Spring Semester, Four librarians from each unit served at the Reference Desk of the other library. The exchange librarians shared their insights with the department, increasing our awareness and knowledge of the services available in the system. The exchange program served to strengthen the existing patterns of cooperation and coordination between Reference and Undergraduate Library. All the Reference librarians took part in a program by the Documents Library designed to keep the Department's documents knowledge and skills up-to-date. Reference serves as "Documents Reference" after 5 p.m. and on weekends, so it is critical to keep current with changes in the Documents Library. This program will, in all liklihood, continue indefinitely to maintain the high level of service in Documents to the Library's patrons. The Reference Department and the Circulation Department initiated a liaison program this year. A graduate assistant was assigned to the Catalog Information Desk for 25% of her time. This liaison position was responsible for facilitating communication exchange among Reference, Circulation and the Catalog Information Desk. 5. Orientation Sessions and Tours Orientation sessions were provided to incoming freshmen through the New Student Week Orientation Program coordinated through the Office of the Dean of Students. Reference and Undergraduate librarians presented 19 orientation sessions to h5oo students in the Residence Halls. During New Student Week, tours of the Main and Undergraduate Libraries were presented at 8 times to 2, students. 12 regularly scheduled tours were offered during the first six weeks of Fall semester to over 6 students. All of these activities were coordinated by Reference and Undergraduate Library for the Library Instruction Committee,.

15 page 3 6. Workshop/Seminars Reference and Undergrad jointly sponsored a series of Reference Updates. These seminars were offered Spring, 1981 on a wide range of topics, by librarians from throughout the Library Faculty. The Reference Department had a h hour tour/workshop on OCR. It increased the mutual understanding between these two units. As a result, there are more accurate and efficient referrals to OCR for patron queries. In addition, OCR has a clearer perception of the Reference needs and uses of their files. 7. Collection Maintenance A complete inventory of the Reference collection was conducted during the summer, 198. The inventory made it possible to correct LCS records for Reference material. It also highlighted areas of the collection which were particularly vulnerable to loss and subsequently in need of replacement, Weeding the collection for transfer to Bookstacks was hampered by lack of space in Bookstacks. Reference, Documents and Undergraduate libraries coordinated the purchase of an important reference tool, SRI microfiche. 8. Hours The Reference Room is open 12 hours per week during Fall and Spring Semesters. The Reference Desk staffing pattern was re-examined and re-allocated as follows: 17 hours - professional librarians, 38 hours - student assistants, 8 hours - graduate assistants, 5 hours - clerks, for a total of 158 staff hours per week. During the Summer Session, the Graduate Assistants staffed the Reference Desk on Saturday morning and Sunday afternoon. Priorities for The Reference Departments first priority is to provide the highest quality Reference service to the Library's user community. The Reference Department has a commitment to staff the Reference Desk with professional librarians in order to provide that level of service. The fine record established this past year assures us that the first step to good service is the availability of the staff to the public. The Department's second priority is the continued involvement and development of the Library Research Skills Instruction Program. It is rewarding to the Reference librarians to be part of such a well-designed program. It is also clear that the students gain a great deal through their awareness of the vast resources of the entire Library as well as the resources of the Undergraduate Library. The third priority is a systematic review of the Reference collection. This review will be assisted by the subject analysis of the Reference Survey. The inventory, completed this last year, will also provide needed information in this review.

16 STATISTICAL SUMMARY REFERENCE Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT. TYPE LAST ~ z ~ TOTAL of YEAR'S v AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL _,...JUNE 3 CATALOGED VOLOMES 2,413 1, ,191 UNCATALOGED 1 VOLUMES * * 681 * PAMPHLETS 2 7,2 * * 49* MICROFILM MICROCARDS 4 MICROPR I NT MICROFIloE 4,615 4,75 4, ,182 _. o-- PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONT I NUATION 6 TITLES 384 2, xx -i ,139 TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES 2,565 mmu Mp- X -39 2,526 I. 2. Nature of Items included Vertlcel file Items. as uncataloged volumes. COMMAND PAPERS, Report the number of reels.. Report the number of Individual cards. 5. Vacant spaces are for slides, filmstripap maps, disks, etc. 6. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates. *PREVIOUS ANNUAL REPORTS DID NOT REFLECT THE TRANSFER OF MATERIAL TO-DOCUMENTS, AND OTHER SUBSTANTIAL CHANGES IN THE VERTICAL FILE. THESE NUMBERS ARE BASED ON CURRENT COUNT. I %-Ný 4Wý I L I. ý

17 II. STATISTICS Reference Questions: 1979/ /1981 Reference 27,847 h5,19 (Includes 2,288 Documents Reference queries) Extended Reference questions Correspondence Directional 4,931 8,67 Total 33,557* 54,4 *Total adjusted for missing data 36,) Library Instruction Sessions: Orientation Sessions and Tours: c Interlibrary Loan Verification: 9 sessions, 2,25 Students 1 tour times, 1,3 Students 153 (Feb-May) 834 Catalog Information Desk: 21,8o 23,345 Online Searches: NA 286 LCS Searches on Reference Public Terminal: 1h5,516 15,81

18 REFERENCE III. Other Information 198/81 o"wmwm=--qftý Library A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats 3. Lounge chairs O B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving C. Number of hours open weekly Reference Room Catalog I: nformation Desk 1. Fall Spring Summer D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 1. (Catalog In: formation Desk) 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 69 b. Spring 69 c. Summer ho 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic See attached page b. Nonacademic

19 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic *Elizabeth Baker Richard Bopp Cynthia Cockerham *Connie Fairchild *Kathleen Kluegel *Martha Landis Stella Mosborg Maureen Pastine *Carol Penka Mary Pillepich *Richard Smith (December 17, 1979-date) (On leave from Reference to Health Sciences Library) (March 3, 198-August 1, 198) (Indefinite Tenure) (August 21, 1979-date) (Indefinite Tenure, 9-month contract) (August 21, 198-August 2, 1981 (Resigned effective July 15, 198) (.5 FTE) (Resigned effective August 2, 1981) (Indefinite Tenure) *Current members of the Reference Department b. Nonacademic Susan Eilering (October 29, 1979-date) Eva Parisi c. Graduate Assistants at Catalog Information Desk Mary Ellen Davis Irene Elrod Paula Garrett Sharon Van Der Laan

20 UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Progress was made in varying degrees in the four priority areas identified last year. o Expanding equipment and personnel in the Media Center by 1%. Although later developments made it inappropriate to increase the number of personnel in the Media Center, we were almost able to double the equipment available in the eenter. The primary source of funds was a successful proposal by Dana Smith for Campus-Wide Nonrecurring Funds in the amount of $8,5, while a further welcome supplement came from the Mother's Association. This additional equipment has allowed us to expand both the variety and the quantity of service available to the University community as well as provide backup machinery for use during the inevitable periods of equipment breakdown. o Hiring a permanent Undergraduate Librarian and a full complement of supporting professional staff. A permanent head of the Undergraduate Library was hired in the fall of 198 and by spring of 1981 arrangements had been made for the addition of two full-time, tenure track professionals to the Undergraduate Library staff. This brings the professional staff to full complement. o Providing on-line bibliographic services as an integral component of the Undergraduate Library reference and instruction program. Due to the equipment costs of providing such services in the Undergraduate Library itself, an oblique approach has been taken on this issue. Closer contact and coordination with Main Reference is being established which we hope will lead to a solution to this problem in the larger context of General Services. We feel this is more desirable than simply attempting an "Undergraduate Library solution". o Investigating the use of microformat for back runs of Undergraduate Library periodicals. We have identified twenty periodicals titles for which it would be both possible and desirable to receive back copies in microform on a regular basis. During the year, particularly with the arrival of the new Undergraduate Librarian, a further priority issue was identified: o Overcoming Undergraduate Library isolation in the library community, particularly in the areas of reference services and collection development.

21 A number of important and successful programs were established to deal with this issue. A Professional Update program designed to develop reference expertise and facilitate reference referral was initiated, a reference exchange between Main Reference and Undergraduate Library was instituted, and a new set of Undergraduate Library collection guidelines, developed in conjunction with the departmental libraries in order to avoid unnecessary duplication as well as enlist departmental assistance in collection building, are being established. In addition to the above, the Undergraduate Library has continued to improve its services and operations in many additional ways. Substantial improvements in Undergraduate Library Reserves, Bibliographic Instruction, Shelving and Periodicals also deserve comment and commendation. These and other developments are due to an excellent and highly motivated staff which continues to be our major resource. MAJOR ISSUES AND PRIORITIES FOR THE COMING YEAR We perceive two main factors determining our goals and possibilities in the coming year. The first factor is the certainty of diminished resources which the Undergraduate Library has already encountered most dramatically in the past year with the loss of five quarter time reference Graduate Assistants. The second is that the Undergraduate Library cannot and must not operate in isolation from a number of significant larger communities, most particularly Main Reference, the UI departmental libraries, UI teaching faculty and state-wide, even nation-wide, professional colleagues. It is out of these perceptions that our major objectives for the coming year have evolved. 1. Continue and expand the Professional Update program. 2. Bring to conclusion the development of jointly agreed upon collection development statements between Undergraduate Library and the departmental libraries and subject bibliographers. 3. Continue to develop and expand the reference exchange program. 4. Establish a joint reference acquisitions program with Main Reference. 5. Implement a new structure to provide Library Instruction. 6. Explore the possibility of supplementing Undergraduate Library's professional resources through the programs and services of the Graduate Library School. 7. Monitor the development of media resources on UI campus, particularly in installation of cable TV capability, and exploration of an appropriate library role in this development. 8. Encourage the professional staff to participate in professional affairs on a state and national level. 9. Explore ways to improve the deteriorating physical environment of the Undergraduate Library.

22 IF LMSTRIPS STATISTICAL SUMMARY UNDERGRADUATE July 198-June 1981 Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT u TYPE LAST z TOTAL of YEAR'S 5 AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL JUNE 3.j..a_. CATALOGED VOLUMES 165,586 6, ,556 UNCATALOGED VOLUMES PAMPHLETS 2 MICROFILM MICROCARDS. 3, ,263 xx MICROPRINT 4 xx HICROFICFZ4 39,53 2, ,57 AUDIO CASSETTE 2,763 26, 26 2,969 VIDEO CASSETTES Asm SLIDES PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONTINUATION TITLES S1. Q r)" J X)Xx H nn. A-4OR2 F ý4i TOTAL SER IAL 6 TITLES I ,161 I - ý Wft. -I mwo Nature of Items Included as unceteloged volumes. VertIcal file Items. Report the number of roels. Report the number of Individual cerd3. Vacant apaccs are for slides, filmstrips, maps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicatoes. 1,199

23 July June 1981 undergraduate Library II. "Recorded Use Month LCS/ Man'1 LCS/ Fac/ Staff 746 Student 6,443 Permit C/Card IRR 66 Special Charger. 1,759 Reserve Materials * 389 Nonprint Materials July Man' I LCS/ , , August Man'1 LCS/ September Man' 1 LCS/ October Man'1 LCS/ November Man'1 LCS/i December Man'1 LCS/ , , , ,66 4 6, , , , ,967 6,162 1,933 4,33 1,9 4, , ,281 1,575 2, January Man'T1 LCS , , February Man' 1 LCS 7 1, , ,512 4,813 1,152 March April May June Totals Man'1 LCS Man'1 LCS Man'1 LCS Man'1 LCS Man'1 23 1, , , , , , ,436 5,857 1,16 3, ,96 11,611 1,458 3, ,72 Grand Total Last Year Increase/ Decrease I LCS Man'1 I rc' I.LCS 11, A446 Man'l -65 i [4,925 16,317 t- - if 152,418 2, , ý1- -^. i ^ c4 T t I.-- ^ -««_- :1JU-- 1-1, ,838 8, ,559 i 9, ~-527 ' I d L I 4-9 SR'4 51,77 59,87-7,38 14,72 16,846-2,144 * IBM computer system

24 Undergraduate Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats Lounge chairs 157 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library 67, Linear feet of shelving 14,313 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 77 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3 (6 1/2 time appointments) 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 62 b. Spring 515 c. Summer 278 (includes substantial work/study) 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic SEE ATTACHED b. Nonacademic SEE ATTACHED

25 PERSONNEL Names of Academic Employees: Undergraduate Librarian: Beginning date of employment Ending date of employment Kohl, David 1/15/8 Assistant Undergraduate Librarians: Gorman, Anne (1/2 time temporary) 2/11/8 Simpson, Virginia Smith, Dana 9/21/79 (transfer from Communications library) 2/21/79 Wilson, Betsy (permanent) 7/1/81 Illini Union Browsing Room Librarian: Martel, Anne (1/2 time) 6/21/78 Visiting Research Associates: Hardin, Linda Wilson, Betsy 8/21/78 2/21/79 5/15/81 6/3/81 Graduate Assistants: Arp, Lori Blackburn, Sharon Christie, Kathryn Cox, Julie Cureton, Cathy Hogan, Mary Konopasek, Katherine Nau, Benjie 8/21/8 8/21/79 8/21/79 8/21/8 8/21/79 8/21/8 8/21/79 8/21/79 8/2/8 8/2/8 8/2/8 8/29/8 8/2/8

26 Graduate Assistants cont.: Nollen, Terry Royce, Carol Tieberg-Bailie, John Wolcott, Cynthia 8/21/8 8/21/79 8/21/8 8/21/8 8/2/8 Names of Nonacademic Employees: Andrews, Norma Jean Beaman, Phillip Blackburn, Joseph Boze, Andy Carter, Luella Chenail, Mark Dunn, Susan Geanious, Gregory Haut, Frank Hershbarger, Sharon Hill William Hinderliter, Alice Huss, Martha Kitzmiller, Sharon Knowles, Jennifer Krejsa, Michael McGuire, Kris tine Murphy, Guy Pirkle, Lauren S. Smith, Pam Stringer, Becky Trail, Pam 12/4/78 8/19/76 3/2/8 8/22/78 1/17/77 1/18/77 1/21/81 6/19/79 9/16/8 8/3/79 7/11/77 1/29/78 1/27/81 4/12/79 8/14/78 7/2/81 8/26/8 4/16/78 1/3/78 1/15/79 5/22/78 1/27/81 11/15/8 11/23/8 7/3/8 Weber, Lorraine 9/2/69

27 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS RESIDENCE HALL LIBRARIES ANNUAL REPORT JULY 1, JUNE 3, 1981 I. SERVICE TO READERS A. Hours of Opening. The Gregory Drive Library hours were extended this year from 31 to 41 hours a week. This was done to give residents access to the Gregory Library during the afternoon. Gregory's hours for this year were 2-5 and 7-11 Sunday-Thursday and 2-5 on Fridays and Saturdays. Hours for all other residence hall libraries remained the same. Allen, FAR, and ISR Libraries were open 2-5 and 7-11 seven days a week. LAR was open 2-5 and 7-11 Sunday-Thursday and 2-5 on Fridays and Saturdays. PAR Library was open 7:3-11:3 Monday-Saturday, 2-5 and 7:3-11:3 on Sundays. Peabody Library continued the same schedule of 9-12, 1-5 and 7-11 Monday-Friday and 1-5 and 7-11 on Saturday.and Sunday. Library hours were extended for Finals' Week at the end of each semester. Six of the libraries stayed open until midnight every night, and Peabody Library extended hours of service until 1: AM. B. Use of Library Materials: Interpretation of Part B of Statistical Summary. Attendance for was 82,724 student visits, a two percent increase over last year's attendance figure of 81,114. Circulation for was 4,35 volumes, a thirteen percent increase over last year's circulation figure of 3,775. It is very gratifying to see an increase in both our circulation and attendance figures for It shows that our overall efforts are achieving results. There are still several areas where some improvement would be bepeficial. Most notably ISR and LAR Libraries where both attendance and circulation dropped noticeably, and at Allen Library which showed a marked decrease in attendance. In all three of these libraries I believe an improvement in the physical facilities would contribute markedly to an increase in circulation and attendance. C. Reference Work--Subject Bibliographies. Bibliographies on topics of interest to students were made available for student distribution. Topics include Politics--U.S., Women, Human Sexuality, Rock Music, Energy, Religious Cults, the Cinema, Science Fiction Award Winners, and a special display and bibliography on Black Americans for Black History Month.

28 -2- II. EXTENSION OF SERVICES A. Orientation Tours or Lectures. The residence hall librarian gave orientation lectures to the Undergraduate Library Graduate Assistants and the EOP Graduate Assistants at the beginning of the year. The residence hall library system was also represented at an information fair for resident advisors at the beginning of the year. The residence hall librarian participated in New Student Week and Quad Day activities in cooperation with the Main Library. The residence hall librarian also met with student government people to discuss the residence hall library system. In addition, the librarian is available to give tours of residence hall libraries to groups of visitors (guests of the housing division, parents, prospective residents and interested faculty and staff members at the university). B. Guides and Handbooks. Information sheets, posters, acquisition lists, bibliographies, and book marks were used to publicize residence hall library services to students. The residence hall libraries were listed in Hallmarks, a housing guidebook distributed to all students in the residence halls. Hallmarks describes the libraries, their hours and services, and listed each library location and telephone number. C. Acquisition Lists. Lists of new acquisitions were collated and distributed bi-monthly to each library. These new book lists were then posted in the library and in various locations throughout the hall or area. D. Other. In August, library open houses were held in the seven residence hall libraries. Student librarians in each area hosted the open houses. The open houses serve to introduce the libraries and their staff to new residents. III. CARE AND IMPROVEMENT OF THE COLLECTIONS A. Inventories and Recataloging. Last year for the first time in several years, FAR was not used for Summer Advance Enrollment and ISR was not used for summer school, so we were able to gain access to both locations for the long overdue inventory and weeding. This summer we plan to inventory and weed the

29 -3- the Peabody Library collection, which is also long overdue for such an operation. This accomplished, six of our seven libraries will have been inventoried and weeded in the last three years, Gregory our newest and smallest collection will be the only exception. We hope now to institute a rotating schedule whereby two libraries will be inventoried every summer, thus limiting the time elapsed between inventories to three years. The time period for weeding will be shorter at both Allen and LAR as both locations have reached their shelving capacity and it is often necessary to withdraw books from these libraries in order to make room on the shelves for new books. This is a no-win situation and I hope the problem can be corrected in the very near future by adding additional shelving units to these locations. B. Acquisitions-Collection Building Procedures. Acquisitions consisted of reference, course-related, popular materials, serials, exam files, and professional literature for the library office and housing professional staff. A record number of books were purchased, catalogued and processed this year in the library office. We purchased, catalogued, and processed over 2,7 volumes. This is due in part to the acquisitions of the IBM 6 Typewriter and more so to the efficient and hardworking library staff. Another 4 volumes were added to the Gregory Library collection, bringing their total to over 1,2 volumes. Which puts this library on a par with the LAR Library, with still more room for expansion and improvement. The enlarged collection and the expanded hours at Gregory have both contributed to an increase in circulation and attendance figures for Gregory Library. Gregory circulated 546 volumes this year, a 39 percent increase over last year's total of 332. Gregory's attendance was up 24 percent to 6,381 from last year's total of 4,85. We are very pleased with the expansion and improvement we have made at Gregory Library and our increased statistics reflect student satisfaction with our efforts. Current fiction and nonfiction bestsellers were acquired to attract students to the libraries, to take pressure off the main library for these popular titles, and to stimulate interest in leisure reading. These recreational or leisure reading items are an integral and important part of our collections and are very well used by our patrons. Paperback, science fiction, mystery and hobby books also continue to be extremely popular tiems in our collection. Our annual shopping trip to the Illini Union Book Center is being planned for mid-june and several of our students will participate. Students and staff enjoy being able to take an active part in the selecting of books for their libraries.

30 -4- The exam files provided a valuable service to students in the residence halls. Offering over 3 course-listings, the union list of exam files also provided service to the reference department and the undergraduate library, both of whom referred patrons to the residence hall libraries to use the exam files. The residence hall libraries provide the most complete collection of exam files on campus. We have plans this summer to completely overhaul and up-date our exam file, to make it is helpful and efficient as possible. C. Overdues and Fines. Students are not fined for overdue books because the task of maintaining accurate records for this purpose is prohibitive. Students are instead billed for books when they do not return them. They are charged the price of the item lost, plus a three dollar processing fee. If the book is returned within thirty days of the bill, all but the processing fee is returned. We have very little need to charge for books as most of our materials are returned. This year only 16 fines (lost book charges) were issued to patrons. IV. QUARTERS AND IMPROVEMENTS A. Improvement of the Physical Facilities. There are several libraries which need improvement of the physical facilities as soon as possible. My memo to the Associate Director of Housing for Student Affairs (dated April 24, 1981) summarized all the needed renovations for the residence hall libraries. (See attached.) The problems we are experiencing in some locations has reached a critical stage and should be taken care of immediately in order to continue the same level of service we have offered to residents in these areas in the past. The proposed move of the Pennsylvania Avenue Library from the cafeteria to the first floor vending room at PAR is a positive and much needed step towards improving our serivce to PAR residents. Moving the library would allow us to open PAR Library in the afternoons and also to expand the collection at PAR. The move from the cafeteria to the vending room will be expensive but the improvements derived from the move will be well worth the expense incurred. (See attachedestimate.) B. Equipment and Capital Improvements. The IBM Model 6 Typewriter purchased last year has more than paid for itself. We have more than doubled our processing output, due in large measure to the efficiency of this machine. We have increased the output from the library office by 36 percent. Some 1,7 volumes were purchased, catalogued, and processed in compared with over 2,7 volumes during this academic year.

31 -5- The LCS terminal in Peabody Library has been a tremendous asset to both students and staff. The one continuing problem with the terminal is that our terminal is not hardwired and we only have dialup access to the computer. Dial-up access limits the amount of time we can use our terminal as it is often impossible to gain entry to the computer because of the limited number of telephone lines available and the great number of people who have dial-up terminals. We are still at the top of the list for the available port, but to date we have had no indication as to when this port will be available. We can only hope it will be soon; with the increased emphasis by the main library on computer access to materials I believe it is important for the residence hall libraries to keep abreast of these developments and to be as much involved as possible. We serve approximately one-third of the students at the University of Illinois and any service we can help provide in this area would be well worth the effort. One other capital improvement needed for the residence hall library system is a new carpet for the Peabody Library. The carpet now in Peabody Library has been repaired and is being cleaned this summer, but a new carpet would add immeasurably to the atmosphere and comfort of Peabody Library. The new carpet for Peabody had been requested for the last several years but we seem no nearer to acquiring this much needed item. V. PERSONNEL AND ADMINISTRATION A. Personnel. 1. Changes in Personnel. A second library clerk was not included in the budget request because of the current financial situation. However, there is still a need to add this position and the hiring of a second fulltime clerk should be looked at again for Professional Activities: Memberships, Offices held, Publications, etc. a. Participation in professional organizations. In June 1981 the librarian plans to attend the American Library Association Annual Conference to be held in San Francisco, California, June 25-July 3. b. Participation in university committees. The residence halls librarian is a member of several committees at the main library: (1) the General Services Council, a representative body of public service librarians, (2) the Library Instruction Committe, an appointive body which initiates and implements library instruction programs for the University Library System, and (3) the Library Assistants Group, a group of Assistant Librarians meeting to discuss new ideas, programs and various problems in the library system.

32 c. Publications (proposed), -6- This year the librarian conducted an ongoing survey in each of the seven residence hall libaries to determine what kinds of materials our patrons were reading. The student librarian was asked to keep track of each book checked out, by use of a tally mark for the general subject area of the material, i.e., 1's, 2's, 3's, etc. Predictably the majority of materials circulated were 8's, which is literature and fiction, with the second largest area being 3's, which includes Social Sciences, Psychology, Law, Education, etc. Results from this survey bear out our thesis that our circulating collection is primarialy for recreational reading and course-related materials. In April 198 the librarian distributed a questionnaire in the seven residence hall libraries and conducted a telephone survey of 2 randomly selected students in the seven undergraduate halls where libraries are located. The questionnaire and the telephone survey were designed to solicit student opinion of our library services, hours and staff, and to determine which reading areas are of most interest to students, to help in purchasing useful materials for the libraries. The questionnaire and survey results should prove very helpful to us in improving our library services and collections. It is also hoped that this material can be written up for publication, thus providing much needed information on college student reading habits to librarians and educators. B. Administration. 1. New procedures and Policies. More LCS terminals are needed for the Residence Hall Library System and our budget request will ask for at least one more terminal for the system. LCS will become more and more important to the Main Library System in the years ahead and to students on this campus. The Residence Hall Library System has an opportunity to provide a unique and valuable service to the students in our halls. We should be looking ahead and begin planning now to provide this valuable service to our patrons and to the University of Illinois Library System. In the policy of hiring only students who live in the halls to work in the libraries was uniformly enforced. This decision has resulted in some increase in our staff turnover rate, mainly because we now lose many of our junior and senior student employees. However, overall I believe this policy to be good for our system. We have experienced a decrease in the number of employees who are late to work, or who don't make it to work because of transportation or other problems. Student employees who live in the halls tend to take a more active interest in the library and also help to promote library services and new materials to other students in the hall.

33 -7-2. Goals and Objectives. Several items have long been on the librarian's list of goals and objectives to be achieved. This year we made great strides in achieving some of these objectives and focusing attention on other objectives which need to be achieved. Short-term goals were achieved with acquisition and operation of the LCS terminal and the expansion of the Gregory Drive Library hours. Long-range goals toward which we are steadily moving include: (A) Improvement of the libraries' physical facilities--the proposed PAR Library move and the inclusion in our budget of funds to improve physical facilities of several other libraries. (B) Continued improvement of the library collections--all libraries have been inventoried and weeded and our library book budget has made it possible for all our library collections to grow and improve. (C) Improvement of attendance and circulation figures-- this year showed an overall improvement in both circulation and attendance figures for the entire library system. The planned physical improvements and the addition of new services in several areas should help to improve circulation and attendance in several specific locations. This year and in years to come we plan to continue our cooperation with the Undergraduate and the Main Library System with a view toward improving library service to undergraduates. We all want the same thing: a library that provides needed materials and patrons who can get to that material. Working together we can achieve these goals. In the years to come I would also like to see the Residence Hall Library System expanded to cover areas not now served. For example, several undergraduate areas do not now have library facilities: i.e., Busey-Evans, the Triad, and the Fourth Street Halls. There are also possibilities for moving into the graduate halls: Sherman, Daniels and most especially Orchard Downs. We have a large unserved population at Orchard Downs with married students, spouses, and children. It would be interesting and very gratifying to serve these people who for too long have been delegated second class status. Exciting things are happening now in Family Housing and the Residence Hall Library System has a place in the development of programs in Family Housing. I am very pleased with the progress we have made this year. The Residence Hall Libraries are obviously a viable and a growing operation. We have achieved a great deal since 1969 when this system was established. We are now twelve years old and going strong. Our possibilities are endless with cable TV now in the halls and all that can and should mean to libraries. Media is a growing part of libraries everywhere and it's time for our residence hall libraries to investigate the possibilities of records, tapes, video, and microforms for

34 our libraries. Computers, too, are a growing part of the library world and we should be involved. I see only good things ahead for us, growing, expanding and providing the best possible service to our students. Respectfully submitted, June 15, 1981 DKW:pf Donna K. Whitner Residence Hall Librarian

35 LIBRARY: ALLEN HALL A. Growth of the Collection: Total withdrawals & books added type of material transfers total cataloged 1, ,93 uncataloged -- O- periodical B. Recorded Use: time period circulation attendance fall semester 242 3,674 spring semester ,183 total ,857 total last year 372 7,58 increase -121 " -723 C. D. E. F. Seating Capacity: 26 Number of Hours Open Weekly: 49 Fines (Lost Book Charges): 2 Personnel 1. Academic positions in budget: 1 2. Non-Academic positions in budget: 1 3. Student positions in budget: 5

36 LIBRARY: FLORIDA AVENUE A. Growth of the Collection: Total withdrawals & books added type of material transfers total cataloged 2, ,37 uncataloged periodical B. Recorded Use: time period circulation attendance fall semester 328 6,214 spring semester 218 4,999 Summer session total ,87 total last year ,12 increase C. D. E. F. Seating Capacity: 61 Number of Hours Open Weekly: 49 Fines (Lost Book Charges): O Personnel 1. Academic positions in budget: 1 2. Non-Academic positions in budget: 1 3. Student positions in budget: 5

37 LIBRARY: GREGORY DRIVE A. Growth of the Collection: Total withdrawals & books added type of material transfers total cataloged ,225 uncataloged periodical B. Recorded Use: time period circulation attendance fall semester 319 3,41 spring semester 227 2,98 total 546 6,381 total last year 332 4,85 increase +214 ' +1,531 C. D. E. F. Seating Capacity: 21 Number of Hours Open Weekly: 41 Fines (Lost Book Charges): 5 Personnel 1. Academic positions in budget: 1 2. Non-Academic positions in budget: 1 3. Student positions in budget: 4

38 LIBRARY: ILLINOIS STREET A. Growth of the Collection: Total withdrawals & books added type of material transfers total cataloged 2, ,317 uncataloged periodical B. Recorded Use: time period circulation attendance fall semester 248 4,777 spring semester 189 4,299 total ,76 total last year 575 9,438 increase -138 * -362 C. Seating Capacity: 38 D. E. F. Number of Hours Open Weekly: 49 Fines (Lost Book Charges): Personnel 1. Academic positions in budget: 1 2. Non-Academic positions in budget: 1 3. Student positions in budget: 5

39 LIBRARY: LINCOLN AVENUE A. Growth of the Collection: B. Recorded Use: time period circulation attendance fall semester 227 2,112 spring semester ,457 total 42 3,569 total last year 462 4,945 increase -6 " -1,376 C.o Seating Capacity: 13 D. E. F. Number of Hours Open Weekly: 41 Fines (Lost Book Charges): 1 Personnel 1. Academic positions in budget: 1 2. Non-Academic positions in budget: 1 3. Student positions in budget: 4

40 LIBRARY: PEABODY DRIVE A. Growth of the Collection: Total withdrawals & books added type of material transfers total cataloged 6, uncataloged... periodical B. Recorded Use: time period circulation attendance fall semester 941 2,942 spring semester ,11 total - 1,687 35,43 total last year 1,355 33,179 increase ,864 C.o Seating Capacity: 12 D. E. F. Number of Hours Open Weekly: 71 Fines (Lost Book Charges): 8 Personnel 1. Academic positions in budget: 1 2. Non-Academic positions in budget:1 3. Student positions in budget:7

41 LIBRARY: PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE A. Growth of the Collection: Total withdrawals & books added type of material transfers total cataloged 2, ,671 uncataloged periodical B. Recorded Use: time period circulation attendance fall semester 14 5,514 spring semester 77 4,477 total 217 9,991 total last year 181 1,2 increase +36 * -11 C.o Seating Capacity: 172 D. E. F. Number of Hours Open Weekly: 31 Fines (Lost Book Charges): Personnel 1. Academic positions in budget:1 2. Non-Academic positions in budget: 1 3. Student positions in budget: 3

42 LIBRARY: SYSTEM A. Growth of the Collection: Total withdrawals & books added type of material transfers total cataloged 17, ,35 19,413 uncataloged periodical B. Recorded Use: time period circulation attendance fall semester 2,445 46,634 spring semester, 1,883 35,496 total 4, 35 82,724 total last year 3,775 81,114 increase ,61 C.o Seating Capacity: 451 D. E. F. Number of Hours Open Weekly: 331 Fines (Lost Book Charges): 16 Personnel 1. Academic positions in budget: 1 2. Non-Academic positions in budget: 1 3. Student positions in budget: 36

43 University of iinois at Urbana-Champaign UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Urbana, Illinois 6181 April 24, 1981 TO: FROM: Helen.Ellison Donna K. Whitner da/ RE: Residence Hall Libraries renovations. As you know I scheduled a tour of the libraries with Bob Fonner. in order to point out problem areas in each library and to elicit his suggestions for improvements and the price of these improvements. I would now like to share with you our findings. Allen Hall Library Allen Library has filled all existing shelving units in the library. The possibility of either relocating or expanding the present library are extremely remote. Consequently we explored the possibilities of adding more shelving units to the present location with a minimal loss of seating capacity. We anticipate that we can add an additional three shelving units to the library, which should give us adequate shelf space for three or four years, with minimal loss of seating space, the shelving to match the existing units of the library. Bob Fonner has quoted a price of $2, to add the shelving we will need at Allen Hall. Florida Avenue Library The shelving problem at FAR has been solved by the FAR maintenance crew. The lower doors on the bookcases have been removed, thus giving us additional book shelving space and decreasing the amount of storage space we have in the library. The rearrangement of the existing furniture in the library has adequately solved our problems at FAR for the moment. Gregory Drive Library Gregory Library, our newest library, is the one with the fewest shelving and space problems as we are still building a collection at Gregory. One item of furniture at Gregory, however, was not purchased at the time the library was opened. This was a magazine shelf unit. We need such a unit to display current manazines and provide storage space for older magazines. We have such a unit at FAR, ISR, and Peabody. Bob Fonner has stated that Housing can construct such a unit, wnod to match existing units, at a cost of $1,. However, we can purchase a periodical storage unit for approximately $6 from one of the library supply companies and we should also be able to adoquately match the woods to the units we already have at Gregory.

44 University of Illinois at Urbana-.Champaign UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Urbana, Illinois Illinois Street Library ISR is experiencing the same shortage of shelving space as Allen; however ISR Library has more room space than Allen and so our problems may be more easily solved. Bob and I both agree that shelving can be constructed along the west glass wall. This shelving would be approximately chest high with backing so that the view through the glass wall would be attractive. This unit would run from the north to the south wall and would give us the additional shlelf space we need in ISR Library so that our collection there would continue to grow and to improve. Bob Fonner has quoted me a price of $2, to make these necessary improvements at ISR. Lincoln Avenue Library LAR has the same problem as Allen Library in that we are short of shelving units and also short of room space. However, we believe there is a way to add an additional four book cabinets to this library with a minimal loss of seating capacity. It is important that the additional units at both Allen and LAR do not minimize seating capacity any more than necessary as both libraries presently seat less than 25 people. We believe we can add two book cabinets to the south wall, one on the west wall and one on the north wall, giving us a necessary four cabinet increase with the loss of only two chairs. The book cabinets would be built by Housing because they originally built the cases we now have at LAR. Bob Fonner quoted me a price of $4, for the addition of these cabinets. The price is expensive but the benefits would be more than worthwhile in terms of improving library service at LAR. Pennsylvania Avenue Library The best solutionto any problems at PAR would be to move the library facility out of the cafeteria. Working around the meal schedule has caused a decrease of service to students at PAR that students in other halls now enjoy, such as afternoon hours; and the absence of a lockable facility has prevented our offering other library services to students. We need a more secure facility for our library collection at PAR. Failing to achieve that goal, our most pressing problem at PAR is the need for a card catalog. The card unit we have been using at PAR is woefully inadequate and has been for some time. Bob feels that it would be possible for Housing to build a free-standing card catalog unit that would be lockable. We really have no place to put a card catalog unit, of sufficient size, anywhere at PAR. A lockable unit seems to be our only alternative until such time as we can move our whole library facility. The price. Bob has quoted for the building of this unit is $4.

