Alison Becker. Project Supervisor. Cynthia Gonzalez Lila Burgos Heather Anderson. Graphics Consultant. Nicolás Zúñiga.

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4 Project Supervisor Project Coordinators Graphics Consultant Survey Team Leads Alison Becker Cynthia Gonzalez Lila Burgos Heather Anderson Nicolás Zúñiga Jacqueline Badejo rvin Brommel, II Participants Summer Youth mployment Program Inspire Research Academy Alex Castillo Desteny Castillo Jahsua Jones Maria Navarro Dolores Nunez Sofia Rivas Jimmy Romero Marvey Williams Rynisha Alexander Juan Jose Cenobio Ivonne Cespedes Guillermo Dominguez Qwentin Dweh Rudy Zúñiga Andrew Thornton

5 CONTNTS Community Summary About Watts Community Studio Survey Results Resident Survey Results Business Survey Results Recommendations Workforce Development Business Development Promote Healthy ating and Active Living (HAL) Infrastructure and Planning Safety Social Activities and Culture Youth Development Leadership Development Next Steps Appendices Appendix A: Methods Appendix B: About Watts, Secondary Data Appendix C: Watts Labor Force Statistics Appendix D: Resident Survey (nglish and Spanish) Appendix : Resident Survey Results Appendix F: Business Survey (nglish and Spanish) Appendix G: Business Survey Results Appendix H: Asset Mapping Appendix I: Maps

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7 COMMUNITY SUMMARY About Watts Community Studio The Watts Community Studio (WCS) is a community research project supported by Los Angeles City Council District 15 (CD15), Office of Councilman Joe Buscaino. The project aims to learn more about Watts from the people who live and own businesses there. Involving residents in the decision-making process for their neighborhood will help with programs, projects, and policies for the future of Watts. Mission: The Watts Community Studio uses community-led research to offer ideas on how to improve the conditions of the neighborhood. Aims Goals and Objectives Survey Outreach Watt Community Studio (WCS) used the Census data, other public agency data, and conducted meetings to learn more about Watts. WCS worked with many organizations and churches in the community to make sure that the surveys to residents and business owners. The team walked door-to-door and went to places where residents gather, youth workers also spent two weeks entering the data from the completed surveys. The three-month project has revealed ideas for how to support the future of Watts that includes the residents and businesses. About 700 resident and 50 business owner surveys were collected in Watts. The survey responses show that they love their neighborhood and have ideas on how to improve it. This Community Summary describes some of the information collected and actionable responses. Thank you to all who participated! With your help, this project has revealed ideas for how to support the future of Watts that includes the residents and businesses. Watts Community Studio 1

8 COMMUNITY SUMMARY About Watts Before surveying residents, WCS collected data about Watts to gain an understanding of the neighborhood. The main points of the data are presented here. 39% of Watts is under 18 years old, with the average age of a Watts resident being 24. Latino, and 28% are Black or African American. This data communicates the demographic shift that has been happening in Watts since the 1980 s. Reflecting that shift, Spanish is spoken at over two-thirds of homes in Watts. Most identify as Mexican in descent or origin. Watts is a neighborhood of families 5% years old 56% Over 65 years old Under 18 years old 39% Watts is predominantly Hispanic or Latino All Other 2% Races Black or African 28% American Latino 70% Just under half of Watts residents over 25 years old have graduated high school. This rate of educational attainment has implications for residents job prospects and health To get to work, Watts residents use public transportation more frequently than median income is $28,700. The median household income in Watts is $28,700 68% of households in Watts moved into their current home since 2000 Watts is a neighborhood of families with an average of 4.3 people living in a house. 30% of Watts residents own their homes. This is lower than some neighborhoods in LA, but affordable housing programs in Watts mean that more affordable rental options exist. This includes public housing as well as multi-family assisted apartments. Watts households have moved into their current homes since Commute to Work, Individual Watts Residents Car, truck, or van: alone 66% Car, truck, or van: carpooled 14% Public transportation 12% Walked 2% Other means 2% Worked at home 4% ducational Attainment of Watts Residents 25 Years Old and Over Completed 8th grade 68% Graduated high school 47% Attended college courses 20% arned a degree (Bachelor's, Graduate or professional) 3% Housing Tenure and Affordable Housing Programs Renter-Occupied Units, Other 33% 37% Owner-Occupied Units 30% Renter-Occupied Units, Affordable 2 studio Comunitario de Watts

9 COMMUNITY SUMMARY Resident Survey Results Who took the survey? 1FPQMF XIP UPPL UIF TVSWFZ NBUDIF the data collected about Watts: They XFSF NPTUMZ -BUJOP )JTQBOJD BO "GSJDBO "NFSJDBO #MBDL CFUXFFO the ages of 14 and 35, and spoke Spanish or were bilingual (Spanish and &OHMJTI )PXFWFS NPTU SFTQPOFOUT were women, and the most common occupation was homemaker. Most respondents were either employed fulltime, or were unemployed. Additional occupation responses included teacher, student, and social worker, which matches the occupation data collected. These occupations demonstrate that residents of Watts are also participating in top jobs for the City of Los Angeles. Watts is a neighborhood of working and committed people seeking opportunities for personal improvement. What are the strengths and challenges in Watts? Residents who responded to the survey like the services available in Watts, the family values and community support that they have established. Responses show that Watts is a dynamic neighborhood with people who feel upset about their life in Watts and happy for their friends and family. They want basic resources to make their lives better like jobs, physical activities, and safe and cleaner streets where they can socialize. Respondents also gave ideas about how to make the neighborhood better, like IBWJOH UIF QPMJDF BO MFBF JO UIF DPNNVOJUZ XPSL DMPTFS UPHFUIFS 1FPQMF XIP UPPL UIF TVSWFZ GFMU UIBU QSPHSBNT GPS ZPVUI would also work to keep them off the streets and away from violent activities. Neighborhood Assets Services and Amenities Nothing Community Support verything Neighborhood s Improving My Home/Grew Up Here/Family & Friends Community Organizing Centrally Located Family Neighborhood I like it Watts Community Studio Neighborhood Challenges Violence/Danger Gangs/Drugs Dirty (needs cleanup) Unemployment/Jobs Non-existing Youth Programs Racial Division/No unity verything/general Improvement Limited Resources ducation Need increased police Neighborhood Priorities mployment (65%) Physical Activities (60%) Neighborhood Cleanliness (57%) nforcement (54%) Social Activities (52%) Culture (52%) Transportations (50%) Housing (50%) Government (50%) 3

10 COMMUNITY SUMMARY A Focus on Youth and mployment Residents who took the survey said that Watts needs more programs for young people and more jobs. Remembering that the average age of a person in Watts is 24 years old, Watts Community Studio researched the relationship between local labor statistics and the youth living in this community. Watts and the Labor Force First, it s important to know how many people in Watts are actively in the labor force. That means that they re over 16 and are eligible to work. If someone is a student, retired, a stay-at-home parent, in an institution (like jail or a hospital), or have been jobless for an extended period of time, they are not counted as part of the labor force. Nearly 60% of the population (24,049 persons) in Watts is eligible to be in the in the labor force, but only half of this population (about 12,800 persons) is participating in the labor force. This means that there are a lot of people in Watts that could be in the labor force, but are not. It could be that Watts residents who are not in the labor force face barriers to employment, such long-term unemployment, lack of training or a criminal history. ligible Population, Labor Force Participation in Watts In the Labor Force 47% 53% Not in the Labor Force Of Watts residents in the labor force, 12.9% are unemployed Are these people not in the labor force the long-term unemployed? It s hard to say because official unemployment numbers are calculated from the number of people actively in the labor force - that means they recently may have lost a job or are looking year, they drop-out of the labor force. Sometimes people may stop looking for a job all together. These are known as discouraged workers and because they are not counted as part of the labor force, they are not officially counted as unemployed. Youth and mployment It is important to look at employment for young people ages 20 to 24 because that is the time when they build the soft and hard skills needed for the rest of their lives. Watts youth unemployment is similar to that of the City of Los Angeles, at a high 19.4%. work, it can have an impact on the entire community. Watts Youth Labor Force, Ages Years Old 65% In the Labor Force Not in the Labor Force 35% Watts Youth mployment, Ages Years Old 81% Unemployed 19% Projected Growing Occupations, Los Angeles County The future of Watts is linked to young people and their ability to gain employment. Many entry-level jobs in the healthcare and hospitality industry are projected to grow growing industries, like nursing and home health aides, require training but there are 1,047 people between 20 and 24 years old are not in the labor force 4 studio Comunitario de Watts

11 COMMUNITY SUMMARY Business Survey Results Who are the small business owners in Watts? Small business owners in Watts are committed to their business and to the community. Over one-third of the owners that completed the survey have been running a business in Watts for more than 10 years. All of them plan on staying in Watts, and 85% ness goals. Watts small businesses mostly serve local customers, but their connection to Watts goes beyond owning a business. Since so many small business owners are also residents, it is not surprising that they have so much in common with Watts. Most most comfortable completing the survey in Spanish. Similar to Watts s status as a family neighborhood, 92% of small business owners have children. This is related to another survey result: the most common reason for starting a business is the need for jobs or the need to provide for family. What are the top problems facing business owners? 38% 29% 24% 15% 12% 12% 12% 6% Weak Sales High Taxes Competition from Other Small Businesses Competition from Big Businesses Credit Availability Rising Rents Rules and Regulations Labor Costs Weak sales, high taxes and competition from other small businesses are the most common problems that small business owners in Watts face. Small business owners and Watts Business owners were asked three questions about Watts. In the physical environment, business owners would most like to see the sidewalks cleaned and nearby buildings improved. About half of owners reported safety and street cleanliness were less frequent responses, but still common concerns. Comparing responses by area shows that owners on Wilmington Avenue think that crime, building quality and signage are issues more often than owners on Central Avenue or Compton Avenue. Owners concerns about Watts generally are summed up in the neighborhood aspects table (on the right). The business business owners identify safety, crime, cleanliness and employment as issues. Neighborhood Aspects Rated Poor Most Often by Business Owners Crime rate 82% Safety 72% Cleanliness 66% Quality of streets, sidewalks and intersections 65% mployment opportunities 55% Landscaping and trees 55% Watts Community Studio 5

12 COMMUNITY SUMMARY Recommendations results show that business owners have similar concerns. The following eight recommendations address these concerns and can happen within the next year. The recommendations are influenced by other survey results, local youth feedback, and the team s research. The complete list of recommendations is in the full report. mployment: Job Training Access to employment is the top priority. Residents of Watts want jobs that to getting good jobs because they have been unemployed for a long time or have gone through the justice system. Despite the difficult economy, 70,000 1 entry-level jobs will be added to many industries in LA County by These jobs offer employment opportunities for Watts. Job training in Watts should focus on the industries that will be hiring. This will ensure that Watts residents are getting the hard and soft skills needed to participate in the labor force. mployment: Connect Small Businesses to Resources 95% of the surveyed business owners do not know about programs that assist local business owners. The local business association will continue to hold meetings of business owners to tell them about available assistance. the business plan program, and one owner with multiple business assistance programs in the next year. Their stories will be shared with the community to make more business owners aware of the programs. Physical Activities: Promote Healthy ating and Active Living has poor health outcomes that could be related to the environment of the community. This includes limited access to healthy food, spaces for physical activity, and social factors like poverty, quality of education, and healthcare access. Survey responses reveal that residents want spaces for physical activities. The following ideas respond to these issues: 1.) Activate vacant lots Neighborhood Cleanliness: Support Clean Watts Residents and business owners want a cleaner Watts. Clean Watts, an effort supported by the Council District office, is a volunteer program committed to improving the streets, parks and alleys of Watts. Since it is a volunteer program, the project doesn t always have the best turnout. A lot of residents to volunteers would get more participants. Incentives can include items donated by city offices or local businesses. Additionally, making cleaning days into community events with music and food would attract more people. 6 studio Comunitario de Watts

13 COMMUNITY SUMMARY Recommendations nforcement: Support Non-Violent Conflict Resolution Safety and crime are top concerns for Watts residents. There are three types of these concerns in the community: (1) Latino and Black tension, (2) gang is available to hold community meetings on the topics of racial tension and violence in an effort to improve safety and quality of life for all residents. Social Activities and Culture: Block Parties and a Street Fair Residents want to be more involved on their block. Most people who took the survey said they feel very comfortable with their neighbors, family and friends. Block parties and street fairs offer the chance to expand the community network beyond the block. Block parties should happen three times a year in each planning area in Watts. They can also be used to connect residents to information about local services and programs. Local business owners can assist in planning, and have tables at the events. A street fair in the summer will use the same idea but bring the larger neighborhood together. Youth Development: Peer Mentorship, College Tours Residents want more youth programs. This summer, Watts Community Studio staff worked with youth from Watts. When asked what they would do to improve Watts, the youth developed an idea for a peer mentorship program. They believe it is important to grow personally as well as academically. The year-long mentorship would include workshops on public speaking, creativity, trust building, self-esteem, social skills and leadership. WCS also recommends an annual tour of colleges to show the youth of Watts more opportunities. Leadership Development: Support Leadership Development and Coalition Building Watts has a committed group of leaders that have created opportunities and programs for residents. The leaders should work together and use their shared knowledge to assist each other with plans and projects that influence the future of Watts. Regular meetings of leaders will build partnerships and a can join the established leadership in working to improve Watts. Watts Community Studio 7

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15 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO Comprehensive Report

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17 ABOUT WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO The Watts Community Studio (WCS) is a community-based research project supported by the Los Angeles City Council District 15 Office of Joe Buscaino. The project goal is to discover the needs and assets of Watts from the people who live and own businesses in the neighborhood to inform local planning and economic development aims to identify the potential for investments in place and people by including the community in these decisionmaking processes. Mission: The Watts Community Studio is committed to neighborhood investment through economic development, social services, and community engagement, using research, partnerships, and programs as elements committed to the people who live, work, and play in the neighborhood. Aims Goals and Objectives community that is inclusive of the people who love, work, and play there Survey Outreach Watts Community Studio reached out to local community-based and faith-based organizations for feedback on both to the success of the project by administering surveys, collecting and analyzing the data. To survey residents of Watts, the youth walked door-to-door and went to places where residents gather, like Ted from Inspire Research Academy. Watts Community Studio 11

