WORKSHOP REPORT. Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) & Genome Canada Ottawa - February 28, 2012

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1 WORKSHOP REPORT Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) & Genome Canada Ottawa - February 28, 2012 Listeria: Integration of Genomic Technologies for Detection and Surveillance This report was prepared by: Groupe Intersol Group: Warren Wilson Inc. 205 Catherine, Suite 300 Ottawa, Ontario K2P 1C3 Ph: ext. 141 Fax: i

2 TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY... II LIST OF ACRONYMS.. III A. GETTING STARTED / CONTEXT Introduction Welcome/Opening Remarks... 1 B. REGULATORY AGENCY AND INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVE Current Prospects for Genomics Technology in CFIA Food Microbiology Inspections Programs The Listeriosis Reference Service for Canada... 2 Open Forum - Discussion: Maple Leaf Consumer Foods An Industry Perspective... 3 Open Forum - Discussion Discussion #1: Table and Plenary Issues around Detection and Surveillance - Needs of Industry and Government... 3 C. RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY MLVA: A New Proactive Approach for Enhanced Microbial Risk Assessment, Management and Control of Listeria monocytogenes... 4 Open Forum - Discussion Public Health Genomics and the New Molecular Epidemiology All Good Contigs Come to a Bad End Discussion #2 Table and Plenary Gaps in Current Research or existing Technologies... 5 D. THE PATH FORWARD A Potential Research Project Discussion #3 (Table and Plenary) Next Steps... 7 APPENDIX A LIST OF PARTICIPANTS... 8 APPENDIX B WORKSHOP AGENDA i

3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Listeriosis is a serious foodborne illness caused by the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes (Listeria) that primarily affects the elderly, pregnant women and immuno-compromised adults, all of whom are more vulnerable to foodborne illness than the general population. In 2008, Listeria in ready-to-eat (RTE) meat caused a widespread outbreak of Listeriosis in Canada resulting in the deaths of 23 Canadians. As a result of the serious nature of this outbreak, the Government of Canada commissioned an investigation into the factors that contributed to the outbreak and to make recommendations for concrete action to strengthen the food safety system in Canada (Report of the Independent Investigator into the 2008 Listeriosis Outbreak, the Weatherill Report), which can be found at The advent of next generation sequencing technologies provides a new paradigm for molecular epidemiological approaches that have the potential to vastly improve the identification and typing of bacterial pathogens and represents the next step in the development of systems for the detection and surveillance of food safety events. The integration of genomics derived information for both food microbiology and inspection purposes will require the adaptation or replacement of existing platform technologies and policies by regulatory agencies. In order to further explore the potential of these technologies and ensure that stakeholders in the regulatory arena can make more informed decisions in supporting their respective mandates, a number of workshops and related initiatives were organized in the Winter of One of these initiatives was a Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Genome Canada sponsored workshop held in Ottawa that provided a forum for experts from CFIA, Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), Health Canada (HC), and other key stakeholders including industry and academia to explore the possibilities that genomic tools offer with respect to a current and key food safety issue Listeriosis. This area is believed to be well-suited to produce early breakthroughs in the application of genomic technologies to current testing methodologies. The workshop included a series of expert presentations covering the current approach to Listeria detection, monitoring and surveillance within the CFIA; the current approach within Maple Leaf Foods; leading-edge research in the area from the University of Guelph, and McGill University and; a HC and PHAC perspective on the value and utility of genomics. Participants at the workshop identified key industry and government (regulatory) needs around the detection and surveillance of Listeria including the need for more cost-effective actionable rapid testing, more precise information and robust typing methodology. Based on these needs and the state of the current technology, the key short term (12 18 month) research need was characterized as: Identification of new markers through sequencing and bioinformatics for the purpose of detection, characterization, and monitoring of Listeria monocytogenes. The research project will aim to assist with: enhancing detection & characterization of Listeria while reducing the costs of monitoring & outbreak management by using a combination of sequencing methodologies to design and develop new markers for use within existing technology/equipment. Research to determine the ecology of critical strains, virulence and prevalence is also needed but is considered more long-term in nature. Development of additional tools or suites of tools aims to provide value by having the potential of informing policy development which may result in reducing costs associated with monitoring, detection and surveillance of Listeria. The research outcomes could also serve as a model for other food borne pathogens. Clear consensus emerged during the workshop that a consortium approach to pursue a project is preferable as it would leverage existing expertise and capacity and ultimately facilitate knowledge transfer. As a result of the discussion, it is anticipated that one or more consortia will come together and apply for funding through the Genome Canada Request for Application (RFA) process. ii