45 uiiveily of Silinois at uroana-unlampaign UNIVERSITY LIBRARY Urbana, Illinois Peabody Drive Library Peabody, as our oldest and largest fadility, still has ample shelving units and space for expansion when and if it is needed. Any difficulties we have here can be solved by rearranging books and shelves as necessary. The conclusion then is that we need additional shelving and rearranging at six of our seven libraries. Some of our problems are more pressing than others. The situation at Allen and LAR has already become critical and some move to alleviate the situation must be made immediately. The PAR card catalog problem is also one that needs immediate attention. The shelf unit for Gregory is also an important purchase but I believe we have sufficient funds to purchase the necessary unit already in our budget, and can purchase the unit before the end of this fiscal year and have it in the library for next fall. ISR needs to be taken care of as soon as possible but is not as pressing as the problem at Allen and LAR. Total cost of necessary improvements for the libraries mentioned will be approximately $1,. A substantial sum of money, but well worth it to maintain the excellent level of service that the Residence Hall Library System has achieved. Adequate shelving, adequate seating capacity, and a congenial atmosphere are all as important to a library as a good and up-to-date book collection. We need to begin correcting our problems now, the most serious ones immediately and the others before they become serious problems. I have tried to present our problems and proposed solutions as clearly and succintly as possible. I would appreciate the opportunity to discuss these proposals with you so that we can begin to make definite plans for implementation as soon as possible. DKW: pf

46 ESTIMATE.Construction of new Library in existing PAR vending room Purchase Remove soffit Remove bumpers Remove water service Remove electrical raceways Upgrade lighting to 5 FT. C. Install new carpeting Paint walls Install alarm on west door Install clock outlet and clock Install telephone outlet and install: 69 linear feet of 36" x 82" shelving with 6 shelves 1 periodical shelf unit 1 1-tray card catalog unit 1 high leg base 3-42"h. x 36" shelf units 8-48" round tables Sub Total 2% Contingency Total $ ,. 2, , ,228. 1,56. 2,11.2 $12,67.2 Provide from storage: 32 chairs 1 desk and chair 4 lamps 2 sofas

47 AGRICULTURE LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 I. Implementation of Identified Priorities: 1. Cooperative funding between the Library and the College of Agriculture was secured for major remodeling of the Agriculture Library's circulation area. The new desk became functional as a circulation and reserve desk by the end of January 1981, and the support staff moved into their new office and work space by mid-february. As planned, clerical time is more effectively and efficiently used with their desk and work area adjacent to the circulation and reserve area. Patron traffic patterns are also more logical. And the professionals' office is obvious from the new entryway; therefore, Nancy and I are more readily accessible to users. A planned bookdrop and shipping and receiving area had to be stalled due to budgetary constraints. Once completed, the users' traffic patterns and the staffs' work flow patterns should even be more logical and efficient. 2. A number of clerical tasks have been re-assigned this year, mostly downward with some horizontal movement. A number of professional tasks have also been re-aligned between Nancy and myself. All work assignments continue to be studied for re-organizational possibilities. 3. Careful and methodical scrutiny during FY 8/81 of the materials acquisition budgets (Monographs, Continuations, Periodicals) resulted in my shifting current monies within the three funds and being able to more effectively allocate new money for FY 81/82. II. Current Issues, Opportunities and Needs: 1. The Agriculture Library needs at least one additional terminal (probably a CRT) to use for public access to LCS. Once the catalog is online, we will be needing a number of additional terminals. Space needs for an expanding terminal population were included in our remodeling. 2. Current plans within the College of Agriculture include expanding the number of PLATO terminals available. I am interested in locating at least some of these new terminals, if purchased, in the Agriculture Library. III. Priorities for FY 81/82: 1. Secure funding, approximately $1, to complete the remodeling of the circulation area. This involves primarily construction of a new bookdrop and a shipping & receiving area. 2. Continue to review job assignments to more effectively use available staff.

48 AGRICULTURE LIBRARY Annual Report FY 8/81 page 2 III. Priorities for FY 81/81: (con't) 3. Continue to review the budget allocations (student wages as well as acquisition funds) to most effectively use these limited resources, and to build a case to secure additional serial funds for FY 82/ Working with the College's Faculty Library Committee, I plan to have at least some of any new PLATO terminals acquired by the College installed in the Agriculture Library. IV. Statistics Review: The Agriculture Library provided 159 online bibliographic searches for 124 individuals during FY 8/81. This does not include the substantial number of searchoffs done in conjunction with these searches. We also had 5 SDI for 2 individuals throughout the year. Nineteen searches were charged to individual or student accounts; the remainder were charged to university accounts. In addition, Nancy and I gave 22 demonstration searches to individual faculty members, graduate seminars and undergraduate classes; these were paid for with funds provided by the College of Agriculture (funding which has been increased for FY 81/82). Total circulation figures are down because: Remodeling eliminated the need to charge materials for photocopying. Space for photocopy machines was included in the remodeling plans and two Savin 775 machines are now located inside the Agriculture Library. Binding was curtailed due to budgetary constraints. Reserve circulation increased by 5597 in FY 79/8, and decreased this year by 5414 to the norm of 2 to 21 per fiscal year. Frankly, I feel an error was made last year (FY 79/8) in collecting reserve statistics. In the early Spring, the Agriculture Library changed its loan period from 3 weeks to 16-4 weeks resulting in fewer renewals. Student and IRR circulation figures continued to increase this year, despite all the above factors. I feel next year's statistics, after a full year of operation in the remodeled area, will more accurately reflect use of the Agriculture Library's collection. Agriculture Librarian

49 STATISTICAL SUMMARY AGR I CULTURE FY 8/81 Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO " SUBTRACT w TYPE LAST z v TOTAL of YEAR'S AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL <: JUNE 3 79/8-198 CATALOGED VOLUMES UNCATALOGED VOLUMES PAMPHLETS MICROFILM MICROCARDS, MICROPRINTh MICROFICHEE ''$ - = ;.... " ' - " ' * - ' PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONTI NUATION1 6 TITLES TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES Neture of Items Included Verticel file Items. Report Report Vacant Refers )XXx ID-W. - iý.-.4.m 4" 1. a*. - I I -M es uncetaloged volumes. the number of reels. the number of Individual cards. tpaccs are for slide5s filmstripe, maps5 disks, etc. to titles currently chocked in, including duplicates i

50 II. Recorded Use AGRICULTURE FY 8/81 Library SLCS/ Fac/ IPermit Special Reserve Nonprint Month Man'l Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ July 8 Man' , LCS/ August Man'l LCS/ September Man' LCS/ October Man' LCS/ November Man'1i LCS/ December Man' LCS/ January' 8 1 Man' l LCS February Man' LCS March Man'l _ LCS ::: :. :. ;'. April Man'l LCS May Man' LCS T June Man' FY 8 / 8 1 LCS Totals Man' _ Grand Total8/ FY 79/8 LCS , _ Last Years Man Increase/ LCS Decrease Man' Toal Totals

51 III. Other Information AGRICULTURE FY 8/81 Library A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables q9 2. Carrel seats Lounge chairs B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving 1185 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 4 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 2 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 2 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 69 b. Spring 74 c. Summer Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic John W. Beecher, Agriculture Librarian (Aug. 21, 1973 to date) Nancy Davis, Assistant Agriculture Librarian (Sept to date) b. Nonacademic Teresa Mueller, Library Clerk III, full-time (Aug 1977 to date) Elizabeth Baniassadi, Library Clerk II, half-time (Jan 18, 1971 to date) Maedra Kellman, Library Clerk II, half-time (July 1975 to August 198) Josephine F. Moeller, Library Clerk II, half-time (August 9, 198 to date)

52 AGRICULTURE LIBRARY Annual Report Appendix A THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE FACULTY LIBRARY COMMITTEE--FY 8/81 Joseph Tobias--Chair and Executive Committee Member (Professor, Dairy Technology) Donnell Hunt (Professor, Agricultural Engineering) Larry O'Reilley (Professor, Foods and Nutrition) Student Representatives Lori Pierce--Agriculture Council Debra Shertz--School of Human Resources and Family Studies EXHIBITS Appendix B August 18, A is for Apple October Trees of North America December Christmas Cardinals January 12, Birds at the Feeder March Tulips April Food Problems in Africa April Book of White Flowers June Poor Misunderstood Garlic

53 APPLIED LIFE STUDIES LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 GENERAL Three basic changes marked the year: 1) Retirement in September of M. Jean Lokke, ALS Librarian since 1965, and appointment in February of a new ALS Librarian. 2) UIUC Library Public Services reorganization in April, with realignment of ALS from the Social Sciences to the Life Sciences Council. 3) Extensive curricular and course revisions, graduate and undergraduate, within the College of ALS; major implementation to occur in fall Results of these changes should be reflected in future annual reports. COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT AND USE $15. supplemental book monies was granted ALS from the University Librarian's fund in March. The action revived ALS collection development which had been suspended--overexpended in all major categories--by fall 198. Increased allocation has been given ALS for FY81-82 and will be carefully handled. Its sufficiency for an evolving ALS literature and changing College curricula is currently indeterminable. Collection use for the year has kept easy pace--final circulation figures should show increase--with both and ' However, in '81-82 a significant statistical--but not actual materials usedecrease is expected: in May a photocopy machine was installed by ALS, and in June "table top" count of materials was discarded. Approximately 6% of all loans continue to be course-related, reserve materials. ADMINISTRATION FY81-82 priorities include: 1) Shelf space. a) Reserve collection will be weeded, then theses and reserves consolidated, freeing 36 shelves for the overcrowded book collection; entire book collection to be shifted, b) Periodicals, bound and unbound, overcrowding will be relieved-and the attractive appearance of the library preserved--by utilizing two double section, wood stacks from the library office. Accomplishment, however, requires replacement of the office units; storagetype metal shelving adequate.

54 -2-2) Periodical control. Check-in form and procedures, as well as follow-up routines-revised by ALS in April '81-will be implemented, integrated with Faxon direct-receipt procedures, and evaluated. 3) Continuation control. Revised check-in forms and follow-up routines will be devised and implemented. 4) University of Oregon, College of Health, Physical Education and Recreation Microform Publications [35-4 microfiche, with accompanying main-entry catalog card, received each year]. Although updated procedures for processing ALS added entry/shelflist cards were initiated in May '81, this collection-now over 11, items--has never been integrated into central UIUC holdings records or LCS; will be investigated. 5) Dictionary Catalog of the Applied Life Studies Library, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Boston, G.K. Hall, 1977). Filming at ALS of a five-year supplement has been scheduled for mid-july '81, with G.K. Hall publication expected late '81-early '82. 6) Staffing. a) Civil Service reclassification for the ALS clerk position (from Clerk II to Clerk III); action was requested and necessary papers processed in June '81. b) Relationship ALS student staffing/wages/library hours/library services will be examined (in conjunction with a Life Sciences Council project). PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES The UIUC-sponsored Third International Symposium on the Effective Teaching of Racquet Sports, June 1-13, 198, was attended for the purpose of acquainting the "new ALS Librarian" with the theory, research, and methodology of sport science as practically applied to a specific field. On the immediate horizon for FY81-82 is attendance at ACRL's 2d National Conference, Minneapolis, in early October.

55 STATISTICAL SUMMARY ALT. Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT w TYPE LAST Wn z tn 5 " TOTAL of YEAR'S AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL - n - w JUNE 3 z z o CATALOGED VOLUMES VOLUMS 18, ,467 UNCATALOGED 1 VOLUMES 3, PAMPHLETS 2 3, ,526 MICROFILM MI CROCARDS4 wxx 1, ,536 MICROPR I NT 1 MICROFIOCE 3, ,513 DISCS _...1 I PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONTI NUATIONW 6 TITLES Flo.... d TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES t L. xxx S22!. Nature of items Included as uncetaloged volumes. special collections (2) o. 2. VertIcal file Items. article reprints (separately, Report the number of reools, organized/indexed). Report the number of Individual cards. 5. Vacant pacca are for elides, filmstripa, rmaps, disks, etc. 6. Refers to titloes currently checked in, including duplicatos

56 ALS Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats 4 3. Lounge chairs 6 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library 5, Linear feet of shelving 2, ft. in Avery brundaqe Room C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 6 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals I 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants - 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics. 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 65 b. Spring 65 c. Summer Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Jane Armstrong (Feb. 16, 1981+) b. Nonacademic Pattie Greenwood (Oct. 16, 1977+) Nila Jefford (Oct.8, 1979+)

57 RICKER LIBRARY CF ARCHITECTURE & ART ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 I. PRIORITIES IDENTIFIED FOR 198/81 Provide the very best reference service possible with full use made of resources. This is a major concern at Ricker Library and all staff members are involved. Support staff members are given basic training in interpreting the index information for users and in use of some standard encyclopedia and biographical materials. The graduate assistants were given both the opportunity and training to enable them to quickly become familiar with techniques of helping patrons in refining their needs. Referrals to other locations are made if necessary, and both telephone and mail reference queries are answered. Increase awareness and use of the collection by publicizing holding newly received via the selected acquisitions lists prepared at Ricker Library. An updated Periodica2s List was typed on mimeograph stencils which were produced with the help of the Department of Architecture. This listing was widely distributed and is much appreciated by the clientele of Ricker Library. Because of the space restrictions, specialized holdings such as "last ten years", "last five years', or "current issues only" are necessary. The Periodicals List includes such notations and also includes call numbers for titles which must be used at M1iain Library stacks. Improve catalogue maintenance by concentrated efforts to file cards as received and accurately identify in-house locations on the shelflist and main entry cards. Workfile maintenance has been kept up to date and special new ID numbers make it possible to utilize shelving in the workroom area. Some "M set" records are still in process and will be a target for the coming year. II. IMPCRTANT ACCCMPLISHMENTS CF THE PAST YEAR In addition to the above there have been some other major gains. These includes Acquisition of Materialss Delivery of books according to the profiles established with Blackwell North American and Elackwell of England began in the fall of 198. Ricker Library was one of the six trial libraries using forms during the previous year. Receiving the actual volumes is a distinct advantage as the quality of reproductions, general format, and possible usefulness for the varied clientele can be judged better. (The only problem

58 2. encountered--the rising costs of books:) Forms are still received for many titles and this has the added benefit of reducing the amount of order preparation at Ricker. Reference Area Crganizations The two graduate assistants and other staff members re-organized.,the reference area when additional snelving became available. Cases have been numbered ard shelflist cards marked so that finding wanted books is simplified. Student assistants worked with the staff in accomplishing this improvement. Vertical File: Cne of the graduate assistants analyzed, sorted, discarded, and condensed the vertical file materials. Criteria were established based on usefulness of material found, availability in other resources, and condition of pieces. Cver 1, items were discarded during the year. Further work on the file is planned with even greater reduction of useless records. This will result in making more space available for the growing Exhibition Catalogue File which is a valued service. Catalogues Raisonn s Listt The second graduate assistant, who has a background in art history, was asked to begin this list of Ricker holdings of these special resources. As catalogues raisonnes are essential to in-depth study of an artist's work, the printed list should prove very useful to faculty and graduate students of art history. Lost Book Problems: Many old charges, problem transfers of long years standing, and inaccurrate records were cleared by one of the support staff working both at Ricker and in the Main Library stacks. tatrons using LCS will now be able to identify location more accurately. NAAB Visits Preparations for the National Architectural Accrediting Board visit in March, 1981 included the updating of the Ricker Library information handout, straight shelves, and new,attractive signage. The visiting team was given a special tour of the library and seemed pleased with the resources and services available. A brief demonstration of LCS was also presented during the scheduled library visit with the many advantages of the whole UIUC Library system explained. III. 1RIORITIES FCR THE C(IING YEAR Continue to emphasize service to our clientele. Continue analysis of procedures with a view toward stream-lin -ng operations. Re-activate the picture file holdings. Continue to evaluate the collection by checking holdings against major bibliographies. Explore the possibilities of additional library space. Dee Wallace July 15, 1981

59 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Architecture & Art 198/81 Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT..... ^ _.. _}... l_ TO T TYPE LAST > z vu 5 TOTAL of YEAR'S AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL - JUaE53 CATALOGED VOLUMES 42, ,417 UNCATALOGED 1 VOLUMES PAMPHLETS HIST. *FPRES FIP E EX.CAT. FLE MICROFILM 2xx MI CROCARD S Xxx MICROPR INT 4 MICROFICx PHCTCGRAIIH 32,65 32,65 CLIIFINGS DISKS TAFES PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONT I NUATION 6 TITLES TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES I I -96ý ý W".-.a W.P.- +5 S._o :_ Nature of Items Included as unceteloged volumes. Vert cal file items. Report the number of roels. Report the number of Individual cerds. Vacant spaces arc for elides, filmstripe, mnps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicatoes. 1I I

60 II. Recorded Use Architecture & Art 198/81 Library LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve- Nonprint Month Man'1 Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ July Man'l LCS/ August Man' LCS/ September Man'l LCS/ October Man' LCS/ November Man' LCS/ December Man' LCS/ January Man' LCS February Man' LCS March Man' LCS April Man' LCS May Man' LCS June Man' LCS , Totals Man' Grand Total , , LCS , Last Year Man' Increase/ LCS Decrease Man'

61 III. Other Information Architecture & Art 198/81 Library A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables 2. Carrel seats 5 3. Lounge chairs 7 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving 3992 (includes 698 folio type) C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 58 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 1 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 1 (2 at.5) 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics g- 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 7 b. Spring 7 c. Summer 2 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Dee Wallace Ann Benjamin (Graduate Assistant - August 21, ) Joan Irby (Graduate Assistant - August 21, 198 -August2, 1981) b. Nonacademic Ellen Foran (February 23, ) Margaret Helms ( August 21, ) Holly Nearing (May 19, ) Judy Husband (September 25, June 5, 1981) Debra Raney ( September 23, January 14, 1981)

62 BIOLOGY LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, Priorities identified in last year's report: a) The highest priority was given to maintaining library services during the Biology Librarian's sabbatical. This priority was met in exemplary fashion without the addition of help for the Biology Library staff. All of the staff, led by the Assistant Librarian, responded to the absence of the Biology Librarian by accepting increased workloads and responsibilities during a difficult period of retrenchment and reorganization of everytidng from technical processes to Public Services. Journal selection and acquisition was kept to a minimum because of the lack of additional staff; because most of the monographic funds were spent by January, 1981, book ordering was not actively pursued, either. b) The second highest priority was to expand the instructional activities with major emphasis placed on recruitment and education of new library users. This priority was met by early identification of new School of Life Sciences (SOLS) faculty members and by compiling and distributing to them a library packet containing printed handouts about the Biology Library, its services, instructional sessions, computerized literature search facilities, etc. The librarians will continue this practice this year and will be able to integrate part of their instructional activities with Professor David L. Nanney's Biology 285 course, "Scientific Writing." c) The third priority, reference services, did not fare as well. We had hoped to establish a regularly staffed reference desk based on the expectation of declining selection responsibilities because of the approval plan, and on the addition of graduate student help during the spring semester. As it turned out, the approval plan required more attention to detail since basically two selection plans had to be monitored; without additional help the staff was able to maintain services, but certainly not expand them. Computerized literature search services were maintained and did increase (see item 2c in this report) even in the absence of one searcher during the spring semester. Based on thee experiences, we are not as optimistic about expanding reference services as we were last year, but we are committed to trying again (see item 3c in this report). 2. Important accomplishments of the past year: a. Rapport: The Biology Library continued to enjoy an excellent relationship with the School of Life Sciences. Tape playback units were installed in the reading room in a permanent, efficient, and attractive fashion through the courtesy of SOLS. Library Advisory Committee meetings were held each semester and the response of the

63 Committee, and of their departments, was extremely helpful and supportive during the current budget difficulties. b) Transfers and withdrawals: The Biology Library was able to transfer or withdraw 1,238 volumes from its collection, a 217% increase over 1979/8. These activities greatly eased our space problems. c) Computer literature searches: There was a 14% increase in computer literature searches and a.9% increase in reference activity using computerized databases. The Biology Library obtained a Lockeed/ DIALOG password to better serve its interdisciplinary users, and the librarians attended workshops on Lockeed/DIALOG, BIOSIS Previews advanced training, Excerpta Medica and Chemical Abstracts. d) Efttries on monograph, periodical, and continuation printouts were clarified and cleaned up. Much of this tedious, time-consuming and important work was left to the Assistant Librarian during the spring semester. Approximately $3, was recovered from the monograph fund from deletions and cancellations. e) With the advice of the SOLS Library Committee, a concerted effort was made to cancel secondary literature titles available online, and primary periodical literature deemed unnecessary because of quality, availability, scope, or language. These cancellations released $5,89.81 for serial purchase in 198/81 plus $279.85, pending for use during the next fiscal year. The library continues to purchase new serial titles as recommended by faculty and students that will keep the collection active, up-to-date, and consistent with the instructional and research interests of the University of Illinois. 3. New priorities for the coming year: a) Highest priority will be given to maintaining library services during the Assistant Librarian's sabbatical in the spring. b) High priority will be given to examing and evaluating the workload and responsibilities of all Biology Library staff. During the coming year, one of the two half-time Library Clerk II positions will be eliminated when the incumbent resigns. At that time it will be necessary to find a solution to maintaining essential functions and services without exploiting the remaining staff members. c) The'reference desk idea is still viable and we will take positive steps toward this goal. We will experiment with times and locations, keep use records, and try to implement reference service that will both free the circulation desk person from reference activity, and will benefit users in a direct way. We are hopeful that a resurgence of reference activity is possible this fall due to workload readjustment which took place during the Biology Librarian's sabbatical. Additionally, we also expect the monograph approval plan to save some staff time and a decrease in library committee responsibilities should allow librarians more time for reference services.

64 STATISTICAL SUMMARY... i] niay1 gy -- Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT..W-. TYPE LAST v TOTAL of YEAR'S 5 AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL < - / JUNE 3 x p z CATALOGED VOLUMES 11, ,56 UNCATALOGED VOLUMES PAMPHLETS MICROFILM MICROCARDS4 389 xx x 389 MICROPRINT LICROFIC1S RECORD (Disc) 6 6 Audio Tapes 2 2 PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONTI NUATIO 6 TITLES 61.5 I XX)C IxXX X)(X TOTAL SERIAL6 TITLES 258 xxx I, Noture of Items Included as unceteloged volumes. Computerized Literature VertIcal file Items. Search Guides Report the number of rools. Report the number of Individual cards. Vacant spaces arc for lides, filmstrip-, mnps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates.

65 Biology Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Month Man'1 LCS/ July... Man' 1 LCS/ August Man'1 LCS/ September Man'l LCS/ October Man'1 LCS/ November Man'1 '- LCS/ December Man ' 1 LCS/ January Man'1 LCS February Man'1 LCS March Man' l LCS April Man'1 LCS May Man' l LCS June Man'1 LCS Totals Man'1 Grand Total LCS Last Year Mn Increase/ LCS Decrease Man'1 Fac/ Staff ,435 6,254 2, Student ,513b 17,8 5,983 +3, Permit C/Card , r1, IRR 196-2m ,769 3,52 2, Special Charges , ,359 3,18 2, Reserve - Materials ,253 38,253 36,463 +1,79 Nonprint Materials..... Total= AnC7 rn /- r- Is 1% *1 37

66 Biology oa Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables 2. Carrel seats Lounge chairs 6 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library 2. Linear feet of shelving 17,92 C. Number of 1. Fall 2. Spring 3. Summer D. Personnel hours open weekly 93 (not including interim) 93 (not including interim) 68 (not including interim) (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number* F.T.E. Professionals 7 2. Number* F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number* F.T.E. Nonacademics A 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 79 (not including interim) b. Spring 79 (not including interim) c. Summer 2 (not including interim) 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Elisabeth B. Davis Mitsuko Williams T - b. Nonacademic 1. Mary A. Collins 12/19/68-2. Susan L. Phillips 5/31/77-3. Wendy Krejsa 1/15/79-4. Michael S. Krejsa 6/19/8-9/27/8 5. Ruby Jahr 6/14/8-6. Richard Wagner 1/5/81-

67 I. Accomplishments Chemistry Library ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 A. The remodelling and expansion project has been completed This has been the primary goal for the Chemistry Library for the past several years. It added square feet of shelving and brought our seating capacity to 8. B. The Weeding Project which accompanied the remodelling project is also complete. We estimate that both projects have provided space for three to five years of collection growth. C. Rearrangement of the second floor (main level) was the third part of Chemistry's reorganization. Circulation and other noisy functions such as photocopying, were moved into the south room of the main level. Together with the two projects above, we feel this has made the Chemistry Library a much more pleasant and functional facility to use. D. Improvement of public services. i. A reference desk has been established in an attempt to improve the visibility of reference services in this library. It is placed in the quick reference section of the library and is to be staffed during the busiest times of the day. ii. A new Guide to the Chemistry Library was completed and is particularly valuable because of the great number of changes that have been made. iii. Online searching has almost doubled over last year (38 vs. 19). Table 1 shows the different databases searched by status of the users. The statistics reflect a 57.8% increase in use by Graduate students and a 69% increase by faculty members.

68 -2- TABLE 1 Databases Searched Databases Undergraduates Graduates Faculty Other AGRICOLA BIOSIS CHEM COMPENDEX CROS ERIC INSPEC MEDLARS METADEX NTIS PREMED SCISEARCH TOTAL Most of the online bibliographic searching was again done for persons affiliated with the School of Chemical Sciences. Table 2 shows that in addition to these there is a growing clientele of persons with other affiliations. TABLE 2 Departmental Affiliations of Users Department Faculty Graduates Under Others graduates Agricultural 2 Engineering Agronomy Anderson Physics Lab Ceramics Eng 1 - Chemistry Civil EngineerL-ng 4 6 Coordinated Sci. Lab 1 Economics 1 - Food Sciences Horticulture Life Sciences 3 - Materials Research Lab 1 3 Metallurgy Microbiology 3 - Physics 2.1 Plant Pathology 1 -

69 -3- II. Major issues and opportunities at the present. A. Aquisition of a public access LCS terminal for our first floor level; a microfilm reader printer for our cartridge microfilm (at present there is not one on campus); a microfiche reader printer to improve the library's service to patrons. B. Establish a regular weeding policy to insure space for new acquisitions and constantly expanding serials such as Chemical Abstracts. C. Initiate a more formal program of staff development for nonacademic personnel in hopes that it will cut down on the turn over of these people. The library has been understaffed most of the past year due to turn over. D. Continue to work with faculty to cancel some little used journals to enable us to subscribe to new journal titles. E. Further improve the reference function of the library including bibliographic instruction and online search service F. Improve public relations with the faculty. III. Highest priorities for coming year. A. Continueing to improve the reference services offered is the highest priority for the coming year. With the Chemistry Librarian on sabbatical for six months it was not possible to man the reference desk with any regularity. In the coming year we will man the desk at peak times during the day. We also plan to expand our online search service with more advertisement to faculty and graduate students and to perhaps expand our access to include a new Vendor-Systems Development Corporation. B. In the past year staff development has progressed to include regular staff meetings to encourage communication. A procedure manual was completed to help train nonacademics personnel. Further steps such as self-instruction programs are needed to continue progress in this area. C. With the physical reorganization of the library complete we need to look to the future. Even with a well coordinated weeding project space will be a problem in the relatively near future. Money also will be a major question. Members of the Physical Sciences and Engineering Council need to work together to develop a comprehensive acquisitions policy so that what money there is will be used most effectively. D. Improve public relations with the faculty and students of the school.

70 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Chemistry Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT u TYPE LAST z TOTAL of YEAR'S AS OF MTER I AL TOTAL t. W JUNE 3! z z o CATALOGED VOLUMES 48, ,828* UNCATALOGED VOLUMES PAMPHLETS MICROFILM MICROCARDS 4 MICROPRINT 4 - HIGROFICHE _-_ - 1 *We feel that between 68, - 7, the collection. PERIODICAL 6 TITLES 636 I I -r volumes more accurately describes I CONTI NUAT ION 6 TITLES TOTAL SERIAL6 TITLES I ,35 L..., +2 1,37 Neture of Items Included es unceteloged volumes, online bibliographic Vertlcel file Items. search tools Report the number of reels. Report the number of Individual cards. Vacant spaccs are for alides, filmstripes maps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates.

71 Chemistry Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve - Nonprint Month Man'l Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ July Man'l LCS/ August Man'l LCS/ September Man'l LCS/ October Man' LCS/ November Man'l LCS/ December Man'l LCS/ January Man'I LCS February Man' LCS March Man' LCS April Man'l LCS May Man'l LCS June Man'l LCS *136 *973 - *429 *5638 * -* Totals Man'l Grand Total LCS Last. Year an' In c Increase r e a s e!. LCS Decrease Man'l *LCS Terminal out of commission almost two months - end of December to early February. Most of 3 level course moved to Undergraduate Library so this number more represents a jump rather than a loss than likely

72 Chemistry Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats 32 (individual tables not carrels) 3. Lounge chairs 6 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library 6, Linear feet of shelving 7292 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Interim periods Spring 16, 3. Summer 16 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 2 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 3 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 5 b. Spring 5 c. Summer 5 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Lucille M. Wert, Aug. 21, Susanne Redalje, March 1, b. Nonacademic Barbara Blanchard, Library Clerk III, Aug. 6, Nov. 22, 198 Library Technical Asst. I Nov. 23, David Ahola, Feb. 25, May 3, 1981 Anita Hayes, Aug. 3, April 17, 1981 Brenda Shannon, June 15,

73 CITY PLANNING AND LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 I. Implementation of priorities identified in last year's report. A. Staff. The need for a full-time librarian was met by the appointment of Mary D. Ravenhall.in January, No action was taken on the suggestion that some student hours be shifted to a clerical position. The library's one clerical position was upgraded, however, from Library Clerk III to Library Technical Assistant I in September, 198, thus assuring increased stability and expertise on the part of support staff. B. Space. The use of remote storage for materials in the main library stacks made possible the transfer of 356 volumes. An additional 91 volumes were identified as unnecessary duplicates and withdrawn, as were 112 missing volumes. These measures provided temporary relief for the library's chronic problem with inadequate shelf space. The need for improved office space was alleviated by the generosity of the Landscape Architecture Department which provided an office for the librarian with direct access to the stack and reading areas. An outter office now houses a Savin copier, a microfiche reader, and four carrels for student use. C. Acquisition policy. Due to the mid-year change in professional staff, no action has been taken on the refinement of acquisition policy. II. Important accomplishments of the year. A. The reorganization of office space described above, the result of an informal agreement between the librarian and the head of the Landscape Architecture Department, stands as the major accomplishment of the year. The librarian is now more accessible to students, faculty, and staff; library patrons have copying facilities near at hand, eliminationg the need to charge out materials for duplication; four much needed study spaces have been added. B. Care of the collection. Aninventory completed in August, 198, identified a substantial number of missing volumes (approximately 26). As an aid to familiarizing herself with the collection the new librarian participated in a follow-up inventory in June, Titles missing for a year will now be considered for replacement or withdrawal. The inventory process was accompanied by a partial weeding of the collection, freeing space for new acquisitions.

74 The librarian has begun a project to weed and reorganize the vertical file. At present much of the pamphlet collection is located in a corridor outside the library, where it is neither secure nor accessible. By eliminating outdated and/or duplicate items, the librarian hopes to reduce the collection to half its present size, house it entirely inside the library, and provide better access through the use of updated subject headings. To date 14 items have been removed from the files, but much remains to be done. A locked case ordered in 198 arrived and now provides increased security for rare and expensive titles. Two new sections (3 drawers) were added to the card catalog. This should provide adequate filing space until the on-line catalog becomes available. C. Service. A revised and expanded list of serials received was compiled and circulated to faculty members, who used this opportunity to increase their requests for copies of contents pages. A bi-monthly new books list continued to be issued. Through the joint efforts of the librarian and Landscape Architecture faculty, funds were obtained for adding non-print material to the library's Media Center. III. Priorities for the coming year. A. Acquisition policy. Under the new system of budgeting instituted in 198/81 it became-clear that the CPLA Library monograph budget was no longer adequate. Both Urban Planning and Landscape Architecture have become highly interdisciplinary fields, whose interests overlap with departments served by the Education, Commerce, Engineering, Agriculture, Architecture, and Map Libraries. At a time of shrinking funds and expanding interests it becomes imperative that the City Planning librarian work with her colleagues to avoid both gaps in the collection and unnecessary duplication. Cooperation inidefining acquisition policy will be the librarian's highest priority for B. Space. Inadequate shelving continues to be a problem, forcing the premature transfer of materials. Since any improvement in the situation seems to involve relocation of the library in some building other than Mumford Hall, the librarian intends to maintain close contact with the departments served and cooperate with any efforts they may make to obtain new and better housing for themselves and their library. Librarian

75 STATISTICAL SUMMARY CPLA Library wwo Pam... F TYPE of MATER I AL LAST YEAR'S TOTAL I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO eff L3V/) SUBTRACT I V) 2: a TOTAL AS OF JUNE 3 CATALOGED VOLUMES UNCATALOGED VOLUMES 19.R38 13 PAMPHLETS 2 17, MICROFILM MICROCARDS1 MICROPR INTh HICROFICI5i PERIOOICAL 6 TITLES CONT I NUAT 1TN TITLES TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES I. 2., K I L..- k xx)x Naturo of Items Included as uncateloged volumes. VertIcel file Items. Report the number of rools. Report the number of Individual cards. Vacant 8paccs arc for elides, filmstripe, rraps, disks, etc. Refers to titlos currently chocked in, including duplicates. XX)( XxX --ý ý q

76 C.P.L±.A. Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve Nonprint Month Man'1 Staff Student C/Card IRR Charge. Materials Materials LCS / / 7 55 _ n July Man' LCS / _ 1Q6.. O August Man' LCS/ September Man' LCS/ C 1 October Man' LCS/ 11 li November Man' LCS/ December Man' LCS/ " January Man'l LCS _Q_. February Man' LCS March Man' LCS April Man' LCS May Man' LCS June Man' LCS Totals Man' Grand Total t LCS Year Man' Increase/ LCS Decrease Man'1. _.31 _4 -..

77 CPLA Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats 4 3. Lounge chairs B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving 1497 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 3 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 1/2 (July-Dec.) 1 (Jan.-June) 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants - 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 1 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 82 b. Spring 82 c. Summer Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Mary D. Ravenhall, Librarian (Jan. - June) Barbara Coburn, Acting Librarian (July-Dec.) b. Nonacademic Laura Weisiger, Library Technical Assistant I

78 CLASSICS LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, Priorities Review Much progress was made over the year in identifying acquisition areas needing attention. Several meetings were held with the department library committee and procedures for selecting new materials to be ordered were revised and refined. These procedures are working very well, and while much restraint is still needed in selecting, most of the important publications in the Classics areas are being ordered. The development of acquisition profiles for the Classics Library by Blackwell and Blackwell North America is also helping, especially in monitoring the receipt of university press titles. Work is again being done in relocating the Dittenberger-Vahlen pamphlets from the Stacks to 411 Library. The library is being aided in this project by a graduate assistant from the Classics Department. Transfer will have progressed well past half of the materials in the collection by the end of summer session. No work has yet been done on the contents file in the Classics Library. This file has been discussed with the Department of the Classics, and in the future plans to work on this aspect of the collection will be considered. As of July 5, the non-academic position in the Classics Library will be increased from half to three-quarter time, and this will facilitate many of the on-going projects in the library and allow the addition of some new projects as need arises. Accomplishments The Papyrology Collection, as proposed by the Department of the Classics, is complete and marked for easy identification. The items have also all been made non-circulating as was requested. This project was accomplished mainly by Stephen Willier and Anne Eickstadt.

79 -2- The major shift of periodicals in the Classics Library went more slowly than anticipated and is just now being completed. By the beginning of fall semester all shifting should be finished and new signs for materials location should be in place. The combined efforts of the staff of the Classics Library make it possible to report that approximately 95% of the MSETS and 99% of the periodicals have their entire holdings and loan periods correctly entered in LCS. The few remaining are due either to marking problems needing individual decisions or to input problems in ARM. Classics is continuing to work on these problems as they arise. The extremely high and successful completion rate on the periodical project is due principally to the thoroughness and dedication of one student in particular, Anne Eickstadt. The addition of serials holdings is progressing nicely. The printout listing serials with no holdings has been updated. Numerous other high-use serials have also been finished. Others continue to be updated as the need arises Priorities Priorities for the coming year are to work on claims, of which there is a substantial backlog; to organize a permanent shelf-reading program; and to plan, and complete as much as possible, an inventory of the collection. Work will continue on the Dittenberger-Vahlen pamphlet move as help and time allow.

80 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Classics Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT TYPE LAST v> - z - TOTAL of YEAR'S 5 AS OP MATERIAL TOTAL - JUNE 3 CATALOGED VOLUMES UNCATALOGEDI VOLUMES PAMPHLETS MI CROFI LM SI CROCARDS1 4'xx MICROPR I NT 1 4 MICROFICHE. PERIODICAL 6 TITLES about 194 a +2 about 196 I CONT I NUAT I ON 6 TITLES TOTAL SERIAL6 TITLES I* about 173 about 367 Nature of Items Included as uncateloged volumes. Vertical file itoms. Report Report Vacant the number of reels. the number of Individual cards. spaccs are for slides, filmstripe, maps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates. -I +5 about 178 about 374

81 Classics Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve- Nonprint Month Man'l Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ July Man'l LCS/ August Man'l LCS/ September Manl LCS/ Q October Man' LCS/ November Man'l LCS/ December Man'l LCS/ January Ma n LCS February Man'l LCS March Man'l LCS April Man'l LCS May Man'l LCS June Man'i LCS Totals Man' Grand Total Last LCS LO M Year Increase/ LCS * Decrease Man' * Permit-C/Card category was dropped from LCS statistics this year.