18 After three months of project planning, research, and community engagement, the Watts Community Studio has from residents and 50 surveys from local business owners. The results speak to the resiliency, power, commitment, dedication, and cultural diversity of the Watts community. It also highlights the importance of engaging the people of Watts in meaningful ways that will help guide all forms of investment in the neighborhood. 12 studio Comunitario de Watts

19 Resident Survey Results of Watts include Central Avenue and Alameda Street (east and west side boundaries) between 92 nd Street and jurisdictions. The City is only able to affect planning and policy within City boundaries. As WCS is intended to influence City-directed planning and policy for Watts, this study analyzes the survey responses from residents of Watts within City boundaries, which correspond to Council District 15 boundaries. 695 surveys were collected from respondents who live in Watts within the CD15 boundaries. Though not included in the survey results for this report, these 99 respondents demonstrate how living in Watts moved out or are living in neighboring communities, understand the resilience of Watts residents. Their experience and knowledge offer possibilities for City and County-planning efforts to collaborate and better respond to neighborhoods that also experience County-City boundary dynamics. Do You Like Living in Watts? Most respondents like living in Watts (74%) and plan to live in Watts for a long time (60%). This commitment offers an opportunity for community engagement and civic participation in efforts that aim to improve neighborhood conditions and develop community assets. Respondents shared that they have established a support network, if not at an entire Watts-neighborhood level, at a block level. Many residents expressed that they live in Watts because Watts is where they can afford to live, thus they have no other place to go. These responses are a demonstration of how Watts offers opportunities to people who would otherwise have no other place to go. Whether it is because they have built their support network in Watts or have no place to go, residents are committed to staying in their community. Therefore, they need the support to ensure that they continue in the community and improve their civic participation and engagement. Though many respondents expressed that they plan to live in Watts and stay for a long time, it is important to acknowledge the respondents who shared that they do not like to live in Watts and hope or plan to move out of the neighborhood. The reasons for these feelings and experiences include the crime, violence, and insecure feelings. Some shared that the neighborhood environment is fearful and dirty. These responses offer possibilities for recommendations. The valuable family, friends, and neighborhood unity can be a tool to respond to the safety and neighborhood cleanliness concerns. Watts Community Studio 13

20 Resident Survey Results Years Living in Watts Approximately 29% of the respondents have lived in Watts between years and about 50% have lived in Watts for over 15 years. Though the secondary data shows that 68% of Watts residents have moved into their home between homes inside the community, or have purchased their home in Watts and continue to raise their family in the neighborhood. Residents are established in Watts and in order to determine planning efforts for economic development, participatory elements for community engagement demonstrate the importance of developing a community without displacing those who live in it. Length of Time Living in Watts 1 year or less 2-5 years 6-10 years years years years years years More than 75 years 5.11 % 19.2 % % % % % 4.95 % 1.25 % 0.18 % Perceptions of Neighborhood Improvement Respondents mutually felt that the neighborhood has improved (42%) and stayed the same (41%) compared to those who felt that the neighborhood is deteriorating (17%). This statistic offers an important note of perceived neighborhood improvements considering that at least half of the respondents have lived in Watts for over 15 years. The perception that the neighborhood has not changed (41%) should be addressed. There is a strong presence of agencies and service providers that want to influence inclusive community development for the people that live in Watts. They may offer possibilities to begin to address the concern of residents who feel that there have not been any changes in the neighborhood. Perceptions on Resident Safety Respondents feel safer at night than in the daytime. This discovery is not surprising when considering that most residents do not leave their home at nighttime. There are not many opportunities in Watts for nighttime activities. Additionally, residents shared that they do not go out at night. The ways in which residents have responded to community conditions may have been normalized. That is, people feel it is in the culture to not go out at night and if they do, it is in a car to get out of Watts. This is a normal response to the social dynamics in the community. Addressing neighborhood safety includes infrastructure and planning efforts that improve street lighting and safety along with programming efforts to engage residents. Perceptions of Safety, Daytime and Nighttime Safe Undecided Unsafe Daytime 130 (20.28%) 200 (31.20%) 311 (48.52%) Nighttime 276 (43.73%) 183 (29.00%) 172 (27.26%) 14 studio Comunitario de Watts

21 Resident Survey Results Activities Respondents felt that most activities in the community were not good enough, in which the top three included: (1) Community Activities where people can come together (73%), (2) Cultural Activities like museum, public art spaces, These top three categories can be applied as a response to one another: community engagement through social and physical activities. Residents would like to come together. Cultural programming and physical activities can serve as ways to come together, while also sharing the culturally-rich characteristic of the neighborhood and improving health outcomes. Respondents were asked to share additional activities that they would like to see in their program through an openended response option. Their responses were entered into a wordle, which is an internet-engine that produces a visual of the most common responses: the larger the text, the most responses. Wordle 1, below, shows the common open-ended responses made by residents on what they would like to see most when reflecting activities. Wordle 1: Necessary Activities Defined by Respondents through Open-nded Questions Watts Community Studio 15

22 Resident Survey Results Programs education for all residents, youth and adults. Respondents also expressed that they would like to see more programs safety concerns. These top 5 programming efforts demonstrate that the residents want to improve their quality of life and their neighborhood, as long as they are provided with the information and resources to strengthen their Watts, but responses show that residents are not aware about the available resources. Wordle 2: Necessary Programs Defined by Respondents through Open-nded Questions Neighborhood Priorities The following neighborhood priorities need to be considered before, or simultaneously, when preparing planning efforts in Watts. Residents want basic resources to improve their quality of life. These requests are important elements for community development because the outcomes of these neighborhood priorities focus on categories of livelihood. In the previous Neighborhood Improvement responses that nothing has changed in Watts (41%). The categories of neighborhood priorities below show that residents request basic resources for improved quality of life like jobs, cleanliness, and community engagement. were asked to identify priorities for each category through options from a series of subcategories. The options were developed between Watts Community Studio staff and the leadership of local community organizations and social 16 studio Comunitario de Watts

23 Resident Survey Results service agencies. Additionally, a survey administration pilot allowed for additional categories to be included on the survey or also removed based on participant feedback. The responses were recorded per category. Sub-categories were listed addressed per category to identify priority subcategories they were able to check, so the table below ranks the categories by most frequently selected. From all of the subcategories that were checked, the most popular categories included employment opportunities, physical education offered potential ideas for community engagement efforts and youth education programs. Rank Priority Category Highest Ranked Subcategory 1 mployment (65%) Access to mployment 2 Physical Activities (60%) Parks and Recreation 3 Neighborhood Cleanliness (57%) Alleys/Trash Dumping 4 nforcement (54%) Safety 5 Social Activities (52%) Shopping 6 Culture (52%) Arts ducation 7 Transportations (50%) Public Transportation 8 Housing (50%) Affordable Housing 9 Government (50%) Support Groups of the Community and State/ Federal Government The responses to this section of the survey offer possibilities for city services to address basic neighborhood concerns. For example, neighborhood cleanliness was a common theme in survey responses. Residents shared that possibilities for improvement in Watts include neighborhood cleanliness, and that infrastructure improvement will also uplift community spirit in an underserved neighborhood like Watts. When looking at the sub-categories of graffiti removal. There are existing programs and projects that offer suggestions for addressing these particular direct the efforts that already exist. The Clean Watts initiative started by the CD15 office can address neighborhood the artistic influences of Watts urban culture. In an effort to address animal control, an understanding of licensing statistics in Watts will determine the ways in which city services can respond to the neighborhood concern for animal control. Similar to the neighborhood cleanliness category, this neighborhood priorities section of the survey with community development and planning efforts. The following section offers potential projects for community development in Watts. Watts Community Studio 17

24 Resident Survey Results Neighborhood Perceptions The resident survey attempted to identify what residents perceive as assets and challenges in Watts. Respondents were asked to share their thoughts about what they like and dislike about Watts and their experiences with living in the community. Respondents were offered the opportunity to share their ideas and offer opportunities for neighborhood improvement in the community. The following are categorized responses based on the respondents qualitative responses. Perceived Assets: Watts. Reponses demonstrate a diversity of thoughts and opinions about the possibilities for Watts. Though many residents expressed a limited understanding of the resources available in the community, those resources that they are aware of are useful for their livelihood. They shared that the people, neighbors, and overall community are a support network in Watts. On the other hand, a number of respondents felt the need to respond that they did not like anything in the community. Addressing this sense of skepticism is an important approach to re-engaging with a community that has felt isolated and dismissed. There is a lot of work that needs to be accomplished in order to challenge the disillusionment in the community. A promising result is that there are also residents who shared that they like everything about their community. The dynamic community of neighbors and support between blocks show that the residents have developed neighborhood unity. These contradicting responses highlight how Watts is a dynamic neighborhood with people demonstrating skepticism about neighborhood assets, but excitement about what they have already established in their community. An interesting asset that respondents cited was Watts central location in LA (close to the airport, beach, and downtown LA). Additionally, the family values, history of community organizing, and assets. Perceived Challenges and Possibilities for Improvement: Similar to the neighborhood priorities section of the survey, respondents shared that safety, cleanliness, and employment are priority areas of improvement. They also offered thoughts about addressing safety through police safety programs and community organizing efforts. Respondents offered a desire to invest in youth development and leadership Rank Rank 1 Violence/Danger 2 Gangs/Drugs Perceived Challenges 3 Dirty (needs cleanup) 4 Unemployment/Jobs 5 Non-existing Youth Programs 6 Racial Division/No unity 7 verything/general Improvement 8 Limited Resources 9 ducation Perceived Assets 1 Services and Amenities 2 Nothing 3 Community Support 4 verything 5 Neighborhood s Improving 6 My Home/Grew Up Here/Family & Friends 7 Community Organizing 8 Centrally Located 9 Family Neighborhood 10 I like it 10 Need increased police 18 studio Comunitario de Watts

25 Resident Survey Results program opportunities as a response to safety concerns connected to gang violence and drugs. Overall, residents respondents have a sense of security with local police officials. This could be due to a decrease in homicide rates in the community. When asked for potential ways to address perceived challenges, respondents suggested immediate responses. For example, providing youth programs to address the need for more programs, or clean the neighborhood so that it won t be dirty. They also offered a desire for more local government visibility and economic development projects that support the residents of the neighborhood. Neighborhood Possibilities In an effort to include the existing planning efforts in Watts, the following table attempts to address resident perceptions regarding these particular efforts. Over 80% of respondents are interested in civic engegement, local expressed that the history and culture of Watts could be a cornerstone of economic development for the community. The concept of cultural tourism includes an effort to anchor the local economy, including local employment, to the arts and culture of Watts, as well as the history. Responses to the questions Do you think others are interested in the history of Watts? (78.48% Yes), and Would you welcome non-watts residents to come and learn about Watts? (83.76% Yes), indicate that they are in favor of this approach as a community planning and economic development effort for Watts. This particular table is an exciting result for planning opportunities that respond to the cultural resiliency of the community. The history of Watts, the cultural diversity, and the community narratives are necessary stories that will highlight Watts as a place different from the popular narrative of Watts as violent. Questions Yes No Do you feel that your neighborhood needs improvement? 94 % 6 % Would you actively participate in an effort to improve your community? 84 % 16 % Do you think the history of Watts is interesting? 89 % 11 % Do you think others are interested in the history of Watts? 78 % 22 % Would you welcome other people who do not live in Watts to come learn about Watts? 84 % 16 % Do you know more than one place to visit in Watts? 70 % 30 % Would you prefer more local jobs in Watts? 94 % 6 % Would you benefit from trainings/workshops about how to get involved in local government? Would you benefit from a meeting to learn/share possible ideas about Watts and its future? 87 % 13 % 86 % 14 % Watts Community Studio 19

26 Resident Survey Results Demographics The changing demographics of Watts include an increase in the Latino residents of the community since the 1990s. Census shift offers important possibilities for planning efforts in the community that consider the cultural diversity and traditions of the residents. The respondent characteristics included a Black respondents. Respondents included the ethnic majority in Watts. As a result, most of the respondents spoke Spanish Additionally, most of the respondents were between years of age, which is reflective of the young residents of Watts. Most of the respondents were either full-time employees or female. Demographic Residents Race/thnicity African-American/Black 36 % Hispanic/Latino 59 % Other 5 % Age % % >58 13 % mployment Status mployed, Full-Time 29 % mployed, Part Time 18 % Unemployed 30 % Gender Male 37 % Female 63 % Language Spoken at Home Spanish 44 % nglish 23 % Bilingual 32 % Other 1 % Occupation Respondents were asked to write their occupation in an open-ended format. The following wordle demonstrates a diverse working community of Watts that is very similar to the Los Angeles top occupations like health service aids and retail services. The wordle shows a community that is diverse in experience. The most common response for occupation was homemaker, which may have been contributed to a high number of female respondents. Additional responses included teachers, students, and social workers. Watts is a neighborhood of working and committed people seeking opportunities for personal improvement. Residents of Watts demonstrate that they are participating in top occupations for the City of Los Angeles. 20 studio Comunitario de Watts

27 4637&: 3&46-54 Resident Survey Results Wordle 3: Respondent Occupations Identified Through an Open-nded Question Conclusion to the Resident Survey Results Common perceptions and themes throughout the survey administration phase, along with quantitative and RVBMJUBUJWF RVFTUJPOT JMMVNJOBUF B DPNNVOJUZ ömmf XJUI FYDJUFNFOU BCPVU PQQPSUVOJUJFT GPS JNQSPWFNFOU BO participation, while also demonstrating concern over issues around cleanliness, safety, and youth development that could be addressed through education, arts, and culture. The Watts Community Studio recommendations include an interdisciplinary approach that informed the recommendations, which included engagement with youth, local leadership, agencies doing work in Watts based outside of the community, city government services, resident narratives and stories, and both qualitative and quantitative results of the surveys. Similarly, the business survey SFTVMUT BMTP JODMVF BO JOUFSJTDJQMJOBSZ BQQSPBDI BO BSF JFOUJöF JO UIF GPMMPXJOH TFDUJPO Watts Community Studio 21