4 LIST OF ACRONYMS Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Genomics R&D Initiative (GRDI) Hazard analysis critical control point (HACAP) Health Canada (HC) Listeria monocytogenes (Listeria) Multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) Ready-to-eat (RTE) Request for Application (RFA) Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) Whole genome sequencing (WGS) iii

5 A. GETTING STARTED / CONTEXT 1. Introduction A workshop focused on the development of a potential Genome Canada/CFIA Request for Application (RFA) was organized in Ottawa with the following stated objectives: Identifying research gaps to support both regulatory agencies and the food industry in the areas of: 1. Trace-back and epidemiological investigations in the event of an outbreak; and 2. Monitoring programs. Identifying high-priority research areas related to Listeria within the realm of genomics that could be achieved within an 18-month timeframe. The workshop was attended by approximately 50 participants including academics, representatives from federal and provincial government departments or agencies, food processing industry and other non-government organizations. A full list of participants is included in the Appendix to this report. The workshop included a series of expert presentations followed by participants working together in a mix of small group and plenary discussions. The second part of the workshop was focused primarily upon discussions to chart the path forward. The full agenda is included in the Appendix of the report. The abstracts provided by the presenters are included in the report, as well as syntheses of key messages recorded during the discussion periods. The report is intended as a record of the meeting, to be used by the participants and organisers in continuing the development of plans and priorities in areas related to the detection and surveillance of Listeria within the realm of genomics. This workshop complements other related initiatives that were undertaken during the Winter of 2012 including a CFIA workshop on the role of genomics and bioinformatics in the protection of Canadians from microbial food safety risks (February 21 and 22, 2012) and; a PHAC workshop on next generation molecular typing methods toward a new era of genome-informed molecular epidemiology held in Guelph, Ontario (February 28, 2012). 2. Welcome/Opening Remarks Dr. David Bailey, Genome Alberta, welcomed participants and gave an overview of the mandate and organization of Genome Canada which is headquartered in Ottawa and works in partnership with six regional Genome Centres across Canada. Together they work to develop and implement a national strategy in genomics research for the benefit of all Canadians. He outlined Genome Canada s new five-year National Strategic Plan, emphasising innovation and the translation of research results into impact as the core focus. He stated that it was a pleasure to work with CFIA, HC, PHAC and others towards the development of genome technology and its application in mitigating Listeria and possible future applications for other food-borne pathogens. He described Genome Canada s role as a funder and enabler in teaming with end-users to identify high-priority research and development areas and further innovation advancements. He highlighted this opportunity to work with the CFIA as a good example of partnership in the development of genomics technology ultimately leading to the refinement of food safety regulation and policy. Martine Dubuc, Canadian Food Inspection Agency thanked Dr. Bailey and Genome Canada for their proactive support in this workshop and, in particular, the focus on Listeria. She talked about the decision-making process around food recall, emphasizing the value of leading-edge science in informing high-risk, decision-making management. She outlined the set-up and ongoing work in the Science Branch, stating that it is very operational and frontline. Daily meetings with the CFIA President ensure everimportant linkages between science and management decision-making. She applauded the good cross-section of stakeholders at the workshop. She talked about the Science Branch s mandate with respect to food safety, animal and plant health and stated that more tools are needed with respect to Listeria in support of the CFIA s regulatory mandate. She concluded that the timing of this work is important given that there remain many key questions in science to support decision-making with regard to Listeria. She reviewed the objectives of the workshop and encouraged the development of good partnerships and knowledge-sharing in the development of a research agenda for the next 18 months. 1