82 Classics Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats 7 3. Lounge chairs B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving 4247 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 52 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 1 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 1 1/2 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 47 b. Spring 45 c. Summer Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Suzanne N. Griffiths b. Nonacademic Barbara M. Nadler (half-time) Rosalind Muhammad (full-time, clerk learner) (March 5, December 6, 198)

83 COMMERCE LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 Report on last year's priorities. 1. Our first priority was for an increase in staff so that it would not be necessary, as it now is, to have signs posted saying "reference service available only between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekdays." We obviously didn't fill this need and, in fact, under present staffing policy, can only hope to hold our own. We attribute the fact that we had a 17 1/2 per cent increase in thefts to having the library staffed by student assistants for most of the hours we are open. During the regular term the library is open 12 hours a week and professional staff are on duty 45 hours a week or less than one half the time the library is open. We feel the approximately 34 students in the College of Commerce are entitled to more hours of professional help. 2. We did a little better in getting more acquisitions funds. The Library purchased for $ 45, a film copy of the Fortune 5 companies annual reports. The College had promised some help on this purchase but was apparently not able to raise the extra funds. Our base monographic fund was increased for next year by $ 7,5. This will be the first full year under the Blackwell Plan and it will be interesting to see how well the budget covers. 3. Jean Koch did make up a one-page guide to the Commerce Library designed to be put in loose-leaf notebooks. It is strictly utilitarian. Something fancier would be nice. The most important accomplishments of the past year. Credit must be given to the College of Commerce Library Committee for its roll in securing more book funds. The Committee, composed of Professor Larry Neal (Chairman), Charles Blair, Roger Cannady and William Hopwood met October 21st in the Commerce Library workroom. The meeting was devoted to a discussion of the sums budgeted for Commerce and of ways the monograph base of $ 25,5 could be increased. It was suggested that a first request for $ 4, would not be out-of-line when compared to other units serving fewer students and faculty and in relation to the volume published. The Committee later met with Mr. Atkinson and received a sympathetic hearing. Mr. Atkinson contributed $ 7,5 from his funds and the Policy and Budget Committee gave Commerce $ 7,5 from the pool funds. Subsequently the library purchased the industrial reports on film

84 and the monographic budget for next year has been increased to $ 41,5; a start in the right direction. Someone adept at puffery could no doubt find other important accomplishments, but running a fairly good operation with limited funds for everything and with a small staff going to classes, taking research time and struggling on the tenure track is, to my mind, an accomplishment. Priorities for the coming year. If I were to be here next year, these are some of the things I would work on. 1. To get the money someplace to purchase the 1K reports on microfiche for the Over-the-Counter listings. We have had the 1K's for the American and New York stock exchanges for the past 5 years, but we are experiencing many requests for information on OTC stocks. Since these are the companies which are difficult to run down in other sources, the 1OK's for the OTC would fill a real need. 2. To have the reserve section reorganized and reduced in size and move the surplus shelving to room To carry on a "forward press" for more equitable book funds. 4. To seek storage space for the books we cannot send to the stacks. 5. To have the whole arrangement for the Peat, Marwick, Mitchell Accounting Research Collection re-evaluated. The original selling point was the Lexis terminal. In fact, Lexis hasn't been on more than 3 months of this academic year because the Accounting Department did not pay the monthly rent. Also it was not made clear at the outset that the Accounting Department was to control the operation. It is at present an autonomous appendage for which we supply premium space and for which we are expected to furnish professional time to build a nucleus collection of free research material to be carted away whenever accounting can establish themselves as an independent College of Accountancy. The accounting faculty takes almost no responsibility for helping to build a research collection. Presently the Peat, Marwick, Mitchell account pays for some tax services for Prof. Willis' classes, the classes that would normally use Lexis if it were in operation. Our recommendation would be to transfer it to the Center for International Education and Research in Accounting.

85 STATISTICAL SUMMARY COMMERCE Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT _ TYPE LAST in z W, TOTAL of YEAR'S < AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL 1 _- JUNE 3 CATALOGED VOLUMES 45, ,422 UNCATALOGED VOLUMES 2, PAMPHLETS 2 MICROFILM MICROCARDS 1 17,548 17,548 xx MICROPRINT 1 / 82,492 MICRO72FICHE PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONTwI NUAT ION 6 TITLES TOTAL SERIAL6 TITLES I ---- GW-om "m ooft. - il-'. MMM4o q Nature of Items Included as uncataloged volumes.*company. Vertical file Items. Report the number of reels, current issue is Report the number of Individual cards. Vacant spaces are for slides, filmstripr, maps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates old repdort is removed when added S198/81

86 COMMERCE Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve - Nonprint Month Man'1 Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ 3,_, July Man' RR 17A LCS/ August Man' LCS/ September Man'l LCS/ October Man' a LCS/ 9q ,3., November Man' " LCS/ December Man' LCS/ January Man' R4f 4R138 LCS February Man' LCS R 12 March Man LCS April Man' LCS May Man' l LCS June Man' LCS Totals Man' ,714 Grand Total , ,714 np LCS , Last,. Year Man ,9 Increase/ LCS Decrease Man' i /81

87 rcommercfe Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables I?24 2. Carrel seats Lounge chairs 6 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving 5.4 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall ]2 2. Spring Summer 77 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 3 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 4 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 19 b. Spring 129 c. Summer Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Miss Esther M. Clausen, Commerce Librarian, Sept. 1, Sept.3, 1981 Mr. M. Balachandran, Commerce Reference Librarian, April, Mrs. Jean Koch, Assistant Commerce Librarian, Aug. 2, b. Nonacademic Aug.2, 1981 Laura (Gina) Jennings, Library Clerk II, Sept. 14, Leslie Mitchell, Library Clerk II, April 27, Theresa Poff, Library Clerk II, Jan. 8, Aug. 16, 198 Denise Wicklund-Will, Library Clerk III, April 14, Elizabeth Bridgewater Wingler, Library Clerk III, Dec. 7, Dec. 6, 198 Donna Zumbrunnen, Library Clerk III, May 21, 198.-

88 COMMERCE LIBRARY INVENTORY STATISTICS Missing 1st time Missing 2nd time Total 1964/ / / / / /7 197/ / / / / / / / / /8 198/

89 COMMUNICATIONS LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981

90 1. Implementation of last year's priorities. A. We provided services and materials with the high standards set in the past. This goal was met despite a serious reduction in student wage allocations. Open hours have not been reduced; reference, information, and instructional services were provided; and collection development continues to expand this fine collection. I have continued to produce the annotated acquisition list quarterly; this list is sent to over 4 organizations and individuals internationally and is regarded as one of the field's most important bibliographies. Study space is provided in the library, although the number of seats is steadily shrinking because of lack of equipment money for new chairs to replace broken ones. B. Improved training for nonacademic staff was provided. I worked closely with the individuals in both the LTA I and LC II positions. They are adept at the provision of informational services and referral for advanced reference inquiries. C. Work progressed on a non-print collection for the area of broadcasting. Because television broadcast materials are generally not commercially available, this aspect of the project is a difficult one. However, the collection of radio program material is now fairly complete, and is housed in the Media Center. 2. Most important accomplishments of the past year. A. In the category of service, several accomplishments stand out. Each Ph. D. candidate has been contacted for consultation about the dissertation topic and research method to be selected. All profiles of faculty interests and research have been revised. New handouts covering public opinion and commercial television have been prepared and distributed, and another LCS workshop was offered for graduate students and faculty. B. In the category of collection development, several projects have been completed which improve collections and budget management. A complete inventory and analysis of continuations and standing orders was finished. We now know what we should be receiving and have established a machanism for claiming items not received. A large number of dead series were identified, and many titles were cancelled as serials to be ordered as published. In addition, the reference collection was weeded. The collections were shifted so that new materials could be accomodated without transfering many older items. A Vertical file was established for quick access to ephemeral items. Access to vertical file items is available through the Communications Library card catalog, and provisions have been made for regular weeding. C. My most important accomplishment in the area of prfessional activity was the completion of the manuscript for a catalog of unpublished scripts in the University of Illinois Library. The catalog os about 25 typed pages in length and was co-authored with Prof. Robert Carringer. It is being considered for publication by

91 G.K. Hall and Greenwood Press. I also planned the programs for the midwinter and summer meeting; of the ACRL Cinema Librarians' Discussion Group and completed several other publications. 3. New priorities for the coming year. A. In an era of budget reductions, the highest priority is the maintenance of services and collections with fewer staff and higher costs. Next year's student wage allocation is smaller yet than last year's, and efforts must be made to avoid a reduction in level of service and efficiency. B. Shelving space has not been adjusted since fall 1979, and crowding will make it necessary to reexamine shelving organization. Related to this problem is that of theft and mutilation. Because of an unsupervised lower level housing all newspapers and magazines, including bound volumes, theft and mutilation problems are serious. Some consideration must be made of ways to reduce loss. C. A new priority should be an examination of subject areas either overlooked by or overlapping with collections in the Social Science Council. Some subject areas collected by the Communications Library in these categories are public opinion, speech communication, and educational media. Some progress has been made in the coordination of these areas, but efforts to improve services for these and other subject areas should be coninued. D. Discussions have begun on ways to create a central service point for upper level research in the subject of film study. At present, the best alternative seems to be the creation of a core collection of monographs, serials, and reference materials in the English Library, and resolution of the principles and details of such a plan should receive a high priority. The project is a result of faculty and graduate student concern and is under discussion with Melissa Cain, David Kohl, Dee Wallace, Barton Clark and myself.

92 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Communicatilons, Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT w TYPE LAST z 2 & TOTAL of YEAR'S < AS OF < MATERIAL TOTAL 2 L x JUNE 3 CATALOGED VOLUMES 12, UNCATALOGED VOLUMES PAMPHLETS 2 F MICROFILM 3 MI CROCARDS4 hxx MICROPR I NTh MIROFICHEO PERIODICAL 6 TITLES 286 X CONT INUATION 6 TITLES 441 xxx xx X * TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES [ L J I.. x-- I. Nature of Items Included as uncataloged volumes.- 2. Vertical file Itoms.. Report the number of rooeels.. Report the number of Individual cards. 5. Vacant apaccsa re for Blide, fil'stripe, mnps, disks, etc. 6. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicatos. *This figure includes only those continuations and standing orders now active. It does not include continuations ordered as published or ordered on an irregular basis. Xxx

93 Communic"ations Librar' II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve Nonprint Month Man'l Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges. Materials Materials LCS/ July Man' _ LCS/ OR August Ma7n'1 1 f 9 ] 727 LCS/ September Man' LCS/ _94 2 October Man' f LCS/ November Man' LCS/ _ December Man' In) LCS/ 116 If January Man' 1 5 8, _ LCS _24... February Man'l n48 LCS _ 9 44 March Man' LCS _92 72 April Man' LCS 69.2 May Man' LCS June Man' LCS : Totals Man'1 2 Grand Total _ Last Year Increase/ Decrease LCS Ma' LCS Man'1

94 Communications Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables 6,7 2. Carrel seats o2 3. Lounge chairs B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving 1538 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer go D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 1 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 2 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 74 b. Spring 72 * Including college-work study time, excluding interim schedule time. c. Summer Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Nancy Allen (August 21, present) b. Nonacademic Virginia Thomas (9/28/79 - present) Jan Smith (8/19,/8 to present)

95 DOCUMENTS LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 ACCOMPLISHMENTS Reference Services Reference services continue to be provided by Documents Library staff from 8: to 5:, Monday through Friday. A recorded total of close to 6,.questions were answered during the year representing an average increase of 58% per month. The department has begun to develop a clientele and depends less on referrals than it did during its first year of existence. Promotion of Service The attached brochure was completed and mailed at the beginning of the fall semester to departmental libraries and selected faculty members. An exhibit was mounted at the beginning of the academic year in the first floor corridor of the Main Library building. The display emphasized current topics of interest and the research uses of federal publications. Extensions of Services Clearance of the 31-series rooms on Decks 1 through 4 was completed by the end of the summer of 198. Routine circulation of documents from the bookstacks collection began in September Documents librarians provided formal instruction to the following classes: 2 sections of Social Work 484 (Watson); Political Science 496 (Watson); and Health Education 41 (Mallory). A limited number of online searches of NTIS database were done for library users in a variety of fields, e.g. agricultural economics and urban planning. (Bekiares) Documents librarians continued to provide current awareness services both to librarians (for collection development and informational purposes) and to faculty in support of research.

96 2 A collection of environmental impact statements and environmental regulations was gathered together and kept on reserve for Landscape Architecture 45 during the spring semester. Staff Training and Development Documents Library continued its efforts to keep the library staff informed of its activities through updates written for Library Office Notes. (See attached write-up on LCS search techniques for documents.) A particular goal this year was to raise UIUC librarians' general level of awareness of documents resources. Specific activities undertaken to accomplish this goal included: 1. Professional Update Talk by Watson on February 17, 1981 on Documents Library Resources, Services, and Directions. 2. Personalized tours of the Documents Library for reference librarians and other library faculty (Watson and Bekiares). 3. A workshop "Introduction to Census Bureau Economic Statistics Programs" sponsored and arranged by Documents Library and presented on May 19, 1981 by Stephen Laue, Data User Services Officer, Chicago Regional Office of the Census Bureau. The full-day program was attended by approximately 25 librarians, including UIUC library staff, a faculty member from the library school, and librarians from the Champaign-Urbana community, Eastern Illinois University and Northeastern Illinois University. 4. Documents Library also sponsored a workshop on CIS reference sources presented by John Cox of CIS on September 17, The two sessions were attended by approximately thirty UIUC librarians, non-academic staff, and graduate assistants. 5. Orientation and training sessions were provided for graduate assistants in Reference and in Undergraduate Library. 6. Documents librarians individually undertook a number of activities to improve their professional skills, as follows: 1) Susan Bekiares attended a week-long Census Bureau seminar in Washington in July ) Susan Bekiares attended a Dialog workshop September 9-1, ) Susan Bekiares, Mary Mallory and Terri Poff attended a 198 census user's workshop on September 24, 1981.

97 4) Mary Mallory attended a Census Bureau workshop "Accessing Federal Statistics" in Detroit June 9-12, Professional Service Documents Library planned and organized a meeting of documents librarians from state university libraries which was held at Urbana on May 2, UIUC documents librarians made brief presentations on statewide holdings of major documents - related microfiche sets (Bekiares); documents holdings on LCS (Watson), UIUC handling of Illinois documents (Golden), plans for GPO DOE microfiche offering (Littlewood) and new developments at UIUC (Watson). Action taken as a result of the meeting included the appointment of a committee to study coordinated statewide collection development for NTIS reports (Watson and Bekiares will serve from UIUC). Also a resolution was drafted to oppose Library of Congress proposals concerning GPO micropublishing and changes in LC documents cataloging practices. Consultation and training were provided to the staff of the documents department at SIU-Edwardsville. SIU is interested in modeling their documents operation on our own. Becky Lenzini of Rapid Cataloging visited Edwardsville and Documents Library staff provided consultation for the staff visiting Urbana from Edwardsville. Technical Services Activities Federal Depository processing increased over last year. Microfiche handling, in particular, has almost doubled. A two-year backlog of unprocessed Illinois monographs and new serial titles was eliminated. An estimated 55 titles were processed and procedures were developed for efficient routine handling of new materials. (Gary Golden was responsible for this project). Our practice is to use cataloging copy and classification available in the OCLC database (usually from the State Library). Dewey numbers in OCLC have an "X" added to the end of their Cutter numbers to definitively differentiate them from call numbers which might already have been used in the UIUC system. An experiment was attempted to further increase processing efficiency for federal depository documents by cataloging documents from the shipping list. The introduction by OCLC of the SuDocs number as a search key made this procedure feasible. Its chief advantage would have been to minimize the handling of pieces and to get documents into the stacks and directly available for circulation sooner. The success

98 of the shipping list procedure depends substantially on GPO's speed in producing cataloging copy containing SuDocs numbers. The shipping list cataloging experiment was abandoned after evaluation demonstrated that GPO cataloging efficiency has greatly declined during the last year. Work has continued during this year to accomplish the orderly transfer of payment and checking records for priced documents subscriptions to OCR. This project was completed by John Littlewood in June Collection Management and Development Documents Library has continued to work on the elimination of its inherited processing backlogs. An estimated 11 documents monographs which accumulated in cataloging backlogs during the 197's have been assigned SuDocs members during the course of this year and added to the documents bookstacks collection. Several major sets of documents materials which had been allowed to fall into disarray in the main stacks were returned to a useable condition. These items included looseleaf sets with frequently superceded parts. Extensive weeding and refiling was done and the sets were relocated to the documents area of the bookstacks. In the interest of improved management of the collection, the decision was made to deselect several other similar sets which require large amounts of labor to maintain but which have a relatively low use. Reclassification of Dewey-classified documents serials in the Documents Library core collection into Superintendent of Documents classification was another major przoject accomplished during the year. Major additions to the reference collection included the Statistical Reference Index microfiche (a General Services Council purchase located in Documents) and the CIS Committee Print Index (transferred from Reference). Issues and Opportunities The organizational phase for the Documents Library is largely completed. Most of the routine technical procedures are in place and running smoothly. Much of the unprocessed backlog has been eliminated. The department is now ready to begin extending its public services activities and to pursue enhancements of its technical programs. However, the continuance of one professional position still remains in doubt. It is to be hoped that this position

99 will be filled permanently next December, so that the service expectations we have generated in our clientele can continue to be satisfied and so that we can continue to explore improvements in processing efficiency and expansions in the area of collection development. The 198 census publication schedule has slipped, so that aggressive promotion of census materials has had to be postponed. Instruction and publicity in relation to the census will provide the opportunity to introduce large numbers of users to the Documents Library and its services. Changes in government information distribution policies are likely to increase departmental workload during the coming year and may also necessitate some adjustments in policies and procedures. GPO expects to greatly expand its micropublishing program. Much of the census is to be made available only in microfiche. GPO is investigating the fiche distribution of all DOE contractor reports (including those now subscribed to in Physics) and we have begun receiving U.S. Geological Survey Open File Reports on fiche. We are already seriously in need of cabinets to store the fiche and will need a continuing commitment to the purchase of equipment to store these important materials. Under present practice, most microfiche received on Federal deposit are not cataloged. The influx of valuable material on microfiche may necessitate a revision of this policy. We may also need to find a more efficient means for producing catalog and LCS records for fiche received. Potential users of these materials should be made aware of their existence and availability. The documents stacks collection is growing rapidly. Binding, storage and weeding policies need to be formulated and plans made to accomodate future growth. PRIORITIES 1. Continue to build Documents Library clientele and to work to raise the level of awareness of Documents resources and services among both librarians and library users. To accomplish these ends we will: 1) expand and improve current awareness services. 2) plan written publicity and/or presentations aimed at introducing specific user groups to specific resources in their areas of interest. 3) expand faculty liaison and instructional activities.

100 2. Continue to increase processing efficiency. In particular, we will explore the most efficient means for adding the greatest number of documents records to LCS. 3. Improve collection management and development by developing policies and procedures for binding and weeding as well as selection policies for both depository and non-depository documents. Our policy for selection of NTIS technical report literature should be reviewed and efforts should be made to coordinate our activities in this area with those of the Illinois State Library. Summary of Progress Our major priorities for last year were to work toward building a Documents Library clientele, to improve processing efficiency and eliminate backlogs, and to more clearly define the scope of our operations. Several initiatives, as detailed above, were taken to increase UIUC librarians' awareness of documents resources. Various promotional activities aimed at the User community were also undertaken. We have clearly succeeded in developing a clientele. Our task now is to increase its size and to improve our services to it. Our focus in the coming year will be on specific user groups, rather than at the more general level as it has had to be during the organizational stage. Substantial progress has been made in improving processing efficiency and eliminating backlogs. During this year we will explore the potential gains to be realized from machine-to-machine transfer of bibliographic records to documents. As staff is available, we will also work to reduce remaining backlogs. Priorities for last year also included defining Documents Library's collection development responsibilities and exploring expansions into other areas of documents service, e.g. assuming processing and reference responsibility for international and state documents. Collection policies for both federal depository and non-depository materials still remain to be developed. Expansions into international, foreign and other state documents will not be possible without an increase in staff, and additional processing staff can not easily be accomodated in our present office space. There is also not sufficient space in our present reference area to house new materials that would be needed to provide service to state, foreign, and international users. Activities in these areas should have a lower priority than developing and promoting the use of the federal collection.

101 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Documents Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION Core Collection in 2D only PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONTINUATION 6 TITLES 6 XXK 3 9 TOTAL SERIAL6 TITLES 26 I xxx.-o-nw fte ý --.IL t I. Nature of Items Included os unceteloged volumes. 2. Vertical file Items. Report the number of rools, L. Report the number of Individual cards. 5. Vacant spaccs are for elides, filstripe, maps, disks, etc. 6. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicatos. 315

102 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Documents Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION Bookstacks Collection ADO SUBTRACT w TYPE LAST u... TOTAL of YEAR'S $ AS OF &ATERIAL TOTAL l o JUNE 3 CATAL(O;CO * VOtLMES 15, , 28, UNCATALOGED 1 VOLUMES PAMPHLETS N.A. N.A. MI CROFI LM 3 MICROCARDSI W MICROPR INT HICROFICKS PERIOICAL 6 TITLES WEEx 1 CONTINUAT ION 6 TITLES TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES 2, W"XXMmw xxx q.ww A A I. Nature of Items Included os uncoteloged volumes. * 2. Vertical file Items.. Report the numrber of reals, 4. Report the number of Individual cards. 5. Vacant opaccs are for elides, filastripe, narps, disks, etc. 6. Refers to titles currently'checked in, including duplicates. * A gross estimate of items relocated from various storage areas to the documents bookstacks area plus documents cataloged during last vear II

103 II. Recorded Use STAc Documents Bin' ' LCS/ Fac/ 1 1 Permiti 1.Special Reserve I Nonprint. Month Man'l Staff Student C/Card IRR ChArges, Materials Materials LCS/ _.A. July Man'1 N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A. N.A 22 N.A. LCS/ August Man' N.A N.A. LCS/ September Man'l NA. LCS/......, 69. October Man'L LCS/ 3 November Man'l _LCS/ 36 December Man'l 13 l LCS_/ 194 January Man'l 17 3 ' LCS 6 64 February Man'l LCS 87 March Man' LCS 76 April Man' LCS l 26 May Man' ' LCS _ 1 87 June Man'l LCS 3 69 Totals Man'l Library Grand Total 2728 S LCS Last Man'1, Year Man '1 3 Increase/ LCS Decrease Man'1. 1 Statistics reported in these columns are for manual charges from the Documents Library core collection in 2D only. 2 Circulation of documents in the bookstacks is not routinely reported separately from General LCS stacks circulation. Figures reported here are based on c.ounts of material returned to documents sorting shelves in stacks after circulation. (OVER)

104 3 Only 4 months of circulation statisitics are available for the first six months of Documents Library operation last year. All circulation of both stacks and core collection materials was done manually. Total recorded circulation of print materials for March-June was 412. Gross estimates suggest circulation of the print collection has increased by 4o.

105 Documents Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables 2. Carrel seats 3. Lounge chairs B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library 2, Linear feet of shelving 693 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 45 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 4. (-.75) 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants.5 (+.5) 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall" 5 b. Spring 5 c. Summer 5 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Paula Watson, Head Susan Bekaires Gary Golden (appt. began S John Littlewood Mary Mallory (appt. began ) b. Nonacademic Toby Castleton, LC II (8-18-8o to present) Theresa Poff, LTA I ( to present) David Zagorski, LC II ( to present) Alisa Ziprin, LC II ( to ) Michelle Jackson, LC II( to 9-3-8)

106 Technical Processing Statistical Summary Regular Depository Processing Total Depository Pieces Received and Processed 1 46,43 Depository Microfiche Received and Processed 23,623 Claims Made 425 Claims Received 261 Depository monographs cataloged 6,639 Depository Serials dataloged 1,138 Volumes and Titles Added Backlogged Depository p eces processed and added to the Bookstacks Collection 1,1 Documents Serial Volumes added 1,47 1 Includes all pieces, cataloged and uncataloged, serials and monographs 2 These titles have been marked with SuDocs numbers and have been added to the bookstacks collection

107 DOCUMENTS LIBRARY Documents Library 2D Main Library (South End - Reference Room)

108 The Collection Documents Core Collection located at the south end of the main Library Reference Room consists of U.S. and Illinois state government reference materials including documents bibliographies, indexes, handbooks, and directories. Major resources are: Monthly Catalog of U.S. Government Publications American Statistics Index Congressional Information Service Index U.S. population and housing census Other census and statistical materials Current Congressional bills, documents, and reports U.S. Statutes at Large, U.S. Code, and slip laws Federal Register and Code of Federal Regulations Technical report literature (NTIS PB reports) Documents Stacks Collection. Beginning in 198, most federal depository documents have been shelved separately in the main Library stacks by Superintendent of Documents classification numbers. SuDocs call numbers may be obtained from the Monthly Catalog of U.S. Government Publications housed in the Documents Library, from LCS searches, and from other sources. Documents may be requested at the Circulation Desk. Library users who have access to the stacks are free to browse in the collection and may retrieve documents directly.

109 Services Information services. Documents specialists provide personal service Monday through Friday from 8 to 5. Reference service after five and on weekends can be obtained from the Reference Department. Instructional Services. One-to-one instruction is always available. Arrangements can also be made for classroom or library presentations tailored to meet course needs. Current awareness services. Individuals wishing to be notified of new government publications in specific subject fields should file a profile with the Documents Library. Regular notification of publications of interest will be provided. Online information retrieval. Documents librarians can search data bases of the National Technical Information Service, the Congressional Information Service, and the American Statistics Index.

110 Government Publications As An Information Resource The Documents Library receives more than 25, publications annually on deposit from the federal government. These documents provide research information in a wide range of areas. For example: Major statistical series: population business housing education transportation agriculture health crime Technological advances: energy transportation aeronautics and astronautics environmental engineering computer science Basic research: physics medicine Translations: Soviet science Foreign news broadcasts Public policy issues: occupational safety consumer protection aged and handicapped care women's rights environmental protection Grants Information

111 LCS Searching for U.S. Documents Classified in Superintendent of Documents Classification I. GENERAL,SEARCHING 1. TLS PROVIDES BEST ACCESS. When the document has a distinctive title, searching by title is generally easiest and most reliable. More individual items in documents series than ever before are now cataloged as separates. 2. ATS. Author-title searches are possible with many U.S. entries. Unless there are problems with the way in which the entry was input, searching should be possible on the first searchable keyword of the entry after U.S. or United States. However, it could be misleading to limit your search to an ATS using the first keyword of the corporate entry due to possible uncertainty as to the exact form of the main entry (e.g., is it U.S. Dept. of Health, Education and Welfare, Public Health Service, or simply U.S. Public Health Service?) Another problem is that an ATS on a federal document which has a fairly common word as the first word of the title can retrieve a large number of entries and the entry in question can be missed or overlooked. 3. DSC. A detailed search by call number is useful to find out if a document published after late 1979 or 198 with a known SuDocs number has been cataloged by UIUC and whether it is located in the Documents Library or in the documents area of the Bookstacks. An LCS record for a document located in Documents Library shows a Doc location: DOC.C3.25+3:WP-79(A) UNITED STATES. BUREAU OF THE CENSUS. INTERNATIONAL POPULATION DYNAMICS, $ WASHINGTON NOLC ADDED: NOCIR DOC PAGE 1 END One for a document located in the bookstacks shows an STX location: DOC.El.28:DOE+CS SCARAMELLI, ALFRED B. RESOURCE RECOVERY$ WASHINGTON NOLC ADDED: W STX The Doc. prefix added to the call number indicates that the item is shelved separately in the SuDocs area of the stacks even though the location symbol is simply STX. To do a DSC on a SuDocs call number always precede the number with a DOC. prefix and substitute p1us (+) signs for the slashes (/) which appear in the SuDocs. number, e.g.', to do a DSC on EI.23:DOE/CS/2178-1, input: DSC/DOC.E1.28:DOE+CS (over)

112 - 2 - Serials The SuDocs number marked on a depository serial piece consists of two parts. The first part, the SuDocs class stem, designates the series. This is generally the part of the number before the colon. The second part of the number is a unique identifier for the individual issue. For example, in the SuDocs number AA2.1:1/2, AA2.1: is the call number for the periodical, Prime Times. 1/2 after the colon indicates volume 1, issue 2. Sometimes the class stem extends beyond the colon, e.g., C3.186:P-26/52 where C3.186:P-26/ is the call number for Current Population Reports Series P-26 and the 52 after the slash indicates the 52nd report in that series. To do a DSC on SuDocs serial call number input the SuDocs number up to the part which designates the individual issue. Thus, for the two examples above, to find out location and holdings by means of a DSC, input: DSC/DOC.AA2.1: DSC/DOC.C3.186:P-26+ Final punctuation must be included. Slashes must be indicated as + signs. Note: A DSC by SuDocs number will not always bring up the LCS record for a depository serial. Continuing serials located in departmental libraries continue to be classified in Dewey. A TLS or an ATS will locate these titles. 4. SPS. Because of possible confusion as to what constitutes a complete and correct SuDocs call number and because of the high potential for error in entering the numbers, it may be preferable to use an SPS rather than a DSC even for searching known SuDocs numbers. It is particularly useful to do so in the case of multi-volume monographs, since there is a lack of consistency in how volume numbers are included in SuDocs numbers. Sometimes all volumes are included as part of the call number, sometimes each volume is cataloged separately and sometimes volumes are listed as holdings in LCS. The SPS can also be used as a kind of corporate author search which avoids the pitfalls of constructing correct main entries. SuDocs numbers necessarily group publications by issuing agency, subagency and series, so an SPS would display an array of call numbers sometimes for the publications of a particular agency or subagency or for the titles within a particular series. The SPS can thus be used to draw together records for titles in series which we have cataloged as separates. For example, since 198 numbers in the National Bureau of Standards Special Publications series have been cataloged by us as separates. If, however, a user were interested in seeing the array of titles published in this series, an sps search could be done on the SuDocs class stemrn for the NBS Special Publications series:

113 SPS/DOC.C13.1: 1DOC.C1.8+3:M /UNITED STA/GUIDE TO FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS FO/1979 2DOC.C1.84-3:SM1/SMS ASSOCI/A DIRECTORY DOF FEDERAL GOVERNMENT BUSINESS AS/198 3 OC.C1.8+3:W84+2/UNITED 'STA 7flE.UI h 7O THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERC/198 idoc.c1.8+4:2/united STA/SYNOPTIC CODE$ REPRINTED NOV TO INCLUDE A/1979 5D OC.C1.8-3:M56/U.S.'DEPT./METRIC LAWS AND PRACTICES IN INTERNATIONAL TR/1976 t6ioc.c13.1:/u.s--natio/special PUBLICATIONS/ 7DOC.C13.1:2/US. -- URE/FEDERAL AND STATE LAWS RELATING TO WEIGHTS AND/ DOC.C13.1:26-64/VELAPOLDI,/A FLUORESCENCE STANDARD REFERENCE MATERIAL/198 9DOC.C13.1:26-69/NATIONAL M/A REFERENCE. METHOD FOR THE DETERMINATION /198 DOC.C SUPP./UNITED STA/PUBLICATIONS OF THE NATIONAL BUREAU OF / 8 DOC.C13.1:4-16/KENNEY, JA/MODULATION MEASUREMENTS FOR MICROWAVE MIXE/198 PAGE 2 INPUT:DOCC13J.31:PG3 I DOC.C13.1:4-43/ /ACCURATE LINEWIDTH MEASUREMENTS ON INTEGRA/198 2DOC.C13.1:4-45/BULLIS, W./SEMICONDUCTOR MEASUREMENT TECHNOLOGY, APRI/198 3DOC.C13.1:4-56/HAMv WILLI/COMPFREHENSIVE TEST PATTERN AND APPROACH FO/198 4DOCoC13.1:4-6/MYERS? Dh /TECHNICAL IMPEDIMENTS TO A MORE EFFECTIVE /198 5DOC.C13.1:4-61/BULLIS, W./METROLOGY FOR SUBMICROMETER DEVICES AND CI/198.6 DOC.C13*1:4-62/UNITED STA/METHOD TO DETERMINE THE QUALITY OF SAPPHIR/198 7DOC.C13.1:4-63/LARRABEE, /A FORTRAN PROGRAM FOR CALCULATING THE ELEC/198 8DOC.C13.1:432+2/ /NBS TIME: AND FREQUENCY DISSEMINATION SERVIC/ DOC.C13.1:446-3/ /BUILDING TECHNOLOGY PROJECT SUMMARIES, 1979/198 ADOC.C13.1:457-4/CENTER FOR/BUILDING TECHNOLOGY PUBLICATIONS, SUPPLEMEN/ [ DOC.C13.1:48--23/GROVER, CH/SELECTION AND APPLICATION GUIDE TO POLICE /1978 PAGE 3 INPUT:DOC.C13.1: II. ADDITIONAL REMARKS ON SERIALS. Serials which have been in the Stacks in Dewey and which are continuing, but are now being processed in SuDoc, will have 2 records under their title in LCS--one with a Dewey number and one with a SuDoc number. These two records will be linked by cross references instructing the patron to enter the SuDoc number for the later issues, and to enter the Dewey number for earlier issues. Notice that the Dewey record will still often have a current or an unbound issues statement if there are still unbound issues, even though the holdings are not, strictly speaking, current. DSC/338,.1UN3AG 338.1UN3AG- U.S.--DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURE DECISIONS$WASH DC ADDED: 7851 SER PER 1 STX 1 2W-BU S CURRENT ISSUES. 2 STX 1 2W-BU FOR LATER VOLS INPUT DOC.A1.58+A: 3 STX 1 2W-BU 35 NO JY-D 4 STX BU 35 NO JA-JE 5 STX 1 2W-BU 34 N JY-D 6 STX 1 2W-BU 34 NO JA-JE 7 STX 1 2W-BU 33 NO STX 1 2W-BU 33 NO JY-D PAGE 1 MORE ON NEXT PAGE,- ENTER PF'D2 DSC/DOC.A1.58+At DOC.AI.584A: U.S.--DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE' AGRICULTURE DECISIONS NOLC ADDEID: 8316 SER 1 STX 1 NOCIR CURRENT ISSUES 2 STX W FOR EARLIER VOLS INIPUT 338.1UN3AG PAGE 1 END (over)

114 Serials classified in SuDocs will be charged by line number as are serials classified with Dewey numbers. III. CHARGING. The documents in the Bookstacks-Documents Collection are in an open stacks area and have a STX location on LCS. They will circulate as do any other stacks titles. They can be charged remotely, and are paged by Circulation personnel as part of their regular routine. Generally speaking, all monographs continuations and bound periodicals circulate. Unbound periodicals may circulate at the discretion of circulation personnel. Because the SuDocs call numbers for documents are unusual, library staff may find it easiest to charge by title number. IV. DOCUMENTS NOT ON LCS. If you fail to locate a document through an LCS search this does not necessarily' mean that the title is not owned. Documents typically not in LCS fall into the following categories. 1. RECENTLY RECEIVED DOCUMENTS. Because there can be up to an ten-week lag between the arrival of the document and the time cataloging appears for it in the OCLC database, an LCS record is frequently not available for new documents until ten to twelve weeks after they are received. Documents are available for circulation, however, usually within two weeks of receipt. 2. MICROFICHE. A significant and growing number of federal documents are coming in on microfiche. These are filed, uncataloged, in SuDoc number order in the Documents Library. Some microfiche will be cataloged and will be found on LCS with Documents Library location indicated. Monthly Catalog citations show when titles are microfiche. 3. EPHEMERA. Many deposit materials are considered ephemeral or inappropriate to have cataloged for the UIUC collection(e.g., pamphlets, announcements of meetings, etc.). These are shelved, uncataloged, in file boxes in the Documents-Bookstacks. It may be clear from the Monthly Catalog citation that an item is ephemeral. Such items, if needed, can be retrieved by Documents Library staff. 4. PRE-1979 DOCUMENTS CLASSIFIED IN SUDOCS. When the Documents Library was established many unprocessed backlogs of federal material were located in various storage areas in the library. These materials are being classified in SuDocs and added to the Documents Bookstacks. Not all these titles can be cataloged. Please call the Documents Library for help in found on LCS. obtaining documents not

115 - 5 - V. ADDITIONAL NOTES. 1. MULTIPLE RECORDS. As was pointed out in II above there may frequently be both a Dewey record and a SuDocs record for documents serials located in the bookstacks. There may also be two records for other documents titles. This will occur when a departmental library duplicates a title in the SuDocs collection. It will appear classified in both Dewey and SuDocs.