28 Business Survey Results Businesses in Watts the landscape of businesses in Watts. All businesses with visible signage were recorded. This assessment focused Since only businesses with visible signage are included, it is a safe assumption that home businesses are underrepresented in this study. Refer to Appendix I for a map of business locations in Watts. continual access by people. 103 rd Street and 92 nd Street are also vehicular traffic-heavy, with some commercial. 103 rd has commercial nodes at Compton and Wilmington, with a few businesses along the south side of 103rd between Wilmington and Alameda. 92 nd Street is primarily residential on the west side of Watts, but becomes increasingly commercial closer to Alameda. Compton and Wilmington Avenues are thoroughfares for local traffic (Wilmington Ave leads to and from the I-105). There are pockets of businesses along them. On both Compton and Wilmington south of 103 rd St, there are physical interventions, such as train tracks, institutional use or vacancies, which challenge a continuous commercial corridor. The spaces between businesses support other activities. On Wilmington Ave near 107 th St, people regularly hangout in front of a vacant building, providing street-level activity that otherwise would not be there. Not all activities that street inactive at night (Markham Middle School, some residential, a church), prostitution is common. south side, and pedestrian crossings on the heavily trafficked street are few. 22 studio Comunitario de Watts

29 Business Survey Results The traditional boundaries of Watts are Central Ave and Alameda St (as east- and west-side boundaries), and 92nd County jurisdictions. The City is only able to affect planning and policy within City boundaries. As WCS is intended to influence City-directed planning and policy for Watts, this study focused surveying and analysis on businesses within the City boundaries, which correspond to CD15 boundaries. Refer to Appendix I for a map of CD15 boundaries. Two breakdowns of businesses by type are shown in the tables below: one of businesses within the traditional boundaries of Watts, and one within Council District 15 boundaries. Within the traditional boundaries, Watts recycling than within Watts at CD15 boundaries. This illustrates what most stakeholders already know: Alameda St has a concentration of auto-related, warehousing, manufacturing and recycling businesses. Businesses in Watts at Traditional Boundaries Food 25.32% Retail 23.18% Auto-Related Supplies and Services 21.89% Other Services 12.45% Manufacturing and Recycling 6.44% Financial Services 4.29% Construction, Shipping and Warehousing 3.43% Health and Human Services 3.00% Businesses in Watts at CD15 Boundaries Food 38.60% Retail 29.82% Other Services 14.91% Financial Services 5.26% Health and Human Services 5.26% Auto-Related Supplies and Services 3.51% Manufacturing and Recycling 2.63% In Watts at CD15 boundaries, businesses are primarily food establishments and retail. An examination of the businesses within each type category further describes the commercial options for Watts residents within CD15. (7). With 22 locations, markets are the most common business in Watts within CD15 boundaries, representing 19.3% diminishes the capacity for businesses to support community networks. Without restaurants where residents can sit down and interact with one another, residents are more likely to stick to their blocks. Within retail, Beauty Supplies and Services is the most common business within CD15 (8 businesses, 7% of all businesses). As places where residents potentially congregate, barber shops and beauty salons have the potential to mitigate the gap in community space left by a lack of sit-down restaurants. Survey Administration 50 businesses completed the business survey. 42 of those were small businesses. 38% of Watts businesses within CD15 boundaries were successfully surveyed. Watts Community Studio 23

30 Business Survey Results Business Characteristics Businesses that completed the survey were predominantly food service establishments. Markets were the largest component of that group (14 markets, or 24% of the businesses surveyed). Retail was the next most common type of business surveyed. Among the remaining business types, Auto-Related Supplies and Services, Financial business type breakdown within CD15 boundaries reveals that the survey responses are fairly representative. The largest discrepancy is in the Other Services type, which is under-represented by almost 6%. While Manufacturing and Recycling is only 2.63% of businesses within CD15 boundaries in Watts, none of those businesses completed a survey. Future survey efforts should focus on capturing these business owners perspectives. Auto-Related and Who are the Small Business Owners in Watts? live in Watts. Length of Time Open at Current Location 36% Less than 1 year 2% 19% More than 10 years 17% 2-5 years 26% 5-10 years 1-2 years Demographic Owners Race/thnicity Asian American 8% Black or African American 14% Hispanic or Latino 76% White or Caucasian 3% Age % % 61 or older 8% Gender Female 54% Male 46% Family Children 92% No children 8% Since half of Watts business owners are also residents, it is not surprising that they have some attributes in common business owners surveyed felt most comfortable completing the survey in Spanish. Similar to Watts status as a family neighborhood, 92% of small business owners have children. This is related to another survey result: the most common reason cited for starting a business is the need for jobs or the need to provide for family. 24 studio Comunitario de Watts

31 Business Survey Results Finances A majority of small businesses surveyed make less than $300,000 annually. More than half of them have experienced a decrease in sales in the last 2 3 years, and most believe the economy is the cause. Despite this recent decrease in sales, business owners are optimistic: more than half of business owners expect an increase in sales in the next 2 3 years. Reasoning for this expectation varied, but included planned improvements or investments, the desire for business to improve and the absolute need for business to improve. The most common problems faced by small business owners are weak sales, followed by high taxes, and competition. In a comparison of responses from different commercial areas, business owners on Compton Ave reported high taxes as an issue more often than business owners on Central or Wilmington. Wilmington Ave business owners reported competition from big business as a concern more often than business owners on Central or Compton. 38% Survey Question: What are the top two problems facing your business? 29% 24% 15% 12% 12% 12% 9% 6% 6% Weak Sales High Taxes Competition from Other Small Businesses Competition from Big Businesses Credit Availability Rising Rents Rules and Regulations Security/Need More Police Patrol Labor Costs Competition from Street Vendors Street Vendors as options. Business owners asserted those responses in the open-ended Other option of this question. The here illustrates how much of a concern it is for them. Watts Community Studio facilitated one meeting of small market business owners in order to better understand Watts Community Studio 25

32 Business Survey Results Watts provide spaces where families feel safe with their children. One owner expressed that if the business lost Planning and 85% are planning an investment in or improvement to their business. Investments or improvements included expanding inventory, hiring staff, publicity and remodeling. One business owner described a plan to create outdoor owners are aware of small business assistance programs. Business Tenure Survey Question: Are you aware of any business assistance programs? Yes 5% Own 40% 60% Rent No 95% Communication answer with sometimes, very few, or a little. Clearly, small business owners are busy people. 90% of businesses More than half of small businesses have employees. Of those, one-fourth employ family. The majority of small Spanish alone with their employees than both. 26 studio Comunitario de Watts

33 Business Survey Results Neighborhood included customers stealing items from the store, attempted store break-ins, and owners grappling with how to than the survey s request for two disadvantages, illuminating the variety of concerns for some business owners. One business owner expressed concern over the activities that happen at a nearby liquor store. In a comparison of responses from different commercial areas, owners on Wilmington Ave reported crime rate as a disadvantage more than owners on Central or Compton. Business owners on Central Ave cited street cleanliness as a disadvantage more than owners on Compton or Wilmington. Survey Question: What are the top two disadvantages of being at your current location? Safety Crime Rate Lack of Parking Street Cleanliness Access to Supplies High Traffic Not a Major Street Lack of Public Transportation Survey Question: How would you improve the environment right outside your business? Clean sidewalk 60% Improve buildings nearby 43% Improve signage 21% More trees 14% Traffic improvements 12% Increased police patrol, regulation of crime or removal of gangs 12% Top priorities for the environment outside their business are sidewalk cleanliness and building improvement. Although this question was intended to be about the physical environment, safety is enough of a concern for increased police patrol, crime regulation or gang removal in the Other option for this question. A comparison of responses shows that owners on Wilmington Ave suggested improvements to buildings nearby and signage more often than owners on Central or Compton. Two owners on Central Ave suggested more trees, while no owners on Wilmington or Compton chose more trees. Watts Community Studio 27

34 Business Survey Results Over three quarters of surveyed business owners wrote that there are advantages to being at their current location. four businesses found their distance away from other businesses advantageous (no competition). The last question on the business survey about Watts asked business owners to rate a list of 15 neighborhood Neighborhood Aspects Rated Good Most Often by Business Owners Traffic 46% Banking Services 36% Garbage collection 35% Neighborhood Aspects Rated Fair Most Often by Business Owners Affordability of Rent 43% Street lighting 40% Banking Services 39% Neighborhood Aspects Rated Poor Most Often by Business Owners Crime rate 82% Safety 72% Cleanliness 66% Quality of streets, sidewalks and intersections 65% Landscaping and trees 55% mployment opportunities 55% Conclusion to Business Survey Results The business survey responses revealed that business owners are concerned about safety, crime and neighborhood cleanliness. Despite some limitations and challenges, business owners in Watts are committed to improving their businesses and contributing to Watts. In answering the question, If you are planning on making investments in, or improvements to you business, what are you planning?, one owner responded: Make Watts worth living for. The business owner surveys illustrate resilience similar to the residents of Watts. 28 studio Comunitario de Watts

35 The following recommendations are informed by the neighborhood priorities and open-ended responses from both resident and business surveys. Common responses included concerns about safety and neighborhood cleanliness. In addition to the neighborhood priorities, responses included a focus on youth development as a response to neighborhood safety, academic enrichment, and community development. WCS also included recommendations based on the summer research process experience, including leadership development efforts and coalition building. It is important to note that these recommendations overlap and support one another in efforts to improve the quality of life for Watts residents. For example, the Infrastructure and Planning category of these recommendations includes possibilities for neighborhood improvement through vacant lots activation and bicycling efforts. These The recommendations outlined in this section of the report include actionable and immediate possibilities for work from organizations already doing the work related to the categories. They are presented here based on order of longer-term basis are outlined in the section titled Next Steps. Watts Community Studio 29

36 Workforce Development Reasons somebody may not be eligible to be in the labor force is because they are students, retired, stay-at-home parents, or institutionalized. There are many reasons that 47% of the eligible labor force, around 12,800 people, may be out of the labor force. Some of these people may be long-term unemployed people who are still unemployed work. The unemployment rate in Watts is 12.9%. This means that of the 53% of Watts residents participating in the labor force, 12.9% or around 1,650 people, are unemployed. If we look at the unemployment rate in Watts (about 1650 people) and low labor force participation rate (about 12,800 people not in the labor force at all) we know that the true unemployment rate in Watts may be much higher than 12.9%. No matter what, it is clear that residents need and want more access and options for jobs. Linking Watts s Residents to the Right Jobs to experience the greatest growth and job opportunities in the County. There are growing occupations that are a key to connecting job seekers to available jobs. These target occupations include: Supporting Organizations that Provide Workforce Development Government agencies offering workforce development have a very visible presence in Watts. Understanding that there may be barriers preventing some residents from approaching certain types of organizations, it s important to residents and offer ongoing labor force mentorship and training. 30 studio Comunitario de Watts

37 Business Development An effective plan includes identifying the strengths in a community and creating strategies to support them. Businesses in Watts are one of many community strengths. Small business owners in Watts are committed: surveys most have ideas on how they can better serve the residents. Not only do they provide access to necessary goods and services to residents, they also contribute to safety by maintaining established community spaces. The number of business owners who have sustained their business for over 10 years in Watts is a testament to the resiliency of Watts. The following recommendations aim to support business owners, bolster the local economy, and this study s economic development strategy. Connect Small Business Owners to Resources There are multiple resources available for small businesses through local agencies and organizations, including: the Small Business Direct Install program, which provides and installs energy and water saving Community Market Conversion Program, assisting corner store expansion into markets. Unfortunately, only 5% of surveyed business owners in Watts know about these programs. Local business owner Lottie Cleveland, with support from City Councilmember Joe Buscaino, has been trying to address this information gap through meetings and informational sessions, such as the quarterly Business Connections Breakfast. These meetings are a vital tool for supporting businesses in Watts. Business owners will continue to so this will be a continuing topic for meetings. As mentioned in the survey results section, most business owners are planning improvements. not have a plan, have never applied for a bank loan, and currently have no access to lines of credit. Financial advising and planning will help them which will be improvements for Watts. Local business owners learn about business assistance programs at the Business Connections Breakfast, June Topics chosen for the meetings should also reflect the current pressing needs of business owners. There are Watts Community Studio 31

38 Business Development relationships with business owners. Following these ideas, this recommendation includes: resources who completed business plans, and the one business owner who accessed multiple resources and use them as testimonials businesses. Maintain contact with agencies and organizations involved in resources. Foster Communication Between Business Owners and the LAPD As mentioned in the business survey results section, safety and crime were the most common reported location improved police response. One business owner talked about how she felt the only venue for discussion of safety her to discuss her concerns as a business owner. The business connections meetings organized by Lottie Cleveland can act as a platform to connect business owners with the police. meetings will be held at neutral spaces, but over the course of the next year, the business Watts Business Association-Specific Recommendation Outreach is a difficult task. The business association is a recent undertaking and Lottie Cleveland has committed a lot of energy toward outreach, communicating the purposes and advantages of a business association, and organizing meetings. The business survey administration results can assist in her continued work in a couple of ways. First, understanding who the business owners of Watts are is vital to business owner outreach and ensuring that meetings are accessible. Second, understanding the needs of business owners communicates what issues the business association can help to address. have children. While some of the children may be teenaged or older, some business owners have to think about 32 studio Comunitario de Watts

39 Business Development their children in as well as their business when considering attending a meeting. Additionally, 44% of business owners preferred taking the survey in Spanish. Based on that information, WCS recommends that the Watts Business Association: youth are welcome during outreach association is to support them (business association as connection to resources, assistance in Shop Watts Involve Business Owners in Upcoming Block Parties As detailed later in the Social Activities and Culture section, this study is recommending neighborhood events like block parties and street fairs. Local business owners should be involved in the block parties, both in planning and through setting up booths to sell their products. The booths will serve to promote businesses in their neighborhood. Interior wall at Watts Coffee House Watts Community Studio 33