6 B. REGULATORY AGENCY AND INDUSTRY PERSPECTIVE 1. Current Prospects for Genomics Technology in CFIA Food Microbiology Inspections Programs Dr. Burton Blais, Canadian Food Inspection Agency gave an overview of the latest work underway at the CFIA, Canada s largest science-based regulatory agency responsible for the delivery of all federally mandated programs for food inspection, plant and animal health and consumer protection as it relates to food. He described the realities of increasing pressures as a result of globalization, demographics and consumer preferences, and the resulting need for enhanced research and technologies to mitigate the emerging risks. The Science Branch, which plays an integral role in these areas, covers the spectrum of laboratory services in 12 laboratories across the country, providing analytical capabilities from coast-to-coast. Analytical systems need to be developed, not just to provide another rapid method but one that provides more informative test results. For this reason, he felt that there is a need to develop genomic technology to bring us into the next generation. Listeria policy could be influenced if the ability existed to differentiate isolates on the basis of pathogenic potential. Dr. Blais sees a system where sequencing could result in specific diagnostic markers to provide immediate, on-site capability for the identification of outbreaks and mitigating solutions. He sees a highly enhanced, risk inspection approach within 5 to 10 years. Dr. Dele Ogunremi, Canadian Food Inspection Agency discussed the CFIA Act and the section which relates to food recall. He also covered the partnerships brought to bear within the context of a food-borne health risk event, the distinct responsibilities of the CFIA, other agencies and industry. Examples of Listeria outbreaks, best methods and gaps in knowledge, identified areas where more work and enhanced partnerships will lead to the development of a superior approach. He stated that work underway with Salmonella typhimurium using genomics technology and the resulting advancements with readily detectable single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) has been encouraging. Dr. Ogunremi stated that genomic approaches can be applied to enhance CFIA trace-back capacity and epidemiological investigations in the event of a Listeria disease outbreak. Comparative genomics for the identification of gene markers for virulence profiling of Listeria isolates to inform regulatory decision-making, and metagenomics are other areas for further research. In summary, he stated that overall Canada is in a good position to move forward with a plan for reaching the next level in genomic technology, both in the short and long term. 2. The Listeriosis Reference Service for Canada Dr. Franco Pagotto, Health Canada discussed how controlling Listeria in food processing environments is a continual challenge. Recent advances in whole genome sequencing, bioinformatics, nanotechnology and micro fluidics have opened up new avenues to identify, detect and use adequate intervention strategies for preventing end-product contamination. The presentation covered the role that genomics and bioinformatics can play in environmental sampling programs, and how they can further enhance the safety of ready-to-eat foods. An overview of current activities within the Listeriosis Reference Service for Canada was also presented. Open Forum - Discussion: Discussion centered on the Listeria Reference Centre s mandate, organization and close ties with Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada (AAFC), Health Canada, CFIA, PHAC and provincial health labs. The persistence of Listeria (which is always commodity dependant) and continuing advances at the Listeriosis Reference Service, were also discussed. Advances in shortened response times, sequencing, biofilm and niche work, and improved procedures for identification and mitigation are encouraging. Genomics technology will help to advance future efforts. The shared proposal with the Federal Government s Genomics R&D Initiative (GRDI) was highlighted as a first effort in bringing together all stakeholders. It was agreed that the timing for this workshop is key in building the right partnerships and ensuring more powerful and timely detection methodologies for Listeria strains, effective support for trace-back investigations, and increased monitoring capacity by facilitating industry access to reliable, real-time technologies. 2