116 EDUCATION AND SOCIAL SCIENCE LIBRAIRY AITNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 I. Imlementation of Last Yearls Priorities: A, Curriculum Materi als Collection: The major priority during the past year was the establishment of a Curriculum Materials Collection, All materials were transferred from the College of Education. Space was made in one of the two rooms previously occupied by the S-collection. New materials were ordered to update the collectiono A guide to the collection was prepared as well as a collection development policy statement. In February, an NCATE accreditation team reviewed the Collection as part of their evaluation of the teacher education program in the College of Education. The Collection was favorablely approved by the committee. B. Staffing: Ms. Nancy O'Brien was added to the staff of the Education and Social Science Library in January after working - time for a month on the Curriculum Materials Collection. C, User Guides: Guides to all subject areas of the Education and Social Science Library were prepared during the last year. In addition, guides to the Test Collection and the Human Relations Area Files were also developed. IH. Accqmb1ishments, A. Curriculum Materials Collection: The most important accomplishment of the past year was the establishment of the Curriculum Materials Collection. B, Collections: Collection development policy statements were written for Anthropology, Curriculum Materials, and the S-collection. Co Online Bibliographic Services: The Education and Social Science Library continues to perform one-third of all searches. D. Circulation: Although circulation was down in some areas, the total circulation was up over the previous year. This is the third straight year that circulation has increased. E. Psychology Library: Preliminary explorations have begun on the possiblity of a separate Psychology Library. Discussions with the Head of the Psychology Department and with members of the Library Committee reveal that there is strong interest in the Psychology Department for a separate library. Cost and space analysis have been prepared for the Psychology Department,

117 ili3 Priorities. A. Staffing: The professional staff of the unit has been permanently reduced by one and ther is currently one vacancy. With this shortage of staff it iwill be necessary to readjust total staffing activities in the Library. A teraporary plan has been submitted to the Director of Public Services. A resolution of professional staffing needs will have to be resolved early in the year since the success of many of the other priorities is dependant upon these needs, B. Faculty Liason: Through neisletters, acquisiticn lists, and personal contacts the u cacation, and Social cience Libay hopes to increase library usage. C Computer Based Information Systemst The Library plans to explore coqperative activities with the Social Science Quantitative Laboratory and its numeric data sets. The Education and Social Science Library has the potential for increasing use of bibliographic data bases by at least 5%, however, limitations of staff have prevented exploring this further. The 'ibrary intends to look at alternative ways of increasing service to computer based reference systems, D. Collection: Collection development policies for all areas served by the Education and Social Science Library will be written during the next year. Serial holdings in both Education and Anthropology will be examined to determine strengths and weaknesses of these collections. 3. Psychology Library: Continued efforts will be made to determine the possibility of a separate library.

118 as uncetaloged volumes* U, N, Docupants Curriculum Materials and 198/81 Education and Social Science Library STATISTICAL SUMMARY I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT TYPE LAST.. z 5 TOTAL of YEAR'S 6 AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL 2 -z 5 JUNE53 CATALOGED VOLUMES UNCATALOGED 1 VOLUMES PAMPHLETS MICROFILM MICROCARDS4 MICROPRINT HICROFIXCL TESTS _illlp- i PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONTI NUAT I ON 6 TITLES I TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES 241h L.., Neture of Items Included VertIcel file ltoms. Report the number of reels. Report the number of Individual card3. (est. at 12!, items). Vacant apaccs are for slides, filmstrips, maps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates.,i.ý.- 1I 2 264

119 198/81 Education and Social Science Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve Nonprint Month Man'1 Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ July Man' LCS/ , August Man' LCS/ J September Man'l lh 87 5h99 LCS/ October Man'l h 8 64h7 LCS/ November Man'l LCS/ December Man'l LCS/ January Man' t ' LCS h12 38 February Man' LCS March Man'l LCS April Man'l Lcs May Man' LCS llh. June Man' h125 LCS _ Totals Man' Grand Total h LCs h Last Man' L Increase/ Lcs Decrease Man'1-5O

120 ACAD'MIC STAFF (122L*8). Clark, Barton. Coblenz, Madeline. Davis, Alayna. Gahin,,Anuna. Jogdeo, Chitra. Johnston, Bobby Joe. Kelliher, Kathleen. Kluever, Sue. Konopasek, Katherine. Langston, Kay. Miller, Marilyn. OWBrien, Nancy. Oyer, Chris. Sheetz, Kathy. Stulgin, Patricia. NO m-acgad~ic STAFF (198/8 ). Aggarwal, Indra. Goggins, Maureen, Lewis, Laurie, Reeser, Dee. Sander, Nancy. Snipes, Cynthia. Tedrow, Terry. Thies, Jodie. Weal, Chris, 8/1A/77-8/21/79-8/21/8-8/21/8 8/21/73-8/21/79-8/21/8-8/21/8-8/21/8-9/11/78-8/21/79-8/21/81-8/21/8-8/21/79-8/21/79-5/17/76 12/2/79 1/2/8 1/2/67 5/31/81 1/2/79 8/3/8 9/13/78 9/15/8 8/2/8 6/5/81 8/2/8 8/2/8 8/2/8 8/2/8-8/1/8-7/18/8 S5/12/81-2/27/81 (paid by College of Education)

121 198/81 Education and Social Science Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats Lounge chairs B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving 618 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 77 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 4 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 2.ý 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 6 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 17 b. Spring 17 c. Summer Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic See attachment b. Nonacademic See attachment E. Turnstile Count

122 STATISTICAL SUMMARY eftl i'l4t Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT w TYPE LAST -.. TOTAL of YEAR'S AS OF < MATERIAL TOTAL au - p z o JUNE 3 CATALOGCED VOLtJMES 171,519 1, 11 I 2,, ' UNCATA'LOGED VOLUMES 1 o PAMPHLETS MICROFILM ! 4c c9- MICROCARDS xx MICROPRINT4 O o HICROFIC i,36.o 5 PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONT I NUAT ION 6 P TITLES A TOTAL SERIAL6 TITLES 15 3,S»<p, XX I.-----,--t.-.- I xxx L... ýj I... X -31 4w +3Zr 1. Nature of Items Included as uncaetloged volumes. 2, VertIcel file itofms. 3, Report the nurmber of reels. 5. Report the number of Individual cerd3. Vacant paces are for slides, filmstripm, maps, disks, etc. 6. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates IS39

123 Engineering Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve Nonprint LCS/ h h July Man' LCS/ August Man'l LCS/. 43 " September Man'l 65 h LCS/ October Man' LCS/ November Man'l 63 T h LCS/ 673 4h December Man'l ho lj7 LCS/ h22 January Man'l h LCS F h 2l1 8h February Man'l] LCS March Man'l LCS h65 79 April Man'l LCS May Man' LCS June Man' LCS Totals M an' Grand Total LCS 11,627 46, Last Year Man' 1 93 h,656 1h7 2l)W h7 8 Increase/ LCS -3,568 +9,28-4, Decrease Man' , , Total = 92, Total = 87,428 Increase in circulation = 4,823

124 Engineering Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables 1i 2. Carrel seats Lounge chairs 9 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving 12,96- Engineering Li.brary 8,576 - Altgeld Hall Annex. C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 63 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 2 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics _ 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 8 (6 Regular, 2 College Work Study) b. Spring 87 (2 Regular, 35 College Work Study) c. Summer 1^ (b~ Regular) 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Leonard Coburn Sept. 195h - Fe] b. 28, 1981 Mrs. Sarojini Balachandran January date b. Nonacademic Mr. Thomas A. Gallivan Ms. Patricia A. Johansen Ms. Mary Reed Ms. Anita M. Rzonca Mrs. Susan Welch Mrs. Mary Ellen Farrell Mrs. Elizabeth A. Wingler 4Mr. Allan DpMuth Nov. Sep. 'May Mar. Aug. Aug. Dec. Feb. 13, Oct. 2h, 198 1, date 29, date 31, Aug. 1, , Sep. 29, , date 8, date 6, Apr. 24, 1981

125 ANNUAL REPORT - English Library was not a year of startling changes in the English Library. But it was a year in which the English Library continued to grow in quality both in its collections, budgets, and. services. The variety of accomplishments that the English Library has experienced over the past twelve months are described in the body of this report. First among last year's priorities was the augmentation of the book budget for English Library monographs. The budget had. been sagging for some time and required readjustment. Over the past year many efforts have been made in the direction of increasing this funding and clearing what has been termed an "historical problem" with the monograph funds. The result has been that the Acquisition Policy Committee and the University Librarian have supplied, this book budget with approximately $9, in additional monies. This increase will allow for a steady flow of materials into the English Library and liberal use of the 2lackwell's Approval Plan can be made. Also, a priority last year was the creation of a Library Clerk II position out of student wage money. A job description was approved and. July 1, 198 was the beginning of this half-time position. Consequently, the English Library's non-academic staff has multiplied in a way which provides for year-round. service. The student wage situation had deteriorated from to a point where the English Library was struggling to maintain 64 hours of service per week. In 198 this fund was increased with temporary money in the amount of $2, from IRRC funds making it possible to finish the academic year without further limiting hours or services. This year, 1981, reflects remarkable strides in this area as the student wage,hud.get, is expected to increase by approximately $3,. This financial assistance is welcome news to the English Department and. to the English Library. The greatest achievements in 198 are those in the area of 1) collection development and 2? serials control. The approval plan has functioned extremely well and over the past year the English Library has converted almost entirely to the receipt of books rather than slips. A massive searching project has been undertaken by the English Library to determine the Ul's holdings and locations of all the BNA (Blackwell of North America) authors listed on their author's lists of poets fiction writers, dramatists and writers of criticism. Literally

126 hundreds of authors have been searched on LCS in this project and. the results tabulated.. This searching is now complete and. will yield. a system-wid.e author profile for the UNA plan and. the UIUC Library. Hopefully, this project will end., or at best curtail, the sporadic, chaotic placement of literature in the library system and contri''ute to a planned placement of material. Also the main print-out received in the English Library was thoroughly searched. and. cleared of problem ord.ers, errors, deletions, etc. An accurate list of orders and. an accurate list of encumbered funds should result. In regards to serials, the LC II has devised a new claiming and check-in system and. in 'the process updated and eliminated all claims filed, in the past and claimed any issues missing to date. In summary, both monograph and. serial records and order files are in excellent condition, Priorities for the coming year must relate to solving the problems of over-crowding on the shelves in the English Library. At present the shelving is considered the gravest obstacle to good service and. maintenance of the collection. Crowded conditions have led. to the massing together of books on the tops of book cases as well as on the shelves. Obviously, when a library reaches this point there is zero growth potential until new shelf units are in place. In addition to seeking new shelving, exploration must ensue which will lead to a better arrangement between stacks and. English in regards to transfers vs. receipt of new material That is, English is now forced to send more than 1 out of 3 new -ooks to Stacks for location due to shelving constraints. It would much behoove the Library to arrange for the tansfer of older materialto the Stacks and the placement of newer material in English. Thus, ways to decrease the "circ- charge" function will be examined! and adopted. if at all possible and. ways to keep this collection most current will accompany this study. Akin to this is the placement and rearrangement of h'ound serials in the English Library and in the Stacks. Some shifting of titles and. holdings must occur within the next year to reflect the users patterns of need. Finally, a modest collection of research materials in film (mostly reference and serialsh might possibly be created in the English Library.in Placement and development of such a collection will reauire many negotiations and considerations between librarians; librarians and teaching faculty; and librarians and students. However, the idea has been introduced and may come to fruition in the coming year. LII/

127 STATISTICAL SUMMARY ENGLISH Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT TYPE LAST u TOTAL of YEAR'S. C AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL z x JUNE 3 - JUNE 3 CATALOGED VOLUMES I -26 io1 UNCATALOGED VOLUMES PAMPHLETS 2 MICROFILM 3 MICROCARDS 1 MICROPR INT 4 KICROFICHE 5 RO -(po 7.,.m PERIODICAL 6 TITLES N4O ~L41 CONTINUATION 6 TITLES 5.54 x i 1~ ~6 TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES I. 2, 6. QCb I-... X)<x Nature of Items Included as uncetaloged volumes. Vertical file items. Report the number of roels. Report the number of Individual cards. Vacant spaces arc for elides, filmstrips, naps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates. I 5~4'

128 II. Recorded Use A/ 6 L Library lqgo - El LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve Nonprint Month Man'1 Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ i s 3,7_ 1 - ' o.g. - July Man' '7 c / 1o / LCS/ 334~ _- 7-3 August Man' 1 / /_ &R LCS/ //9 /3-7 3 September Man' i / LCS/ 3 /g/ - /$ /_ October Man'1 _ q 3 L LCS/ ,. _.. November Man'1,,3 - - _3_3 LCS/ 361 /5-7/ - December Man'l (J 1 3 _ /2"_ LCs/. - /- January Man'l " 7 _ / g_ / February < / _7/ /oo o,..-. LCS 31 /i"m3 -. /,/_,7, ' "' Man'1 I l 3 _/ LCS j/ / - /br 7 c March Man'1 '1 / D / 3 33 LCS 39 aks3 - // April Man'l / _. 1 May Lcs g _,/ _ Man'l 'o _ 2. / / / LCS O) O q June Man'l / 7 - LCS 37z/9 /d3s // Totals Man' 1 8/ 6/ / / 73 / 2 /?c Grand Total LCS V-s5r /3,777 /; 99 t j7q 31 / - Last T Year Man 'i / / Td9 / 7 I F ' 3 Increase/ LCS.. 2 t.. 8 jjt /& Decrease Man'l ']7 -,,.,, I - _-... -/7 7._

129 ENGLISH Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables 1 2. Carrel seats. 3. Lounge chairs B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Chtdn a Lk ob us) 2. Linear feet of shelving L._ C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall 2. Spring 4 3. Summer Sj D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants Number F.T.E. Nonacademics t* 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall b. Spring _3 c. Summer _ 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Melissa Cain. August present,» b. Nonacademic Louise Diodato. Greta Krolikoski- Karen Singer. March 1, 198-June 31, 1981, July 1, present, January 17, 1981-present,

130 GEOLOGY ANNUAL LIBRARY REPORT July 1, 198-June 3,1981 I. Accomplishments A. Long-standing recognition that the collection of early geology books on the Urbana campus is a nationally important one and an expression by the Depart- - ment of Geology for its proper care, has led to plans to transfer many valuable titles from Geology Library to the Rare Books Room in the main library. In addition, we are identifying other titles in our open shelves which should receive special handling; for example, we are now restricting circulation of our early Survey Reports of the Territories, which are in very poor physical condition. In another project involving the collection, I am working with Marilyn Satterlee to identify duplicate and little-used serials, which are better removed or transferred when compared to the shelf space gained. B. Reorganization of acquisition procedures, eliminating duplicate routines to conserve staff time, was followed by the adoption of simpler ways to handle new books and serials. With the aid of librarians in the main library, we cleaned up our book fund printouts, and I worked with catalogers in Main to prioritize work on geology books which had been accumulating in that department for years. We are currently working on a revision of our staff manual, after having prepared a checklist for student trainees. During the spring semester, we extended our hours of access by staffing the 5-7 period each evening,mon.- Thurs., and by pushing back the 2pm opening on Saturday to noon. C. Thanks to the appointment of a competent and knowledgable Library Technical Assistant to compensate for loss of a professional position, we were able to process and file a considerable backlog of sheet maps. We use the OCLC terminal in the Map and Geography Library to search map titles. We have delayed original cataloging of geology sheets until we obtain the confidence for this task. Although storage of books in the main stacks was not possible for us this past year, we did effect transfer of many atlases and other folio-size items into storage there. D. There is a Deckwriter II in the Geology Building to which I have access. In addition to giving a demonstration to members of a technical writing class, I have performed 15 computer data base searches for graduates and faculty. E. Formal instruction to geology classes included 3 hours to Geology 199 (Technical Writing) and one hour to 6 students in Paleontology 342. As soon as I am able to substantially revise a library instruction course formerly taught, I plan to reach freshman geology majors thrauh their regular laboratory sessions. II. Issues The environmental conditions which have been described ad infinitum in the annual reports and separate appeals of my predecessor, Harriet Wallace, continue to rank as the No. 1 Issue in the Geology Library. A very valuable and distinguished resource is being subjected to unbearable heat (steam pipes) and water damage caused by periodic accidents in the Biology laboratories situated on the floor above.

131 -2- Space: With the addition of approximately 2, volumes per year, the Geology Library is virtually out of space to house its collection. A cosmetic solution carried out last year resulted in my commandeering shelves which had been installed for student use in the carrels. Naturally, the books stored in the carrels are out-of-sequence. Perhaps a year's accurmulation of books can be managed by our approved transfer of rare and early titles from Geology Library to Rare Books Room. Here is the opportunity to preserve some of our distinguished materials while gaining precious shelf space. The display of current periodicals in our reading room has been a constant source of irritation to users. Organized periodical shelving should replace the existing chaotic arrangement of journals on top of the reading room tables - but, again, lack of space prevents us from solving this simple problem. The situation in our once-crowded map room affords a brighter picture. In consultation with members of the Geology Department, we were able to return collections of teaching maps and aerial photographs (originally Geology's) to the Department. Now we have enough space to rearrange the flat-lying map sheets and render the collection active and useful. We do, however, need to acquire additional steel vertical files, as the majority of new maps arrive in folded format. III. Priorities A. The Physical Environment of the Library. When this issue is considered along with the reputation and quality of the geology collection and with the costs involved in obtaining it, the separate environmental factors responsible for the problem should be dealt with as a whole. These environmental factors are: Disintregation of the collection and unbearable working conditions from heat; fire and flood prevention; winter energy losses; humidity control; security and access; and space. It is my suggestion that library, departmental, and campus officials, who are appropriate to the problem, confront the issue at the soonest possible date. I suggest this approach because most of the cosmetic changes have now been identified and effected. It is now time we discuss whether or not a more permanent solution can be found to maintain this important scholarly resource. At the least, these practical measures should be considered: 1) Installation of air conditioners in the geology library stacks, 2) Cost estimates on new or additional insulation on steam pipes affecting the stacks, 3) Replace sprinklers in stacks with gas detectors, 4) Paint walls, repair spalling and cracking, and 5) Acquire more space in the Natural History Buklding to erect additional stacking. B. Equipment. Priority One: 2 vertical 5-drawer steel files for maps Safety ladder for map room Kardex File (Replacement for rusty one) Priority Two (for FY 82): Selectric typewriter (Replacement for old and constantly-repaired ones) Long Range: Mlicrofiche reader and microfilm reader (Replacement for hard to use 1, antiquated models; Geology Library is due to receive USGS Open-file reports on microfiche) Shelving for periodicals - Modern periodical shelving to replace current arrangement - see under "Issues".

132 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Geology Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT w TYPE LAST n z t v. TOTAL of YEAR'S < 6 AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL I JUNE 3 CATALOGED VOLUMES 77, UNCATALOGED 1 VOLUMES PAMPHLETS MICROFILM MICROCARDS4 55 o o o 55 MICROPRINT 4 MICROFIOCHE *X reprint collection disbanded PERIODICAL 6 TITLES 839 A CONTINUATION 6 TITLES TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES KXX I..XX Nature of Items Included as unceteloged volumes. 2. Vertical file Items. Report the number of reels.. Report the number of Individual cards. 5. Vacant paccs arc for slides, filmstripes, maps, disks, etc. 6. Refers to titles currently chocked in, including duplicates.

133 II. Recorded Use Geology Library LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve Nonprint Month Man'l Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ July Man'l LCS/ August Man' l LCS/ September Man'l LCS/ October Man'l LCS/ November Man' LCS/ _ December Man' LCS/ January Man' LCS February Man' LCS March Man'l LCs April Man"' LCS May Man'l LCS June Man' LCS o -" ~ Totals Man' Grand Total LCS Year Man' Increase/ -LCS o Decrease Man'

134 Geology Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats Lounge chairs B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 2 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 1 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 1.5 (7/1/8-12/11/8) 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 2.e (12/12/8-6/3/81) 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 6ý b. Spring 75 c. Summer 2 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Dederick C. Ward 8/21/8-5/2/81 b. Nonacademic Katherine J. Hunter 7/1/8-6/3/81 Linda R. Russie 7/1/8-6/3/81 Diana L. Walter 12/12/8-6/3/81

135 VI. STAT I ST I CAL SUMAARY A. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION -- MAPS ADD SUBTRACT "--TV) WU TYPE LAST z n TOTAL of YEAR'S L v AS OF < MATERIAL TOTAL x z JUNE 3 ( -X U 2 2 < o CATALOGED MAPS 31,657 1, ,75 * UNCATALOGED. MAPS 21, ,549 CATALOGED MAP TEXTS 3, ,638 FOLIOS ** AERIAL PHOTOS 11,498 11,499-11,4 8 MOON ROCK PHOTOS 1, *N *X*X Teaching sets returned o DepartmenofGeology Returned To Department of Geology. Returned to De artment e of Geology. PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONTI NUATION 6 TITLES MAP SERIAL 6 TITLES I L- 514 I.- xxx xxx Nature of items included as uncataloged volumes. Vertical file items. Report the number of reels. Report the number of Individual cards. Vacant spaces are for slides, filmstrips, maps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates.

136 LIBRARY OF THE HEALTH SCIENCES - UC ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 The latter half of this year was mixed with feelings for the unknown and finally disappointment. These feelings evolved around discussions on the elimination of the School of Clinical Medicine and the disappearance of the College of Associated Health Professions from the Urbana Campus. Our projections for an expanded program of library services for health and rehabilitation professionals do not seem possible at this time or in the near future. This has been very difficult on the library staff who are making plans for the next academic year. At this time our plans are to maintain the status quo, keeping library hours and services the same as they have been in the past. Only one of our three priorities for FY 81 has been met, i.e. the reduction in loss of library materials. The student staff have been examining all bags leaving the library and there has been no loss of library equipment or furniture as there has been in the past few years. New alarms were installed on the doors on both floors of the library. Turnstyles will be installed in July for further security precautions. The two priorities which were not met were: 1) secure funding for continuance of the Center for Rehabilitation Information, and 2) obtain cataloging for backlog of audiovisual materials. Both of these goals needed support from organizations outside the Library of the Health Sciences-UC. The State Library indicated there were not funds to continue funding the Center, and with the University Library's deficit and the loss of the allied health programs it is clearly not the time for the library to invest many dollars in this area. The University Library does have a committment in this area which will be maintained. Another year has gone by and although some audiovisual materials have been cataloged, the backlog of uncataloged audiovisual items has increased. Although some of our goals were not met, the year was not that bleak and the library staff can be credited for many fine accomplishments. The Library of the Health Sciences-UC sponsored two workshops entitled "Breaking Down Barriers: Information Services for Disabled Persons " which were held in Champaign and Chicago and produced a proceedings of those workshops. The proceedings will be published as the September 1981 issue of Illinois Libraries. The Library has submitted remodeling plans which include phasing out the Audiovisual Department, consolidating reference materials, expanding the circulation area, and in general making better use of library space. Many of the audiovisual materials have already been moved in anticipation of this remodeling project.

137 Page 2 Another accomplishment during the past year was the development of various user-oriented activities including the production of a new software catalog, several library instruction aids, and two multimedia programs: Access to Rehabilitation Information: Computer Searching a videotape Library Instruction Materials: Considerations for the Deaf a slide/tape program Both of these multimedia programs were funded by an LSCA Title I grant. The library staff also gave a three hour program of library instuction to the second year students in preparation of their research project. To further improve user services anin-service-training program was initiated for both the non-academic and student staff. This was very successful and will become a permanent activity in the library. In addition to the "Breaking Down Barriers" workshops, the Center for Rehabilitation Information provided numerous other services to librarians and rehabilitation professionals throughout Illinois. Twelve subject bibliographies based on Center holdings were distributed to individuals on our mailing list and to workshop attendees. Center audiovisuals have been heavily used both locally and by health professionals statewide. The Rehab Reels lunch theater program provided local professionals and students with an opportunity to view films dealing with various disabilities. The Center has also provided reference service to local users as well as to those from around the country who have written for information on various rehabilitation topics. The goal of the Library of the Health Sciences - UC for FY82 is to be responsive to current budget reductions and changes proposed in the reorganization of the College of Medicine and to become more efficient with the present staffing. The Library plans to meet this goal by remodeling the library circulation area to include space for audiovisual materials and staff. This will permit better use of staff time and make audiovisual materials more accessible to users. Another project to meet this goal is the elimination of the duplicate interlibrary loan services offered directly from the Library of the Health Sciences-UC. This will involve the integration of services with those offered by the Main Library. The third project is to conduct user surveys of the book and journal collections. The purpose of these surveys will be to modify the library collection to meet the new demands by the changes made in the College of Medicine and the elimination of programs from the College of Assoicated Health Professionals.

138 Library of the Health Sciences gkii STATISTICAL SUMMARY I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT TYPE LAST 'v ~ t u TOTAL of YEAR'S $ 6 AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL n JUNE 3 CATALOGED VOLUMES 11, ,252 UNCATALOGED I VOLUMES 4, ,756 PAftPHLETS PAMPHLETS 2 1, ,568 MICROFILM 3 MICROCARDS4 MICROPRI NT 4 HICROFICHE ,9 - - l-... _L- - i AV's ,137 GOV DOC'S ,811 PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONTI NUATION 6 TITLES TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES I.- Nature of Items Included as uncataloged volumes. Vertical file items. Report the number of reels. Report the number of Indlvidual cards. Vacant apaccs arc for slides, filmstripe, maps, Serials disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates

139 Health Sciences Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve - Nonprint Month Man'1 Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ July Man' LCS/ August Man' LCS/ September Man'l LCS/ October Man'l LCS/ November Man' LCS/ December Man' LCS/ January Man' LCS February Man' * LCS March Man' LCS April Man'l LCS May Man' LCS June Man' LCS Totals Man'l ,484 5, ,484 5,572 Grand Total LCS Last Year Man' ,465 6,134 Increase/ LCS Decrease Man' LCS Stats for March were reported lost by Chicago and never sent.

140 Library of the Health Sciences Iazt)SX III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables 2. Carrel seats Lounge chairs 9 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library 9, Linear feet of shelving 4,59 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 49 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 3 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 1 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 4 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 11 b. Spring 11 c. Summer Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Phyllis C. Self Francesca A. Anstine Richard E. Bopp Anita Johnson Julie M. Neway 4/1/8 thru 4/28/81 Valerie Gondek 6/1/8 b. Nonacademic Maleah Broeker 7/1/79 thru 1/25/8 Marie Hardin 3/3/8 thru 8/1/8 Julie Greenman 4/7/8 thru 8/31/8 Julie Hamilton 12/4/8 Jeri Troxell 2/2/8 Ellen Ensel 1/13/8 thru 5/29/81 Ruth Peters 1/27/8

141 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Hi try Id hi 1 osophy Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION I --- ADO SUBTRACT TYPE of MATER IAL CATALOGED VOLUMES A Mr L UNCA TALC.LEU VOLUMES fý r% LAST YEAR'S TOTAL 21, V) LL z 3L z TOTAL AS OF JUNE ,843 PAMPHLETS 2 MICROFI LM 3 MI CROCARDS4 X MICROPR I NT 4 HICR~OFICH^ 5 I Nature of Items Included as uncat6loged volunes. Vertlcoa fl I Items. Report the number of rools. Report the number of Indlvidual cord~, Vacant zpaccs are for Blid"sj filstrip,,aps, disks, etc. Rofer. to titloo currently chocked in, including duplicatos.

142 History and Philosophy Librar II. Recorded Use LCS/ Month Man' 1 LCS/ July Man'1 LCS/ August Man' 1 LCS/ September Man' 1 LCS/ October Man'1 LCS/ November Man'l LCS/ December Man'l1 LCS/ January Man'1 LCS February Man'l LCS March Man'1 LCS April Man'1l LCS Mavy Man '1 LCS June Man'1 LCS Totals Man'1 Cr nnd Total Last Year Increase/ Decrease LCS Man'1 LCS Man' Fac/ Staff Student Permit C/Card IRR I Special Reserve - Materials Nonprint Material1 Nonprint Mat er ial 1= ý ý - i -L-- I -74

143 History and Philosophy Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats 3. Lounge chairs B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving 2629' C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 56 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 2 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 35 b. Spring 4 c. Summer 4 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Mary Ravenhall (July 1, August 2, 198) Martha Friedman (July 1, June 3, 1981) b. Nonacademic Linda Bryceland (July 1, June 3, 1981) Jody Gibbs (July 1, October 1, 198) Catherine Bridgeford (October 12, June 3, 1981)

144 HOME ECONOMICS LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 I. LAST YEAR'S PRIORITIES UPGRADING THE LIBRARY CLERK II POSITION--After analyzing more carefully the LC II position and discussing upgrading this position to LTA I with other librarians, the Home Economics Librarian concluded that this would not be a wise decision. Considering the budget and the general nonavailability of persons in the LTA I category, it would be better to upgrade the LC II to a LC III position. The justification for upgrading this position is in the writing process. (The current library clerk II did receive a merit raise this year) BETTER SECURITY SYSTEM--Theft and disappearance of materials continued at a high rate. Following inventory last year the loss was 5 o/o higher than the previous year. Inventory has not been takn this year. However, with the generation of the "snag"notices on LCS, it was obvious that the number of missing items was increasing. It was thought last year that perhaps the implementation of plans drawn up for turnstiles in 1963 could be slightly modified for 198/81. With furthar study and mental visualization, these plans were considered not appropriate. The Librarian had hoped that one way of controlling loss would be changing - the lock, thereby making the library accessable to people only during opening hours. The Librarian made this decision only after polling other librarians in the Science and Technology Council. The majority of the members did not approve of anyone outside the library staff having a key. Changing the lock seemed to be a way of, at least, narrowing the field of how the books might be disappearing. INCREASED LIBRARY INSTRUCTION--There was some increase in the opportunity to present bibliographic instruction through classes during the Fall and Spring semesters. A one page information sheet concerning the Home Economics Library also was made available to students in a new HRFS 199 course. II. ACCOMPLISHMENTS Not having access to the Library after hours apparently was a serious problem with faculty and students in Food and Nutrition. The precedent of having a key was set before the current Librarian came to the Home Economics Library. An accomplishment could be the working out of the compromise of the assigning a key to be made available to this department. The key is the responsibility of the head of the department. The Librarian is hesitant to evaluate this accomplishment as good or bad, but the public relations with Food and Nutrition faculty have improved. Because of an increase in the student wage budget it was possible to extend hours on Sunday from 1-5 to 1-1. Seating count has indicated that these were generally busy hours and justified the increase. Student assistants are working more hours during the day providing time for the Library Clerk to accomplish more tasks and stay current with these tasks, and for the Librarian to perform more professional duties.

145 The Home Economics Librarian appreciated the reorganization of the Public Service Departmental Libraries into (at least for the Science and Technology Libraries) smaller councils. This Librarian has been working on a subcommittee in the Life Sciences Council so that, in the event of an emergency,sharing a staff member could be done more easily and effectively with that staff member understanding routines in another library. The reorganization has been an educational adventure in communication. The School of Human Resources and Family Studies Library Committee had two joint meetings with the Library Committee of the College of Agriculture. These meetings were significant because they were also the first times that the representatives from the College of Agriculture were aware that there was a Home Economics Library and that this library had materials which were also useful in their fields! In a final report the Chairman of Te College of Agriculture Library Committee recommended that the College of Agriculture consider supporting and funding, at least partially, future projects of the Home Economics Library. III. PRIORITIES The Librarian continues to feel that security of library materials is the most important priority. She is working on a plan for redesigning the desk and exit area and hopes to secure some funding for this plan, and for the possible installation of turnstiles. The redesigning needs to include not only the relocation of the present LCS terminal but also the future installation of a public terminal, $885 for which havebeen provided by the College of Agriculture. Although some publicity and bibliographic instruction were included last year there is the opportunity for increased activity in these areas. The creation of BIS programs in the different divisions of SHRFS is a goal towards which this Librarian would like to strive. The Librarian would like to investigate the possibility of changing the name of the library to correspond with the name of the school which it primarily serves. A very frequent question since the Home Economics Department changed its name to the School of Human Resources and Family Studies is "Why doesn't the library also change its name?"

146 STATISTICAL SUMMARY HOME ECONOMICS Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT w TYPE LAST TOTAL of YEAR'S AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL zz JUNE 3 CATALOGED VOLUMES11P UNCATA()bGED 1 VOLUMES PAMPHLETS _ MICROFILM 3 MICROCARDS wxx MICROPRINT4 MICROFIOC SLIDES 26P O 26P P272 I PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONTI NUATION 6 TITLES TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES XWAXXIPýF LWM 275-ý ý ai 14 ±7 p8; L... Nature of Items Included as unceteloged volumes. Vertical file Itoems. Report the number of reels. Report the number of Individuel cards. Vacant Bpaccs are for slide, fils trips, maps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicatos j I I

147 HOME ECONOMICS Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve - Nonprint Month Man'l Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ July Man' LCS/ August Man' September LCS/ Man' LCS/ October Man' LCS/ November Man'1 i ? LCS/ December Man'1i LCS/ January Man ' LCS February Man' LCS March Man'l LCS April Man' LCS May Man' LCS June Man' LCS Totals Man' Grand Total LCS Last Year Increase/ a LCSO Decrease Man' _""75,

148 HOME ECONOMICS Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats 3. Lounge chairs B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving 1636 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 45 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 1 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 1 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 57 b. Spring 57 c. Summer Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Barbara C. Swain September b. Nonacademic Kathy Chapman January. 198-

149 ILLINI UNION BROWSING ROOM ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 I. Priorities The priorities identified in last year's report mistakenly dealt with my position in the Undergraduate Library. As manager of the Illini Union Browsing Room my report will be confined primarily to that position. II. Accomplishments of the past year A. Illini Union Browsing Room 1. Prepared and distributed two annotated acqusition lists in August, 198, and January Prepared a third in June and July to be distributed in August, They are sent to Residence Halls, departmental libraries and technical services departments, IUBR patrons, select number of staff, and the Illini Union Information display rack. 2. Supervised the transfer of 517 books from IUBR for bookstacks (boxed transfer). 3. Supervised the cleaning and inventory of record albums. 4. Supervised inventory of book collection. 5. Ordered 81 books. 6. Interfiled catalog cards following new catalog filing rules. 7. Room painted in June (Hardly a personal accomplishment - IUBR closed for 1 days). B. General 1. Attended course in Government Documents 2. Attended numerous workshops and conferences (see Annual Report I-G) 3. Conducted seven tours of Main Library and Undergraduate Library.

150 4. Term Paper Counseling 5. Since my tenure as membership chairperson of Intellectual Freedom Round Table, membership increased about 2%. Distributed brochures at ALA Midwinter and Annual meetings. Kept in close contact with state IFC in order to distribute brochures at state library conferences. III. Priorities for coming year A. Get the books off the floor. 1. More extensive weeding. 2. Continue requesting Illini Union for separate shelves for periodicals in order to free the periodical bookcase for books. B. Update and revise IUBR manual. C. Become more active in ALA committee work.

151 STATISTICAL SUMMARY.ini Union Browsing Room Library. /- I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT TYPE LAST, 2,, i TOTAL of YEAR'S y 5 AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL < JUNE - U,- u Z z ' Z z CATALOGED VOLUMES F 617 UNCATALO( ED 1 VOLUMES PAMPHLETS 2 MICROFILM 3 MI CROCARDS 4 MICROPR INT 4 HICROFICýH 5 5 l _ PER I O I CAL 6 TITLES A , xxx 2 63 CONT I NUAT IOMA TITLES TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES I Nature of Items Included as uncataloged volumes. Verticl4 file tems,. Report the number of rools. Report the number of Individual cards. Vacant spaces irc for slideas, filmstripcr,,aps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates.