40 Promote Healthy ating and Active Living Research shows that environmental forces and social conditions influence health outcomes. In June of this year, the City of Los Angeles released the health indicators (e.g. socioeconomic status, obesity, chronic illnesses, educational attainment) that determined the health conditions of neighborhoods in Los Angeles. The goal was to ensure that planning and development efforts considered health impacts of the neighborhoods when looking at future planning efforts. One of the staggering results was that of their Bel-Air counterparts and Watts residents life expectancy has remain unchanged in almost 40 years. It has become increasingly important to highlight the ways in which healthy living programs can improve health outcomes in Watts. This section offers an approach for potential programs, activities, and partnerships that aim for a healthier Watts. Identify Programs and Social Services Aimed at Improving Health Outcomes in Watts poverty and quality of life issues in Watts. The Watts Community Studio has found that residents and small businesses are not often aware of the various programs and services available to them. Supporting service providers and programs that have shown to increase human capital and build capacity in an array of programmatic areas pertinent to Watts could inform the ways in which resources reach a home in Watts and make a difference in health outcomes. Key programmatic areas of focus include: leadership development, mental health, adult literacy, undocumented persons, opportunities for ex-offenders, health education, and youth programs Increase Access to Healthy Food In a public health context, Watts is considered a food desert. In this case, the neighborhood experiences: (1) lack of quality grocery stores, (2) high prices or low quality of fresh produce at existing grocers, (3) the over-abundance of fast-food restaurants and limited healthy food options and (4) the proliferation of liquor stores or corner stores that lack the capacity to stock fresh food. The health impacts of living in food deserts include obesity and chronic illnesses. In an effort to increase healthy food options in Watts, the Watts Community Studio suggests the following: 34 studio Comunitario de Watts

41 3&$0..&/%"5*0/4 Infrastructure and Planning The recommendations for infrastructure and planning in Watts are based on the changes needed in the urban GBCSJD UP TVQQPSU UIF OFJHICPSIPP QSJPSJUJFT PG DMFBOMJOFTT QIZTJDBM BDUJWJUJFT BO TPDJBM BDUJWJUJFT JFOUJöF JO UIF SFTJFOU TVSWFZ SFTVMUT 5IF SFDPNNFOBUJPOT BSF BMTP JOGPSNF CZ UIF GPMMPXJOH öojoht t 3FTJFOUT OBWJHBUF HBOH UVSG CPVOBSJFT BO PS CPVOBSJFT PG TBGFUZ XIFO NPWJOH UISPVHI UIF OFJHICPSIPP 5IFTF CPVOBSJFT BSF TJHOJöDBOU FOPVHI UIBU NBOZ SFTJFOUT P OPU experience much of Watts outside of their block. t $PNNVOJUZ TQBDF JT DIFSJTIF CZ SFTJFOUT CVU JU JT MJNJUF UP TQFDJöD QMBDFT MJLF DIVSDI 5F 8BULJOT 1BSL PS TPNF CVTJOFTTFT Clearly, supporting neighborhood cleanliness, and physical and social activities is inextricably linked to issues of safety. While these recommendations have the potential to contribute to safety, safety needs to be addressed alongside this work in order to be successful. Incentivize Clean Watts Initiative The Clean Watts Initiative is an all-inclusive effort to improve the neighborhood conditions using a volunteer approach for community engagement facilitated by CD15 Field Staff. In conjunction with this effort, the We Clean Watts Initiative applies social media methods and local programming for outreach, the Clean Watts Initiative seeks to unite volunteers and community members to uphold Councilman Joe Buscaino s mission of revitalizing the substandard streets, parks, alleys, and community conditions of Watts. The project, in its initial phase, has encountered a great deal of support, but is challenged by the continuity of volunteers. There is uncertainty regarding the reasons for the lack of continuous resident involvement, but the community demographics may offer an explanation. These demographics demonstrate that Watts is a community with limited resources, high unemployment rates, and individuals living in poverty. Though a great initiative, Clean Watts should expand to include a participant incentive that responds to the residents who may wish to participate but are limited by their conditions. Volunteers of Clean Watts (photos courtesy of We Clean Watts facebook page and flickr account) Watts Community Studio 35

42 Infrastructure and Planning Continue Supporting Bicycle Infrastructure An active cyclist in Watts discussed the reason he felt bicycling is important in Watts: he wants kids to be involved with bikes instead of gangs. While the reality may not be so cut-and-dry, bicycles are an important option for young people as recreation, as community engagement through local bike clubs and bike culture identity, and as empowerment through independent transit and use of public space. A discussion with a youth from Watts and an adult who lives just outside Watts illuminated the possibility for biking to blur gang turf boundaries. There is at least one former-gang member they know who is safe crossing boundaries when part of an organized bike ride. Bicycling in Watts has the potential to be a tool for violence prevention and intervention. Bicycling infrastructure needs to be wholly supported. Members of United Riders (ast Side Riders Bike Club and Los Ryders) prepare for the bike ride preceding Councilman Joe Buscaino s inauguration in Watts. Activate Vacant Lots Vacant lots can have negative effects on a community that are often discussed in policy and planning circles. Since As demolition of vacant and dilapidated buildings is a key tool in some shrinking cities, the topic of vacant lots has become a national discourse, with many creative ideas on how to create community space out of a vacant lot. In Watts, vacant lots are connected with the issues of illegal dumping, general cleanliness and safety concerns. Additionally, vacant lots influence a person s social wellbeing, mental and physical health. Throughout South and Southeast LA, some vacant lots still stand as a result and reminder of the 1992 riots. Regardless of origin, a vacant lot can signify loss and city or community disinvestment for a resident. Activating these lots has the potential to address these issues and provide local programmatic support and recreational opportunities. 36 studio Comunitario de Watts

43 Infrastructure and Planning There are three methods for activating vacant lots in Watts: (1) Temporary use, organized events (short-term/ immediate) long-term/permanent), and (3) LA Open Acres (long-term/permanent). They buy-in. Not only does it entail residents showing up to use the space, it involves some residents taking initiative and sometimes committing to the spaces. In a successful outcome, residents have the opportunity to implement an idea they have for Watts. Temporary Use: Organized vents Actuating the potential of vacant lots as community space would contribute to safety and quality of life, and using the vacant lots for organized events is actionable within the year. As mentioned in the resident survey results, 72% of residents surveyed feel that there are not enough community activities in Watts. Community activities received the most responses of all activities listed in the survey. Ideas for temporary lot use include: In all of these proposed events, the vacant lots could be used to showcase local talent, provide recreational options and reinforce the strong community networks of Watts. ncourage Development time and tapping into community comment to encourage facilitate development, including real estate development LA Open Acres foundation for converting vacant properties into community green spaces. Their project, LA Open Acres, involves creating a database of vacant properties, including ownership, and using that database to create an online venue for the public to access the information. The plan is based on 596 Acres work in New York City, where the online platform enables residents and advocates to connect with community organizations and public agencies in order to develop projects with the vacant lots. The project invites participation from residents. During the creation of the vacant lot inventory, community resident Watts Community Studio 37

44 Infrastructure and Planning users can upload photos of additional vacant lots, allowing for the community to continuously update the database. Community organizations will be able to access information about the vacant lots, in efforts to streamline developing them into green spaces. Residents interested in participating in the activating of a vacant lot can access information on projects in the works, or use the available data to advocate for the transformation. community resident researchers. the community informed about how they can contribute 38 studio Comunitario de Watts

45 Safety While 75% of survey respondents described that they like living in Watts, many shared that they were concerned Department has reported that violent crime decreased 30 percent since 2011 in Watts, criminal activity is still higher in Watts than in neighboring communities. It is important to note that changing demographics of the neighborhood have affected racial dynamics. Survey respondents mentioned that racial tension has increased between the African American and Latino communities in Watts. Gang-related criminal activity and interracial conflict are two separate issues that need to be addressed with different strategies. should remain a top priority. Fostering other potential partnerships could help increase the level of safety for all support programs that aim to decrease criminal activity and increase safety in the neighborhood. Interracial Tension & Safety activity. This office is equipped with resources and connected with service providers that can aid in decreasing strategize on how to foster programs and services that address interracial violence. Watts Community Studio 39

46 Safety Support Violent Crime Reduction Programs programs and studies aimed at decreasing violent crime and gang activities directly in Watts. Through collaboration, stakeholders can work together to make Watts a safer place. Business and survey respondents that felt concerned about safety often requested increased law enforcement visibility as a remedy. Law enforcement does provide safety training, programs and information for residents at 40 studio Comunitario de Watts

47 Social Activities and Culture Residents of Watts have expressed a desire for community events where neighbors come together and enjoy the culture of Watts. Additionally, neighborhood dynamics and a strong sense of community allows for word-of-mouth and paper fliers to be the best method of disseminating information. Supporting more opportunities for wordof-mouth and community interactions can lead to increased opportunities for civic engagement and economic development for the neighborhood. Cultural Programming for Community ngagement: Block Parties and a Street Fair information-exchange between residents and service providers and offer ways for social activities and cultural programs. The block parties would happen simultaneously at each planning area in Watts at a quarterly basis. The events would conclude in the summer with a street fair at a neutral space. Local businesses would support the Drum and Jazz Festival can serve as these culminating events that are inclusive of the block parties and local businesses in Watts. Watts Community Studio 41

48 Youth Development This summer, the Watts Community Studio was honored to work with numerous organizations in Watts. YO!Watts, of youth between the ages of 16 and 24. These organizations serve youth who are residents of Watts, which made the experience even more engaging. During the exchanges between the youth and WCS staff, the youth shared their vision for Watts and their experiences that included witnessing the multiple forms of violence (gang, Black and Brown, death, and rape), limited academic opportunities, and desire to improve their conditions. Their lives demonstrate a commitment to personal growth and community capacity-building in spite of some challenges as a result of growing up in poverty. The following suggestions resulted from a partnership between these youth and the Watts Community Studio. Peer-to-Peer Mentorship Program Applying a year-long program that attempts to keep youth off of the streets and away from engaging in obscene crime, the youth proposed a project that would address the interrelated categories important to youth development: and (6) Leadership Development. In this particular order, participating youth would engage in bi-monthly Saturday workshops on these categories, each with its own 2-month plan (4 workshops per category) and aimed to address the most important assets to youth capacity-building. Provide College Tours College tours expose youth to opportunities outside of their neighborhood that they would otherwise not have access to. A 42% graduation rate in Watts demands a focus on academic enrichment and educational attainment. The exposure to local universities will help engage youth, establish relationships, inform possibilities for personal growth, and improve aspirations that would ultimately lead to an improved quality of life. This recommendation suggests to identify local agencies that have the capacity to travel with youth and expose them to different college campuses at the city-level and the state-level. 42 studio Comunitario de Watts

49 Leadership Development The demographic shifts in Watts include an increasingly diverse group of stakeholders in the community. Along with the changing facets of Watts, the leadership of the community continues to transform. The support of these changes influences the ways in which community stakeholders access resources and information offered by leaders in the community. Leadership development would improve the abilities and knowledge-sharing of leaders, which leaders will contribute to a participatory and an all-inclusive dialogue of community development. stablish a Leadership Coalition The history of Watts illuminates a vibrant and committed leadership that has provided the opportunities and programs that are available in the community. Recently, legacy leaders have begun to engage in conversation about coalitionbuilding and collaborative efforts. legacy of these organizations and individuals, a coalition of committed leaders will provide the necessary direction for development that is inclusive of the community. Leaders from local community-based and faith-based organizations, as well as city agency employees meet to discuss Watts Community Studio, June This recommendation suggests a coalition that inlcudes legacy leaders as the core, as well as new community leaders, with the goal of supporting a dialogue between established and new leaders, and the development of new leaders in Watts. The coalition s knowledge about community development, resiliency, and participation will assist with plans, programs, projects, policy, and development that influence the future of Watts. Leaders will engage in monthly meetings to update each other on their ongoing work. These meetings will provide information on projects functioning. This work will ensure that projects and programs are not reproduced, but are being utilized and made available throughout Watts. Additionally, this effort will promote the formation of strong partnerships between facilitate the meetings and information-exchange about projects and services. Watts Community Studio 43

50 Agencies and Contacts Involved with Programs Aligned with WCS Recommendations Topic Recommendations Agency(ies) Contact Phone # mail Workforce Development Linking Watts Residents to the Right Jobs Workforce Development System Gregory Burks, South LA Director (323) Supporting Organizations that Provide Workforce Development UCLA Labor Center IDPSCA Victor Narro Mario Lopez (213) (323) Business Development Connect Small Business Owners to Resources Los Angeles conomic and Workforce Development Department Adrian Morales Veliz, Business Services Manager (Harbor Region) (310) Watts Business Association-Specific Recommendations Watts Business Association Lottie Cleveland Use Promote Healthy ating and Active Living Identify Programs and Social Service Agencies Aimed at Improving Health Outcomes in Watts Watts Labor Community Action Committee Timothy Watkins, President/CO (323) Increase Access to Healthy Food Los Angeles Food Policy Council Clare Fox, Director of Policy and Innovation (213) Infrastructure and Planning Incentivize We Clean Watts City Council District 15 John Jones, III, Watts Field Deputy (213) Activate Vacant Lots Community Health Councils Mark Glassock, MPH, Policy Analyst (323) Continue Supporting Bicycle Infrastructure United Riders rvin Bromell, II Use Safety Interracial Tension and Safety Human Relations Commission Francisco Ortega (323) Support Violent Crime Reduction Programs Advancement Project Jamecca Marshall, MPP, Policy Manager, Urban Peace (213) Cultural Programming for Community ngagement: Block Parties and Street Fairs City Council District 15 General (213) Use phone number Youth Development Peer-to-Peer Mentorship Program INSPIR Research Academy Alejandro Covarrubias (323) Provide College Tours INSPIR Research Academy Alejandro Covarrubias (323) Leadership Development stablish a Leadership Coalition City Council District 15 Charles R. Drew University John Jones, III, Watts Field Deputy Cynthia Gonzalez (213) (323) Support merging Leaders Human Relations Commission Francisco Ortega (323)