7 3. Maple Leaf Foods An Industry Perspective Diane Wood, Maple Leaf Foods provided an industry perspective to workshop participants outlining Maple Leaf s organizational and practical approach to the challenge of Listeria prevention and outbreak mitigation. Maple Leaf has 25 processing facilities across Canada including a number of slaughter plants as well as multi-component food production plants. All plants do some testing but three laboratories in particular are tasked with corporate and Listeria testing, doing analysis for the risk-based sampling programs, hazard analysis critical control point (HACAP) programs, shelf-life testing programs, new product testing, sanitation program monitoring, carcass testing and other ad-hoc testing requirements. Testing for Listeria involves 18 ready-toeat (RTE) food processing plants, in which 198 processing lines per plant are swabbed per week resulting in a minimum of 1800 swabs a week to be analyzed at two laboratories. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the current method used for detection of Listeria. Month-by-month monitoring is done to determine annual trends and hot spots which influence annual improvements. Genomic technologies are of interest to Maple Leaf since the current 3 to 5-day response time is too long from an industry point of view and the use of genomic technology to aid in virulence marker identification, understanding sanitizer resistance, biofilm formation, etc. is of great interest. Aid on recall investigations e.g., tracking strains in the plant environment, and focussed efforts on highly virulent strains would be invaluable. Open Forum - Discussion Discussion of the advantages of integrating genomic technology with traditional practices to build first-responder capacity in a Listeria event, highlighted areas for potential benefits and challenges to industry. Emphasis was placed on faster and cheaper methodologies and collaborative practices going forward. There was discussion regarding the consequences to policy, should genome technology be used to determine virulent versus non-virulent strains. Whether sporadic or consistent, Maple Leaf treats all events in the same manner. In the case of a major outbreak, a major tear-down occurs. Depending on where the isolate is found, there may be additional impacts. There is continual sampling of the lines until clearance is achieved. 4. Discussion #1: Table and Plenary Issues around Detection and Surveillance - Needs of Industry and Government The presentations served as a basis for participants to identify and discuss specific needs for the type of information that could be provided through the use of genome technology to inform both regulatory agencies and the food industry. It was agreed that Listeria is well-suited to produce the earliest breakthroughs in the application of genomics. The following industry needs were noted: 1. There is a need for more robust, actionable (sensitive, accurate and specific), rapid and cost-effective testing to meet, track and respond to an outbreak. 2. One approach is a comprehensive set of practical markers that could be used within either a dedicated laboratory setting or a testing site with limited tools (such as a processing facility). The markers would need to balance industry requirements with regulatory requirements. Government, industry and academic collaboration could provide this. 3. The importance of addressing the issue of virulence vs. non-virulence or live vs. dead strains (i.e., to better target sanitization strategies or influence policy development) was highlighted. 4. More understanding of the ecology of Listeria within production facilities is necessary, especially as applied to the investigation, identification and handling of sporadically appearing isolates. 5. Enhanced communication/strain sharing between industry, academia, and government is needed to push forward advances in methodology. 6. Environmental sampling is important for more detailed characteristics. 7. There will be a need for validation of new methods and a well-researched cost analysis. 3

8 C. RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY 1. MLVA: A New Proactive Approach for Enhanced Microbial Risk Assessment, Management and Control of Listeria Monocytogenes Dr. Saleema Saleh-Lakha, University of Guelph gave an overview of multiple locus variable number of tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) technology. Listeria is responsible for rare but severe and often fatal human infections. The majority of human Listeriosis has been linked to consumption of contaminated foods, and L. monocytogenes is routinely isolated from a wide range of farm, food, environment, animal and human samples. Different types/strains of this pathogen have different levels of virulence; and only a small number of L. monocytogenes strains appear to have been associated with human illness and listeriosis outbreaks. An integrated program of molecular subtyping and whole genome sequencing of Listeria isolates is critical to understanding the epidemiology of food-borne listeriosis, to assess pathotypes, and to support preventative efforts to minimize food-borne Listeriosis and outbreak investigations. At the University of Guelph, a rapid molecular subtyping method to characterize strains of Listeria based on MLVA has been developed. The method employs multiplex PCR and fluorescent fragment sizing to determine the variable number of tandem repeats at eight specific loci in Listeria. The method provides high discriminatory power, amplification efficiency and data quality with portable results. The MLVA method has been demonstrated to be an attractive additional tool to pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) for subtyping Listeria because it provides rapid, reproducible, portable and cost-effective results. The comprehensive MLVA database allows exchange and comparison of data among laboratories and among historical and new isolates from both food and clinical sources. Open Forum - Discussion Additional development work is needed in areas such as: subtyping and fingerprinting to get an identifier, updating the different data bases, and development of better molecular markers allowing for potential prevention of outbreak incidence. The MLVA database needs updating. More strains need to be typed, in order to facilitate more relevant comparisons between the two sub-typing methods. PulseNet Canada, the MLVA database, the Listeriosis Reference Service of Canada and whole genome sequencing (WGS) were all sited as tools to be leveraged as this technology moves forward. 2. Public Health Genomics and the New Molecular Epidemiology Dr. Matthew Gilmour, Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) discussed the research being carried out at the National Microbiology Laboratory. During the 2008 Listeriosis outbreak, the National Microbiology Laboratory utilized innovative wholegenome sequencing laboratory technologies to obtain a definitive characterization of the outbreak-associated Listeria strains. In the past, genomics was considered a research tool but technological advances have made it feasible and suitable for use during public health investigations of bacterial diseases. The evidence provided by whole-genome sequencing, when combined with epidemiological evidence is all but indisputable in determining the cause and scope of human illness. These new genomic methods promise to revolutionize the ability of the laboratory to provide information on and evidence for the evolution, source tracking, virulence and potential therapies for bacterial pathogens and this revolution is launching the new field of genomic epidemiology. The National Microbiology Laboratory is now working with provincial and federal public health and food safety partners to regularly implement these modern genomics technologies in their laboratories. This presentation discussed how these technologies can be implemented within existing outbreak detection and response programs, such as PulseNet Canada, in collaboration with other departments involved in the study of food-borne pathogens. 4