152 Illini Union Browsing Room Library I Month July August September October November December January February March April May June Totals LCS/ Man' 1 LCS/ Man' 1 LCS/ Man'1 LCS/ Man' 1 LCS/ Man'l LCS/ Man'1 LCS/ Man'1 LCS/ Man'l1 LCS Man' 1 LCS Man'1l LCS Man'l LCS Man'l LCS Man'1 LCS Man'1 Fac/ Staff 1P I T1 I y 676 II. Student L L Recorded Use I -----a a Permit C/fCard.2 23 li , ,,. TRR ? , ' 82 /913,/o 2. I, I 7 Special Charges ' ~ ' Al bum J -..Horromer /9SO-- >/ I ati Ot ýc -rr Iý - Al bhi) AT r,ti- i hr Grand Total LCS t511^ Last..... Year a n Increase/ LCS Decrease Man' ISO

153 Illini Union Browsing Room Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats 3. Lounge chairs 32 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library IR23 2. Linear feet of shelving 3 5 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall R O 2. Spring _ 3. Summer D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals I 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall no b. Spring no c. Summer 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Anne Martel b. Nonacademic

154 ILLINOIS HISTORICAL SURVEY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 In preparing for the second time this brief annual report for the Illinois Historical Survey, as in writing two longer personal annual reports, I feel engaged in a kind of soliloquy. Yet I recognize the introspective value of such periodic assessments, and I infer, so long as they are read without comment, that my work and the Survey's present role are generally satisfactory. Although I believe that the Survey usefully contributes to the reference and research functions of the Library, I assume that such a small unit should not require particular administrative attention except in the case of serious inadequacies, a change of regular staff, or a realignment of its role in relation to other departmental libraries. There is even an element of faculty autonomy in this situation, giving me as a professional historian a sense of independent responsibility for the unit, although most of its operations require only the routine services of an academic librarian. Being the only full-time appointee in the Survey, I necessarily see its record as an extension of my own, but at this point I want to allude to others engaged in related work. Above all, I include Professor Robert M. Sutton, with whom I feel on close terms and whose laissez faire spirit toward staff initiatives and procedures allows the unit to function easily and productively. I also want to recognize the part-time contributions of several students from the History Department, not only the graduate assistants--sue Esserman throughout the fiscal year, David Montgomery since August 21, Jim Ducker until April 4, and Wendy Hamand since May 21, but also the hourly staff--laura Messersmith, an undergraduate, during the academic year, and two graduate students, Laura Porter last summer and Evelyn Bohac this. Beyond the Survey, I continue to enjoy agreeable contacts throughout the Library, especially with colleagues in the University Archives and the Rare Book Room. 1. Reverting to my priorities a year ago as the unit's librarian, I feel it possible to report significant although immeasurable progress toward greater familiarity with the collections of the Survey, not yet through systematic review of the manuscript work files or through the preparation of additional guides, but through day-by-day responses to particular reference questions, both by mail and on the spot. To achieve better control of the Survey's library, another objective, I have set the staff to checking all cataloged materials, not against the increasingly outdated and superceded shelflist, but against a printout of all "IHX" entries in LCS. In the past, omissions, inaccurate call numbers, and other discrepancies in the system came to light one by one, each corrected by a special effort and each likely to irritate a patron or embarrass the staff. Now most of these difficulties are being resolved efficiently n.in q inor I P,nn -n rt- - fg( F Fnr I-

155 2. I believe that the most important although least quantifiable accomplishment of the year has been improved reference service. The Survey is a specialized collection, attracting each day only a few users, but they usually require individual attention, and the staff as a matter of policy assists them as fully as possible. For my part, I see myself increasingly as a reference librarian, on hand more than nine hours a day either to help patrons directly or to answer mail inquiries. A second accomplishment of the year was the acquisition of several manuscript collections, some of which I described in last February's report. I have broadened this essential responsibility of the Survey to include work on two important collections located elsewhere in the Library: the Barton family papers acquired for the Lincoln Room and the Carl Sandburg archive in the Rare Book Room. It was gratifying after months of planning to receive confirmation last month of a two-year grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities for the development of the Sandburg Collection. 3. My priorites for the coming year variously relate to last year's agenda and accomplishments. Briefly stated, they include special attention to processing about two dozen manuscript lots, to make them fully available for research; study of the Survey's archives, to understand better the accumulation of the unit's collections; and supervision of a second phase of the staff's LCS project in which it will use the work file maintenance routine to specify for quicker access the items in the Survey that are kept in storage or are specially shelved as serials, reference works, oversize volumes, or rare books. These priorities reflect only a fraction of the projects enumerated in work plans for myself and the staff--lists which save me from any illusion that the Survey as presently constituted is serving its several constituencies with optimum effectiveness. July 15, 1981 John Hoffman

156 Illinois Historical Survey Library STATISTICAL SUMMARY See, again, "Notes onu tresatisca Xages," Report ADO SUBTRACT TYPE LAST 6u TOTAL of YEAR'S AS OF MTERIAL TOTAL S- z 2x JUNE 3 z z.., CATALOG ED VOLUMES c. 1, c ,654 UNCATALOGED VOLUMES PAMPHLETS 2 c.2,985 c ,185 MICROFILM 3 c.2,c ,36 MICROCARDS4 xx MICROPRINT 4 MICROFICHE Manus crip.s Manuscripts cts6 ln.ft.c Maps c.1,635 c.5 j+5 1,4 A PERIODICAL 6 TITLES c.2 +c.3 23 I CONTINUATION 1 TITLES TOTAL SERIAL6 TITLES c IL --lamom do&w..~ ft- I, Nature of Items Included es uncetaloged volumes. 2, Vertical file Itoms., Report the number of roees.,. Report the number of Individual cerds. 5. Vacant epaces are for slidep, filmstripe, maps, disks, etc. 6. Refers to titles currently chocked in, ilncluding duplicates. ý * ~ ý"wý -- 9 W-low ýý q

157 II. Recorded Use Illinois Historical Survey Library LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve - Nonprint Month Man'1 Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ July Man'l LCS/ 9 19 August Man'l 18 4 LCS/ September Man'l LCS/ October Man'l LCS/ L November Man'1 24 LCS/ December Man' January Lcs/ M an ' LCS February Man'1 t LCS March Man'l LCS April Man'l Est. LCS 6 24 May Man'1 2 1 Est. LCS June Man'l LCS Totals Man'l Grand Total LCS n Last Year Man' Increase/ LCS (-11) Decrease Man' (-8)

158 hecorded Patron Count Materials Use Illinois Historical Survey and In-House MONTH Students GENERAL Requests Bv Mail nd Faculty )thers Total MemOs Request By Phone Books, Films, Maps Used Mss. Used b f r July August September October November December January February March April May June L- Totals Total Last Year 1, , ,56 144! 4,35 3, Increase L Decrease +293 I r V / - -I /) -b 4 -.4

159 III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats 3. Lounge chairs B. Physical facilities (unverified) Illinois Historical Survey Library Total square feet in library c in hall 2. Linear feet of shelving c. 955 (books), 154 (office and storage), 522 (boxed mss.), 13-'TT(6-ced mss.), 135 (flat storage) C. Number of hours open weekly (excluding librarian's extra hours) 1. Fall Spring Summer 35 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 2 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 1 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall c. 1 b. Spring c.8 c. Summer c Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Robert M. Sutton, Director John Hoffmnann, Librarian b. Nonacademic

160 ILLINOIS RESEARCH AND REFERENCE CENTER ANNUAL REPORT July 1, 198- June 3, 1981 I. Evaluation of Last Year's Priorities: Priority 1: To improve response time toward meeting goal of answering 7% of title requests received within one day. Two FTE LCII positions were added during the year to retrieval operations which helped stabilize the schedule flexibilities of student employees and also made it possible for IRRC to visit each branch at least once daily and the heavier runs twice daily. Schedules have been modified to have all the instate loans prepared for ILDS delivery by 5 p.m. of the date retrieved. LCS was scheduled into the searching procedures for locating serial titles and an estimated 3% of the requests were found quickly on this first search. All serial requests are still not located within four hours of receipt, although progress has been made toward meeting this goal. Priority 2: To improve bibliographic service by utilizing more of the library's reference and advanced verification work. A ½ FTE reference librarian position was added to handle processing of information requests. In late fall 198, the IRRC librarians were trained to use BRS and IRRC began utilizing this online resource to identify citations in response to information requests. Forty searches for twenty-nine questions were conducted at a cost of $165.11; from these searches, thirty-five documents were identified, located at UIUC and sent (generating $147. revenue). Six visits were also arranged for IRRC faculty to meet subject specialists at the branch libraries to become better acquainted with specialized resources; one of the faculty members audited a course in government documents to improve her understanding of the bibliographic organization of such items. No reference workshops were conducted this year, as had been originally projected. Priority 3: To continue to stabilize IRRC procedures to most efficiently process incoming requests. The IRRC fully handles all remote charges on LCS, including those from HECA libraries; LCS programming changes were completed to produce two pageslips on the IRRC printer which has simplified handling problems considerably. As positions were vacated, each was reviewed for staff classification and schedules. Procedures have been rewritten to reflect changes, with approximately half the IRRC manual left to be revised.

161 II. Most Important Accomplishments of the Past Year: Major activities affecting the IRRC service during FY81 included a) full incorporation of processing requests via LCS initiated by other (HECA) LCS-participating libraries; and b) implementation on Sept. 2, 198 of the Intersystems Library Delivery Service (ILDS). Internally, a small, but critically needed, amount of additional space was assigned to IRRC and adjusted to accomodate the greater delivery preparation. Changes in support staff occured mostly among the part-time Library Clerk II positions, while most of the full-time positions had no turnover this year. The Bibliographer position changed as Linda Larson assumed the new half-time reference librarian position in August 198 and Anne Wendler joined the faculty in January 1981 as the Bibliographer. Ms. Larson's patient and productive service as the Bibliographer since 1978 and during the very hectic transition period when both LCS and OCLC were introduced and when volume more than doubled is greatly appreciated. The total volume of requests processed by the IRRC continued to increase this year: 139,473 loans and photo requests were received, 74% (12,638) of which were from Illinois libraries; 12,277 such title requests were filled, 39,83 were not filled, totaling 141,36 processed. This reflects a 19% increase in the volume of requests received compared to FY8 (116,98) and a 73% (of number received) fill rate for title requests compared to a 66% fill rate last year. The number of information requests received (241) has decreased by 8% over last year (262); data for 1295 information requests were sent which is 76% of the total processed. Speculation on the reasons for this drop include greater ease in use of automated tools by system staff for difficult-to-verify titles previously sent more frequently as information requests, and the sensed impression that ILLINET reference service may generally have dropped. Response time has improved with 14% of filled title orders completed the same day as receipt, 5% within one day and 73% within two days. Nearly half (52%) of completed information requests were sent within five working days of receipt and 84% were sent within ten working days. III. Highest Priorities For FY82: Priority 1: To improve response time toward meeting goal of answering 7% of title requests received within one day and without decreasing the fill rate. Activities: A..Kssign one supervisor to have responsibility for monitoring retrieval as his main charge and who will also be given more time to improve training of retrieval staff. B. Revise the searching schedule such that all requests received by 3:3 P.M. each day will have been searched through the basic level (e.g. LCS, card catalogs, serial record and current issues). C. Add one new position at the Clerk Typist II level who will be trained on processing OCLC-ILL requests, searching LCS and the

162 card catalog. D. Complete documentation on IRRC procedures. Priority 2: To respond to circulation problems and status requests within two days of receipt. Activities: A. Assume responsibility for routine discharging on LCS of returned library materials borrowed from the Main Stacks. B. Formalize procedures for responding to the assortment of forms of inquiry from UIUC and off-campus library staff. C. Schedule an additional two hours each day for processing circulation problems and add one new position at the Library Clerk II level to assume some of these added responsibilities. Priority 3: To promote information services among ILLINET systems. Activities: A. Continue to utilize online search services and actively assist any ILLINET system wishing to gain access to such resources; develop search skills among IRRC faculty. B. Design and distribute at least four new "ALERTS" identifying UIUC special resources. C. Actively participate in a statewide reference institute, or if none is scheduled by 1982, to offer a workshop focusing on resources and services before the end of the fiscal year.

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165 TABLE III Unfilled Requests By Library Type and Reason FY81 Library Not Owned/Not Total Type Owned Available Other Unfilled ILLINET Public Academic(non-HECA) (HECA) Special School Non-ILLINET Illinois Academic ICIU IU-M Special Illinois Sub-Total , ,695 Non-Illinois(U.Sj. Public School Academic Special Individuals Reprinters Canada Other Foreign GRAND TOTAL 1,668 24, ,83

166 TABLE IV-A REQUESTS RECEIVED BY CHANNEL OF COMMUNICATION AND TYPE OF LIBRARY FY81 LIBRARY TYPE LCS Mail/ILDS OCLC TWX TOTAL ILLINET Public 38, ,157 Academic non-heca ,231 HECA Special ,749 School Non-ILLINET ILLINOIS- Academic ICIU IU-M Special Non-ILL(US) Public School Academic ,136 Special Individual Foreign Canada '1817 Other Reprinters -" TOTAL 57,287 4,662 14,36 27, ,473 % of Total 41% 29% 1% 2% 1%

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169 INFORMATION TABLE V B REQUESTS RESPONSE TIME FY81 Month Sample Completed Within 5 Days Number Percent Sample Completed Within 1 Days Number Percent Total Sample Completed* 198 July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec % 43% 54% 64% 72% 49% % 76% 86% 94% 9% 81% Jan. Feb. March April 1 May June % 46% 44% 43% 52% 58% % 76% 87% 76% 86% 88% TOTAL FY % % 233 *Response time is measured as the number of working days from the time of receipt to the time of completion by UIUC; the sample does not include those requests where the dates were not clear.

170 TABLE V-C ORIGIN AND CONCLUSION OF COMPLETED INFORMATION REQUESTS FY81 FINAL IRRC ACTION ORIGINATING LIBRARY Pattially Not Total SYSTEM FILLED Filled Filled # % Bur Oak % Chicago % Corn Belt % Cumberland Trail % Du Page % Great River % Illinois Valley % Kaskaskia % Lewis and Clark % Lincoln Trail % North Suburban % North Illinois % River Bend % Rolling Prairie % Shawnee % Starved Rock % Suburban % Western Illinois % Direct Public % Direct Academic % TOTAL: %

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172 APPENDIX A IRRC PERSONNEL FY81 Academic Danuta Nitecki Anne Wendler Shyamala Balgopal Marcy Joncich Linda Larson John Dunkelberger Support Staff Gail Schmal Elsie Wojnar Sylvia Gladhill Jodi Wonser Linda Holmes Helen King Cheryl Melchi Patricia Maher Anthony Romano Reine Drame Cynthia Rivera Elizabeth Amsbary John Carey Alan Conrad Melanie Elbert Joseph Nose Liette Wallace Karen Moran Richard Palmer Brian Ripp Sharon Murray Jessica Paul Kay Trinkle Vasso Romanos Sherry Blanco Students Mark Pausch Matt Pausch Clark Young Sherril Filbert Rich Blazier Coordinator Bibliographer Reference Librarian Reference Librarian Reference Librarian Bibliographer (temporary) Library Clerk IV Library Technical Assistant I Library Technical Assistant I Clerk Typist III Clerk Typist III Clerk Typist II Clerk Typist II Library Clerk II Library Clerk II Library Clerk II Library Clerk II Library Clerk II Library Library Library Library Library Library Library Library Library Library Library Library Library Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk Clerk 11 II II II II II II II II II II II II 3/78--present 1/81--present 1/79--present 8/77--present 12/78--present 8/8--I/81 1/6/8--present 5/25/8--present 8/18/8--7/21/81 1/77--5/22/81 1/9/79--2/1/81 1/1/79--5/15/81 6/9/81--present 2/25/8--5/22/81 11/12/79--present 3/1/8--present 9/24/79--present 1/2/81--4/3/81 7/1/81--present 3/3/8--1/5/81 7/21/8--present 4/3/81--present 11/4/8--present 6/16/8--present 9/3/8--1/11/8 5/27/81--present 4/15/81--5/22/81 1/16/79--present 9/12/8--1/7/8 6/17/8--7/3/8 6/19/8--present 1/21/8--present 1/7/79--present 9/7/79--present 1/5/79--persent 1/24/8--11/17/8 1/24/8--6/3/81

173 Jim Rozich Diana Pitstick Mike Miller Laura Adams Mary Westfal l Brian Ripp Kerrie Johnson Shari Schlachter Kathryn O'Connor Connie Dalton Mindy Tyner Rich Veckler Dorothy Spence James Polizzi Marsha Spence Bart Smith Andrew Dahle Margaret Bauer Randy Hoth Julie Paschen Sandra Schwabe Kathy Hardaway Margaret Malloy Teserach Kitema Jayne Reynolds 1/3/8--present 3/19/8--11/17/8 2/15/8--11/17/8 2/15/8--11/17/8 5/1/8--present 5/13/8-4/14/81 5/13/8--6/3/81 5/3/8--present 5/3/8--11/17/8 7/16/8--11/17/8 8/22/8--present 8/22/8--6/3/81 9/5/8--present 9/5/8--3/6/81 5/26/81--present 9/19/8--11/1/8 1/2/8--2/5/81 1/22/8--2/5/81 1O/21/8--present 1/28/8--6/3/81 3/2/81--6/3/81 3/9/81--present 1/21/8--2/5/81 3/6/81--3/19/81 5/1/81--6/26/81 6/15/81--present

174 LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 I. Meeting last year's priorities Three priorities were identified in last year's annual report. The last of these, generation of more serial funds, was not satisfactorily addressed this year. Some cancellations were made, and the printouts were corrected, but serial funds remain a problem for Labor as for most other departmental libraries. The second priority--additional shelving--was solved by the installation of 147 linear feet of additional stack shelving transferred from the Chemistry Library, and the entire collection was read and shifted. This enabled us to integrate the volumes shelved on top of the vertical file and on the reading tables into their regular places in the collection. It seems, though, that the additional shelving will not allow for as much collection growth as I had originally projected. In regard to sabbatical preparations, the first priority, I prepared four guides based on frequently asked reference questions to aid my staff in assisting users while I was on sabbatical. I presented a special session on using the labor looseleaf services for students, reference librarians from the Law Library, and ILIR Library staff. Several discussions were held with the Acting Director of the Institute about sabbatical arrangements, and the membership of the Institute Library Committee was changed to provide a more balanced representation of subject areas since the Committee would be taking over the task of book selection during my sabbatical. II. Accomplishments of the past year The biggest accomplishment was the smooth operation of the library during my sabbatical, in spite of the 33 percent reduction in staff. Because of the concern, hard work, and dedication of Betty Yapp, the cooperation of staff members in other departmental libraries (particularly Commerce and Reference), and the understanding of the ILIR faculty, staff, and students, the library was able to maintain a reasonable level of service. I continued to compile data on the number of reference questions I answered until I left on my sabbatical. From July 1, 198-January 3, 1981, I answered 216 reference questions; 55 from faculty, 118 from students, and 43 from other persons. During the same period, I did 16 online bibliographic searches; 2 for faculty and 14 for graduate students. Data on changes in circulation and in the library's holdings are reported in the statistical sections attached.

175 In February 1981 the library began participating in the Blackwell North America approval plan. III. Goals for FY 1982 Reclassification of the Chief Library Clerk to LTA III, would more accurately reflect not only the changing content of the job but also increasing capabilities of Betty Yapp. All of the paperwork has been completed, and I hope reclassification can be accomplished speedily. A new, nonbibliographic database (LABSTAT) has come up on Lockheed that promises to be of great use to people in the labor and labor economics fields. I have asked for a Lockheed password, and, as soon as I have it, I shall be trained to search that system. This will mean that ILIR library patrons will have access to online databases offered by all three major vendors. As a result of a couple of reference questions I received, I became aware of some problems and gaps in the UIUC library's holdings of U.S. and foreign labor union newspapers. Before I left on sabbatical, I began an evaluation of our foreign labor union newspaper holdings, and I intend to finish the project this year as well as to coordinate the acquisition and retention of U.S. labor union newspapers with the Newspaper Library and the Stacks. Finally, I intend to complete the planning, and, I hope, actually begin the building of the collective bargaining contract collection requested by the ILIR faculty. The library has hundreds (perhaps thousands) of contracts, but they are not arranged for easy retrieval, and there is no method for systematic acquisition of new contracts. I doubt that the project could be completed in one year without major additional staffing, but certainly a beginning can be made. MC:by

176 STATISTICAL SUMMARY ILIR Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT TYPE LAST ut z TOTAL of YEAR'S F 5 AS OF z MATERIAL TOTAL j w JUNE 3 S 3 z a w G-f CATALOGEDS ,514 UNCATALOGED I 96 4 I VOLUMES PAMPHLETS 26, ,441 MICROFILM MICROCARDS- -- :.--- -i , _ t, MICROPR INT 4 ZICROFICHEI CASS 32-_.... m CASSETTE : :T :.....,,,, =. L ,,,..- -,,,, - PERIOICAL 6 TITLES 396 x xxx X CONTI NUATION 6 TITLES 28 i 1 28 TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES I I - -W go". - I.li Nature of Items Included Vertical file Items. as unceteloged volumes, theses... Report Report the number of reels. the number of Individual cards. Vacant, apaccs are for slides, filmstripe, mnpsp disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicatos

177 ILIR Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve * Nonprint Month Man'l Staff Student C/Card IRR Chargen Materials Materials LCS/ July Man'l LCS/ August Man'l LCS/ September Man'l LCS/ October Man' LCS/ November Man' LCS/ December Man' LCS/ January Man' LCS February Man' LCS March Man' LCS April Man' LCS May Man' LCS June Man' LCS Totals Man' ,58 - Grand Total ,58 1I LCS Last Year Man' ,277 - Increase/ LCS _ _ Decrease Man'

178 ILIR Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats 5 3. Lounge chairs 6 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving 2126 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 3 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 1 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 2 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 15 b. Spring 2 c. Summer 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Margaret A. Chaplan, Librarian, b. Nonacademic Betty Yapp, Chief library clerk, April 12, Kathy Wright, Library clerk II, October 1,

179 STATISTICAL SLUMMARY Law Library TYPE of AATERIAL I LAST YEAR'S TOTAL I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION I-- u 9 ADO U9 VI LA. z SUBTRACT z o 3 v) z LJi o TOTAL AS OF JUNE 3 CATALOGED VOLUIMES 38,185 9,18 5, , ,58 UNCATAL COED VOLUMES 23,956 (A) (A) (A) 23,956 PAMPHLETS 2 2,958 8,67 11,628 MICROFILM 3 1, ,29 MICROCARDS 4 33,586 33,586 MICROPRINT 4 HICROFICKHS CASSETTES 5 93, ý2, ,159 9 RECORDS 4 4 I. 2. 3, A. Nature of Items Included as unceteloged volume5. Federal & Illinois VertIcal file Itos,. Depository. Report the number of roels, Report the numrber of Individuol cnrds. Vacant paccs r-re for Elides, fil.stripe, mnps, disks, etc. Refers to titloo currently checked in, including duplicates. The Law Library no longer distinguishes between cataloged and uncaitaloged materials. If necessary, a safe estimate is that one-sixth of the figures above are uncataloged.

180 B. All departments recounted live serials this year and we are thus substituting a new base figure. However we do not have new figures on the breakdown between continuations and periodicals.

181 Law Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Month Man'1 Staff LCS/ 58 I Studeni 2 I Permi t C/Card IRR 91 Special Charger 21 Reserve u Materials Nonprint Materials -July _ Man'l 355 LCS/ ,634 1 August Man'l ,559 LCS/ September Man'1 216 LCS/ T ,774 3 October Man'l ,147 LCS/ November Man')1 482 LCS/ ,952 December Man'1 212 LCS/ ,594 January Man' ,99 LCS February Man'l ,1 1 March LCS Man' ,924 2 LCS April May June Man'1 LCS Man' LCS Man' LCS , , , ,35 3,172 1, Sf of Totals Man'1I 2,98 2, , ,12 13 Grand Total (2) 4,177 7, ,239 1,531 31,12 13 ) Last Year -V I Increase/ Decrease LCS LCS Man' , ,465 2,248 3,65 +2, , T-A , ,669 33, ,39-2,26 1. We now count only materials that were checked out of the Law Library. Previously materials used in-house were also counted. 2. The reduction in recorded circulation can be attributed to three factors: 1. The faculty are no longer required to check out things they plan to use for )VER less than 24 hours. 2. The library was open more hours this year creating less need J I -,

182 to check out the non-circulating materials which conprise 8% of the Law Library collection. 3. The change in procedure for counting non-print circulation (see footnote 1).

183 Law Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats Lounge chairs 1 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library 43, Linear feet of shelving 55,59 C. Number of hours open weekly(1) 1. Fall Spring Summer 85 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 5 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 11. c5 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 15 b. Spring 15 c. Summer Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic SEE ATTACHED SHEET b. Nonacademic SEE ATTACHED SHEET. 1. During the sessions these figures are the same as last years. llhowever because of additional staff we were able to stay open more hours than last year during holidays and breaks.

184 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Edward F. Hess, Jr. - October 1, 1964-August 31, 198 Carol Boast Nancy Johnson Timothy G. Kearley Cheryl Rae Nyberg - August 29, 198 Kathryn A. Webster b. Nonacademic Jeffrey M. Barnet - January 5, August 2, 1981 Melonv G. Barrett Jacqueline Birkey Kenneth J. Carlborg - May 28, 1979-August 2, 1981 Robert Chapel - September 16, 198-November 22, 198 Anne Easterly-Potter - January 5, July 31, 1981 Leta Hunt Michael S. Krejsa - September 28, 198-July 18, 1981 Jeffrey Loftiss - April 1, 1981 William E. Ogg - December 1, 198-May 23, 1981 Sharon Person - May 1, 1979-August 15, 198 Joseph Reid - February 18, 198-August 15, 198 Jean E. Samet Marsheneal Townsend - July 8, 198 Margaret Williams Carol A. Willms - March 9, 1981-August 7, 1981 (Illini Temporary Help)

185 LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 In her 1979/8 annual report, Mary Pillepich identified three priorities and made recommendations with regard to each priority. I. Priority: Monographic budget Recommendation: "$8,5 be established as the new base for the Library Science monographic budget." Action: The Library and Information Science Library has received a materials allocation of $24,3 for 1981/82. This is an increase of 23% ($4,4) in the total budget and an increase of 24% in the monographic/continuation budget. Because of changes in the library's acquisitions policies which have shifted many titles from the continuation budget to the monographic budget, it is too soon to tell whether the monographic budget, now $1,2 will be adequate. Nonetheless, substantial progress has been made toward this goal. II. Priority: Library Science Library Committee Recommendations: 1. "The library school's Library Science Committee needs to be resuscitated and/or activated in a meaningful way." 2. "The University Library faculty should establish a Library Science Library Committee, jointly or independently of the Library School." Action: The librarian met with the library school's committee in February. The meeting provided a valuable opportunity to discuss the library's collection and its user services. The librarian also met with the University Library's Research and Publication Committee. This committee has agreed to become the library's advisory committee. In the coming year the librarian will continue to encourage these committees to offer advice and useful criticism when these are needed. III.Priority: Physical facilities Recommendations: 1. "The University must do major exterior repair work to stop the leak in room 36." or- 2. "The University Library should provide or seek funds to move Library Science monograph shelving." Action: Work by the University's physical plant appears to have corrected the leak. There was no rain damage this year. ACCOMPLISHMENTS 198/81 I. Monographs: 1. Standing orders were placed for two microfiche series, British Library Research and Development Reports and American Doctoral Dissertations in Library Science. 2. The library began participation in the Blackwell/North America Approval Plan resulting in popular titles being in the library more quickly. 3. Mrs. Holloway has nearly completed weeding the reference collection eliminating out of date or no longer relevant titles.

186 II. Serials: 1. A comprehensive serial claiming project has been completed. Mrs. Ashley claimed hundreds of missing serials from OCR/Serials and wrote to hundreds of libraries and other sources claiming gift serials. Serials no longer available as gifts have been ordered. There has not been a project of this scope for more than six years. 2. The library asked to be placed on the newsletter mailing list of all the library systems in Illinois. Similar requests were made of UTLAS, RLG, SOLINET, WLN, and other library networks or consortia. Response has been very favorable, and we now receive many additional newsletters. III.User services: 1. A current contents service was started in September. The library provides tables of contents of some 6 journals to 57 library faculty and Graduate School of Library and Information Science faculty. 2. The library began publication of an acquisitions list in March. 3. Photocopying for University Library faculty has been provided. About 5 different librarians are currently using this service. Cost is charged to the Research and Publication Committee. IV. Facilities and hours: 1. Hours were changed in August. The library remained open from 5-7pm Monday through Thursday rather than closing these two hours, but it closed on Sunday evening. 2. Room 36 was painted white. Posters, plants and new signs were added. 3. Room 316 became a conference room which is scheduled by LIS Library. 4. The library's name was changed to Library and Information Science Library in April. This change was made because of a similar name change in the library school. PRIORITIES 1981/82 The two long range goals of the library are the development of a research collection of excellence and the provision of user services which foster research and enhance the teaching function of the library school or the operation of the University Library. Priorities for the coming year are as follows: I. Collection development: 1. There will be a continued effort to upgrade the serials collection. 2. The vertical file needs to be revitalized. 3. Work must be done on an acquisitions policy statement. II. User services: 1. A guide to the library is in preparation. 2. A list of serials in Library Science will be prepared. 3. The library will begin a program of profiling library clientele. III.Physical facilites and hours: 1. The library will remain open 5-7pm on Sunday. 2. An investigation of costs of a microfiche reader printer will be made and the reader will be purchased if possible.

187 Library and Information ScienLtbrary STATISTICAL SUMMARY I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT TYPE LAST - z TOTAL of YEAR'S ~ AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL - i m JUNE 3 CATALOGED VLMES 13q73 I Tq 37'i,34 UNCATALOGED VOLUMES ci l 3 _13 3 JL PAMPHLETS 2 q +I i ' MICROFILM x xx 3 MI CROCARDS 4 xx x MICROPRI NT T 1 13oq _qq,_,, 1 q 5/5 - _.,, Nature of Items Included es unceteloged volumes. Vertical file items. Report the number of rools. Report the number of Individual cards. Vacant Bpaccs arc for elides, filinstripes mrps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates. I ~t, ~Ieins

188 Library and Information Science L L ci II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Month Man'1 Staff Student LCS/ 9Z 2. 3:3 ijuly Man'l q /O I D 7 LCS/ S L / August Man.'1.35 LCS/ I/i 37R_ Sptember Man'l I LCs/ /7?! 32 Permit Special Reserve - Nonprint C/Card IRR Chargen Materials Materials I I r I 3 22? / --11(23L I I LCS/ 9 z 35 Z Lcs/ /! gy December Man'. / u L C S/ January Man'f 52. LCS _ February Man'! I March April LCS Man'l LCS Man'! LCS aayv Man' 1 June LCS Mane'1 LCS [otals Man' 1 ;rand Total Last ear ncrease/ Decrease LCS Man'1 LCS Man'l /3I 37 ;/ 5 I'3b J1L (r I-2L^2 51f8 -a^ -3 - /! - g/oal _ ii25 37? q2 65,3.2 LIN3-33T '7 o 3 LL3_ sq 35$ 1' Ai 92 O9 53 / S5W i 3/ 437.! -/ o /5 23 a3. q.. 2 'C-- 145"c &I g t- &q I / i / Ž5± - i IL, 1S3 15 a &so '" I I

189 Library and Information ScienceLibrary III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables 2. Carrel seats 3. Lounge chairs B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library 3,44 2. Linear feet of shelving C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall 77 does not include interim hours 2. Spring Summer 77 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 1 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 2 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall does not include periods when b. Spring 74 aren't in session classes c. Summer Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Mary Pillepich:July 1, October 12, 1981 Patricia Stenstrom: January 1, b. Nonacademic Johnna Hawkins Holloway, LTA I Allison Ashley, Clerk II

190 MAP AND GEOGRAPHY LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 I. A. Last year's highest priority--to resolve the conflict between our technical service and public service functions--was communicated to the University Librarian with a program for short and long range solutions but there has been no response. It is especially frustrating to be ignored when one spends a great deal of time working on a proposal. B. It is not surprising, in these times of financial restrictions and instability, that we were not able to add a professional assistant to the library. It is especially gratifying that the Director of Public Services awarded the library a graduate assistant to aid our processing efforts. This position's major responsibility will be cataloging and classifying the map collection. C. The appointment to Assistant Director for Special Collections, although well appreciated and even fun, has wrecked havoc with my OCLC cataloging goals. The library was doing quite well to that point and was on target with our projected goal of 1, titles--we did manage to process 69 titles which is a slight improvement over last year. II. A. The major accomplishments of the year are briefly outlined below: 1) The book card catalog was completely reorganized to reflect the expressed concerns of our users. We decided to ignore ALA filing rules, AACR 2 filing rules, and all others that only "librarians" can understand, and proceeded to a dictionary alphabetical file. 2) Thousands of maps were shifted to make room for crowding in certain geographical areas. 3) A new bibliography series was initiated. Entitled Info, a guide to our county atlases and aerial photographs have already been published. We have one on selected maps of Chicago ready for press and three are in preparation: U.S. atlases; world atlases; and pre-19 maps of the United States. 4) Use of the library increased 11.8% over the previous year. Ordinarily, this would not be very significant except that it represents a major rebound for the Map and Geography Library. Three years ago our circulation really "bottomed

191 out" when in 78/79 we circulated 22.9%fewer items than in 77/78. Last.year our circulation increased 17.5%and this year nearly 12%. Why 9 Our concerted and very purposeful p.r. program has obviously worked: T.V. spots during basketball games, newspaper articles, displays in Undergrad, lectures to Reference and Undergrad staffs, and reference update to library faculty. The wall ddsplays on the fourth floor have also attracted persons who would just walk by the library. Finally, the recent remodeling and reorganization of the library makes it a more pleasant environment for our patrons. The 8+ increase in our interlibrary loans show a direct relationship to our participation in the IRRC workshops. I am happy that our library has increased its circulation by nearly 3% over the last two years! III. The new priorities for the coming year are outlined below: A. The addition of the G.A. position, although not as satisfactory or as productive as a full-time professional assistant, will provide the library with needed assistance to "attack" our growing backlog. Our major goal must be to eradicate the backlog and increase our OCLC input. B. Our new guide series is important for us and our users. This type of publication is especially valuable to a "special collections library" when materials may be more efficiently organized by format, type, date, etc. These special locations, although convenient for the staff in the long run, it is maddening to new staff and many of our patrons. These "guides" will also be useful for other library units such as Reference, CPLA, Documents, Undergrad, etc., etc. C. We hope to centralize our "collection access" points to the map collection which will require the map card catalog nearer to our circulation desk. This will put our map bibliographic file next to our LCS terminal and map indices file and should have a positive effect on improved reference service. C. We hope to join with the Illinois Geological Survey to form a National Cartographic Information Center Affiliate for Illinois. This will put us into a direct cooperative relationship with the U.S. Geological Survey and involve the sharing of some of our data collection and, in return, we will be given some data on satellite imagery, advance mapping information, and generally a more favorable position for data distribution from USGS. Provisionally, IGS would be responsible for cartographic information in digital form and we would act as the "map-inprint" backup for Illinois and non-illinois material. I am really excited about this project and the positive implications it may have for the Map and Geography Library, the Special Collections Council and the University of Illinois.

192 SUMMARY I am somewhat disappointed that my priorities for last year fell short, however, considering this library's political climate the goals may have been too lofty. Our accomplishments for the year have made the library a better library and a more visible unit in the whole library. The goals for the coming year are focusing on more practical priorities and are more locally, or unit, oriented than those we have established in the past. This should not be translated to mean that we are diminishing our goals for I look forward to this year with much more confidence than any I can remember at Illinois.

193 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Map Geography Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT w TYPE LAST >u 2 TOTAL of YEAR'S 9 AS OF < MATERIAL TOTAL JUNE 3 CATALOGCD VOLUMES 13, ,424 UNCATALOGED VOLUMES PAMPHLETS 2 MICROFILM MICROCARDS4 MICROPR I NT HICROFIC 5, 2,25 1-2,25 MAPS 37,322 4,837 6X , ,448 AIR PHOTOS 13,69 9,878 +9,878 4,487 This figure does not represent additions to the map collection but rather repairs completed by binding. PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONTI NUAT IOb TITLES 561 xx* I TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES 75 Xxx Nature of Items Included es uncmtaloged volumes. Vertical fl Io Itoem. Report the number of rools. Report the number of Individual cards. Vacant rpaccs are for elidea, filmntripe, maps, disks, etc. Refers to titloo currently chocked in, including duplicatoes. I..

194 Map & Geography Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve Nonprint Month Man'1 Staff Student C/Card IRR Chargees Materials Materials LCS/ July Man' _ LCS/ i ugust Man' LCS/ 6o September Man' LCS/ October Man' LCS/ ' November Man' LCS/ December Man' LCS/ January Man' LCS February Man' LCS March Man' LCS April Man' LCS 56 19_7 2i 1 May Man' LCS June Man' LCS Totals Man' Grand Total LCS' Las t Year Man' Increase/ LCS -8 _ Decrease Man'

195 Map & Geography Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables 2. Carrel seats 3. Lounge chairs B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library 3,22 2. Linear feet of shelving 2,337 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 35 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 1 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 1 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 8 b. Spring 7 c. Summer 2 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic David A. Cobb b. Nonacademic Christine M. Kuechler (7/8-6/81) Valerie M. Blaine (6/81 - )

196 MATHEMATICS LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 Implementation of 198/81 Priorities 1. I resubmitted the Title II-C application and was successful. On June 21 the U.S. Office of Education awarded $12, for 1981/82 to recatalog and reclassify the mathematics collection in order to create a nationwide online mathematics document delivery and reference center. 2. Celeste Leonard and Sarojini Balanchandran developed a referral form to be given to patrons by the Engineering Library Staff when referring them to materials in the Altgeld Hall stacks. This referral form has resulted in better service to patrons as well as better training of the Engineering Library staff. However, the more fundamental problems of the incorrect location designated on LCS and inappropriate materials housed in Altgeld Hall remains unresolved. 3. No work was begun on development of a program promoting online services because MATHFILE will not be online until January Most Important Accomplishments of 198/81 1. We completed the acquisition on microfilm of Russian mathematics titles under the third year of the Slavic Title II-C program. We now own 98% of the Russian titles reviewed in Mathematical Reviews over the last 4 years. 2. I initiated the development of the article in the January 1981 issue of Friendscript on "The Magnificent Mathematics Collections". This article was successful in securing funds to purchase the journal Mathematical Modelling for the next two years. 3. I re-examined the procedures for the ordering and processing of new monographs, card filing, and monographic series claiming. This has allowed the Mathematics Library to accomodate loss of one professional position without too much loss in service to our clientele. 4. The Mathematics Library experienced a 56% increase in LCS student circulation, a 12% increase in LCS faculty/staff circulation, and a 2% increase in reserve circulation. These increases were accomplished with less staff and less student assistants. The great increase in LCS student circulation is due to the Mathematics Library

197 becoming better known through LCS to all users on campus. Increased awareness has also resulted in increased theft. "Credit" for circulating Engineering journals (as ENX became MTE) accounts for some of the increase, too. Priorities for 1981/82 My most important priority for 1981/82 is to supervise the staff of my Title II-C grant in order to recatalog and reclassify the mathematics collection, to search and acquire the c. 2, unowned titles reviewed in Mathematical Reviews, and to design the subsequent nationwide reference system. At the same time as the Title II-C project is going on in 213 Altgeld Hall with the consequent moving of books back and forth between 213 and the stacks, I hope that we can continue our high standard of service without too much disruption. All other priorities are secondary to this goal and attempts toward accomplishment can occur only as time permits. I list these other priorities in descending order of priority. a. I will work to expand the mathematics materials fund budget in order to serve present clientele as well as continue to build the base for a national mathematics document delivery and reference center. b. I will continue to press for better service of the Engineering Altgeld Hall collections through integration of the monograph collection, weeding, and change in the LCS location, c. I hope to work with the statistics faculty, especially those in the Graduate Applied Statistics Program, to determine their collection needs. d. I will continue to press for additional student wage money to compensate for our decrease in staff and increase in circulation. e. I will continue to weed the Mathematics collection of unnecessary duplicates in order to best use the available space. f. I will continue to work for a means of instituting a library instruction program for the Mathematics Department graduate students at the beginning of their dissertation research. Graduate level library instruction was enthusiastically received during the one year experimental program in 198, but no further development was made in I would hope the Physical Science Council will take up this project.