51 The previous chapter, Recommendations, presented ideas for improvement that can be implemented in the next year. This chapter, Next Steps, includes longer-term considerations and recommendations. Since they are longer- Watts Community Studio 45

52 Workforce Development Supporting Wage and Worker mpowerment Policies Due to the conditions of poverty, low educational attainment and the age of average Watts residents (24 years job seekers will attain. These industries often pay minimum wage, leaving workers unable to overcome poverty. Additionally, persons working entry-level positions can have difficult working conditions or experience phenomena such as wage theft. Supporting policy that promotes living wages and prevents wage theft ensures that Watts residents can earn sufficient wages to move out of poverty. Business Development ncourage New Business in Vacant Storefronts areas, most are along the main thoroughfares. With a coordinated long-term plan, encouraging new businesses in these spaces will expand commercial options for residents, bring more business to established businesses, strengthen the local economy, increase safety and support a more active community street life. The necessary steps include prioritizing vacancies, contacting property owners, reaching out to new businesses, and emphasizing commercial diversity. Increase Commercial Options sit-down restaurants and a lack of shopping options both came up in survey responses. Beyond utilizing vacant storefronts, another method toward this goal is to support current business owners plans for expansion, particularly support these efforts. Pair Summer Youth mployment Participants with Business Districts Two YouthSource locations in Watts administer youth employment programs. A group of youth participants could be paired with business districts for the summer (one to each commercial cluster or corridor) to assist with tasks Infrastructure and Planning Track the Southeast Community Plan and Re:code LA effect on Watts, staying informed through public presentations and tracking project progress is vital to understanding whether they have an influence on Watts. 46 studio Comunitario de Watts

53 Building Improvement County generally, which translates into increased maintenance costs for home and business owners, challenges for renters, and community quality issues (43% of business owners expressed a need for improvement of nearby buildings). A few methods can be used to support and promote building improvement: Community meetings concentration of absentee property owners, or if there are absentee property owners that own multiple properties with assistance. Continue Housing and Zoning Research affordable housing will enable stakeholders to work to extend the affordability of low-income and special population housing currently in Watts. Tracking affordable housing also reveals characteristics of residents that may investigations for future research should also include: identifying where renovations and new construction are happening, a full catalog of vacant houses, exploring lot size typology, discerning whether current zoning is out-ofdate (particularly in commercial clusters), and reaching out to apartment managers at special population housing for future survey attempts and relevant discussions. ducation Research Local Schools Residents concerns around youth development, jobs, and youth crime prevention indicates an interest in a more engaged school leadership like spending time with principals, super star teachers, and after-school programs will offer possibilities for community engagement. This recommendation suggests developing a plan that would offer possibilities for improving local schools in order to discover their assets and needs. This investigative partnership will help direct investment and collaborations with the aim to improve the educational attainment of the children who attend schools in Watts, while also promoting academic enrichment. These efforts will contribute to making schools the community centers they should be to engage parents for the access of local neighborhood services, programs, and activities. Communications Residential survey respondents expressed a need for more programs and services in Watts. The Watts Community Studio knows of available neighborhood resources exist but many residents do not know how to access the information. Constituents in Watts face three primary barriers in obtaining information. These barriers include (1) Watts Community Studio 47

54 programs and services in Watts. A need for a reliable, impartial means for transmitting community information offers improved opportunities for communication between residents, government agencies and service providers that can lead to better distribution of services critical for improving the quality of life. The Watts Community Studio believes in supporting safe and simple methods to improve the dialogue and information exchange between residents and other stakeholders. stablish a Community Wall for Information xchange Limited access to information is a barrier to community involvement and to residents knowledge of programs and resources available to them. A Community Wall is a space where residents can provide and exchange information, along with organizations and agencies. The wall would be built at the local community park, shopping center, or civic center. The Community Wall could provide information on (1) upcoming and ongoing community events, Partnerships This summer, the Watts Community Studio encountered a number of people, organizations, and agencies that are committed to the development and resiliency of the residents of Watts through programs, projects, and initiatives. The development of these items requires a partnership between the local leadership of the community, the elected office, and all organizations and individuals committed to the people of Watts. This will enable transparent, communicative exchange in order to limit the reproduction of similar, if not identical, efforts. The Partnerships next step includes: identifying the work that is being conducted in Watts by agencies located organizations to leadership meetings (detailed in the Leadership Development section of the recommendations). Additionally, the following is an important consideration for building and sustaining partnerships: Include Immigration Resource Networks in the Partnerships One challenge for this assessment was addressing the existing population of undocumented residents in Watts. This is a sensitive topic, with Though incredibly supportive in their work, it s a challenge to reach out to residents of Watts who identify as undocumented. Involving these organizations in the network of organizations in Watts can create a resource for the undocumented residents of Watts. 48 studio Comunitario de Watts

55 APPNDICS

56

57 Appendix A MTHODS Survey Tools Development Residential surveys included a 5-step development process: (1) create a tool that would assist with understanding the assets and needs of the Watts residents; (2) share survey tool with local leaders and organizations to provide feedback on evaluating the tool; (3) finalize the tool and pilot the instrument at a local event; (4) update tool based on resident feedback; (5) return for final community-based organization review, finalize, and update. The small business survey followed the same 5-step development process. The small business survey was tailored to gain an understanding of the strengths and needs of business owners, and to identify what improvements business owners want for Watts. As part of those goals, survey questions address demographic, economic and social data, as well as day-to-day operations, employees and customers, finances and neighborhood services. Survey Outreach In order to ensure representation of various blocks, Watts Community Studio surveyed residents based on planning areas. Watts is divided into ten planning areas of which four (4) include the housing developments (Jordan Downs, Imperial Courts, Nickerson Gardens, and Gonzaque Village) and the remaining include single-family housing and multi-family housing (Please refer to Appendix I for a map of Watts that includes planning area boundaries). WCS partnered with local and citywide agencies and programs to administer surveys throughout the Watts neighborhood. The aim was to include perspectives of residents who live in the housing developments and those that do not, in order to look across housing distinctions and determine resident perspectives of their neighborhood overall. Resident surveys were conducted during the month of August in partnership with the Summer Youth mployment Program (SYP). SYP participants who were born and raised in Watts contributed to the effort and success of the survey administration, data collection, and analysis of this project. The youth committed to the efforts of the multiple project phases and demonstrated excitement to learn about the research process, participatory strategies, and the history of their own community. In an effort to be all-inclusive, WCS used multiple approaches for resident survey administration: (1) walking door-to-door, (2) surveying at places where residents gather, like Ted Watkins Park, (3) attending local events, like the LAPD National Night Out, (4) partnering with local organizations to administer surveys, and (5) working with local churches and faith-based organizations. The small business survey administration included visiting businesses with two different groups of young people: one from Inspire Research Academy, and the other through the Summer Youth mployment Program. Time-wise, the bulk of surveying happened alongside the residential survey administration during the month of August with the SYP participants. Additionally, WCS conducted a meeting of small market owners to discuss issues they experience. Methods: Watts Community Studio utilized an inter-disciplinary methodology to capture neighborhood assets and needs through residential and business surveys.! APPNDIX A 1!

58 Survey Administration: Complete a self-administered survey for residents and a selfadministered or interview-format survey for business owners in Watts. Administer surveys throughout the community to avoid geographic concentration of responses. Focus Groups: ngage with local community leaders and youth to advise on the project planning, survey administration, and planning document completion. Wordle: ngage local leaders on completing Watts is and Watts needs exercises to identify community assets and needs. Asset Mapping: Conduct digital asset mapping sessions with Inspire Academy and SYP youth to identify where the resources and strengths of Watts are located. Secondary Data During survey creation and throughout survey administration, Watts Community Studio also collected secondary data about Watts in order to supplement and reinforce an understanding of social and economic conditions. conomic data includes workforce development and employment data, with a sector analysis, as well a discussion of businesses in Watts. The most recent data available about demographics, housing and economics in Watts was acquired through the U.S. Census Bureau and various public agencies. Data sources are listed in their respective sections throughout this report. Survey Results: WCS Primary Data After three months of project planning, research, and community engagement, Watts Community Studio has prepared this comprehensive report on its findings. WCS originated in an effort to work with stakeholders about their knowledge of the community in order to inform the planning and development that influence the residents of Watts. This study aims to illuminate where neighborhood improvements are needed, what residents and business owners want to see in Watts, and to lay the groundwork for harnessing the benefits of new development for all residents. This measure will facilitate projects that do not displace and/or discount the people who live in the area. During the month of the data collection phase, WCS collected 794 surveys resident surveys and 50 business surveys. The results speak to the resiliency, power, commitment, dedication, and cultural diversity of the area and simultaneously demonstrate the importance of engaging the people of Watts in meaningful ways that will help guide all forms of investment in the neighborhood. A number of possibilities arise with this effort. The survey results in this report include basic data analysis of the responses provided by the residents and business owners of Watts who live within the CD15 boundaries. The results provide a valuable analysis of neighborhood conditions, priorities, and possibilities offered by the people who live in and own businesses in Watts. Future endeavors to continue the resident survey analysis will include: (1) an analysis of the 99 surveys survey respondents living within the traditional boundaries of Watts, (2) including the 99 respondents in the overall basic output for an overview that would inform county and city collaborative efforts, (3) comparison of neighborhood perspectives between residents who live in the housing development and those that do not, (4) comparison between responses and (5) expanded literature and analysis of the findings from this report.!! 2 APPNDIX A

59 Appendix B ABOUT WATTS, SCONDARY DATA This section is intended to be an index of the most recent data for Watts, including social, economic and housing information. A brief summary of the standout data is followed by the complete set of data in formatted tables with comparisons to Los Angeles County demographics. Social Watts is a family neighborhood: 39% of residents under 18, and the majority of Watts households are family households, with just over half including children or youth. Consistent with that fact, Watts households average 4.3 people. As a community of young people, 36% of residents are enrolled in school. Watts residents over 25 have attained less education than LA County residents. Residents are predominantly Hispanic or Latino (70%), and Black or African American (28%). Reflecting that identity, Spanish is spoken at over two-thirds of homes in Watts. In Watts, there is a higher percentage of single-parents than in LA County (most significantly for women). There is also a higher ratio of grandparents who are responsible for their grandchildren. conomic Watts residents experience a higher poverty rate than LA County. Almost 30% of Watts households earn less than $15,000 annually. Appropriately, households in Watts are accessing Social Security Income, cash public assistance and SNAP benefits (food stamps) more often than County households to remedy their lack of resources. Nearly a third of households receive SNAP benefits. Housing When examining the affordability of housing in a community, the factor most often explored is housing cost burden (the percentage of income that households spend on rent or owner costs). Contemporary metrics assert that when a household spends 35% or more of their income on housing, it is a financial burden. This burden is especially heavy for low-income households, who have a limited amount of money after housing cost to spend on other items. More than half of households in Watts are paying over 35% of their income on housing. As seen in the tables below, this burden is experienced by a larger percentage of renter households. Creating an inventory of publicly sponsored and incentivized housing enables another understanding of affordable housing availability, and implies what programs have been most successful. WCS created an inventory of affordable housing units available in Watts. Research should continue in order to verify this data (retrieved through city and federal agency websites), and search for additional affordable housing units. Including public housing and publicly incentivized housing, there are 3,353 affordable housing units in Watts. When viewed alongside homeownership, this data adds depth to an analysis of affordability. (30% of Watts households own their home.)! APPNDIX B 1

60 After the housing bubble bust of 2007, assessing the foreclosure rate of communities is important. The latest data available through HUD on foreclosures is for , at which time the foreclosure rate was higher in Watts than for the County. Additionally, Watts homeowners were more likely to have a high-cost loan. Vacancy rate is considered an indicator of general housing availability. The housing vacancy rate in Watts in 7.15%, which is 1% higher than the County s vacancy rate. This indicates that there is not a shortage of housing stock. While building type in Watts is similar to the County, the buildings in Watts are older. The median home value in Watts is $280,000, compared to $478,300 for LA County. This begs an examination of housing quality for Watts. There are two data-driven methods for understanding housing quality: Census data and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) physical inspection scores. Census data that is physically descriptive of housing ( lack of plumbing, lack of full kitchen ) shows that the quality of private housing in Watts is comparable to that of the County. The HUD data is more descriptive. HUD completes physical property inspections of public housing and multi-family assisted housing that is under the jurisdiction of HUD. 20,000 inspections are completed annually with the aim of ensuring safe and sanitary housing for assisted families. Inspections include rating every item on a list of physical points to inspect, with deductions for issues. Issues are weighted by severity. ach inspection is completed with a 100-point scale. Frequency of inspections increases when scores are lower. Properties that score below 80 points are considered problematic enough to warrant annual inspections to ensure resolution of issues and improvement. Public housing in the County averaged 80. In the most recent inspections of the four public housing developments in Watts, only one scored below an 80. Jordan Downs scored 73. The City s acknowledgement of the substandard conditions at Jordan Downs was impetus for the upcoming Jordan Downs redevelopment. The multi-family assisted housing inspections portray substandard housing. Four out of the six developments from Watts with scores accessible via HUD s website are below 80. All of the developments listed for Watts have improved their scores since the previous inspection. However, these scores should be tracked to understand if the properties are being inspected annually, and whether the inspections continue to leverage improvements. Another indicator of housing quality issues is overcrowding. According to Census data, 12% of housing units in Watts are overcrowded, and 16% are severely overcrowded. This is significant overcrowding by accepted metrics and when compared to the County s rates, 5% and %7 respectively. For residents and stakeholders, these data sets may not be surprising. The one surprising data set is in household mobility: 68% of Watts households moved into their current home since This is similar to County rates of moving. While some of these households may not be entirely new to Watts, it is safe to assume that many of them are since this correlates to the demographic shift in Watts. While Watts is home to some old-timers, there is a high percentage of newer residents.! 2 APPNDIX B