9 Open Forum Discussion Genomic technology can be implemented within existing outbreak detection and response programs, such as PulseNet Canada. Listeria outbreak examples and PulseNet Canada s approach using genomics, highlighted faster and more accurate results to support the traditional methodologies with more detail-rich results. Genomics has a key role to play. Models for data release and sharing were discussed including bottleneck challenges hindering the goal of data in/data out in a one to two day timeframe. 3. All Good Contigs Come to a Bad End Dr. Ken Dewar, McGill University discussed new developments in massively parallel DNA sequencing that are of particular relevance to bacterial genome sequencing and assembly. One is the growing recognition that increasingly higher capacity systems with long experimental run times are logistically difficult for the sequencing of small genomes, especially in situations requiring rapid response. Also of interest, the trend towards less complete draft genome assemblies may now be reversing with the introduction of very long read (>2 kb) technologies and very promising results in obtaining finished quality genome assemblies. Advances in read length and base-calling accuracy in the very high capacity systems are opening up new approaches to sequencing, assembling, and analyzing microbial communities (microbiomes). Hybrid strategies blending very long reads (for defining genome organization) with highly accurate reads (for base-calling) are currently being investigated. Bioinformatic analyses are also becoming more rapid and accessible. More and more levels of standard analyses are becoming automated and routine. Even though there remain many discovery phase analyses, browser resources are becoming increasingly sophisticated in allowing the comparing and contrasting of genome size datasets. Whereas the role of the elite bioinformatician is still critical to work out solutions to new problems, the tackling of well-defined problems can be increasingly handled by the biologists themselves after a moderate level of training. Open Forum Discussion The McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre is a core genomics facility that includes leading edge technologies which are taking the science in a fast-forward direction. One example given was the Oxford Nanopure, a new, very high capacity machine. Higher quality, lower-cost genome assemblies with very fast run times are the aim. Genomics does not replace other technologies but rather complements them to facilitate better prediction and adjusted responses. 4. Discussion #2 Table and Plenary Gaps in Current Research or existing Technologies The presentations and resulting discussions served as a basis for participants to identify and consider the gaps in current research or existing technologies where genomics can support both the regulatory agencies and the food industry in assessing and managing Listeria and other food-borne diseases. The following gaps were identified: 1. There is a need for a representative set of Listeria isolates from human, animal and environmental sources and varying geographic areas throughout Canada to be made available internationally to all interested researchers. Currently there is limited or no capability to identify virulence factors and to sequence large numbers of representative strains. 2. Utilize information from WGS to choose targets to develop a robust typing system that could be standardized and used by researchers, public health, industry and regulatory agencies such as a multiplex PCR test for rapid diagnostic capability which would be faster, real-time, with more detailed data and be more cost-effective. 3. There is a need for Genomics 101 training/education for industry to identify the potential uses of genomic technologies and to outline the potential outcomes for end users. 4. There are limited tools to narrow detection in clusters and potential outbreaks. 5. There is a need for research toward identifying best methods/mechanisms to identify and track new markers. 5