198 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Matma Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT TYPE LAST z7 TOTAL of YEAR'S L AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL Sz v_ z ~ o JUNE 3 CATALOGED VOLUMES 57, 2, ,22 59, 22 UNCATALOGED 1 VOLUMES PAMPHLETS 2 MlCROFI LM 3 MICROFILM MICROCARDS MICROPR I NT4 MICROFICHE 2 Cassette Tape 4 4 Motion Picture Video Recording PERIODICAL 6 TITLES I CONTI NUATION6 TITLES TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES I, 2, &ý Iý Mý. -i 6ý i -ý Nature of Items Included as uncetiloged volumes. Vertical fi le Iterms. Report the number of rools. Report the number of Individual cards. Vacant apaccs arc for Elides, filmstrips, mnaps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates

199 Mathematics Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve - Nonprint Month Man'1 Staff Student C/Card IRR Charge s Materials Materials LCS/ July Man' LCS/ August Man' LCS/ September Man' LCS/ " October Man' LCS/ November Man' LCS/ December Man'l LCS/ January Man LCS February Man'l LCS March Man ' LCS April Man' LCS May Man' LCS June Man' LCS , Totals Man' , Grand Total , , Last Year LCS , Mn _ Increase/ LCS Decrease Man'

200 A, w...., Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats 3. Lounge chairs 2 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library 66 est. 2. Linear feet of shelving 6254 est. C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 63 (198) 59 (1981) D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 2 (1 after 13 February 1981) 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 2 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 73.5 b. Spring 73.5 c. Summer 63 (198) 34 (1981) 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Nancy D. Anderson 1 September Celeste Leonard 21 August February 1981 b. Nonacademic William Johnston 25 September Eula Sisco 4 March June 1981

201 MODERN LANGUAGES AND LINGUISTICS LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 During fiscal 198/81 the staff of the Modern Languages and Linguistics Library was involved in a number of projects designed to provide better service to the library patrons. One continuing project, the Modern Language Association Bibliography Acronyms List (see last year's report), is now complete volume 1 to date ( ). The list consists of ca. 5,2 serial titles, their acronyms and University of Illinois call numbers or status as parts of "catalogued as separate" series. In addition, significant progress has been made in another project, a revision of the Library's collection started last year. It involved the evaluation, selection and transfer of ca. 1,15 volumes up from the main library stacks and the weeding of almost 7 volumes, a large percentage of which have been sent on to Remote Storage. This will result, we believe, in a more meaningful and accessible core collection. We feel that this renewal of the collection is also responsible in part for a 37% overall increase in circulation for January-April 1981 over January-April 198. Another project in which the library was involved during the past year, with the assistance of Mr. Steve Willier (Graduate Assistant for the Humanities libraries), was the surveying of the Chicano collection at the University of Illinois library and the subsequent beginnings in the establishment of a Chicano literature collection housed at the Modern Languages and Linguistics Library. We have also developed several procedures to streamline operations and improve service: a new reserve book request form, a more detailed method of keeping reserve statistics, and a "mini" serial continuation file in our library to save trips downstairs and to help avoid duplicate orders. Goals for the Future The three projects mentioned above: the MLA Bibliography acronyms list, the revision of the collection, and the establishment of a Chicano collection will be ongoing projects for at least the next three years, subject to the availability of staff and funds for student help. We would like to reiterate our equipment requests for an electric typewriter and a microfilm reader as stated in the annual report of 198/81. We renew our conviction that this equipment can make a difference in our work efficiency and provide a necessary extension of library services. In addition, we are asking this year for a book case, a high chair and a typing stand.

202 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Modern Languages Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT TYPE LAST u z u TOTAL of YEAR'S N ' AS OF MATERIAL 2 TOTAL I JUNE 3 2 z z o CATALOGED VOLUMES 15, , ,66 UNCATALOGED 1 VOLUMES PAMPHLETS 2 MICROFILM3 MI CROCARDS 4 MICROPRINTh HICROFICHEh 5 DISCS ,, PERIOOICAL 6 TITLES CONTINUAT ION 6 TITLES TOTAL SERIAL6 TITLES I Nature of Items Included Vertical file Items. Report Report Vacant Refers.- L.. as unceteloged volumes. the number of reels. the number of Individual cards. spaces arc for slides, fil-mstripe, maps, disks, etc. to titles currently checked in, including duplicates

203 Modern Lanfrualss Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve - Nonprint Month Man'l Staff Student C/Card IRR Chargen Materials Materials LCS/ July Man' LCS/ August Man' LCS/ September Man'1l LCS/ October Man' LCS/ November Man' SLCS a. December Man' LCS/ January Man' ' LCS February Man' LCS March Man' LCS o LCS _ May Man' LCS June Man' LCS 1,932 6, Totals Man' , , Grand Total 2,51 7, ,523 3, LCS 1,595 5, , Year Man'l 585 1, , Increase/ Lcs -r337 [1, Decrease Man'

204 Modern Languages Library III. Other Information A. Sqeting capacity 1. Seats at tables 6 2. Carrel seats 3. Lounge chairs 3 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving 2886 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 59 c19 8 J.59 [ D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 1 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 2 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 62 b. Spring 64 c. Summer 59 cl98i 65 c Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Sara de Mundo Lo John Dagmnais b. Nonacademic Pamela J. Lindell Cynthia Knee rlibrary Clerk I , Library Clerk II

205 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN MUSIC LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 Last Years's Priorities - Results 1. An outline and report was drafted (Winter 198) concerning the issues of preservation, access, and service to the total range of uncatalogued research music materials (in special collections and other areas). Short- and long-range plans should be developed for each category of materials. 2. Orientation tours, new signs, and brief descriptions in the News from the Music Library were designed and implemented to explain to Music Library users the many changes taking place in access to materials via LCS, AACR2 cataloguing code, and the supplementary music catalogue. When a public LCS terminal is installed in the Music Library, a special instructional program will be adapted, designed, and implemented for Music Library users. 3. An extensive reorganization of music cataloguing took place in January 1981, resulting in a large number of changes in procedures, along with major improvements in the flow of work through all the Technical Services Departments. Appropriate changes in duties and responsibilities were implemented with the Music Library assuming responsibility for serials check-in, claiming, and binding preparation. Accomplishments One of the measures indicating the vitality and use of the Music Library's resources, services, and facilities is found in the number of transactions made to borrow materials for use outside the library. Although all the figures are not completely tallied for this past year (statistics for May and June 1981 are lacking), we have estimated that about 27, transactions were made to borrow materials for use outside the library. (Included in the 27, transactions are 84,8 copies and sets of parts that were borrowed for choral and instrumental music ensembles and classes.) In addition to recorded use, it has been estimated that over 146, items (based on a sample taken during a two-week period in October 198) were used in the Music Library facilities during the year. In addition, about 6,2 questions were handled through the information-reference services, approximately 5, of these in person, 85 by telephone, and 35 by either correspondence or requests from the Illinois Research and Reference Center. About 1,324 titles were purchased on the allocated music fund, including 245 editions of music, 347 books, 229 microfilms, and 53 sound recordings (mainly LP discs). Out of the 13,323 items received as gifts, only 521 were forwarded for processing and cataloguing. In the total gifts, over 1, items represent sound recordings transferred from the Illinois State Library to the jurisdiction of the University of Illinois Library. With assistance from the School of Music Library Committee several priorities were developed for music acquisitions in

206 - 2 - All of the above measurable accomplishments do not reflect the total effort by the Music Library staff to provide effective and viable service. Most service tasks do not produce tangible products that can be counted; rather, the performance of library service involves activities that assist or benefit someone or something, intangible qualities that can never fully be measured. Most Music Library staff members concern themselves with providing the highest quality user-oriented service by finding out what a user wants and where the information or material can be found within the total resources. Priorities for Within the reduction of resources and services to fit the current level of financial support, we will aim to carry out the following goals: 1. Reduce two circulation desks to one. Eliminate circulation point on second level (special collections). 2. Transfer jurisdiction of large ensemble music (working collections for choral and orchestral groups, and wind ensemble) from University Library to School of Music. 3. Improve the arrangement of existing collections and reorganize ways of delivering service to save time of personnel. Due to staff reductions, plans to organize, preserve, provide access to, and services for the unorganized special collections in the field of music must be deferred.

207 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Music Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION (CATALOGUED VOLUMES) ADD SUBTRACT w TYPE LAST 2 z v wi TOTAL OF YEAR'S u) z G c LU < uw cu : AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL : < -- ) --w June 3 :L:W 2U < HM < H -- - Q -_ i 'U"c 1981.c- C) L a!- Z O SCORES AND PARTS BOOKS PAMPHLETS MICROFILM MICROCARDS MICROFICHE FILMSTRIPS DISCS CASSETTES TAPES , 7 CHORAL COLLECTION ORCHESTRAL WIND COLLECTION KITS GAMES , Vertical file items. Report the number of reels. Report the number of individual cards Report the number of discs. Vacant spaces are for slides, filmstrips, maps, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates.

208 Music Library II. Recorded Use * LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve onprint Month Man'1 Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ July Man' _ LCS/ 49Q9 243_ August Man' LCS/ _ September Man' LCS/ October Man' LCS/ November Man' LCS/ December Man' LCS/ January Man' LCS February Man' LCS March Man' LCS April Man' LCS May Man' LCS June Man' LCS Totals Man' Grand Total LCS Last Y Year Man' LCS Inc r e a s e / Decrease Man'1l * Does not include transactions for 83,745 multiple copies of scores and sets of parts, and recordings. ** Includes only manual charges for sound recordings.

209 Music Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats Lounge chairs 8 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library 22, (Includes 1,915 square feet in Smith Memoria'l Hall) 2. Linear feet of shelving 18,84 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 81 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 3 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 279 b. Spring 279 c. Summer Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Jean Geil William McClellan Judy Rabin b. Nonacademic Cindy Chaffee (.5 FTE), October 31, 1978, to March 13, 1981 Denise Cotton (.5 FTE), September 15,198 to date Mary James, January 18,1981 to date (transfer from Original Catalog- Mark Lee, (.5 FTE), April 7, 1981 to date ing) Cheryl Martyr, December 22,198 to July 24, 1981 Patricia Mayes, March 15, 1979, to August 18, 198 Anita Rzonca, August 3, 198 to November 26, 198 Marlys Scarbrough Robert Stiehl (.5 FTE) Kim Wolfgang

210 ILLINOIS NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 FY'81 Priorities Last year's first priority was to work towards achieving enough space in the library for five years' acquisitions by transferring and withdrawing volumes, installing new shelving and shifting the collection. The new shelving has been installed and three-fourths of the collection has been shifted. Working within the limits given us by the Circulation Department, we were able to transfer and withdraw 825 volumes. When the sixth stack addition is completed, we have approximately 3, more volumes designated to be transferred. Our second priority of acquiring a microfilm-microfiche reader-printer has been put on the back burner temporarily while the Natural History Survey Administrative Services, including the library, is looking into word-processors. Accomplishments The library continued this year in its effort to reach and serve the Survey researchers located at research station around the state. The station at Grafton, Illinois was visited by the librarian with a dual purpose of seeing the kind of research being conducted and of helping the researchers there set up a storage and retrieval system for the literature accumulating at the station. With a concentrated effort these last two years I think we have made our researchers at the stations aware of the services we can do for them and have created an atmosphere in which they feel free to call or write us with requests for information. About five years ago a collection of nearly 1, reprints from the 18's to 193 was moved from the library to a room in the basement. An author file to the collection was kept in the library in case someone would need to use one of the reprints. Not once in the five years did we go down to retrieve a reprint for anyone. Consequently this year researchers went through the author file choosing reprints they would like to have in their offices. The library staff retrieved the reprints and disposed them to the offices. The reprints that are left are going to be donated to a library that can use them. Of course, the biggest accomplishment this year was the installation of the new shelving and the shifting of the collection. The shifting process also includes reading the shelves, leaving the completed sections neat, in order and with room for growth.

211 FY' 82 Priorities 1. Shifting the last one-fourth of the collection and taking inventory. It has been five years since our last one. 2. Investigating the possibility of acquiring or sharing a wordprocessor for library procedures* The librarian (1) has drawn up a list of procedures in the library that could be done more efficiently on a wordprocessor and submitted it to the Library Committee Chair, and the Chief of the Survey; and (2) is a member of the Survey's Ad Hoc Committee on Word- Processors which is exploring the applicability of word-processing as a vehicle for storing and reproducing printed material in the Survey. 3. Entering the library's currently-received serials into a data base that will become the Illinois Institute of Natural Resources Union List of Serials.

212 STATISTICAL SUMMARY Natural History Sur. Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT TYPE LAST u ~ TOTAL of YEAR'S 5 AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL 1. JUNE 3 AT z z - CATALOGED VOLUMES 34, ,335 UNCATALOGED VOLUMES none none PAMPHLETS 2 none none MICROFILM 5? MICROCARDS ^ MICROPRI NTU HICROFICM4 5 5-::.,-: _ _L i_ PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONTINUATION 6 TITLES xx-x I i TOTAL SERIAL 6 TITLES I L. 1,15 I..a 1,15.- IL * lw.4 ý -41jb. ýl 1, Nature of Items Included as uncetaloged volumes. Vertical file Items. Report the number of reels. Report the number of Individual cards. Vacant spaccs are for slides, filmstripe, maps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates.

213 Natural History Survey Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve - Nonprint Month Man'l Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges, Materials Materials LCS/ july Man'l LCS/ August Man' LCS/ 4 34 September Man'l LCS/ 3 42 October Man'l LCS/ November Man'l LCSN/ December Man'L _5 1 LCS/ _13 January Man' LCS February Man' LCS March Man' LCS 2 44 April Man' LCS May Man'l LCS June Man'l LCS Totals Man'1 4, Grand Total Last Year LCS Man' 1 4, Increase/ LCS Decrease Man'1)

214 Natural History Survey Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats 3. Lounge chairs B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library 3, Linear feet of shelving 5,142 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall 4o 2. Spring 4 3. Summer 4 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 1 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 1 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall b. Spring c. Summer 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Doris Sublette, Sept b. Nonacademic Monica Lusk, Deca

215 NEWSPAPER LIBRARY SUMMARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 I. Accomplishments During , the Newspaper Library served over 2,O patrons who used an estimated 4h,OO current newspapers and 23, reels of microfilm backfiles. These statistics represent a substantial increase in our service to the university community. We reached another 74 researchers through the interlibrary lending of over 22 items. The level and purposes of this use (described in Tables II B and C) justify the Library's on-going support for a newspaper collection that can meet the retrospective research needs of students, faculty, staff, and public. Unfortunately, the limitations in acquisitions funds foreseen in last year's report have restricted growth of the collection. No new subscriptions to newsprint or microfilm titles have been ordered; meanwhile, 11 gift subscriptions were cancelled. As the result of orders placed in previous fiscal years, a few microfilm backfiles were received. These included: Frankfurter Zeitung, , ; Lettres Frangaises, 19h4-1972; Excelsior, _E1 Dia, ;. and a collection of early English newspapers. A high level of public service was maintained through improved training and careful supervision of staff. Access to the collection was enhanced by the publication of a 29-page holdings list of all subject-classified newspapers, and a five-page update of our 1977 list of non-classified general subject newspapers in microform. Following the third vacancyin as many years in our full-time civil service position, the job description was revised and a re-classification was requested. This led to the upgrading of the position from Library Clerk III to library Technical Assistant I. II. Issues and Opportunities The failure of the acquisitions, student wage, and equipment budgets to keep pace with inflation is the major issue influencing the future of the Newspaper Library. We are most encouraged by the Acquisitions Policy Committee's recent recommendation that the budget for newspapers be increased to a level commensurate with the inflation of serials costs. Nevertheless, there is still a need to establish a permanent annual fund solely for the purchase of microfilmed backfiles of newspapers. The national preeminence of our newspaper collection cannot be maintained without filling in several gaps in backfiles of newspapers, and without expanding our retrospective holdings to meet new research needs.

216 2. In , the Newspaper Library was quite successful in meeting many public service and administrative needs with student personnel. Continuing this success in will be challenging since the student wage budget will remain static while the minimum wage increases by about 8 percent. The lack of any major equipment funds for the past four years presents a problem for the use and storage of the newspaper collection. Several of our microfilm readers damage film, are difficult to use, and are expensive to maintain. These should be replaced in the near future. An additional positive reader/printer should be purchased to meet the high demand for photocopies from microfilmed newspapers. Finally, as noted last year, 6 sections of shelving will have to be replaced by 1983 to prevent disruptions in shelving and use of microfilm. A shortage of storage space has been averted temporarily by the acquisition of six surplus computer-card storage files which can double as microfilm cabinets. In the past year, the Newspaper Library has confronted a new hindrance to public service. For reasons that are not entirely clear, there have been major interruptions in the receipt of a large number of subscriptions. Moreover, claims for these items, normally handled promptly, have been delayed. As a result, we are lacking current microfilm and indices for over 14 titles, including the Chicago Sun-Times, Chicago Tribune, Christian Science Monitor, Cincinnati Enquirer, Le Figaro, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and San Francisco Chronicle. Similar lapses in the receipt of United7STates and foreign newsprint have frustrated many of cur patrons. The solution to this problem most likely will depend on increased staffing in technical processing departments and changes within those departments. During the past one and one-half years, the Newspaper Librarian has advised staff of the Daily Illini on procedures for establishing a machine-readable index to the student newspaper. We will continue to assist the Illini Publishing Company in this indeavor. III. Priorities A. Last year's priorities We have succedded in meeting most of the needs listed as priorities in last year's report. Access to the newspaper collection has been promoted through the publication of holdings lists. The level of paid subscriptions has largely been been maintained, but funds have not been available for purchase of significant backfiles. We have been quite successful, however, in working with the Acquisitions Policy Committee, especially in obtaining a commitment for an adequate increase in the budget. Public service and daily operations have remained efficient. Staffing has been enhanced through the re-classification of the full-time civil service position. There has been no further loss of space at our off-site storage facilities, but we have

217 3. encountered security and environmental problems which threaten the preservation of the newspaper collection,. The lack of equipment funds has prevented the acquisition of readers and shelving needed for the microfilm collection, B. Priorities for the coming year 1. We will promote greater use of the Newspaper Library by publicizing the nature and extent of our holdings as well as by describing methodologies for research in newspapers. The feasibility of entering newspaper holdings information into the Full-Bibliographic Record will be explored with the new library automation manager. 2. We will work to maintain our present level of acquisitions and to solve technical processing problems that have hindered the receipt of our current subscriptions. To insure control over the disbursement of our funds, we will continue to monitor acquisitions accounting printouts and arrange for corrections to be made when errors appear. 3. We will work closely with the Special Collections Council to explore new sources of funds for badly needed equipment and for microfilmed newspaper backfiles. Through contacts with library and campus administrators, we will attempt to remedy the security and environmental problems at our remote storage areas.

218 STATISTICAL SUMMARY -_Np-wappr_.. June 3, 1981 Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT TYPE LAST " ' z S TOTAL of YEAR'S 5 5 AS OF < MATERIAL TOTAL " JUNE 3 u.,..2 CATALOGED VOLUMES 1, ,818 UNCATA'LOGED VOLUMES PAMPHLETS 2 MICROFILM 3 65., ,41 MICROCARDS. 8,81 xx 8,81 MICROPRI NTh HICROFICM 5 PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONTINUATION 6 TITLES 3 XXxC 3 TOTAL SERIAL6 TITLES 96 I Nature of Items Included Verfical file Items. R eport Report Vaca.nt Refers as unceteloged volurmes. the number of rools. the number of Individual cards. spaces are for slides, filmstripe, maps, disks, etc. to titles currently checked in, irncluding duplicates.

219 Table I-B July 1, 1981 BOUND NEWSPAPER INVENTORY FOREIGN TITLES Law 68 Room 1 Total Argentina Australia 4 h Brazil Bulgaria Burundi 2 2 Canada 8 8 Chile 3 3 Czechoslovakia Denmark 8 8 England Finland France Germany Greece Guyana 6 6 Hong Kong 11 II Hungary India $2 $2 Iran 1 1 Ireland Italy Japan 22 h3 65 Kenya Lebanon Mexico Netherlands Poland Portugal 8 8 Puerto Rico 1 1 Rumania Scotland 2 2 Senegal 6 6 South Africa 4 h Spain Syria 1 1 Trinidad 8 8 Turkey Uruguay U.S.S.R Venezuela 1 1 Yugoslavia 6 6 Foreign Total

220 Table I-B July 1, 1981 (continued) BOUND NEWSPAPER INVEvTOCRY UNITED STATES TITLES Law 68 Room 1 Total Arizona 6 6 California Connecticut District of Columbia Florida 3 3 Illinois Indiana 1 1 Iowa 8 8 Kansas Kentucky 2 2 Louisiana 4 4 Maine 1 1 Maryland 5 5 Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Missouri New Hampshire $ $ New Jersey 7 7 New Mexico 5 5 New York Ohio Oklahoma 1 1 Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina 8 8 South Dakota 2 2 Tennessee 2 2 Texas Vermont 2 2 Virginia Washington 1 1 Wisconsin 3 3 Total U.S Total Foreign Total Classified 2892 (Attic) Portfolio 1 1 Grand Total 62W (includes Attic)

221 Table I-C July 1, 1981 MICROFILM INVENTORY FOREIGN TITLES REELS U. S. TITLES REELS Argentina Austria Bangladesh Belgium Brazil British Honduras Bulgaria Canada Chile China Columbia Cuba Czechoslovakia Denmark Egypt England France Germany Hong Kong Hungary India Iran Ireland Italy Japan Jordan Korea Lebanon Malaysia Mexico New Zealand Pakistan Peru Poland Rumania Sierra Leone Soviet Union Spain Sri Lanka Sweden Switzerland Syria Tanzania Thailand Uruguay Vietnam Yugoslavia )43 ) ) $ $ Alabama Alaska Arizona California Colorado Connecticut District of Columbia Georgia Hawaii Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana New Hampshire New Mexico New York North Carolina Ohio Pennsylvania South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Special Collections Underground Press Negro Newspapers 63 2 $ U.S. Total 5215 (Non Illinois 37658) Foreign Total Classified Total Foreign Total Grand Total 6841

222 r-4 r-4 CO r\ C r-4 4- I. C' " CM O r--4 r m Hr CG- CO N Gco Cj O r-4 cj 4c') Oj.O *r4 r4h *4-1 W *) ( Po c\o NJ CJ 1\ CO r-4 H *-, r-i FO r-4 4- r4 coi c HP co : r-i r-4 C\y - or- co o o.- OCO - (cy c^ -P. C*r4 cd a oo Hc 4-) *H - r-4 C\ CP\ COIf H,, (Vcy on --- I co C*- I - r-4 r-4 CCMv r- > -H Sco r-4 r r-4 > - O tria ol co H -H 9 S cc r-4 Cd to *H. or4 r-4 o 62 o d bd r--4 SO SHN CH H r-4 E r-1 *- 4 ( CO 1) 3- ci ) c--! ^ CL U) -P -P O S.CO *r-. -*C- r--i rh CL ( 5i *r-1 E ( CH ci --r d () U) 4-3 Cd *H r-- Cd } HOHOP f- D -P r-4 o ) O CO CH d ^ Mo ( CI) OC' E-<o P ) X go ct C V.Q I -r-4

223 Newspaper Library II.A Recorded Use * LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve - Nonprint Month Man'l Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ July Man'l LCS/ August Man' _1 8 LCS/ September Man'1 176 LCS/ _ October Man'l C-9 LCS/ November Man'l _ LCS/I6 _ December Man'l 171 LCS/!... January M a n t l LCS February Man'1 2" LCS f March Man'l LCS... April Man' LCS May Man'l 13 1H.3 12' LCS June Man'l LCS Totals Man'l 1hh h9 Lh Grand Total 11h L9 h4 LCS Last Year Man'l 1297 $1 1 2h LCS... Increase/ LCS.j Decrease Man'l +1 +[ Total circulation: 38 (increase of lb over last year) *Since the Newspaper Library is a non-circulating library (except for interlibrary loan and faculty carrels) this table showing charge-outs reflects only a small portion of our use. See Tables II B and C for a complete description of our use.

224 TABLE II-B: RECORDED USE Newspaper User Survey July 198-June 1981 PATRONS NUMBER PERGENTAGE Faculty Graduate Student Undergraduate Public Total 48h6 1. PURPOSE Dissertation/Thesis Historical Research Course Paper Classroom Other Total NEWSPAPERS USED FILM PRINT (Bound/ TOTAL PERCENTAGE Unbound) United States $ $1.8 Illinois Foreign Percentage From July 1, of microfilm. 198 to June 3, 1981 patrons used a total 22,61 reels This distribution of patrons is based on the user survey instituted in Patrons are counted only once for each day they use the library even though they may read more than one paper. The total of newspapers used will be greater than the total of patrons, and a given paper is counted only once for each user each day. This survey is based on patrons who complete a request card and, therefore, is only a representative sample of "serious" patrons using the library for retrospective research. The floor plan and staff limitations of the Newspaper Library prevent a survey of all our users, so the figure of 48h6 is only 2 percent or less of total users. The total does include 7 individuals who used our holdings through interlibrary loan.

225 bfl (ii H co CO \ ocj \ C co.e C - l\\ -Or- on CM r- CM O m r-4-. r- CM,(n C\ (^1\ CM \CO -I CM -o -mn r H O HCO GD OIN r-4 ^-, r-- ^ 1\ \ CON cor\ \ r4 ^- ("I CM Hr4-OnH H \ (\M CC Hr CM'f\ I-f\ (Y) r-4 ON H I, ", r--. ON r-h ON H r-4 CMi rhoocv\ C jor-4\mo * *. (--c j - c\jr-4 omc~om r-4 C\J r4 C\JzM H r-4 C-- oh CO \ H N CO \ r-4 ON Ho r-4 I r-- co ON r1 N Iz U) CO CO C CO C co m I-**-Aco *r*-\r- I** H-CO OO ODA C-O C\ MC - Co\ CM '\J C\l -4r COOC IH CO r-4 CO o\ ON r- C-CO r- L" -r,-- I-r co.--- I r-4 zrz H * * ON E- U) r- o\ I r-4 CM a\ ON r-4 *O * 9 * r-4 Cy,, C r-- r-i CM CM r-. r-4 * V\ r-4 r CO CO r-4,on N-- r-l r ON r--4 Lr\ N- ON H- r-4 NOl a\ OCo r-\,\ co CHON C -DCN-\ ---- ON c\.--con r4 C\M r-.4 r-t r-(n r4 - U) CC NO * * Oo * 4,. P M, ^ c F Of: F- C S<) * r-o ) UM CO c P- 4P $ 1CwO. aho O c U) P4 P*HcAOHqp PHI C 4- O$ t f-4 ^ r-4 pw A M DAL A QQoL Z 4r- * im r-i O Pe A M U) Q CO U) o.p *H (1) my

226 Newspaper Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats 1_ 3. Lounge chairs 8 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library 5,31_ 2. Linear feet of shelving 7,374 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall 64.* 2. Spring 6._* 3. Summer 48*5 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals o5 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 1._ 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 55 b. Spring c. Summer Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic illiam J¾ Maher (December ) (One half-time in Newspaper Library and half-tirme in University Archives) b. Nonacademic Betty Hildwein (half-time) (October ) inary James (September 1979-September 198) Tom Gallivan (November 198- )

227 NEWSPAPER LIBRARY COMPREHENSIVE ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 Two events in the past year reflect the paradoxical position of the Newspaper Library. On the one hand, we acquired the first part of a microfilm collection of 17th-19th century English newspapers which support research in the earliest period that newspapers document society. On the other hand, some of our current newspapers prophesied "the demise of the newspaper as we know it". Cable networks, computerized data systems, and technologies still too revolutionary to be imagined will replace the newspaper as the source of information for the average citizen, they say. Should these scenarios come to pass, more will be lost than just low-grade paper useful for wrapping fish. A major source for reconstructing the past will disappear. Just as the early English newspaper collection covers the beginning of the newspaper era, the papers from the 198s may well document the end of an era in-which the broad circulation of this inexpensive information source changed politics and society, while leaving a record for future generations. Certainly, electronic production and presentation of news offers the advantages of speed, "updatability", and easier access to articles on given subjects. What will be sacrificed, however, will be a medium that presents information and ideas within the context of time. Newspapers, as we know them, are valuable research tools precisely because they capture the moment in time in which they were printed. They capture the insights, information, and misinformation presented by governments, institutions, individuals, and journalists on which our opinions are formed, decisions made, and actions taken. They thereby permit researchers to reconstruct the past so that theories of culture and society may be tested, origins of families and institutions may be found, and the rights of citizens may be protected. Newspapers serve as the best single primary source to analysize the events of the period since the late eighteenth century. Their encyclopaedic coverage--commerce, politics literature, arts, religion, social mores, sports, and popular culture -provides the modern researcher with a comprehensive glimpse of th past. Used with discretion, newspapers can help recreate a specific moment in the past. Use of the Newspaper Library in reflects this role of the newspaper in research. Compilers of the Oxford English Dictionary used an 1818 Missouri newspaper to verify the moment at which a usage of the word "roach" entered the language. An economist used financial newspapers to analyze the moment at which a stock split was announced to determine the announcement's effect on prices. An English professor in Scotland used the newspaper collection to ascertain American reaction to playwright Tom Stoppard when his works first appeared in this country. Political science undergraduates analyzed the daily changes in newspapers' coverage of the 198 presidential election. Political science graduate students and faculty used metropolitan dailies to study the effects of city council redistricting on the delivery of municipal services. Rhetoric classes used newspapers to examine public attitudes following the bombing of Hiroshima, and during the Beatles' 196h American tour. Family historians searched for accounts of ancestors involved in famous (and infamous) court cases. A local

228 resident examined Champaign-Urbana newspapers to determine the decor and motifs for a new restaurant. Cartoons in the Irish World were used by the Australian National Broadcasting Commission to recapture the spirit of Irish nationalism in the 187s. A Chicago resident found newspapers to be a valuable means to prove that his home should be on the National Register of Historic Places. It is unrealistic to expect that newspaper publishers and purveyors of information networks might change their plans for non-print newspapers merely because of future generations' research needs. Nevertheless, operations of the Newspaper Library in illustrate the value of newspapers as well as their role in a research library. Tt will indeed be unfortunate if this resource is lost. I. Service to Readers A. Use of Library Materials 1. Interpretation of tables II A-B, and C. The Newspaper Library serves two distinct groups: patrons interested in current newspapers on foreign and domestic subjects; and researchers interested in backfiles of newspapers (largely on microfilm) as historical sources. The majority of these groups of users are not reflected in Table II-A: Recorded Use, since our holdings do not circulate and are used primarily "in-house". The only exceptions to this noncirculation policy are special charges to graduate student carrels, faculty studies, and interlibrary loans. Thus, the 38 charges on Table II-A represent only a very narrow portion of newspaper use. To evaluate the level of use of the newspaper collection, we have collected three types of statistics: sample reading room counts; reels of microfilm reshelved; and surveys of microfilm users. Based on sample reading room counts, an estimated 14, patrons used over h., current newspapers during Much of this was casual reading but a substantial portion was research directed toward the completion of course papers, journal articles, or monographs. Since the newspaper collection is non-circulating, we have used the number of reels of microfilm reshelved as an indicator of the research use of our holdings. On this basis, 22,61 reels of microfilm (or one-third of our film holdings) were used during To obtain a clear perception of the types and purposes of research in newspapers, we have, since 1971, surveyed researchers based on cards completed when microfilm is requested. The user survey does not cover all researchers (especially since the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, and Wall Street Journal are in self-service cabinets) but it does provide a representative sample of patrons using retrospective files of newspapers. This survey records title and dates requested, types of users (faculty, graduate student, undergraduate, and public), and purpose of use (dissertation/thesis, historical research for publication, course paper, classroom, and other). Table II-B: Newspaper User Survey, indicates that h846

229 3. individuals used newspaper backfiles in the past year. In previous annual reports we have estimated that this accounts for only 2 percent of all users; thus, over 24, people used the Newspaper Library last year. Statistics for and comparative percentages for 1975 through 1981 are summarized in Tables II-B and II-C. The total number of patrons surveyed increased by 32 percent over last year and by kh percent over The number of reels of film increased by 11 percent. The significance of this combined increase is that substantially more patrons are finding newspapers to be valuable research tools. Moreover, while use of the Chicago Tribune, Wall Street Journal, and New York Times remains hig, 32 percent more people than last year examined titles beyond these basic ones. Table II-C, showing six year trends in types and purpose of use reflects changes in use of the collection. Undergraduates are largely responsible for the increase in our use during They now account for nearly 5 percent of patrons using retrospective files (beyond the three titles in self-service cabinets). Graduate student and faculty use remained steady. The number of public users was about the same as last year, but their proportion declined. The large amount of undergraduate use is also reflected in a 6.1 percent growth in "course paper" and"classroom" as the purpose of research. While it is not possible to be sure which patrons have used which papers, the coincidence of a rise in undergraduate use and of use of foreign titles suggests that many of these students were broadening their research scope. To an extent, this use is in response to recent acquisitions such as the Sunday Times microfilm (198+) an index to French newspapers (1978+), and a file of a German paper for Reader/printer use. According to Newspaper Library records, about 14,59 photocopies from microfilm were made on our machines in This represents an increase of about 2 percent over last year. The popularity of our Kodak reader/printer, the only coin-operated positive copier on campus, is reflected by its 11,579 copies and the frequent waiting line to use the machine. B. Reference Service 1. Reference activities. In the past year, Newspaper Library staff answered 166 in-person and 125 telephone reference questions. These statistics represent inquiries of a substantial nature such as instruction in the use of an index or retrieval of a specific piece of information from a newspaper. This reference work includes instruction in the use of our geographic cataloging system, location of publishers' addresses, and location of newspaper files at other repositories, such as the Library of Congress, Center for Research Libraries, or the Illinois State Historical Library. They often include requests for newspaper accounts of crimes, trials, stocks, wrestling scores, recipes, and election results.

230 We answered 32 written inquiries from fifteen states and three foreign countries. Of these, eight were genealogical in nature; others concerned theatre reviews, Black history, sporting events, early use of color in newspapers, the Alaskan pipeline, and presidential assassinations. 2. Newspaper indices. To accommodate inquiries for subjects like those noted above, the Newspaper Library subscribes to 22 indices to newspapers. Because of a lack of acquisitions funds, no new indices were added in the past year. Unfortunately, we also received notice that the Milwaukee Journal and Philadelphia Inquirer indices have been discontinued. Meanwhile, service to patrons has been hampered by interruptions in the receipt of indices to five heavily-used titles (including Atlanta Constitution, Chicago Sun-Times, Chicago Tribune, Christian Science Monitor, and San Francisco Chronicle) as the result of problems in technical processing departments. Since indices are so crucial for research in newspapers, it is imperative that these problems be solved and that funds be located to support new subscriptions. C. Interlibrary loans. During , in response to 712 requests, 2127 items were sent out on interlibrary loan and 13 items were copied for loan. This represents a.3 percent increase in requests and a 9.5 decrease in items used. The decrease in items used must be seen in light of an exceptionally high count for because of the research of an interlibrary loan borrower from Northwestern University. Among the notable interlibrary loan uses during the past year was the copying of 38 reels of the English paper, John Bull ( ) for a history professor at Old Dominion University. Interlibrary Loans July 198-June 1981 Newspapers Requests Microfilm Microfilm Newsprint* Used Titles Reels T itles/vols.o United States 369 ( 1.8),- 321 (47.1) 198 (51.6) 73 (7.9) Illinois 167 (23.5) 164 (24ol) 582 (27.4) 3 (3o) Foreign 176 (24.7) 196 (28.8) 447 (21.) 27 (26.1) Total Items charged to interlibrary loan for photoduplication by the Photographic Services Division. Each request consists of only one volume. **(Numbers in parentheses are percentages.