61 DMOGRAPHICS, SOCIAL WATTS LOS ANGLS COUNTY Total population 39,593 9,818,605 Age Under 18 15, % 2,402, % , % 6,350, % 65 years and over 1, % 1,065, % Median age (years) Gender Male population 18, % 4,839, % Female population 20, % 4,978, % Hispanic or Latino and Race Hispanic or Latino 27, % 4,687, % White % 2,728, % Black or African American 11, % 815, % American Indian and Alaska Native % 18, % Asian % 1,325, % Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander % 22, % Some Other Race % 25, % Two or More Races 1, % 438, % Hispanic or Latino Hispanic or Latino 27, % 4,687, % Mexican 21, % 3,510, % Puerto Rican % 44, % Cuban % 41, % Other Hispanic or Latino 6, % 1,091, % Not Hispanic or Latino 11, % 5,130, %! APPNDIX B 3

62 WATTS LA COUNTY Language nglish only 31.64% 43.40% Language other than nglish 68.36% 56.60% Speak nglish less than "very well" 31.60% 26.80% Spanish 67.94% 39.40% Speak nglish less than "very well" 31.43% 18.80% Other Indo-uropean languages 0.18% 5.40% Speak nglish less than "very well" 0.00% 2.10% Asian and Pacific Islander languages 0.24% 10.80% Speak nglish less than "very well" 0.16% 5.60% Other languages 0.01% 1.00% Speak nglish less than "very well" 0.01% 0.30% Place of Birth Native 68.33% 64.40% Born in United States 67.88% 63.50% Born in Puerto Rico, U.S. Island areas, or born abroad to American parent(s) 0.45% 0.90% Foreign born 31.67% 35.60% Date of ntry Foreign born % % ntered 2000 or later 16.18% 23.40% ntered before % 76.60% School nrollment (population 3 years and over enrolled in school Nursery school, preschool 6.68% 5.70% Kindergarten 5.74% 4.70% lementary school (grades 1-8) 47.94% 37.80% High school (grades 9-12) 27.21% 22.50% College or graduate school 12.43% 29.30%! 4 APPNDIX B

63 WATTS LA COUNTY ducation Attainment (highest level of education achieved for individuals over 25 years old) Less than 9th grade 31.96% 13.80% 9th to 12th grade, no diploma 20.64% 10.10% High school graduate (includes equivalency) 26.74% 20.80% Some college, no degree 14.06% 19.20% Associate's degree 3.24% 6.80% Bachelor's degree 2.28% 19.10% Graduate or professional degree 1.09% 10.10% Percent high school graduate or higher 47.40% 76.10% Percent bachelor's degree or higher 3.37% 29.20% WATTS LOS ANGLS COUNTY Households Total households 9, % 3,241, % Family households 7, % 2,194, % With own children under 18 5, % 1,052, % Husband-wife family 3, % 1,480, % With own children under 18 2, % 721, % Male householder, no wife present % 216, % With own children under % 92, % Female householder, no husband present 3, % 497, % With own children under 18 2, % 239, % Nonfamily households 1, % 1,047, % Householder living alone 1, % 784, % Male % 360, % 65 years and over % 76, % Female % 424, % 65 years and over % 169, % Households with people under 18 6, % 1,220, % Households with people 65 and over 1, % 790, % Average household size ! APPNDIX B 5

64 WATTS LA COUNTY Grandparents Number of grandparents living with own grandchildren under % % Responsible for grandchildren 35.26% 25.80% Years responsible for children Less than 1 year 8.19% 5.00% 1 or 2 years 7.27% 5.90% 3 or 4 years 3.67% 4.30% 5 or more years 16.12% 10.60% Veteran Status Civilian veterans 3.00% 4.80%! 6 APPNDIX B

65 DMOGRAPHICS, CONOMIC WATTS LA COUNTY Income Less than $10, % 6.10% $10,000 to $14, % 5.90% $15,000 to $24, % 10.40% $25,000 to $34, % 9.70% $35,000 to $49, % 12.80% $50,000 to $74, % 17.40% $75,000 to $99, % 12.00% $100,000 to $149, % 13.60% $150,000 to $199, % 5.80% $200,000 or more 0.47% 6.30% Median household income (dollars) 28,700 56,266 Percent Unemployed 12.87% 9.80% Benefits Households with Social Security 23.72% 22.20% Households with retirement income 6.60% 11.60% Households with Supplemental Security Income 11.77% 5.80% Households with cash public assistance income 19.85% 3.90% Households with Food Stamp/SNAP benefits in the past 12 months 32.89% 6.20% Occupation Management, business, science, and arts occupations 12.42% 35.00% Service occupations 24.22% 18.20% Sales and office occupations 21.54% 25.60% Natural resources, construction, and maintenance occupations 15.80% 8.30% Production, transportation, and material moving occupations 26.02% 13.00%! APPNDIX B 7

66 Occupation by Industry WATTS LA COUNTY Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting, and mining 0.52% 0.50% Construction 10.39% 6.00% Manufacturing 13.86% 11.20% Wholesale trade 5.24% 3.70% Retail trade 10.47% 10.60% Transportation and warehousing, and utilities 9.24% 5.20% Information 1.15% 4.40% Finance and insurance, and real estate and rental and leasing 3.56% 6.70% Professional, scientific, and management, and administrative and waste management services 9.86% 12.10% ducational services, and health care and social assistance 16.70% 20.20% Arts, entertainment, and recreation, and accommodation and food services 8.14% 9.90% Other services, except public administration 8.24% 6.10% Public administration 2.63% 3.40% Availability of Vehicle, Household No vehicles available 22.92% 9.60% 1 vehicle available 35.85% 34.80% 2 vehicles available 26.28% 35.10% 3 or more vehicles available 14.95% 20.40% Commute to Work, Individuals Car, truck, or van -- drove alone 65.62% 72.20% Car, truck, or van -- carpooled 13.84% 11.10% Public transportation 12.08% 7.10% Walked 1.74% 2.90% Other means 2.44% 2.00% Worked at home 4.28% 4.70% Mean travel time to work (minutes) ! 8 APPNDIX B

67 HOUSING WATTS LOS ANGLS COUNTY Tenure Occupied housing units 9, % 3,241, % Owner-occupied housing units 2, % 1,544, % Renter-occupied housing units 6, % 1,696, % Population in owner-occupied housing units 14, % 4,878, % Population in renter-occupied housing units 24, % 4,768, % Average household size of owner-occupied units Average household size of renter-occupied units Occupancy/Vacancy Total housing units 9, % 3,445, % Occupied housing units 9, % 3,241, % Vacant housing units % 203, % WATTS LA COUNTY Mortgage Status of Owner Occupied Units Housing units with a mortgage 87.70% 76.90% Housing units without a mortgage 12.30% 23.10% Affordability Owner Costs as a Percentage of Income Less than 25.0 % 31.63% 44.37% 25.0 to 34.9 % 14.73% 17.95% 35.0 % or more 53.65% 37.68% Rent Costs as a Percentage of Income Less than 25.0 % 16.19% 30.69% 25.0 to 34.9 % 19.72% 20.80% 35.0 % or more 64.09% 48.50%! APPNDIX B 9

68 Housing Bubble Bust WATTS LA COUNTY Foreclosure Rate, % 6.50% High Cost Loan Rate, % 24.52% Housing Characteristics, Quality Building Type, Size 1-unit, detached 48.71% 49.90% 1-unit, attached 11.83% 6.60% 2 units 3.74% 2.40% 3 or 4 units 6.43% 5.70% 5 to 9 units 10.02% 7.90% 10 to 19 units 2.87% 7.80% 20 or more units 15.92% 18.10% Mobile home 0.48% 1.60% Boat, RV, van, etc. 0.00% 0.10% Housing Units, Year Built Built 2005 or later 3.43% 2.10% Built 2000 to % 3.20% Built 1990 to % 6.10% Built 1980 to % 11.70% Built 1970 to % 14.30% Built 1960 to % 15.20% Built 1950 to % 20.90% Built 1940 to % 11.30% Built 1939 or earlier 20.02% 15.10%! 10 APPNDIX B

69 WATTS LA COUNTY Value, Owner Occupied Homes Less than $50, % 2.30% $50,000 to $99, % 1.90% $100,000 to $149, % 2.10% $150,000 to $199, % 3.20% $200,000 to $299, % 11.00% $300,000 to $499, % 33.10% $500,000 to $999, % 35.90% $1,000,000 or more 0.00% 10.60% Median home value (dollars) 280, ,300 Quality Indicators Lacking complete plumbing facilities 0.75% 0.60% Lacking complete kitchen facilities 1.08% 1.60% No telephone service available 4.60% 2.60% Occupants Per Room 1.00 or less 72.28% 88.00% 1.01 to % 7.10% 1.51 or more 15.75% 4.90% Year Householder Moved In Moved in 2005 or later 40.26% 38.70% Moved in 2000 to % 21.60% Moved in 1990 to % 20.50% Moved in 1980 to % 8.80% Moved in 1970 to % 5.80% Moved in 1969 or earlier 3.80% 4.50%! APPNDIX B 11

70 Public Housing Units and Most Recent Posted Inspection Scores, HUD Inspection Development Units Score Inspection Date Gonzaque Village /16/2010 Imperial Court /11/2010 Jordan Downs /10/2010 Nickerson Gardens 1, /01/2010 Average public housing inspection score, Los Angeles County: 80 Multi-Family Affordable Housing Units Development Units rd St 1 Sheridan Manor 3 Alice Manor 60 Bandara Senior Housing 60 astside Village Family Apartments 77 Gibson Manor 50* Imani Fe ast and West 90 Imperial Highway Apartments 45 McCoy Plaza 64 ML Shephard Manor Senior Housing 89 Washington Court Family 100 Watts Arms I 104 Watts Arms II 40 Westminster Park Plaza Apts 130 Total public housing units: 2,440 Total multi-family affordable housing units: 913 Total units of public housing and multi-family affordable housing: 3,353 Multi-Family Assisted Housing Inspection Scores, HUD Inspection Development Score Inspection Date Alice Manor 67 07/21/2009 Imperial Highway Apartments 55 10/07/2010 Sheridan Manor 83 11/20/2007 Washington Court Apartments 58 12/09/2010 Watts Arms I 46 09/28/2009 Watts Arms II 91 12/04/2008 Occupied Housing Units, Tenancy and Affordable Program Status Owner Occupied 2,735 30% Renter Occupied, Affordable Programs 3,353 37% Renter Occupied, Other 3,003 33%! 12 APPNDIX B

71 NOTS ON DATA This exploration of data about Watts uses the boundaries of the City of Los Angeles, in order to inform city-directed planning and policy. City boundaries coincide with Council District 15 boundaries, and with Census Tract boundaries, enabling reliable data collection through the U.S. Census Bureau and other sources. For purposes of this study, Watts includes Census Tracts 2420, 2421, 2422, 2423, 2426, 2427, 2430 and Refer to Appendix I for a map of Census Tracts in Watts and surrounding areas. DATA SOURCS U.S. Census Bureau Decennial Census, Population Age Gender Hispanic or Latino and Race Hispanic or Latino Households Tenure Occupancy/Vacancy U.S. Census Bureau American Community Summary, 5-year estimate, Language Place of Birth Date of ntry School nrollment ducation Attainment Grandparents Veteran Status Income Benefits Occupation Occupation by Industry Availability of Vehicle, Household Commute to Work, Individuals Mortgage Status of Owner-Occupied Units Owner Costs as a Percentage of Income Renter Costs as a Percentage of Income Building Type, Size Year Built Value Quality Indicators Occupants Per Room Year Householder Moved In U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Neighborhood Stabilization Program data, (18-month period) Public housing inspection scores, Multi-family assisted housing inspection scores, Housing Bubble Burst Public Housing and Multi-Family Assisted Inspection Scores! APPNDIX B 13

72

73 ! Introduction Appendix C WATTS LABOR FORC ATIICS The Watts Community Studio conducted primary and secondary research to identify factors that impact the urban economic fabric of Watts. The variables studied to establish the Watts Labor Profile include: Local Labor Force Profile o Watts Labor Force Overview o Women in the Labor Force o Youth Labor Force o Top Occupations! Survey Results Targeted Growth Industries Workforce Development Program Overview o WorkSource o Non-Profits Recommendations By understanding the local labor force, workforce development opportunities and sector strengths, strategies for targeted education, training and economic development policy can be created. Research methods include the collection and analysis of secondary data from public agencies, government-supported workforce development service providers; primary data from the small business survey; interviews with key informants and site visits. As a micro-geography, Watts must be understood as a component of the regional Los Angeles economy. Comparative data from the City of Los Angeles has been integrated into the report to add this context. Key words Labor force: mployed and unemployed persons of legal working age and eligible to be working. Students, retirees, stay-at-home parents, discouraged workers and institutionalized persons are not counted as part of the labor force. Discouraged worker: Workers who are no longer seeking employment after prolonged time unemployed. This population is not included in the unemployment rate. Dislocated worker: Include a range of workers that have been terminated or laid off; are ineligible or have exhausted unemployment benefits; have been terminated or laid off as a result of permanent closer; was self-employed but is now unemployed due to economic conditions or a natural disaster; or a displaced homemaker who is no longer supported by another family member. Watts Labor Force Profile General Labor force The most recent US Census data shows that Watts has a low participation rate in the labor force, with only 53 percent of the persons eligible to be working participating in the labor! APPNDIX C 1

74 force. The City of Los Angeles has a higher labor force participation rate of 63 percent. 1 Low participation rates can be due discouraged workers, informal or unreported labor activity, retirees, stay-at-home parents and persons in institutions. For Watts residents who are participating in the labor force, they face a slightly higher unemployment rate, at 12.9%, than the rest of the City of Los Angeles (12.1%) 2. Table 1: Selected Labor Force Characteristics of Watts 3 Population 16 Years and Older In Labor Force mployed Unemployed Pop % in Labor Force Pop % mployed Pop % Unemployed 24,049 12,803 11,155 1,648 53% 87% 12.9% Source: American Community Survey 5-Year stimates Census Tracts 2420, 2421, 2422, 2423, 2426, 2427, 2430, 2431 Key Findings Nearly 60 percent of population (24,049 persons) in Watts is eligible to be in the labor force, however; only about half of this population (12,803 persons) is actively in the labor force. 87 percent of the Watts labor force is employed (11,155 persons) Unemployment in Watts is at 12.9 percent (1,648 persons). Participating Labor Force Fast Facts 4 Women and the Labor Force Of the total females eligible for the labor force (12,523), only 45% of them are in the labor force. Of the females in the labor force, 83% are employed (4,834). It is possible that females are not in the labor force due to family and/or caretaker obligations. The high employment rate for this demographic illustrates a need to integrate more females into the labor force. Youth and the Labor Force mployment opportunities are critical for youth ages 16 to 24 years old. Youth typically enter the labor force in this age group and learn essential soft skills that will enable them to succeed. Jobs for youth also act as deterrent to juvenile delinquency and gang activity while instilling responsibility in pride in young workers.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! "!#$%&'()*!+$%!,+-.)!/+)01(!#$(122341$51!617.)(!8.)!(91!:3(*!.8!,.'!;$4121'<!;&4&'(!=>"?!! =K=><!=K="<!=K==<!=K=?<!=K=L<!=K=D<!=K?><!=K?"!! K!#-3%M!! 2 APPNDIX C!