10 D. THE PATH FORWARD 1. A Potential Research Project Dr. Ismahane Elouafi, CFIA and Dr. Karen Dewar, Genome Canada presented a proposed way forward. There was general agreement that the research and technology gaps identified during the discussion could be prioritized as follows: For the short term (18 to 36 months): Identification of new markers through sequencing and bioinformatics to assist with: Detection & characterization Identification Assessing virulence and resistance Cost Monitoring Outbreak management Sharing and knowledge transfer (community building) Technology development Modification of existing tools (environment testing) towards costs savings (as opposed to developing new tools in 18 months) Applied combination of sequencing methodology For the longer term: There is a need for additional research to determine the ecology of the critical strains, and their virulence and prevalence. Further discussion identified a potential project to address these gaps in the short term. Background was given on Genome Canada s Emerging Issues Program as a possible source for funding. This Program aims to support projects that are reactive and responsive to emerging issues of high importance, both nationally and internationally. An emerging issue is defined as an unanticipated issue, which has newly arisen or suddenly increased in importance, and requires urgent/immediate attention and timely resolution. Parameters were outlined for this type of application. Genome Canada will invest a maximum of $250K per project with matching co-funding expected from one or more parties at a minimum of $250K. Funding is based on an 18-month timeframe to ensure short-term results. 2. Discussion #3 (Table and Plenary) The potential for a consortium to pursue a project was discussed. There was broad agreement that a consortium approach is best as it would leverage existing expertise and capacity and ultimately facilitate knowledge transfer. As a result of the discussion, it is anticipated that one or more consortia will emerge and apply for funding. Industry will need education on the kinds of deliverables that are possible with genomics, emphasizing that the outcome would be to develop markers that can be useful in a real way to industry. A Genomics 101 education initiative should be made available for industry as soon as possible. Under the RFA process, project leadership should ideally come from academia. Co-leadership could come from government or other stakeholder groups. 6

11 3. Next Steps Process Step Who When Meeting Report Development and release of the RFA CFIA, Genome Canada CFIA, Genome Canada 1 Month Early Summer 2012 Development of Project Proposal Expert Group Fall 2012 Closing: Diane Allan, CFIA and Cindy Bell, Genome Canada closed the workshop by thanking everyone who had organized, contributed to and participated in the event. There was a sense that all had benefited from the meeting and clear agreement that Genome Technology is the new way forward with promise of enhanced capacity to bring real solutions for end users. The education component was re-emphasized as a key element for immediate action as well as needed clarity on specific outcomes expected within 18 months. There was agreement that the workshop had achieved the desired outcomes and that CFIA and Genome Canada would be pleased to take a leadership role in moving the agenda forward as noted above. 7

12 APPENDIX A LIST OF PARTICIPANTS GENOME CANADA / CFIA WORKSHOP LISTERIA: INTEGRATION OF GENOMIC TECHNOLOGIES FOR DETECTION AND SURVEILLANCE February 28, John G. Diefenbaker Building, 111 Sussex Drive, Ottawa Participant List CANADIAN FOOD INSPECTION AGENCY (CFIA) Primal Silva Director General Food Safety and Quality, National Science Program Diane Allan Executive Director, Food Safety Science Directorate Martine Dubuc Vice President, Science Branch Donna Douey Manager, Bacteriology Science Branch, National Laboratory Operations Burton Blais Research Scientist and Head Research and Development Section Ottawa Laboratory, Central Experimental Farm Ismahane Elouafi Director, Research Management and Partnerships Division Kingsley Amoako Research Scientist, Lethbridge Laboratory George Huszczynski Senior Microbiology Analyst Greater Toronto Area Laboratory Min Lin Research Scientist, Ottawa Laboratory Dele Ogunremi Research Scientist, Ottawa Laboratory Philippe Raymond Research Scientist St-Hyacinthe Laboratory - Research and Technology Development Darren Slevin Security Science and Research Management Advisor Research Management and Partnership Division Jacqueline Upham Scientific Specialist - Food Microbiology Dartmouth Laboratory Hongsheng Huang Research Scientist, Ottawa Laboratory 8