231 Interlibrary Loan Trends 5 yr. average ( ) Total requests 675 $ Microfilm reels * Newsprint 11$ $ (titles/vols.) Average reels or * vols. per request These 712 interlibrary loan requests represent about 14.7 percent of our recorded users (listed on Table II-B) and the 2127 reels of film sent account for 9.4 percent of all microfilm used. Interesting comparisons can be made between the types of newspapers requested by interlibrary loan users and in-house users. Both requested the snme amount of non-illinois U. S. papers, $1.8 percent. Yet, interlibrary loan users were more interested in foreign titles (24l.7 to 15.4 percent) and less interested in Illinois titles (23.5 to 32.8 percent) than in-house patrons. This illustrates the importance of collecting foreign newspaper backfiles to meet statewide and national needs. D. Hours of opening. During the Fall and Spring semesters, the Newspaper Library hourse are: 8:3 a.m. to $ p.m. and 7 to 1 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 8:3 a.m. to $ p.m. Friday; 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday; and I to $ p.m. and 7 to 1 p.m. Sunday. While summer school is in session, the hours are from 8:3 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday; and 8:3 a.m. to $ p.m. Friday. During vacation and intersession periods, the hours are 8:3 a.m. to 4:3 p.m. weekdays. We frequently have made special arrangements for visiting patrons with limited schedules, when the Newspaper Library is closed but other libraries are open. The current schedule represents a slight increase in public service hours (one hour on Saturday afternoon), but this level of service can only be maintained if our student wage allocation continues to provide about 23 to 24 hours annually. II. Extension of Services Newspaper Library staff provide orientation lectures, tours to individuals and groups, and equipment instruction as part of its daily activities. In September, the Newspaper Librarian gave a tour to Professor Waller's class in American history to introduce students in the use of newspapers as research tools. In November, the Newspaper Librarian gave a lecture on the holdings and use of newspapers to the graduate assistants who provide reference service in the Undergraduate Library. In January, he conducted a seminar on the use of newspapers as research materials for University of Illinois professional librarians. Since major portions of the newspaper collection are not in LCS or the card catalog, the Newspaper Library distributes copies of the following lists of our holdings: general information sheet, geographical

232 listings of United States and foreign titles currently received, list of labor titles received, list of newspaper indices, and General Newspapers in Microform, a 28-page listing of microform holdings. To facilitate broader access to our holdings, we issued a 29-page listing of all subject classified newspapers and a fivepage update of the 1977 list of general newspapers in microform. During , the following exhibits were prepared in the Newspaper Library to illustrate newspaper accounts of historical events and to promote research in newspapers: III. Newspaper Collection The Political Spectrum (U. S. elections coverage) Presidential Assassinations - Twenty Year Trends Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker Bibliographic Access to Newspapers Subject Access to Newspapers A. Inventories and distribution of holdings. In June 1981, staff conducted a complete inventory of reference and microform holdings and updated the 1979 inventory of bound volumes and indices. Tables I-A, B, C, and D, attached to this report, shcw the holdings by state and/or country of publication as well as by storage location. These data show the following distribution of our holdings (in percentages): Microfilm Bound Total United States (non-illinois) 5.U 17.6 $1.2 Illinois 21.1 h.h 19.2 Foreign h 22.1 Classified h 7.5 B. Acquisitions. By definition, the Newspaper Library is dependent on serials. Therefore,the lack of funds for new serials during prevented us from expanding the collection to meet new research and reading needs. Only or subscription (Deia, a Basque language paper from Spain) was started in the past year. The cost of this subscription will have to be covered by lapsing funds from a few titles which have ceased publication. Meanwhile, we continue to witness a high inflation rate for our newsprint and microfilm subscriptions. Since our budget increase fell short of the inflation rate, we spent considerable time monitoring acquisitions accounting printouts. We were able to finish the year "in the black" and without cancellations only because of the slow payment of bills and because years of erroneous encumbrances had been entered into the accounting data base for our serial funds. After several weeks of work, errors on the printouts were located, and noted for accounting personnel. Nevertheless, many corrections have not yet appeared on our printouts.

233 7. To maintain the current level of subscriptions, a memorandum was prepared to request an increase in our budget for that would meet an annual inflation rate of about 15.5 percent. The Acquisitions Policy Committee's recommendation that this increase be granted is most encouraging. Unfortunately, in the past year, the Newspaper Library has encountered a new problem that hinders the acquisitions of our on-going subscriptions. For reasons that are not entirely clear, there have been major interruptions in the receipt of a large number of subscriptions. Moreover, claims for these items, normally handled promptly, have been delayed. As a result, we are lacking current microfilm and indices for over l1 titles, including the Chicago Sun-Times, Chicago Tribune, Christian Science Monitor, Cincinnati Enquirer, Le Figaro, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, and San Francisco Chronicle. Similar lapses in the receipt of United States and foreign newsprint have frustrated many of our patrons. The solution to this problem most likely will depend on increased staffing in technical processing departments and changes within those departments. Notable Acquisitions Film Dates No. of Reels Asahi Evening News (Tokyo) 198+ (on order) El Dia (Mexico City) Early English Newspapers Excelsior (Mexico City) Frankfurter Zeitung (Frankfort) , h3 1 Freeman (Indianapolis) Les Lettres Franqaises (Paris) 19hh Rude Pravo Current subscriptions. The following table shows four-year trends in the numbers and distribution of film and newsprint subscriptions. It is discouraging to note the continuation of a decline in our total subscriptions and the rapid drop in titles received as gifts. Newspaper Subscriptions Subscriptions 21$ (uewsprint) Subscriptions (microfilm) Gift 27h * 228& Total subscriptions 6$ $ *includes 28 PL-48 titles

234 Newspaper Subscriptions (continued) Separate Newspaper Titles Domestic titles ('newsprint) Foreign titles 125 (newsprint) Microfilm titles 63 (for which we receive no newsprint) PL-48 titles Total titles h 51h Since newspapers are serials, we are particularly "hard hit" by restrictions on purchasing new serial titles and we have been unable to initiate subscriptions that meet users new needs. In the past year we have had requests for papers from California, New York, Missouri, Texas, Israel, Germany, England, and Venezuela. 2. Microfilm acquisitions. To many patrons, the Newspaper Library is no more than a place where they may find current issues of their favorite newspaper. The heart of the collection, however, consists of microfilmed backfiles of newspapers. Steady growth in these holdings is essential to supporting research. The following table shows four-year trends in these acquisitions. Microfilm Acquisitions (reels) Current Subscriptions 1,216 1,5 1,319 1,219 Backfiles 9, Total received 1,544 1,526 2,76 2,191 Transferred to other units 1l * Growth of film collection 1,44 1,26 2,76 2,191 XIn we transferred 7751 microfiche of NewsBank to the Undergraduate Library, which has a current subscription to this title. The total of 2191 reels includes 1l reels of the Frankfurter Zeitung, 39 reels of Lettres Frangaises, 76 reels of El DaD and, 72 reels of Excelsior ordered in previous fiscal years. The newspaper backfiles on microfilm added during (listed on page 7) represent a substantial strengthening of resources for retrospective research in European and Mexican subjects.

235 9. The additional reels of Frankfurter-Zeitung provide our first complete file of a German newspaper for the period The file of Lettres Franqaises replaces an incomplete newsprint run of this influential literary and cultural newspaper. The 271 reels of the Research Publications Early English Newspapers are the first part of a comprehensive collection of British newspapers from 1622 to 182. This purchase, made by the Collection Development Department will vastly increase our resources for British history and for early history of the newspaper. These acquisitions are important, but the present lack of funds for backfile purchases suggests that next year's list of notable acquisitions may be a short one. The Acquisitions Policy Committee's Pool Funds (when available) have helped fill a few gaps in our retrospective holdings, but many more remain. A provision should be made for the budgeted annual purchase of microfilm backfiles so that we may plan acquisitions of microfilm for France, Great Britain, and southern and midwestern United States. 3. Cooperative filming projects. We continue to supply Illinois newspapers to the State Historical Library in Springfield, which preserves these titles on film and makes them available through interlibrary loan. In the past year, we collated and wrapped 7 Illinois titles in 122 volumes for transfer to the State Library. To guarantee the preservation of a unique and long run (ca ) of a paper from Arcola, Illinois, we arranged for the State Historical Library to film copies of the Arcolan, recently found by a real estate agent in that town. We made arrangements with the Library of Congress to regularly supply single issues needed to complete files of current European papers before record microfilm copies are made. We continued to supply individual issues to the Center for Research Libraries for their Foreign Newspaper Microfilm Project. D. Processing 1. Wrapping and binding. The Newspaper Library collates and wraps (in brown paper and cardboard) many of.its titles for which we do not receive microfilm. In addition, 66 volumes were re-wrapped in connection with normal use. Ideally, newsprint should be microfilmed, not wrapped or bound. Therefore, in the past year, we began filming the Sporting News to preserve this heavily used newspaper. Funds should be located to permit more extensive filming of those newspapers which are currently being bound. Annual wrapping and binding to maintain our current collection Number of Titles Number of Volumes Wrapped 89 1 Bound Total for our collection 11$ 143 Wrapped for Illinois Historical Total Library

236 2. Daily processing of mail. To provide public service for readers of current newsprint, our library must process about ten cubic feet of mail daily. This includes unwrapping and sorting the mail, and checking-in and shelving an average of 2 titles received each day. This activity accounts for more than one-half of the student hours used by the Newspaper Library and must be considered in the allocation of student wages. 3. Card catalog. Unlike most public service units, the Newspaper Library bears the major responsibility for cataloging its holdings since only 7.5 percent of the collection is cataloged and classified by Technical Services departments. The remaining 92.5 percent is described in a geographically-arranged catalog based on the Library of Congress model. To insure the accuracy of the LCS's information on our classified holdings, we regularly send updates and corrections to the Automated Records Department. Unfortunately, there have been long delays in making corrections in the data base. E. Theft and mutilations. The Newspaper Library's floor plan and limited staffing create security problems for our holdings. In , we have witnessed a continuation of the security problems first noted in In particular, newsprint issues for the Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Washington Post, and San Francisco Chronicle have disappeared on several occasions. The only security problems in the microfilm collection, however, have been the temporary disappearance of a few reels of the Wall Street Journal which generally reappear a few days after classroom projects are due. IV. Quarters and Equipment A. Physical facilities. For the first time since 1977, we have completed a fiscal year without experiencing a further loss of storage space in the Law building. While this is a most welcome change, the space in the Law building is totally inadequate. Most of the 353 volumes stored there should be replaced with microfilm. Moreover, in , we witnessed an increase in security problems and a deterioration of the environmental conditions at this location. Both these -factors threaten the preservation of the unique files of newspapers stored there. In the past year, there was a continuation of thefts of patron's wallets, first witnessed in Frequent warnings to patrons seemed to be effective in reducing the number of thefts, but this security problem continues to be disturbing to both patrons and staff. Equally disturbing was the theft of two of the six desk lamps located in the microfilm carrels. B. Equipment. Last year's report mentioned the need for replacing 6 units of our microfilm shelves by 1983, but the lack of equipment funds prevented the pu chase of any units during As an interim measure, we acquired six data card files from surplus property. These should accommodate enough microfilm reels to prevent any immediate shortages of storage space,

237 11. Without equipment funds, we were unable tozeplace several of our microfilm readers that damage film, are difficult to use, and expensive to maintain. Problems in the ordering of light bulbs resulted in four of our readers being out of service for about two months this past winter. VI. Personnel and Administration A. Personnel 1. Academic and clerical. The Newspaper Library is staffed by one half-time professional, one half-time Library Technical Assistant III, and one full-time Library Technical Assistant I. At the end of September 198, Mary James, Full-time Library Clerk III since September 1979, resigned to accept a promotion to Chief Library Clerk in the Music Library. Her replacement, Thomas Gallivan, formerly of the Engineering Library, began work in November. Mr. Gallivan has adapted well to the Newspaper Library. He has set a new standard for the supervision of our student employees, and he is very effective in providing public service. As a result of his analysis of the job functions, he and the Newspaper Librarian re-wrote this position description and requested a reclassification. The resultant upgrading of this position to Library Technical Assistant I reflects the complexity and importance of the work Mr. Gallivan performs. The higher classification should also help in retaining qualified personnel longer. Our half-time Library Technical Assistant III, Betty Hildwein, is in her fifteenth year of service to the Newspaper Library. In addition to her invaluable assistance in administrative activities, and compiling reports and lists of holdings, she maintains our card catalog, and serves as support staff representative to the Special Collections Council. 2. Student employees. The Newspaper Library is heavily dependent on student employees for public service during the evenings and weekends, and for some technical functions. The daily processing of mail, retrieval and reshelving of film, and retrieval of volumes from our remote storage are handled largely by student employees. From July 198 to June 1981, the Newspaper Library used about 23 hours of student help, down 235 hours from last year. Through the use of two work-study students, we were able to maintain a high level of public service while still leaving a surplus in our student wage budget.

238 Student Employees Student Class Major David Farris Graduate Student Art History Jody Frahm Sophomore Engineering Perry Frahm Senior Physics John Heinz Sophomore Engineering Joan Kling Senior Education Sharon Madison Junior Commerce Carline Pasquier Junior LAS Glen Schabes Junior LAS Clyde Stansbury Freshman LAS 3. Professional activities. The Newspaper Librarian is a member of the Society of American Archivists, the Midwest Archives Conference, and the Association of St. Louis Area Archivists. In April he was elected to a two-year term as Secretary-Treasurer of the Midwest Archives Conference - a professional association of more than 6 archivists and manuscript curators. In'the past year, the Newspaper Librarian attended the annual meeting of the Society of American Archivists, where he presented a paper on "Statistical Measurement and a Scientific Model for Cost Analysis in Archival Processing". An expanded version of this paper has been accepted for publication in College and Research Libraries. He also attended the fall 198 and spring 1981 meetings of the Midwest Archives Conference. He visited libraries and archives at Milwaukee Public Library- Manuscripts Division, Milwaukee Municipal Archives, Marquette University, Northwestern University, University of California- San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Huntington Library, and the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Library. Within the Library, the Newspaper Librarian served as chair of the Social Science Council from August 198 to March He was also a member of the Preservation Committee, and of the Search Committee for an Applied Life Studies Librarian. In addition to his duties as Newspaper Librarian, he is the Assistant University Archivist. In this capacity, he shares the responsibility for the administration of the Archives with the Archivist. He is responsible for much of the Archives' records management program and supervision of parts of its automated finding-aids project. B. Administration 1. New procedures. The duties of our full-time civil service employee were reviewed and the position was reclassified from Library Clerk III to Library Technical Assistant I. Following increased problems with the timely payment of bills for subscriptions, we have begun to keep a register of all invoices sent to the Ordering, Claiming, and Receiving Department. To

239 13. obtain a clear perception of the costs of subscriptions, payment cards (maintained in the OCR department) for all our titles were checked, and the payment information was copied onto Newspaper Library check-in cards. This permits the monitoring of price increases as new bills are received. 2. Goals and objectives. Our most basic goal is to continue a high level of public service to the University and research community. While new subscriptions will be limited, we will work within the Library and University to obtain better funding for the newspaper collection. We will also work with researchers to simplify access to and promote research in newspapers. In addition, we will: -examine the Library of Congress's new rules for bibliographic control of newspapers in connection with exploring the feasibility of entering newspaper holdings information into the Full Bibliographic Record. -continue to work with the Illini Publishing Company as they refine their machine-readable subject index to the Daily Illini. -reorganize the card catalog by merging cards for classified newspapers with those for reference volumes, and refile according to new ALA rules. -meet with Library and campus administrators to obtain support for badly needed equipment and to solve security and environmental conditions in our storage areas. William J. Maher Newspaper Librarian

240 STATISTICAL SUMMARY _r-.- n p.library _ June 3, 1981 IA GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT TYPE LAST. -"- S TOTAL of. YEAR'S f. 5 AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL - JUNE 3 CATALOGED.VOLUMES.. 1, ,818 UNCATALOG ED VOLUMES PAMPHLETS 2 MI CROFI LM 65, ,41 MI.CROCAFrtDS 8,81 x x x 8 81 MICROPRINT. 4 HIC.OFICHS 5 -y-o- PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONTI NUAT 1 ON 6 TITLES I TOTAL SERIAL6 TITLES 25 3 X I -ý il.. ý--j,liol Noture of Items Included es uncataloged voluries. Verficel file Itoem3. Report the number of rools, Report the number of Individual cbrds. Vacant paccs arc for elides, filmatript, maps, disks, etc. Refers to titloe currently chocked in, including duplicatou..,-... XIx

241 Table I-B July.l, BOUND NEWSPAPER INVENTORY FOREIGN TITLES Law 68 Room I Total Argentina 39 Australia h 11 5 h Brazil Bulgaria Burundi 2 2 Canada 8 8 Chile 3 3 Czechoslovakia Denmark 8 8 England Finland France Germany Greece Guyana 6 6 Hong Kong Hungary India Iran 1 1 Ireland Italy Japan 22 h3 65 Kenya Lebanon Mexico Netherlands Poland Portugal 8 8 Puerto Rico 1 1 Rumania Scotland 2 2 Senegal 6 6 South Africa 4 h Spain Syria 1 1 Trinidad 8 8 Turkey Uruguay U.S.S.R Venezuela 1 1 Yugoslavia 6 6 Foreign Total

242 Table I-B July 1, 1981 (continued) BOUND NEWSPAPER INVEYTORT- UNITED STATES TITLES Law 68 Room 1 Total Arizona 6 6 California Connecticut District of Columbia Florida 3 3 Illinois Indiana 1 1 Iowa 8 8 Kansas l14 14 Kentucky 2 2 Louisiana 4 h Maine 1 1 Maryland 5 5 Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Missouri New Hampshire 5 5 New Jersey 7 7 New Mexico 5 5 New York Ohio Oklahoma 1 1 Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina 8 8 South Dakota 2 2 Tennessee 2 2 Texas Vermont 2 2 Virginia Washington 1 1 Wisconsin 3 3 Total U.S Total Foreign Total Classified 2892 (Attic) Portfolio 51 $1 Grand Total (includes Attic)

243 Table I-C July 1, 1981 MICROFIIM INVENTORY FOREIGN TITLES Argentina Austria Bangladesh Belgium Brazil British Honduras Bulgaria Canada Chile China Columbia Cuba Czechoslovakia Denmark Egypt England France Germany Hong Kong Hungary India Iran Ireland Italy Japan Jordan Korea Lebanon Malaysia Mexico New Zealand Pakistan Peru Poland Rumania Sierra Leone Soviet Union Spain Sri Lanka Sweden Switzerland Syria Tanzania Thailand Uruguay Vietnam Yugoslavia REELS )4 79) h $ U. S. TITLES REELS Alabama Alaska Arizona California Colorado Connecticut District of Columbia Georgia Hawaii Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana New Hampshire New Mexico New York North Carolina Ohio Pennsylvania South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Special Collections Underground Press Negro Newspapers h T U.S. Total 5215 (Non Illinois 37658) Foreign Total Classified Total )484 Foreign Total 135h2 Grand Total 6841

244 r-i r-4 CO O \ C r- d r- 4 r\ -r\ 4-P V\ C' ( \J I H C - ic I E-i r-4 co CO 6 - r-4 -A 4-) a-4 4.p) CO).p PQ, C\! cco C\J CH C.)C -A Oo O c r- 4.*r4 ) ' o ro H co \ r-- co C r-- (CJ N r- r-4 d r-4 M O E-4 R M 4-) tr.- rh I V\CO oc r-i z N \ CCO I\ r-th Pe4 coj cvcv o\co r-1 o r4- r-4 cv C'M CMl cp +4 r-4 to C O Hr1 o r4 Cd - -m ccl $4 I C) ('A Cd cc (V '5' C) co or-» Er-) CO *Hr-. H 4- -Ċ) r-p a) 8C -ci ) CO) h *-r-4 - e tc CH *r, C 4-'_ *H r-h r- HOHO (,. o r-h 4) C) a) r-1 H H C) O(D a) ) $4 C) t) CH X CH d o OC * -P - 4o 4cjO C) C) CL to 4) o Od S r.4 ' -P CM t \ cc r-h O - CL') E-4 ci StdC S. i

245 Newspaper 19. Library II.A Recorded Use o LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve 6 Nonprint Month Man'1 Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ July Man'l LCS/ August Man'l 18 LCS/ September Man'l 176 LCS/ October Man'l LCS/ November Man'l LCS/ December Man'l 171 LCS/ I M a n ' l January an 3 3 LCS February Man' _ LCS March Man'l LOS, LCS.. April M an'l LCS May MaLSn' ; LCS I June Man' LCS Totals Man'l h9. h..., _ Grand ol1i48 Total h44 LCS Year Man' $ Increase/ LCS ' Decrease Man'1 J_+I.. O _ j+18 - _- --I Total circulation: 38 (increase of lh over lastz year),since the Newspaper Library is a non-circulating library (except for interlibrary loan and faculty carrels) this table showing charge-outs reflects only a small portion of our use. See Tables II B and C for a complete description of our use.

246 TABLE II-B: RECORDED USE Newspaper User Survey July 198-June 1981 PATRONS NUMBER PERCENTAGE Faculty Graduate Student Undergraduate Public Total PURPOSE Dissertation/Thesis Historical Research Course Paper Classroom Other Total.48h6 1. NENWSPAPERS USED FILM PRINT TOTAL PERCENTAGE (Bound/ Unbound) United States $1.8 Illinois Foreign Percentage $ From July 1, 198 to June 3, 1981 patrons used a total 22,61 reels of microfilm. This distribution of patrons is based on the user survey instituted in Patrons are counted only once for each day they use the library even though they may read more than one paper. The total of newspapers used will be greater than the total of patrons, and a given paper is counted only once for each user each day. This survey is based on patrons who complete a request card and, therefore, is only a representative sample of "serious" patrons using the library for retrospective research. The floor plan and staff limitations of the Newspaper Library prevent a survey of all our users, so the figure of 48h6 is only 2 percent or less of total users. The total does include 74 individuals who used our holdings through interlibrary loan.

247 21. C) bd \ r CC)d > ON,-4 CO CON C) - N- rr-- Ht C V t H (V - V\\ r S S rh CJ C CM mif\r\ (V V cr\ ci r,-. con r-h C ' CIO O ON I CO C r- r-4 r-4 CM (OV C( r-h4 r \P r-h (CM V z-_- * 9 * * S Cj r t r - H C - r-4 IM r-4 CO ON H ON,- ON H- r-4 r-4 C( r-4 M CO l. N- ( M r - H- CM 4Hr CM CO r-4 \ Or- t M C M C\1 CM r-r o- o H r-i MOON O\ CY\ V- OCN r-4 ON H CIN C-- r-4 CO r- cnr-4 CMj CMf U) CO U) E- -C4 co CO Z o r- ONo H \- CV m CM -I\ CO CN NV- CO & CO CM ca r-i I r- ON S.1 r-4 H ) N^rm N-1 E-4 \ ONE-- r-4 oo rn-co r- -- r-4 CMj CV! CMJ C\M cr\ H N «* t ft 5 N- r- ON H \ 'C r-4 vi (Vl CMl r-4 H\ c' c-> H^ CN- vo- o c CO ON-\ cr\c H ( \- - C ft* -t ( n O c M r-4 CC COr-4 ON G'C N- ON H N- ON H- H al l. co r-4 r'l-cc CM c\^r M r-4 \ r-o ( Co O,c\\ co HHl r \HH^r^- (VN ^ -O 4 o 7\ N- CMi 44 H 2 U) H.-_ P -P CI ) ci 4P to oc) r- r $-.r-4 :1 ) t 1- IO ti) r-h c ý ci wcf C) TO (X ( *H U )C E(- ( C) *H *HO ; Ci'- 4-I -4 o C C-) O -H -S4 D ) o o. U) CO 2 1-l U) Mi: -4 coi *-I -PH - r-h i-i HI C) tr CO HeP *H -. h. *ro C,.

248 Newspaper Library IIl' Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables h5 2. Carrel seats Lounge chairs 8 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library 5, Linear feet of shelving 7374 C. Number of hours open weekly I. Fall 64o 2. Spring Summer 48.9 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals.5 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 5- b. Spring 55 c. Summer Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic William J. Maher (December ) (One half-time in Newspaper Library and half-time in University Archives) b. Nonacademic Betty Hildwein (half-time) (October ) Mary James (September 1979-September 198) Tom Gallivan (November 198- )

249 PHYSICS/ASTRONOMY LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, Implementation of Priorities A. Maintenance of quality of the collection Despite rising costs of books and journals, the Physics/Astronomy Library continued to supply successfully materials needed to satisfy both research and teaching needs, particularly in Physics where the literature is well controlled and easy to identify. We found no problem in acquiring astronomy materials published by commercial houses and were able to purchase all needed and relevant materials. With the assistance of the General funds we were able to acquire, also, two outstanding collections of sky maps--almost one-of-a-kind items. The problem of acquiring publications from other observatories probably worsened as funds everywhere are being cut back drastically, making it impossible for such places to distribute reports freely. We are, at present, trying to accomplish this, at least for the Russian observatories, by enlisting the service of a clearinghouse in Moscow. B. Maintenance of service Thanks to the hiring of a second non-academic in December, together with a very helpful group of students, we were able to continue to provide all the services we have in the past: special files, orientation seminars, special lists, acquisitions lists, etc. We feel that both the quantity and quality of reference work has increased with the freeing of the librarian and the LTA from some clerical duties and both have been enabled to give much more attention to individual needs as well as to be more knowledgeable about incoming materials, new reference works and the collection as a whole. C. More space This is still a pie-in-the-sky priority, though recent talks with the Head of the Physics Department have raised hope that more space may become available in the foreseeable future. At the moment, we are weeding as much as possible (LCS is a big help here) and making us of every inch of space including tops of ranges (not great). 2. Accomplishments The library has been well used this year and we feel the statistical page will bear this out. In this regard, it should be borne in mind that the statistics in no way reflect journal use which, for xeroxing purposes alone, adds at least another 15, volumes to the accompanying statistics. At the time of this report, we have in hand only the reserve statistics which show a 5% increase in usage. On the advice of the Department of Energy and in an attempt to keep the DOE fiche reports in a no-growth situation (cabinet space being completely used up) I undertook a massive weeding of this collection, mainly by category and/or title. Weeding by year published is another, less time-consuming way, but this has to be done with caution, as there is still much valuable material from the late ' 6 's on fiche We are able to provide for most needs with material at hand; for the locally non-available, Argonne National Lab has been most generous in assisting us.

250 Problems with inaccurate records of the former Observatory collection continue to arise, but these are being handled as they appear. An inventory, presently under way, is identifying these rather more rapidly and the LCI, together with more experienced students, is clearing up the records both on LCS and in our catalog. As noted under Section I, space problems did not improve except as we were able to dispose of materials to Alper and/or Kraus and to find extra space in closets and such for little used materials. This together with the transfer or withdrawal of nearly 8 physical volumes made it possible to house the 1262 new volumes acquired. We have been able to continue providing specialized lists, seminars on the uses of the library and the literature, improved xeroxing services (we now have two Savin copiers for general use). With LCS, users are more easily supplied with materials and, for those interested, we have been able to help our users help themselves--an asset to our sizeable group of after-hours users. We have abandoned the use of the Almy fund for "luxury" items, feeling the department's research needs would be better served by using the money to keep a second copy of Physical Review coming into the library. 3. Priorities for As stated in last year's list, the major priority continues to be the maintenance of the quality and relevance of a superb collection (this judgment based on a comparison with the acquisitions lists of comparable university libraries). Concomitantly, we give equal priority to using this collection as a base for providing the kind of service an outstanding department needs and expects. This entails training students beyond shelving, competent use of LCS and circulation methods to the point where all personnel can handle the files, abstracts, basic reference questions, simple problems involving the technical services departments and the main reference desk as well as the various procedures unique to the Physics/Astronomy library. To accomplish this more effectively, we plan to institute a required 3-4 hour session for all student help before the beginning of classes-- this in addition to any LCS training sessions given at the Main Library. We will continue a serious transfer/withdrawal effort while at the same time we will press for more space--both in shelving and study tables. My personal priorities--with adequate clerical help--are to sit-in on astronomy courses to upgrade my familiarity with the concepts and materials and also to attempt a survey on the uses of older materials as a guide to weeding and acquisitions. With a threatened 5%7 increase in the cost of many of our journals this becomes an imperative.

251 STATISTICAL SUMMARY.r) Library I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT _. wn uj TYPE LAST v z v TOTAL of YEAR'S 9 AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL -< - JUNE 3 CATALOG ED UNCATALOGED VOLUMES PAMPHLETS 2., rv, / w MICROFILM 3 ( MI CROCARDS4 xx x MICROPRINT 4 MICROFIC14., 7,m s.-;< r c 5OS Nature of Items Included as uncateloged volumes. Vertical file Items, Report the number of reels. Report the number of Indlvldual cards. Vacant apaccs are for liden, filmstrips, mnps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates.

252 Physics/Astronomy Library II. Recorded Use LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve - Nonprint Month Man'1 Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ July Man'l LCS/ August Man'l LCS/ September Man'l LCS/ October Man' LCS/ November Man' LCS/ December Man' a LCS/ January Man' LCS February Man'1 J LCS March Man'l LCS April Man'l LCS May Man' LCS June Man' LCS Totals Man' Grand Total Last LCS I Year Man'l Increase/ LCS -. 5% + 36% -3% Decrease Man'1 -. 4% - 15% - 66% -+56% % +3

253 Physics/Astronomy Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats 8 3. Lounge chairs 15 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving 498 C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 4 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 1 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 2 (LTA I:I and LC I) 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall 62 b. Spring 62 c. Summer 4 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Bernice Lord Hulsizer b. Nonacademic Mary Kay Newman (LTA II) Rosalind Muhammad (LC I)

254 RARE BOOK ROOM ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, 1981 I. Accomplishments, Issues, Opportunities As contrasted with last year, it is a pleasure to report that the Rapid Cataloging Unit has been able to catalog its "quota" of twelve titles per week for the Rare Book Room. Perusal of the numbers of titles still in Receiving (as found in the Statistics Section of this report) indicate that there are still serious arrearages. However, most of these titles will have to be cataloged by the Original Cataloging Department. an Lack ofaadequate Student Wage Fund has been a problem during the past year, and it has been necessary to supplement this with money accruing to the Rare Book Room from the NEH and OE money supporting the Cavagna project. This "extra" money has now been exhausted, and unless a sufficiently adequate Student Wage Fund is found for the Rare Book Room for the fiscal year 1981/82, I foresee only a "holding action" as far as operations for the Rare Book Room are concerned during the next year. It has already been necessary to cut out Saturday hours of opening during Summer School of By an adequate Student Wage Fund, I mean a sufficient amount to support student coverage with one person 4 hours a week, 52 weeks a year. II. Service to Readers A. Hours of opening: The same as during the previous Report Year, up until the beginning of Summer School on June 15. B. Use of library materials: Use of library materials over last year shows a slight overall increase, in spite of the fact that for this year only (with our internal cut-off date of May 31) there are only 11 months of statistics. III. Extension of Services Several exhibits have been held, including an exhibit on Samuel Johnson and his times, which was a display mounted in honor of the contributions of Robert W. Rogers, sometime Dean of LAS, on behalf of the Library; "Illustrations of Paradise Lost in England, 1688 to 182' mounted by Mary Ravenhall; and "Playthings Bred in Heart and Head: Truth and Fancy in Children's Books" (arranged by Dr. Selma Richardson's class in the history of children's literature). Visitors and faculty have begun several extended projects, among others, in the Rare Book Room during the past year: - A study of satirical elements in publications under the English Commonwealth, by Cedric Brown, visiting faculty from the University of Reading (England).

255 -2- - Work with original texts - Andrew Maxwell, John Milton (Paradise Lost), Henry Vaughan, and Robert Codrington, by Linda Veccni, a graduate student from St. Bonaventure University, St. Bonaventure, N.Y. - Seminar reports: William Blake, J.M.W. Turner, and American Art, by Marie Czach, an art history graduate student from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL - An appraisal of Hobo News by Frederick Danker, Boston State College, Boston, Mass. - A study of early American national histories and descriptive geographies by David Davenport, doctoral candidate in geography from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL - An examination of the correspondence to and from Sandburg with Lincoln biographers by Helen B. Crocker, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Ky. - An assessment of the concept of virtue in the 16th-century French emblem books, by Irene M. Bergal, Associate Professor of French, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark. - Work with the Franklin J. Meine Collection in Folklore, Local Color, and Humor, by Winifred Morgan, graduate student from the University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. - The preparation of a bibliographic catalog of John O'Keeffe's works, by Frederick M. Link, Professor of English, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska. - A history of reform in the American language in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, by Dennis Baron, Assistant Professor in English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In addition, several classes from the School of Library and Information Science have met in the Rare Book Room on a regular basis. The Friends of the Library have also on occasion continued, as in the past, to hold meetings and receptions in the Rare Book Room. IV. Care and Improvement of Collections. The Rare Book Room's project of continuing to clean and oil its leather-bound volumes continues, and at this point not all volumes in the collections have been cleaned for the first time, although we continue to work toward that goal. The Statistics Sheets indicate that something like 1491 volumes have been done-all by volunteers from the Friends of the Library. The Rare Book Room Librarian has also continued to transfer volumes from the Stacks as they have been brought to his attention by volunteers from the Friends. Unfortunately, during the year mildew became very much in evidence on books in the Rare Book Room Stacks. Finally, advice was obtained (from the Preservation Unit at the Library of Congress through William Henderson) that each shelf should contain a

256 -3- receptacle with a tablespoon of o- phenyl phenol. This powdered substance was put around on each shelf--a very time-consuming process--with the aid of personnel from the Binding Unit. In all, 1, to 12, cups were filled. During the year under review the Rare Book Room Librarian has participated in planning for the Sixth Stack Addition. Also, because there is still some space in the Rare Book Room Stacks, with the approval of the Circulation Librarian, the Reference Department, and the Documents Unit, the U.S. Serial Set, , was transferred from the Stacks to the Rare Book Room Stacks. Maps and plates in these volumes should now be much safer. V. Quarters and Equipment Security, of course, is an important concern in the Rare Book Room. It is therefore of much import when the sonar system does not function properly, as on numerous occasions has been the case during the year. Within the next year, it remains to be seen whether in the long run it would not be more economical to have a new system installed. As noted last year "sleeves" over fluorescent light fixtures need to be installed so as to filter out ultraviolet rays. The other physical aspect of our quarters much in need of attention is the rug in the Reading Rooms. It is not only filthy in places, but also badly worn, as has been pointed out to David Cobb, the recently appointed Assistant Director of Public Services for the Special Collections Libraries. VI. Personnel and Administration There remains only to mention the fact that during the year the logistics of routing books from Acquisitions to cataloging has been streamlined. All volumes under $2. each, or those not singled out for special treatment, go either to the Rapid Cataloging Unit or to Original Cataloging (as applicable); then after cataloging, to Marking, and then to the Rare Book Room. In this way much double handling and checking out from the Rare Book Room for cataloging is avoided. As far as personnel is concerned, regular staff have remained the same over the past year. It is sad to record the death of Lyle Bamber, Biology Librarian, emeritus, who had served as a volunteer in the Rare Book Room. Dr. Marian Harman continues to serve, and has done much work on a volunteer basis on the printer/publisher/ bookseller file. Miss Clarissa Lewis continues to volunteer much of her time in the Original Catalog Department for the cataloging of rare books. Miss Edythe Kirk, retired Associate Head of the Catalog Department, has joined Miss Harman in the past year, also, as a volunteer working on the printer/publisher/bookseller file. Titles of notable acquisitions during the year will be found in the Annual Report of the Head of Collection Development and Preservation.