75 The Great Recession has led to the elimination of many of the entry-level, service-related positions that youth in this age group would obtain as their entry into the labor force. Currently, unemployment rates for youth 16 to 19 years old in Los Angeles County stands at a high 41 percent. 5 Throughout the country, the labor force participation has been declining for youth from 16 to 19 years old because remaining a student for higher education has increased. Table 2: Watts mployment: Youth 16 to 19 Years Old 6 Total Population of 16 to 19 yr olds Source: Total Pop of 16 to 19 in Labor Force mployed Youth 16 to 19 Unemployed Youth 16 to 19 % of 16 to 19 Youth in Labor Force % of 16 to 19 Youth mployed % of 16 to 19 Youth Unemployed 3, % 52.4% 47.6% American Community Survey 5-Year stimates Census Tracts 2420, 2421, 2422, 2423, 2426, 2427, 2430, 2431 Low participation rates exist for this demographic, with only 21.5 percent (733 persons) of the total population of 16 to 19 year olds in Watts participating in the labor force percent are employed percent are unemployed. Watts mployment: Youth 20 to 24 Years Old By the age of 20, most eligible persons have fully entered the labor force as full-time private wage or salary workers. This demographic could also be starting young families or making major purchases or investments, such as a first car or taking out student loans. Throughout LA County, this group maintains an unemployment rate of 19 percent. 7 The Watts unemployment rate for this demographic is at percent. The following table provides further insight into this group: Table 3: Labor Force Information for Youth 20 to 24 years old in Watts Total Population of 20 to 24 yr olds Source: Total Pop of in Labor Force mployed Youth 20 to 24 Unemployed Youth 20 to 24 % of 20 to 24 Youth in Labor Force % of 20 to 24 Youth mployed % of 20 to 24 Youth Unemployed ,045 1, % 80.6% 19.4% American Community Survey 5-Year stimates Census Tracts 2420, 2421, 2422, 2423, 2426, 2427, 2430, percent (2,045 persons) of the total population of 20 to 24 year olds in Watts are in the labor force.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! @!#$%#!&'()*+,-!./''0-*12!30)4(2!%56(,)!781*',1(89!3(:(+1(;!7+/-/'*+!.<,),+1()*81*+89!=/8!&->(:(8!./0-12!! APPNDIX C 3

76 1,047 persons aged 20 to 24 years old are not in the labor force percent of year olds in Watts labor force are employed. Top Occupations In the residential survey, respondents filled out their occupations. Many responses were left blank but 412 responses were legible and able to be categorized by occupation and industry. The results yielded that the top occupations for Watts survey participants are as follows: Occupation Industry Percentage of Responses Homemaker 18% Construction & General Labor 17% Service Industry 14% Office, Professional & Tech Services 11% N/A / Healthcare /Student 7% There were very diverse responses from the residents that filled out the occupation section on the surveys. Other categories that ranked below 7 percent included retired, disabled, unemployed, self-employed and not applicable. Referring back to the secondary data analysis, census estimates identify the class of worker from employed Watts residents. The overwhelming majority of Watts workers are private wage or salary workers and they work between 34 and 39 hours a week. 8 Looking at average hours worked can help indicate if underemployment is occurring. At the present time, more information is needed to conclude if underemployment is taking place. Class of Worker 9 82% (9,099) are private wage or salary workers 10% (1,105) are government workers 8% (941) are self-employed Less than 1% (10) are family employees On average, these employees work between 34 and 39 hours per week Targeting Growth Industries Access to employment opportunities, training and education are critical to alleviating poverty. A variety of entry-level occupations, mainly in the medical profession and service industry, are projected to add thousands of jobs within the next decade in LA County. 10 The current top five occupations in the City of Los Angeles are:!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! #A#CB!#A#DB!#A#%B!#AC$B!#AC'!!FG,HI!! '$!F/H2:3+4!./H!J.G1+!K.+?*3!F/3*<<,L*/-*!M*N1+3!=1+!3O*!0,34!1=!J1:!(/L*<*:B!(2L2:3!#$'C!! 4 APPNDIX C!

77 1) Healthcare and social assistance 2) Retail trade 3) Manufacturing 4) Accommodation and Food Services 5) ducational services As the decade progresses and the economy slowly recovers, other occupations and sectors will experience substantial growth in LA County. Training and workforce development for dislocated workers or persons reentering the workforce should be targeted at these industries. The following occupations are the fastest growing, entry-level occupations that amount to about 77,500 employment opportunities: Fastest Growing Occupations in LA County 11 Occupation New Jobs Projected Personal care aides 40,300 Nursing, psychiatric/home health aides 16,120 Home Health Aides 7,280 Market Research Analysts/Marketing Specialists 5,570 Food Service Managers 3,490 Taxi Drivers and Chauffeurs 1,830 MTs and Paramedics 1,540 Gaming Dealers 1,370 Watts Workforce Development Program Overview Workforce development programs provide specialized training and job resources for unemployed members of the labor force. There are government agencies and non-profit workforce development service providers throughout Los Angeles and several that have programs in Watts. WorkSource Centers WorkSource centers are designated workforce development centers throughout LA County that are funded mostly by Workforce Investment Act (WIA) funding. Funding and programmatic partners include multiple federal, state and local government agencies. Watts has one main WorkSource Center at the W.L.C.A.C. and another three HACLA operated WorkSource-HACLA Portals at Nickerson Gardens, Imperial Courts and Jordan Downs. WorkSource centers are well staffed and offer universal access to online services that can aid with job assistance. Job seekers do not have to be from Watts to use the WorkSource centers in Watts. Job seekers that qualify for WorkSource sponsored programs can enroll and receive specialized training, case management, paid-training and a variety of other supportive services. Not all job seekers will qualify for these programs or meet the federal standards necessary for programmatic assistance. Factors such as immigration status, substance abuse or distrust in government agencies can lead to limited participation in WorkSource programs.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ""!#$%$&!'(!)%*+(',-+%!./0*'1/&-$!2&3&*'0/&-$!2&0%,$/&-$!! APPNDIX C 5

78 Programs for at-risk youth that offer workforce development are provided through YouthSource centers in Watts. Two YouthSource centers are within the traditional Watts boundaries and provide targeted programs for juvenile offenders and high school dropouts. ducational programs and case management services are also provided for youth participants. Despite the prevalence of government agencies providing workforce development in Watts, unemployment is still high and the labor force participation rate is low compared to the rest of LA. WorkSource-HACLA portals offer mployment Technology Centers that offer computer and internet-based job seeking services. These centers can be accessed by anyone looking for a job and usage of the Technology Center does not require the enrollment in a WorkSource program. There are no restrictions for how often job seekers can use the centers. As of January 1, 2013 to September 2013 the HACLA mployment Technology Centers 12 have been utilized thousands of times. How many times centers have accessed does not signify unique users. HACLA mployment Technology Centers: Nickerson Gardens 7,684 uses Imperial Courts - 13,556 uses Gonzaque Village 5,934 uses The mployment Technology Centers are designed to be for employment search and related tasks only. It is likely that the high uses reflect resident interest in job opportunities. Non-Profit and Community-Based Organizations Government mistrust, immigration status, substance abuse, long-term unemployment and previous incarceration can act as barriers to job seeker participation in the workforce development programs facilitated by government agencies. Non-government agencies, such as non-profit organizations, unions and community-based organizations offer employment resources, case management and training programs similar to what WorkSource offers, however, as non-governmental agencies they often have more lax regulations. In addition to the enhanced flexibility these organizations can have, they often have faithbased, identity-group based or sector based programs to support soft and hard skills development for participants. These types of programs may be more appealing for Watts residents may face one or more barriers to employment. xamples of these types organizations include Worker Centers (Black Worker Center or IDPSCA), non-profits (Homeboy Industries) and unions (Unite Here Local 11). Both government agencies and non-profit organizations often partner with local educational institutions to provide training and often support each other through sub-contracts. Acknowledging that both entities can compliment each other is important for providing the most access to jobs possible for unemployed constituents.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! "#!$%&'()*'+!+*&,!-('./(0!12(345!6*('7&/(!/8!9/2&,!:/4!;%.'<'4!=/(38/(7'!6')'</>?'%&!904&'?!! 6 APPNDIX C!

79 Resident Survey, nglish and Spanish APPNDIX D

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81 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO RSIDNT S NDS ASSSSMNT Survey created solely for the purposes to interview residents of Watts to discover more about their needs. Name: Address: City, State, Zip:! LIF IN WATTS 1. Do you live in Watts? YS NO If yes, how long have you lived in Watts? 2. Do you like living in Watts? YS NO 2.1. Why? 3. Do you see yourself living in Watts for a long time? YS NO 3.1. Why? SAFTY AND NIGHBORHOOD CONDITIONS 4. Do you see your area (A) improving (B) deteriorating (C) staying the same 5. How safe do you feel in your neighborhood during: Safe Undecided Unsafe 5.1 Daytime Nighttime What is the current level of the following activities/places in Watts? Activities/Places 6.1 Cultural Activities (like Museums/Galleries, Community vents, Public Art) 6.2 Social Activities (like Family Night Out Dancing, Shopping, Artwalk, Dine-in) 6.3 Physical Activities (like Sports, Gyms, Workout Classes, xercise Spaces) 6.4 Groceries (like Local grocery stores, fresh produce) 6.5 Green Space (like parks, community gardens, recreational areas) 6.6 Quality of local shopping center 6.7 Community Activities (for people to come together) 6.8 OTHR (please provide your own response) Good nough Not Good nough Don t Care 7. What is the current level of the following programs in Watts? Programs 7.1 Health ducation/preventive Care Programs 7.2 Homeownership Information/Programs 7.3 Business Ownership Information/Programs 7.4 Safety Training Programs 7.5 Cultural/Social/Recreational Programs 7.6 Reading and Writing Classes 7.7 Language Classes 7.8 Mentorship/Academic Programs 7.9 OTHR (please provide your own response) Good nough Not Good nough Don t Care

82 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO Resident Needs Assessment NIGHBORHOOD PRIORITIS 8. Please check ( ) the most important item for each box. Please check only one. Physical Activities Social Activities mployment _ Bike Lanes _ Parks and Recreation _ Sports Programs _ Dancing _ Shopping _ Restaurants/Coffee Shops _ Access to employment Job re-training Opportunities for local jobs Housing nforcement Government Affordable Housing Homelessness Home improvement Support Renters Rights Infrastructure (zoning, streets) Safety Burglaries Homicides Neighborhood Council City Council State/Federal Government Support Groups for the Community Transportation _ Public Transportation _ Parking Availability _ Traffic Lights _ Affordable transportation Neighborhood Cleanliness _ Streets/Potholes _ Alleys/Trash dumping _ Animal Control _ Graffiti Removal Culture _ Arts ducation _ xposure to Local History _ Areas for Public Art _ Mural Projects DMOGRAPHICS 9. Age: 10. Gender: (A) MAL (B) FMAL (C) OTHR: 11. thnicity: 12. mployment Status: (A) FULL-TIM (B) PART-TIM (C) UNMPLOYD (D) RTIRD () UDNT 13. Annual Household Income: 13.1 Occupation: 14. Primary language spoken at home: 15. Housing Status: (A) RNT (B) OWN (C) OTHR: 16. Single parent/guardian household? (A) YS (B) NO 16.1 IF YS, # adults in the home: # of children in the home: 16.2 IF YS, what s your relationship to the child(ren)? 17. What was the last year/grade in school you completed? 18. Marital Status: (A) Single (B) Married (C) Widowed (D) Divorced () OTHR:! "!

83 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO Resident Needs Assessment NIGHBORHOOD POSSIBILITIS 19. Please answer YS or NO to the following questions about Watts: Questions YS NO 19.1 Do you feel that your neighborhood needs improvement? 19.2 Would you actively participate in an effort to improve your community? 19.3 Do you think the history of Watts is interesting? 19.4 Do you think others are interested in the history of Watts? 19.5 Would you welcome other people who do not live in Watts to come learn about Watts? 19.6 Do you know more than one place to visit in Watts? 19.7 Would you prefer more local jobs in Watts? 19.8 Would you benefit from trainings/workshops about how to get involved in local government? 19.9 Would you benefit from a meeting to learn/share possible ideas about Watts and its future? 20. What do you like about your community? 21. What challenges do you see in your community? 22. Do you have ideas on potential possibilities to improve your community? YS NO If so, what are they? FURTHR INFORMATION 23. Please answer YS or NO to the following questions: 23.1 Would you like further information about the Watts Community Studio? YS NO 23.2 Would you like to participate in a discussion about this survey? YS NO If yes, please provide best way to contact you (circle one): PHON MAIL 24. Additional comments/questions/concerns: Do you have any other concerns or suggestions for the Watts area that you would like to provide? THANK YOU!! "!