13 AGRICULTURE AND AGRI-FOOD CANADA Tim Ells Research Scientist, Food Safety & Quality Tineke Jones Research Scientist, Food Safety and Quality Martin Kalmokoff Research Scientist, Food Safety and Quality Gabriel Piette Science Director Food Research and Development Centre Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec HEALTH CANADA Kirsten Mattison Senior Advisor, Bureau of Microbial Hazards Franco Pagotto Co-Director, Listeriosis Reference Service Food Directorate, Bureau of Microbial Hazards PUBLIC HEALTH AGENCY OF CANADA Matthew Gilmour Research Scientist National Microbiology Laboratory, Winnipeg Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Manitoba Gary Van Domselaar Departments of Medical Microbiology, Computer Science and Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba Chief of Bioinformatics, National Microbiology Laboratory INDUSTRY Lisa Anemi Quality Manager Arla Foods Sophie Chagnon Quality Assurance Advisor Agropur Oka Jorge Correa Technical Director Canadian Meat Council Jackie Crichton Chair, Dairy Technical Committee Dairy Processors Association of Canada (DPAC/ATLC) Sylvain Fournaise Vice President, Food Safety and Technical Services Olymel L.P. Guy Latreille Chief, Quality Division Agropur Murielle Lefebvre Chief, Quality Control, Agropur Oka Luc Savoie Directeur R&D and Tech Services lab Saputo inc. Diane Wood Director, Technical Services, Maple Leaf Foods 9

14 ACADEMIA Inanc Birol Scientist, BC Cancer Agency, Genome Sciences Centre Professor, Computing Science, Simon Fraser University Fiona Brinkman Professor, Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Simon Fraser University Jose Cruz-Toledo Post-doctoral fellow, Department of Biology Carleton University Ken Dewar Professor, McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre Radhy Gupta Professor, Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University Andy Potter CEO and Director, Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization University of Saskatchewan Sylvain Quessy Vice-doyen à la recherche et aux études supérieures Professeur, Département de pathologie et microbiologie et Groupe de recherche sur les maladies infectieuses du porc (GREMIP) Université de Montréal Susan Richardson Head Microbiology, Senior Associate Scientist Physiology & Experimental Medicine Associate Professor, Laboratory Medicine & Pathobiology The Hospital for Sick Children Saleema Saleh-Lakha Post-doctoral fellow, Agriculture and Food Laboratory Laboratory Services Division University of Guelph ACADEMIA (...CONT D) Myron L. Smith Professor, Biology Carleton University Richard Wintle Assistant Director, The Centre for Applied Genomics The Hospital for Sick Children Alex Wong Post doctoral fellow, Department of Biology Carleton University PROVINCIAL AGENCIES Valerie Bohaychuk Section Head, Biology Agriculture and Rural Development Government of Alberta Jeanine Boulter-Bitzer Microbial Food Safety Science Analyst Food Inspection Branch Ontario Ministry of Agriculture Food and Rural Affairs (OMAFRA) GENOME CANADA Cindy Bell Executive Vice-President, Corporate Development Karl Tibelius Vice-President, Genomics Program Karen Dewar Director, Genomics Program Naveed Aziz Director, Technology Programs 10

15 GENOME CANADA (...CONT D) Marlene Orton Director, Media & Communications Kim Corbett Program Manager GENOME CENTRES David Bailey President and CEO Genome Alberta Marcia MacDonald Manager, Scientific Affairs Genome British Columbia Helen Petropoulos Senior Manager, Business Development Ontario Genomics Institute (OGI) Daniel Tessier Assistant Director McGill/Genome Quebec Innovation Centre CANADIAN INSTITUTES OF HEALTH RESEARCH Judith Bray Assistant Director, Institute of Infection and Immunity and the Institute of Cancer Research WORKSHOP FACILITATOR Warren Wilson Senior Consultant and Facilitator Intersol 11

16 APPENDIX B WORKSHOP AGENDA 12

17 13

18 14

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