257 RARE BOOK ROOM II. Recorded Use 198/81 Moeth LCS/ Fac/ Permit Special Reserve Nonprint Man'1 Staff Student C/Card IRR Charges Materials Materials eference TOTAL LCS/l Man' LCS/ Aug. Man' LCS/ pt Man' LCS/ Man' No 1LCS/ ' Man' LCS/l' D Man' LCS/ a LCS _ Feb "-... Man' LCS Man' A p r i l L C S. ] June Man' ,LCS1,.. Man' LCS I - J Man'1.an' I 1_.. LCS Totals. Man' ,115 Grand 14,115 Total Lat LCS Tsear _ Mantl " ,44 Increase LCS /De seman' I +71-MA

258 RARE BOOK ROOM. ANNUAL REPORT 198/81 Rare Book Library III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables Carrel seats 3. Lounge chairs 6 B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving 25, feet C. Number of hours open weekly 1. Fall Spring Summer 38 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 2 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 1 4. Average weekly hours of student help a. Fall ca. 4 b. Spring ca. 4 c. Summer ca Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) SAME AS LAST YEAR : a. Academic N. Frederick Nash, Rare Book Room Librarian and Assistant Professor of Library Administration Mary S. Ceibert (Mrs. LeRoy H.), Assistant Rare Book Room Librarian and Ass't. Professor of Library Administration b. Nonacademic Miss Louise Fitton, Clerk-Typist III arcella Grendler and Scott Bennett, whose offices were in the Rare Book Room,ended their employment with the Library during the year under review.) "K ~,/~#/

259 VI. STATISTICAL SUMMARY -- RARE BOOK ROOM A. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION 198/81 z b' < -3 u -3 a. 2 'a U 'a HI o 'a H 'a -3 TYPE OF MATERIAL Cataloged Vols. in the General Collections Partially Cat. Vols. ii 1 General Collection; SUB-TOTAL 2 Cat. PAMPHLETS Part. Cat. MICROFILMS 3 Cat. Part. Cat. Cassettes 4 Cat. MICROCARDS Part. Cat. MICROPRINTS 4 Ca t. Part. Cat. MICROFICHE 4 Cat. AS IAN CAVAGNA CHURCHILL IHARWELL HECHT Part. Cat. Cat. Part. Cat. Part. Cat. Cat. Part. Cat. Cat. Part. Cat. Cat. Part. Cat. Cat. Part. Cat. LAST YEAR' S TOTAL 74, , C C 1, AnnDD LAJr &,' ' I SRTR ACT _ C O.... 4,14 o> u 7- Ll Ii -X-ý L ,975 6, L. =.....: BASKETTE Cat. --I I HOLLANDER CatI C Part. Cat. 4,2631 C Cat LAkRSEN Pý- f... Part. Cat 1 u CA I I fA 22, , 1, 384, 58 -ý jjý 8 2 C C Cc SUI -a z u z +1, I- - -j -,,, I +. 2 A% A) TOTAL AS OF JUNE , ,55 117,836 I L 1 A. 71, JUJ i nn 1-9 tk I, I 7l 22, , _6 4, f.. L

260 STATISTICAL SU MSS) K ba Ad%, A A li l4 a. V A& TYPE OF MATERIAL RM. 198, LAST YEAR'S TOTAL I*-i i ADD '81 orb..... gone-ammmm (2a 7.U HJ I SUBTRACT zo TOTAL AS OF JUNE d 4 1. U< u (a U,C 'C (a H H< tg 3- MEINE MURPHY NICKELL SANDBURG SMITH WELLS TOTAL(Includes PERIODICALS CONTINUATION Cat. Part. Cat Cat. Part. Cat. Cat. Part. Cat. Cat. Part. Cat. Cat. Part. Cat. Cat. Part. Cat. 5 TITLES TITLES 5, , , , Ii 4 lw - - r -4 a r--& I Ot'? a A15I Ll r 27 A 4 ai up : f, S I S I , h rv I TOTAL SERIAL TITLES Nature of items included as part. cat. volumes ire those in the general collections (including manuscripts, Miltoniana, etc.) recorded on temporary cards in the Rare Book Room catalog only, or recorded only in a bibliography and shelved according to the bibliography. 2. Vertical file items. 3. Report the number of reels. 4. Report the number of individual cards. 5. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates. * Refers to part. cat. volumes which have been fully and officially cataloged for the first time. ** Statistics for special collections include fully cataloged items, part. cat. items recorded on temporary cards, and part. cat. items checked only in bibliographies. All statistics recorded for pamphlets, microforms, and special collections are in addition to statistics reported for the general collections.

261 VI. STATISTICAL SUMMARY -- RARE BOOK ROOM 198/81 ARREARAGES (ITEMS COMPLETELY UNCATALOGED AND NOT UNDER ANY KIND OF PUBLIC BIBLIOGRAPHIC CONTROL) TYPE OF MATERIAL VOLUMES TITLES OTHER Foreign Treatises Theological Treatises 124 3, 463 (E TIRE COLL. IN PROCESS) 2, 576 (only about 15% of the Receiving Shelves total may be sent to týhe (last yr.) Rapid Cataloging Unit) Sandburg Collection cubic ft. of mas., et cetera. IN PROCESS BINDING AND RESTORATION TOTAL NUMBER OF VOLUMES SENT FOR V BINDING AND/OR RESTORATION THIS REPORT YEAR LAST YEAR'S TOTAL 39 vol. for hand restoration 17 vol. to liertzberg 6 vol. to Hertzberg only S491 vols cleaned and oi1ed. 4fQ2 l.- LETTERS, MEMOS, REPORTS SENT OUT * mostly from the Sutton Collection

262 UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES ANNUAL REPORT July 1, June 3, Last year t s priorities and what has been done to implement them. A - Secure additional space. Nothing has been done. B - Schedule three types of records and sample a fourth. About half have been scheduled; a sampling technique has been developed. C - Maintain reference service with reduced staff. Reference service has been successfully maintained even with increased use of the archives and reduced staff. D - Publish two microfiche guides. The press has been considering one for six months; the ALA has agreed to publish the other. E - F - Improve finding aids for undergraduates. Minor progress has been made on this; the workload prevents improved service. Prepare administrative and statistical histories. Nothing has been done on this project due to lack of staff time and computer entry capability. 2. Most important accomplishments. The text under each heading is taken from the University Archives 18th Annual Report, for the most part. The principal accomplishment of the Archives in staffing has been its ability to maintain and expand its services in the period since 1973, while library support in the form of student wages has shrunk from 87% to 6% of the student hours. This has been done without becoming dependent on federal grants. The most important need of the archives is four additional full-time positions - a records manager, audiovisual archivist, reference archivist and conservation specialist. They would permit us to handle our present work load. Handling this workload is an "important accomplishment." Although the university has not included an archives or "special collections" building in its top fund raising priorities, its aspirations as a research center and the presence of such facilities at Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin, Kansas, Texas, North Carolina and other universities suggests that adequate housing is a matter of time and patience. "Stretching" our space to meet needs of administrative offices and other users is an "important accomplishment." The archives staff extended the subject indexing feature of the PARADIGM archival automation system to all record series in the University Archives. The archivist concluded an agreement for archival services with the American Association of Law Libraries. The Law Library provided space and the Assistant Archivist supervised the project. An annual grant of $3, covered the services of a quarter-time research assistant, who processed the archives in accordance with University Archives procedures.

263 Based on a cost estimate of $6.25 per square foot annually for storage space, these records retention schedules save the university $7661 each year in storage sp'ace. Unfortunately, administrative and clerical personnel are often so unfamiliar with the contents of large backlogs of inactive files that they are unable to evaluate and weed these files. In these cases, it is necessary to reduce the volume through archival processing. In the past year the archives reduced a transfer of 12 cubic feet from the Comptroller's Office by 21%. To improve access to information about completed records schedules and assist in compiling statistical tables, the assistant archivist developed an automated list of all record series under retention schedules reference uses represent a 1 1/2% increase and a new record. One hundred faculty, thirty-one doctoral candidates, forty-seven graduate students and 238 undergraduates used the archives. Faculty members in eighty-four other universities and colleges in twenty-nine states and eight countries used the archives. The archival education program continued to produce qualified archivists and important staff support from the GSLIS. Participation as officers of the Society of American Archivists and the Midwest Archives Conference has enhanced the professional reputation of the University of Illinois archives. The work on national information systems. institutional evaluation and cost analysis of archival processing represent important professional contributions. 3. New priorities. A - B - C - D - E - F - Secure additional space. Schedule records and reduce holdings by sampling. Maintain reference service. Publish guides. Improve finding aids and computer access. Publish administrative histories. Maynard Brichford University Archivist

264 STATISTICAL SUMMARY J j jt jar_ y i.. chives N y I. GROWTH OF THE COLLECTION ADO SUBTRACT w TYPE LAST t» z TOTAL of YEAR'S g f AS OF MATERIAL TOTAL < JUNE 3 - Q -- Z o CATALOGED VOLUMES UNCATALOGED VOLUMES PAMPHLETS 2 MICROFILM 3 MI CROCARDS4 wxx MI CROPR I NTU MICROFICHE Archives cu. ft PERIODICAL 6 TITLES CONTI NUAT I ON 6 TITLES a EXE I AM TOTAL SERIAL6 TITLES I. 2. 5, EwAý -M aft. - IL..Nmpw.,No ý.o.wooft- WON ý W -loys. I Nature of Items Included as unceataeloged volumes. Vertical file Items. Report the number of reels. Report the number of Individual cards. Vacant spaces are for slides, filnstripe, maps, disks, etc. Refers to titles currently checked in, including duplicates.

265 University Archives II. Reco ded Uae of er unv. ana public LCS/ Fac/ rm Special Reserve & Nonprint Month Man'l Staff Student..d IRR Charges Materials Materials LCS/ July Man-' 1 _ Man' LCS/ 1 Auguse t Man'1_ LCS/ October Man'1 November December January February March Man'L LCS/ Man'1 LCS/ Man' 1 LCS Man'1 LCS Man'1I LCS April Man'1 LCS May Man'l LCS _ June Man'1 LCS Totals Man'l Grand Total LCS ear Man' Increase! LOS- J Decrease Man'

266 University Archives III. Other Information A. Seating capacity 1. Seats at tables 1 2. Carrel seats 3. Lounge chairs B. Physical facilities 1. Total square feet in library Linear feet of shelving ca 16 C. Number of hours open weekly I. Fall 4 2. Spring 4 3. Summer 4 D. Personnel (exclude those not hired by the Library) 1. Number F.T.E. Professionals 1 ½ 2. Number F.T.E. Graduate Assistants 3. Number F.T.E. Nonacademics 1 4. Average weekly hours of student help (excluding contractual assistant a. Fall 55 (38) paid by outside agencies) b. Spring 55 (38) c. Summer 55 (38) 5. Names of employees (note inclusive dates of employment) a. Academic Maynard Brichford William Maher b. Nonacademic Evelyn Arvedson

267 UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT July 1, 198 to June 3, Operations It is a literary fashion to disparage the past. People say that a simplistic analysis belongs in the 19th century or that someone was dragged "kicking and screaming" into the 2th century. They talk of the Edwardian Era, the Roaring Twenties, the Fabulous Fifties and even the music and politics of the 6s and 7s as if these were merely evolutionary points on the path to the present. The past was a time before we had the wonderful methodological and technological tools of the present. They tend to confuse consumption with growth, inflation with progress and measurement with control. Archives enable us to deal with the past on its own terms. We can examine the collective efforts of humanity to resolve problems and achieve solutions with a detachment freed from the rhetoric and opinions of the present. As we reassess national, institutional and personal priorities "empires may crumble", but the value of documenting society's performance will continue to merit public support and attract scholars to archival theory and practice. Higher education is an arena for the contest between the advocates of winning and those who stress the importance of performance in relation to ability. For the former, the objectives are a winning athletic program, courses "aced" on the way to a degree and winning admission to a professional school. The champions of performance contend that achievements in life, marriage, writing and the evaluative judgment of one's peers are based more on accomplishments in relation to ability. The archives provides ample support for the position that we are not likely to win them all. The long term result of a university's fixation on winning Nobel Prizes or basketball tournaments is likely to be a media-induced paranoia. The University of Illinois is one of the few major universities that has no written history. We can be thankful that this monumental work has never been undertaken or completed. It permits us to examine the records and draw our own conclusions from the evidence, rather than refer to a written legend. We have an ample supply of folklore about "Illini Firsts", "Golden Days" and "top-rated" departments to meet the needs of those who publicize images and indulge in nostalgia and trivia. Indeed these activities stimulate the popular research that is indispensable for maintaining an archival program. Directing our archival "ministry" to the needs of all, not just the leaders in power or thought, provides the basis of support for unpopular research. The products mentioned in the following pages include both basic services to our users and additional returns on the investment.

268 A. Staff. The key to an effective archival program is a dedicated (and overworked) staff. William Maher as half-time assistant archivist has handled responsibilities for records management, records retrieval and conservation. Evelyn Arvedson, as Archives Technical Assistant, was responsible for reference work, contacts with the Library and the supervision of the 16 students employed by the Archives and listed in Table I. The efficient work of students is reflected in the accomplishments described throughout this report. Student wage funds covered 1177 graduate student hours and 748 undergraduate student hours, an increase of 33 over In addition to regular hourly student employees, the Graduate School of Library and Information Science provided a quarter-time assistantship for the academic year and two quarter-time assistantships for the summer of 198. The American Library Association contract provided a half-time assistantship for the academic year. A similar agreement with the Association of American Law Libraries provided a quarter-time assistantship for the second semester. The loss of Evelyn Arvedson in May was a severe personal blow to her many friends and associates in the community and the university. A loving and concerned teacher, her ten years in the University Archives is a continuing inspiration and challenge to those who worked with her. The most important need of the archives is four additional full-time positions - a records manager, audio-visual archivist, reference archivist and conservation specialist. They would permit us to handle our present work load. Staff salaries are also inadequate for the level and scope of archival responsibilities exercised by the staff. The principal accomplishment of the archives in staffing has been its ability to maintain and expand its services in the period since 1973, while library support in the form of student wages has shrunk from 87% to 6% of the student hours. This has been done without becoming dependent on federal grants. In , 52.3% of our graduate student hours did not come from library appropriations. The dollar percentage of nonlibrary support is greater. The absence of travel funds is a major staff problem. covered 3.8% of the archivist's travel expenses. In 198, the Library The archivist participated in two meetings of the Library's Public Services Promotion & Tenure Review Committee.

269 Square Capacity Processed Unprocessed Total % B. Space. Feet Cubic Ft. Cubic Ft. Cubic Ft. Cu. Ft. Occupied Library Attic Basement Corridor Newspaper Library Child Development Commerce West * Law 68E Law Library Bevier Hall *Estimates of business archives not included in Section II-A below. With 1,871 cubic feet of records in 1,64 cubic feet of shelf space, the Archives is 13% occupied. Records in nine locations mean delays and poor reference service. The projected destruction of 35 cubic feet of records in Commerce West will still leave more records in that location than the shelves can accomodate, i.e. over 1% occupancy. A recent study of Yale's records disclosed 35, feet of records in storage. While Yale is an older institution, it is less than a third as large as Illinois. The volume of records in the Yale Archives and annual use figures are close to the totals at Illinois. Given the need for prudent financial management, Yale provided a 16, cubic foot area for its archives in 1977 and recently decided to fund an archival/records management program on a continuing basis. Although the University of Illinois has not included an archives or "special collections" building in its top fund raising priorities, its aspirations as a research center and the presence of such facilities at Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin, Kansas, Texas, North Carolina and other universities suggests that adequate housing is a matter of time and patience. C. Equipment. During the year nothing was spent for supplies and equipment. Several requests were made. The location of an electrostatic copy machine near the entrance to the Illinois Historical Survey and University Archives has been the major equipment development of the year. This permits many archives users to make copies without long trips to the Library Photolaboratory. The former inconvenient system required that our staff guide the patron to and from the photocopy room through locked doors. While the present location of the machine is a problem, it is a distinct improvement. Another improvement has been the availability of an "auditron" for archives copying. This saves many hours of staff travel time, negotiations with library staff and typing. We hope to expand our usage of form letters and paragraphs.

270 II. Holdings and Processing. On June 3, 1981, the University Archives contained: A. Type of Material No. of Series Cubic Feet Processed Office Records Personal Papers Publications Unprocessed Office Records Personal Papers Publications Archives total American Library Association Archives Processed Office Records Personal Papers Publications Unprocessed A.L.A. total Total Archives' processed holdings include office records (63%), personal papers (27%), and publications (1%). Processed volumes in cubic feet are the approximate equivalents of 3,835 file drawers, 7,341,6 manuscripts and 7,314 books. See Tables 2 and 3 for breakdowns of record. groups in the University and ALA Archives by types of records. 97% of the holdings of the University Archives are processed. The page Archives' Classification Guide has been revised and retyped. Processing totals for the past year increased by 32 record series and decreased by 116 cubic feet. A.L.A. Archives processing totals increased by 55 record series and 43 cubic feet. The Archives contains about 8,811, historical manuscripts.

271 B. Significant Accessions. Cubic Feet Staff Appointments File, Committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure File, Committee on Student Discipline Minutes, Associate Provost Files, Instructional Videotapes, Comptroller's Subject File, Assistant to the Comptroller File, Gifts Correspondence, University and Foundation Investments File, Statistical Studies, Patent Committee Files, Retirement System File, Comptroller's Budget File, Accident Compensation Committee File, Economics Staff Files, Business Management Scrapbooks, Mississippi Valley Industrial Arts Conference Papers, NCTE Executive Committee Minutes, NCTE Staff Appointments File, Geology Subject File, and Staff Applications, Chancellor's Committee File, Ombudsman's Subject File, Chancellor's Budget File, Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs File, AID Projects Office File, AID Progress Reports Files, Njala University College Subject File, Participants and Staff File, Overseas Project Director Subject File, AID Tunisia Project File, Study Lists, OAR Automation File, Chicago Illini Club Minutes, and photographs.6 Library Staff Association File, Engineering Library Correspondence, Housing Historical File, Housing Scrapbooks, Radio Station WPGU File, Pennsylvania Residence Halls File, Press Subject File, Presidents' Speeches Press Releases, Dean of Students General Correspondence, Student Affairs Personnel File, Student Organizations Assistant Dean's Correspondence, Dean's Subject File, Conference on Conduct Governance File, Veterans Affairs Office Subject File, Student & Faculty Organizations Registration File, Hiker's Records, Galesburg Business Manager's File,

272 III. Programs. A. Personal Papers. The archives received the papers of coach Ray Eliot, trustee William L. Abbott, psychologist Raymond Cattell and substantial additions to the papers of chemist Edward Bartow, astronomer George McVittie, and botanist William Trelease. While the volumes were all less than three cubic feet, the research value of these collections is high. The archivist wrote a solicitation letter to the Music faculty concerning personal papers and arranged for space in the Music Library. B. Publications. The staff concentrated work on publications from the Colleges of Agriculture, Engineering and Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the Student Affairs and President's Offices. C. Sound Recordings and Oral History. The archivist resumed the oral history program with a series of interviews with Political Science Professor Clarence A. Berdahl, Ph.D. '2, and Board of Trustees Secretary Anthony Janata, '2. D. Photographs. The archives received an extensive collection of photographs from the Sports Information Office. Individual alumni responded to the invitation in the Illinois Alumni News with gifts of snapshots. E. Finding Aids. The archives staff extended the subject indexing feature of the PARADIGM archival automation system to all record series in the University Archives. They also expanded the subject descriptor data base from 3423 terms to 3535 terms. Supplementary finding aids listing box and folder contents exist for 23.4% of all record series, 45% of official records and 55% of personal papers. Staff members produced 23 pages of supplementary finding aids, which brought the total to 679. It would be far more efficient to enter this data on a word processor in the archives. In December 198, the assistant archivist completed a study of the costs of processing archival and manuscript collections. The processing of 91 record series totaling 39.2 cubic feet was analyzed. The study found an average processing time of 3.5 hours per cubic foot for official records, 9.8 hours for personal papers and 5.6 hours for publications. A preliminary description of the study was made at the 198 annual meeting of the Society of American Archivists, and a final report will be published in a fall, 1981 issue of College and Research Libraries. The exact costs of processing determined by this study reflect our circumstances and may differ from costs at other institutions. However, the study illustrates that the allocation of personnel resources to processing can be measured and quantified to produce data that will aid in developing supervisory guidelines and planning for future acquisitions.

273 IV. Projects. A. History of Science and Technology. The archivist was involved in several national programs relating to the appraisal and retention of scientific and technological records. He attended Cincinnati and Toronto meetings of the Joint Committee on the Archives of Science and Technology (History of Science Society, Society for the History of Technology, Association of Records Managers and Administrators and Society of American Archivists). JCAST has published a preliminary report and received a second grant from NHPRC. The archivist is preparing a bibliographic essay on scientific and technological documentation for records appraisers and processors. The archivist served on a Mathematics Association of America Committee on Applied Mathematics in the United States during World War II, which met in Washington for ten days in July, November, and March at the request of the National Science Foundation. The Committee rewrote proposals for documenting the history of applied mathematics in the World War II era by means of a disciplinary research center, oral history interviews, checklists of archival and manuscripts collections and a bibliography. The Committee expanded the scope of the project to cover the "mathematization" of U.S. society in the 2th century. He attended a New York meeting of the American Institute of Physics' Advisory Committee on the Documentation of Postwar Science in Department of Energy National Laboratories, and provided advice on the archival components of a draft American Institute of Physics proposal to the Department of Energy on a "History of Solid State Science." He served on the advisory board for the Archives of American Psychology at the University of Akron and advised on an NEH proposal to catalog a library of Slavic material on psychology. The archivist drafted a proposal for the support of a disciplinary research center for geology and the earth sciences for submission in case archival staff and space become available. B. Business Archives. While we do not collect business archives, we participate in workshops and consultations to encourage the development of business archives' programs. C. Academic Organizations. The University Archives provides archival services for twenty academically-related organizations. While staffing and space constraints have held the records of these associations to a total of 1189 cubic feet, they provide valuable research material.

274 8 As Director of the American Library Association Archives project, the archivist supervised a half-time research assistant; visited the ALA headquarters in Chicago twice to discuss policy and arrange the transfer of records; spoke to the ALA division heads on records retention and ALA Archives as they prepared to move to new administrative offices; and transferred 133 cubic feet of records to the Archives. Reference use remained steady. The number of subject descriptors in the data base increased by 29 to The staff prepared a brochure on using the ALA Archives. The National Catalog of Sources for the History of Librarianship (NCSHL) data bases have been programmed for publication and the Library History Roundtable has agreed to publish the guide in COM fiche format. The archivist concluded an agreement for archival services with the American Association of Law Libraries. The Law Library provided space and the Assistant Archivist supervised the project. An Annual grant of $3, covered the services of a quarter-time research assistant, who processed the archives in accordance with University Archives procedures. The American Society for Quality Control Archives received regular additions of published series from its headquarters in Milwaukee. In developing the A.S.Q.C. archival program, the Archives' staff reprocessed record series in the Archives. V. Records Management The archives' basic records management responsibilities are to evaluate all university records to determine which shall be destroyed and which shall be transferred to the archives, and to improve the quality of university records by advising offices concerning standards, procedures and techniques required for efficient creation, use and destruction of records. The Campus Administrative Manual includes sections on records disposal procedures and the Archives' Microfilm Advisory Service. During the past year, the archives completed work on 12 schedules for 31 record series totaling 36.1 cubic feet. 18 active series with an annual accumulation of 24.3 were scheduled for destruction. 5 inactive series with a volume of 8.5 cubic feet were scheduled for destruction. 8 active series with an annual accumulation of 3.5 cubic feet were scheduled for transfer to the archives. The current total of 83 records disposal authorizations approved by the archives cover the annual destruction of 28 active series accumulating at a rate of cubic feet a year, and the archival transfer of 43 series with an annual accumulation of 47.9 cubic feet. Based on a cost estimate of $6.25 per square foot annually for storage space, these records retention schedules save the university $7661 each year in storage space. Schedules completed cover records from administrative divisions, academic departments, and public service units including Chancellor, Student Affairs, Public Information, Instructional Resources, Russian and-east European Center, Physiology, Speech and Hearing Sciences, and Police Training Institute. After a lengthy review of research and privacy considerations, a schedule was approved for the case files and minutes of meetings for the Committee on Student Discipline. The filing systems of the Police Training Institute and the Department of Physiology and Biophysics were inventoried and placed under schedule. The Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences' extensive files on denied applications for admission and on former students were

275 Records Management (continued) scheduled following consultation with the Legal Counsel. The large volume of financial records maintained in most university offices is reflected in the fact that eight of the twelve schedules approved in the past year included financial records. The assistant archivist and archivist advised university offices on filing procedures and inventorying of records. This work can lead to better control over the documentation of the university and improve the management of information resources needed to conduct everyday business and plan for the future. One of the goals of records management is the transfer of only that small volume of records that best documents the office or origin. Unfortunately, administrative and clerical personnel are often so unfamiliar with the contents of large backlogs of inactive files that they are unable to evaluate and weed these files. In these cases, it is necessary to reduce the volume through archival processing. In the past year the archives processing staff reduced a transfer of 12 cubic feet from the Comptroller's Office by 21%. In a study of processing procedures, the assistant archivist has identified files reduction as a factor in measuring processing costs. The reappraisal of processed collections is necessitated by space needs and infrequent use. The archivists completed a review of 396 cubic feet of student employment folders transferred and processed from 1969 to 1978 and determined that a 1% sample should be retained. After consultation with statisticians and computer personnel,the archives decided to use machinegenerated random number tables to select a sample of about 14, folders from the total file which covers To improve access to information about completed records schedules and assist in compiling statistical tables, the assistant archivist developed an automated list of all record series under retention schedules. Based on PARADIGM, this online system enables staff to search for all records of a given department, schedule, or type (e.g., subject, personnel, academic or financial files). Machine-generated tables provided statistics on records scheduled by disposition (destroy or transfer) and by office of origin. These tables show that 57% of the active records under retention schedule are in the Business Office. Another 17% are in Admissions and Records. By contrast, 2.5% are in Personnel Services, % in Housing and % in Operations and Maintenance. This information will assist the archives in appraising records and planning future scheduling activities. The records management program facilitates administrative, teaching and research activities by providing for the prompt disposal of large volumes of routine information. Every office should have all its records covered by retention schedules. Our lack of staff has prevented the accomplishment of this goal. Meanwhile, the technology of the photocopier, computer and word processor are complicating the situation. They have increased the capacity to produce data without improving the control of information. As information costs decline, so does the quality of the product. The miracles of the Xerox Age end when the copy emerges from the machine. When office workers file the product, they add to the archival workload. Help!

276 1 VI. Use. A. Reference Service reference uses represent a 1 1/2% increase and a new record. Tables 5 and 6 show users and purposes of use from the July 1, 198 to June 3, 1981 period. Table 7 shows five-year trends in percentages. Table 8 shows records used in the past year. The most frequently used record groups were Student Affairs, Alumni Association, Public Information, Board of Trustees, President, Liberal Arts and Sciences and Press. B. Research Use. Thirty-one doctoral candidates used the resources of the University Archives. Fourteen dissertation researchers were from Illinois and three from foreign universities. Eight were in library science, six in education, four in literature, three in history of science, and three in history and art history. Eleven candidates spent extended periods in the Archives. Three were in education and library science and one each in architecture, agricultural education, art history, history and literature. Among their topics were higher education, ; teacher preparation in developing countries; the origins and development of intercollegiate athletics, ; Accent magazine and Greek Revival architecture. Four masters theses included studies of marine ecology and Los Angeles librarians. Dissertations on president David Kinley and Art Collecting at the University of Illinois were completed. Fourty-seven graduate students and 238 undergraduates in architecture, speech, library and information science, journalism and other curricula used archival material for course or seminar papers or reports on campus buildings, university history, traditions, persons and other topics. The Assembly Hall and the Survey Building were the most popular subjects attracting sixteen students. Fourteen chose Chief Illiniwek. Ten wrote on Altgeld Hall and seven each on the Undergraduate Library and Education Building. Other topics included Block I, campus plan, housing regulations, ethical standards and oceanographer Francis Shepard. Other student uses were for developing a multi-media Homecoming show; writing administrative histories and direct mail appeals to alumni;and preparing to interview campus administrators and to tryout for the position of Chief Illini. Students also read Illios, looked into fraternity histories and engaged in genealogical research. One group undertook the preparation of a guide to campus architecture. One student read the Daily Illini for autobiographical background information. Students comprised 42% of our users. 1 Illinois faculty used the archives to study women and scholarship, departmental resource allocation, local history, smoke emission from the Abbott Power Plant, Illinois Association of School Librarians, Phi Beta Kappa, Lorado Taft, Phineas Windsor and Gabriel Guevrekian. The principal organizational studies were histories of the Medical Center, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the Natural History Museum. Most faculty users were from Liberal Arts and Sciences (26%), Library (18%), Engineering (11%), and Fine and Applied Arts (1%).

277 Research Use 11 Faculty members in eighty-four other universities and colleges in twentynine states, Canada, Japan, Australia, New Zealand, Korea, England, Norway and South Africa used the archives. Among their topics were organic chemistry, the Illinois State Academy of Science, patenting Tykociner's sound on film invention, the East European Fund, college football, Blacks and sports, the 194 Olympics, Korea and the Olympics, the history of nursing, an architectural history of universities, progressive education and Africa, and Progressive Era faculty involvement in state government. Biographical studies concerned Roger Adams, Charles E. Bessey, Avery Brundage, Robert B. Downs, Willard C. Flagg, Gustave Herve, and Charles Moss. Faculty from Iowa State used the Matthias Dunlap nursery records in developing a landscaping plan for the Lincoln home site in Springfield. Several faculty requested information and photocopies of engineering and education publications and the letters of literary figures. Faculty from an additional thirteen universities used the ALA Archives for organizational and photographic histories and studied library collections, annual conferences, round tables, committees and policy documents. Other ALA users included staff at the Chicago headquarters and members. Among the special uses of the archives were searches for News-Gazette photographs of Marilyn Monroe's 1955 visit to Bement, the Red Grange/Bob Zuppke film for use by a television network and a football game film of the former player who was wounded in a presidential assassination attempt. Fraternity initiates sought information on founders and alumni. Alumni and public users found information on the construction and use of the Auditorium, Avery Brundage, university history for a children's musical, a Christie Clinic benefactor, Harold Grange, Harry Gray, Hillel Foundation, Iota Sigma Pi, Lin Pei Fen, negotiated wage salaries, Louis N, Ridenour, Rock Island's Illinois Labor Home, the School of Military Aeronautics and World War I aviation, university business policies and procedures, and the University Woman's Club. Several users sought illustrations for advertising and promotional programs and publications, e.g. farm scenes for a federal land bank calendar and vitamin deficiencies in animals for a chemistry text. Twenty-six users sought family history information. Representatives of the American Society for Quality Control and the National Council of Teachers of English used their archival material for administrative and historical purposes. While 53% of the public users were from Illinois, the others were from twenty-five states and four foreign countries. Heavy administrative use of the archives continued. The principal users were Student Affairs, Library, Alumni Association, Afro-American Studies, Library and Information Science, Foundation, Public Information, Historical Survey, Agriculture, President and Admissions and Records. Thirty-five other university offices used the archives. The most common administrative uses were searches for subject and personnel files, photographs and policy statements. Many requests for university publications were routed through the Library research and reference service. Student services interns did administrative research on Campus Chest, Club 1, Dad's Association, Mawanda, vending machines, and the university logo.

278 12 Research Use (continued) Other administrative users studies abandoned mines, agencies allied with the university, Committee on Program Evaluation reports, and Phi Eta Sigma. The Afro-American Studies office sponsored a project to develop information resources on Black Students, organizations and graduate alumni. Uses by the media included eight Daily Illini and two Illio writers, and newspaper and magazine reporters from Champaign-Urbana, Chicago and New York. Classes visiting the archives included graduate classes in library and information science and a high school class. Undergraduate library staff also visited the archives. C. Publicity. The archivist wrote to 6.9% of the graduate students beginning research for their dissertations to call attention to archival resources. Many of them visited the archives to consult records or obtain the addresses of repositories having source material relevant to their topics. The archivist attended two meetings of the Friends of the Library executive committee. He spoke to the Campus Roundtable on the University's archival program. The assistant archivist published a six page article in Illinois Libraries on "The Illini Archives: A Laboratory for Retrospective Research." The archivist published an article on "Sources for the History of Physics in the University of Illinois Archives" in the May 1981 American Institute of Physics, Center for History of Physics Newsletter. A visiting reporter from the Champaign-Urbana News-Gazette wrote a feature article on the Archives' "Reasons for Writing Letters" exhibit, which featured personal correspondences of Roger Adams, Albert Einstein, Sylvia Plath, William Trelease and others. Another reporter used archival sources for a feature story on Homecoming. Table 9 lists twelve archives exhibits prepared by the staff. The archives also supplied material for exhibits at the Illini Union for Homecoming and a housing conference. The archives staff responded to surveys of our holdings relating to Asian and Pacific sources, athletics, computer science, nursing, oral history, photographic collections, twentieth century physicists and Swedes. The published guides and papers resulting from these surveys publicize our resources.

279 13 VII. Archival Program A. Training. During the spring semester, the archivist taught a class of seven graduate students in the course on the "Administration and Use of Archival Materials." The 7-page course notes and 2-page bibliography for this course were maintained and updated by CYBER on-line. The students prepared footnote citations for administrative histories of university departments, biobibliographical critiques of archivists and papers on archival areas. They also processed record series in the University Archives. In the summer 1981 session, the archivist taught three students in the "Information Management" course and one student in the advanced archival studies course. The archivist completed a 21-page self-study report on the archival education program at the University of Illinois for the Committee on Education and Professional Development of the Society of American Archivists. The courses include a - The Administration & Use of Archival Material (438) b - Advanced Studies in Librarianship - Archives (45) c - Archives Practicum (36) d - Information Management (45 JJ). The archivist lectured to an Indiana University doctoral seminar on resources in the ALA Archives and the PARADIGM automated retrieval system, conducted the "Records Management & Business Archives" session at the Society of American Archivists' Business Archives Workshop at the Ford Archives in Dearborn, Michigan, and talked with trainees at the Tab Products Corporation Training Seminar about archives and records management. He served on doctoral committees in the College of Education (final examination) and Graduate School of Library and Information Science (preliminary examination). In the past year archivists from Earlham College, University of Illinois Medical Center, Illinois State University, Iowa State University, Knox College, Marquette University, University of New South Wales, Northwestern University, Southern Illinois University, Williams College and University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, and the states of Illinois and Minnesota visited the archives. Mail and telephone inquiries concerning archival and records management practices were received from twenty-one colleges and universities. Archival inquiries were also received from Rothschild's, the Smithsonian Institution and Society of American Archivists. The archivist visited academic archives at Earlham College, Knox College, Marquette University, Sangamon State University and University of Toronto and the National Archives, Smithsonian, Ford, Rockefeller and Sears. He also visited the Chicago Historical, Milwaukee, Newberry and Connersville and Richmond, Indiana libraries. The assistant archivist visited the Milwaukee Public Library, Milwaukee Municipal Archives, Northwestern University, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, University of California San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Huntington Library, and the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Library.

280 14 B. Professional Activities. As president of the Society of American Archivists, the archivist presided at the annual meeting in Cincinnati. He attended council meetings, Executive Committee meetings, Council Programs Committee meetings, a Committee on Education and Professional Development meeting and chaired the Professional Standards Committee. He chaired a session on "The Persons Behind the Principles: Archival Biographies" and gave a paper on "Reflections on Muller, Feith, Fruin, and Their Contemporaries"; gave the presidential address - "Academic Archives: Uberlieferungsbildung"; presided at the annual business meeting and participated in the officers and committee chairs and new members meetings, receptions and athletic events. The archivist attended four meetings (nine days) of the Society's Task Force on National Information Systems for Archives and Manuscripts Collections in Alexandria, Cincinnati, and Washington. The National Endowment for the Humanities funded the Society's $131, proposal for support of Task Force activities in In January, the Task Force identified standard descriptive categories for archives and manuscript collections, drafted a statement on the National Historical Publications and Records Commission's SPINDEX data base which was approved by the Society of American Archivists and adopted a position paper calling for shared formats for transferring data between national data bases. In June, the Task Force charged a working group of NARS, NHPRC, LC and RLG representatives to develop a format for data exchange. The archivist met in Chicago with Society's Institutional Evaluation Task Force, which was funded by the Council on Library Resources. The Task Force tested the site visit and self survey procedures at the Chicago Historical Society. In May, the archivist participated in a four day site visit to the Illinois State Archives and Sangamon State University Archives in Springfield. He also served as a member of an archival consultant team, which prepared a five-year program review for the Governing Council of the Rockefeller Archive Center operated by the Rockefeller Foundation, Rockefeller University, Rockefeller Brothers Fund and Rockefeller family interests in Pocantico Hills, New York. The archivist attended meetings of the Midwest Archives Conference (MAC) in Milwaukee and Chicago. At the former, he chaired a session and gave a paper on "After the Cheering Stops: Athletics in Archives." The archivist participated in a Panel Discussion of "Research Libraries and Information Science" at a meeting of the Student ASIS Chapter of the Graduate School of Library and Information Science. He gave a public lecture on "European Archival Theory Since 1789" and talked on "European Archives" during International Week at the Illini Union. The archivist published "What's Past Was Future: in The American Archivist, (Summer, 198); "President's Greeting" in the "Agenda for.the Eighties " program for the 44th Annual Meeting of the Society of American Archivists (Sept. 3-Oct. 3, 198); "Academic Archives: Uberlieferungsbildung" in The American Archivist (Fall, 198); and a review of "Local Government Records: An Introduction to Their Management, Preservation and Use" by H.G. Jones in Journal of American History (Dec., 198). The archivist chaired three meetings of the Illinois State Archives Advisory Board in Chicago and Springfield. He served on the Tykociner Lecture Committee and the University Film Center's 5th Anniversary Committee.