84 UDIO COMUNITARIO D WATTS NCUA PARA RSIDNTS sta encuesta es únicamente para entrevistar a residentes de Watts y descubrir más sobre sus necesidades.! VIDA N WATTS Nombre: Direccion: Ciudad/stado/Zip: 1. Vive en Watts? SI NO Cuanto tiempo ha vivido en Watts? 2. Le gusta vivir en Watts? SI NO 2.1. Porque? 3. Se ve a sí mismo viviendo en Watts durante un largo período de tiempo? SI NO 3.1. Porque? SGURIDAD Y CONDICIONS D L BARRIO 4. Puede ver que su zona esta (circule uno) mejorando deteriorando sin cambio 5. Cuán seguro se siente en su barrio durante: Seguro/a Indeciso/a Inseguro/a 5.1 l Dia La Noche Cuál es el nivel actual de las siguientes actividades / lugares en Watts? Actividades/Lugares 6.1 Actividades Culturales (como museos/galerías, eventos de la comunidad) 6.2 Actividades Sociales (como noches familiares, bailar, compras, cenas) 6.3 Actividades físicas (como deportes, gimnasios, espacio para ejercicio) 6.4 Mercados (como tiendas locales con frutas/vegetales frescos) 6.5 spacios Naturales (como parques, jardines, áreas de recreo) 6.6 Calidad de el centro comercial 6.7 Actividades para unir la comunidad 6.8 OTROS (por favor, proporcione su propia respuesta): Hay Suficiente No Hay Suficiente No importa 7. Cuál es el nivel actual de los siguientes programas /informacion en Watts? Programas/Informaci n Hay Suficiente 7.1 ducacion Para la Salud/Prevencion de nfermedades 7.2 Información/ Programas sobre Compra de Hogar 7.3 Información/ Programas sobre mpezar propio negocio 7.4 Seguridad 7.5 Programas culturales/sociales/recreacionales 7.6 Cursos de escritura y lecture 7.7 Cursos de Lenguaje (como clases de ingles) 7.8 Programas de mentoria y academicos 7.9 OTROS (por favor, proporcione su propia respuesta) No Hay Suficiente No importa

85 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO Resident Needs Assessment PRIORIDADS DL BARRIO 8. Por favor marque ( ) los puntos de mas importancia en los siguientes cuadros. Actividades Fisicas _ Carriles para Bicicletas _ Parques y recreaciones _ Programs Deportivos Vivienda _ Vivienda Asequible _ Falta de Vivienda _ Mejoramiento al Hogar _ Ayuda/Derecho Para Renteros Transportacion _ Transportacion Publica _ stacionamiento _ Semaforos _ Transportacion Asequible Actividades Sociales _ Bailes _ Compras _ Restaurantes/Cafes sfuerzo de Leyes _ Infraestructura (zonificación) _ Seguridad _ Robos _ Homicidios Limpieza Comunitaria _ Calles _ Callejones/Vertido de la Basura _ Control de Animales _ Retiro de Grafiti mpleo _ Oportunidades de mpleo _ Oportunidades de ntrenamiento _ mpleo local Gobierno _ Concejo Comunitario _ Concejal de la Ciudad _ Gobierno statal/federal _ Grupos de Derecho en el Barrio Cultura _ ducacion de Arte _ Historia Local de Watts _ spacios para Arte Publico _ mbellecimiento de Murales DMOGRAFICAS 9. dad: 10. Sexo: (A) MASCULINO (B) FMNINO (C) OTRO: 11. tnica/raza: 12. status de Trabajo: (A) Tiempo Completo (B) Tiempo-Medio (C) Desempleado (D) Retirado () studiante 13. Ingreso Anual: 13.1 Ocupacion: 14. Idioma principal hablado en el hogar: 15. Vivienda: (A) RNTA (B) DUNO (C) OTRO: 16. Vive en un hogar con solo padre o madre? (A) SI (B) NO 16.1 Si tiene niños, # adultos: # niños: 16.2 Si tiene niños, que es su relación con ellos (por ejemplo, papa, abuela)? 17. Cuál fue el último año o grado en la escuela que ha completado? 18. status matrimonial: (A) Soltera/o (B) Casada/o (C) Viuda/o (D) Divorciada/o () OTRO:! "!

86 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO Resident Needs Assessment POSIBILIDADS PARA L BARRIO 19. Por favor responda SI o NO a las siguientes preguntas sobre Watts: Pregunta SI NO 19.1 Siente que su vecindario necesita mejora? 19.2 Participaría activamente en un intento de mejorar su comunidad? 19.3 Cree usted que la historia de Watts es interesante? 19.4 Cree usted que otros están interesados en la historia de Watts? 19.5 Daría la bienvenida a otra gente que no vive en Watts para venir a aprender sobre Watts? 19.6 Conoce más de un lugar para visitar en Watts? 19.7 Preferiría más empleos locales en Watts? 19.8 Le haría beneficio asistir juntas sobre como participar mas con el gobierno local? 19.9 Le haría beneficio asistir a juntas para aprender mas sobre el futuro de Watts y sus posibilidades? 20. Que le gusta de su comunidad? 21. Qué desafíos/problemas ve en su comunidad? 22. Tiene ideas sobre posibilidades para mejorar Watts? SI NO Si, cuales son? PARA RCIBIR MAS INFORMACION 23. Por favor responda si o no a las siguientes preguntas: 23.1 Desea más información sobre el studio Comunitario de Watts? SI NO 23.2 Gustaria participar en una junta para darnos mas informacion? SI NO Si si, cual es la mejor forma para contactarle (circule uno): TLFONO MAIL 24. Comentarios/preguntas/preocupaciones adicionales: tienes otras inquietudes o sugerencias para el área de Watts que desea proporcionar? GRACIAS!! "!

87 Resident Survey Results APPNDIX

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89 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO RSIDNT S NDS ASSSSMNT Survey created solely for the purposes to interview residents of Watts to discover more about their needs. Name: Address: City, State, Zip:! Total Number of Surveys Collected: 695 surveys total with 682 that responded Yes to living in Watts the others were confirmed by address provided Subarea 0* Frequency Percent *Did not provide address and/or area. LIF IN WATTS 1. Do you live in Watts? YS NO If yes, how long have you lived in Watts? 682 that responded Yes to living in Watts the others were confirmed by address provided. Response (years) <1 > 1 5 > 5 10 > > > > > Frequency Percent Do you like living in Watts? YS [483(74.31%)] NO [167(25.69%)] Like because: 2.1. Why? Dislike because:

90 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO Resident Needs Assessment 3. Do you see yourself living in Watts for a long time? YS [391(60.15%)] NO [259 (39.85%)] 3.1. Why? Yes, living for a long time because: No, not living for a long time because:! "!

91 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO Resident Needs Assessment SAFTY AND NIGHBORHOOD CONDITIONS 4. Do you see your area (A) improving [275(42.37%)] (B) deteriorating [108(16.64%)] (C) staying the same [265(40.83%)] Other [1(0.15%)] 5. How safe do you feel in your neighborhood during: Safe Undecided Unsafe 5.1 Daytime 130 (20.28%) 200 (31.20%) 311 (48.52%) 5.2 Nighttime 276 (43.73%) 183 (29.00%) 172 (27.26%) 6. What is the current level of the following activities/places in Watts? Activities/Places Good nough Not Good nough 6.1 Cultural Activities (like Museums/Galleries, Community vents, Public Art) 171 (25.3) 481 (71) 25 (3.7) 6.2 Social Activities (like Family Night Out Dancing, Shopping, Artwalk, Dine-in) 164 (24.3) 477 (70.8) 33 (4.9) 6.3 Physical Activities (like Sports, Gyms, Workout Classes, xercise Spaces) 218 (32.2) 429 (63.5) 29 (4.3) 6.4 Groceries (like Local grocery stores, fresh produce) 276 (40.3) 391 (57.1) 18 (2.6) 6.5 Green Space (like parks, community gardens, recreational areas) 263 (38.7) 397 (58.5) 19 (2.8) 6.6 Quality of local shopping center 222 (33.7) 417 (63.3) 20 (3.0) 6.7 Community Activities (for people to come together) 153 (23.7) 468 (72.6) 23 (3.6) 1 (0.2) *6.8 OTHR (please provide your own response) *6.8 OTHR (please provide your own response)* Don t Care! "!

92 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO Resident Needs Assessment 7. What is the current level of the following programs in Watts? Programs Good nough Not Good nough 7.1 Health ducation/preventive Care Programs 205 (30.4) 447 (66.3) 22 (3.3) 7.2 Homeownership Information/Programs 138 (20.4) 498 (73.4) 42 (6.2) 7.3 Business Ownership Information/Programs 126 (18.4) 510 (74.7) 47 (6.9) 7.4 Safety Training Programs 125 (18.4) 526 (77.3) 29 (4.3) 7.5 Cultural/Social/Recreational Programs 160 (23.6) 486 (71.7) 32 (4.7) 7.6 Reading and Writing Classes 144 (21.7) 484 (73.0) 35 (5.3) 7.7 Language Classes 169 (25.6) 458 (69.5) 32 (4.9) 7.8 Mentorship/Academic Programs 137 (21.0) 475 (73.0) 39 (6.0) *7.9 OTHR (please provide your own response) *7.9: OTHR (please provide your own response) Don t Care NIGHBORHOOD PRIORITIS 8. Please check ( ) the items that you find most important for each of the boxes. Physical Activities Housing Transportation Social Activities nforcement Neighborhood Cleanliness mployment Government Culture % 50% 50% 52% 54% 57% 65% 50% 52% PHYSICAL ACTIVITIS Q8.01 Bike Lanes Q8.02 Parks and Recreation Q8.03 Sports Programs Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Yes No /2001 = 60% Frequency Missing = 28 Frequency Missing = 28 Frequency Missing = 28 HOUSING Q8.04 Affordable Housing Q8.05 Homelessness Q8.06 Home Improvement Support Q8.07 Renters Rights Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Yes No /2664 = 50% Frequency Missing = 29 Frequency Missing = 29 Frequency Missing = 29 Frequency Missing = 29! "!

93 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO Resident Needs Assessment TRANSPORTATION Q8.08 Public Transportation Q8.09 Parking Availability Q8.10 Traffic Light Q8.11 Affordable Transportation Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Yes No /2659 = 50% Frequency Missing = 30 Frequency Missing = 31 Frequency Missing = 30 Frequency Missing = 30 SOCIAL ACTIVITIS Q8.12 Dancing Q8.13 Shopping Q8.14 Restaurants/Coffee Shops Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Yes No /2001 = 52% Frequency Missing = 28 Frequency Missing = 28 Frequency Missing = 28 NFORCMNT Q8.15 Infrastructure (zoning, streets) Q8.16 Safety Q8.17 Burglaries Q8.18 Homicides Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Yes No /2667 = 54% Frequency Missing = 28 Frequency Missing = 28 Frequency Missing = 28 Frequency Missing = 29 NIGHBORHOOD CLANLINSS Q8.19 Streets/Potholes Q8.20 Alleys/Trash Dumping Q8.21 Animal Control Q8.22 Graffiti Removal Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Yes No /2941 = 59% Frequency Missing = 30 Frequency Missing = 29 Frequency Missing = 30 Frequency Missing = 30 MPLOYMNT Q8.23 Access to mployment Q8.24 Job Re-Training Q8.25 Opportunities of Local Jobs Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Yes No /2000 = 65% Frequency Missing = 28 Frequency Missing = 29 Frequency Missing = 28 Q8.26 Neighborhood Council GOVRNMNT Q8.27 City Council Q8.28 State/Federal Government Q8.29 Support Groups for the Community Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Yes No /2665 = 50% Frequency Missing = 30 Frequency Missing = 29 Frequency Missing = 28 Frequency Missing = 28 CULTUR Q8.30 Arts ducation Q8.31 xposure to Local History Q8.32 Areas for Public Art Q8.33 Mural Projects Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Frequency Percent Yes No /2666 = 52% Frequency Missing = 29 Frequency Missing = 28 Frequency Missing = 28 Frequency Missing = 29! "!

94 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO Resident Needs Assessment DMOGRAPHICS 9. Age: Age >70 Frequency Percent Gender: (A) MAL (B) FMAL (C) OTHR: Gender Male Female Other Frequency Percent thnicity: thnicity African-American/Black Hispanic/Latino Other* Frequency Percent OTHR* Frequency Percent Other Asian Black/Mexican Creole Caucasian/White Hospite Hebrew Indian Israelite Mulatto Mixed Spanish Vietnamese mployment Status: (A) FULL-TIM (B) PART-TIM (C) UNMPLOYD (D) RTIRD () UDNT mployment Frequency Percent Status (A) Full Time (B) Part Time (C) Unemployed (D) Retired () Student (A) & (B) (A) & () (B) & (D) (B) & () accident ! "!

95 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO Resident Needs Assessment 13. Annual Household Income: (not able to be analyzed: respondents did not seem to want to respond and/or provide accurate/continuous numbers) 13.1 Occupation: 14. Primary language spoken at home: Language Spanish nglish Bilingual (Span/ng) Other* Frequency Percent Language-Other Chinese nglish/philippino Ghetto Spanish/Italian Vietnamese NA Frequency Percent Housing Status: (A) RNT (B) OWN (C) OTHR: Housing Status Rent Own Other* Frequency Percent *Other: Homeless (x2), Lease (x1), Live with parents (x1), Live with Son (x1), Mortgage (x1), Property (x1), Son owns home (x1) 16. Single parent/guardian household? (A) YS [285(47.50%)] (B) NO [315(52.50)] *Follow-up questions could not be analyzed 16.1 IF YS, # adults in the home: # of children in the home: 16.2 IF YS, what s your relationship to the child(ren)?! "!

96 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO Resident Needs Assessment 17. What was the last year/grade in school you completed? 494 Respondents Year/Grade Frequency Percent lementary Middle School High School Some College AA BA/BS Undergraduate GD/Adult School Graduate School Vocational/Trade Marital Status: (A) Single (B) Married (C) Widowed (D) Divorced () OTHR: Marital Status Single Married Widowed Divorced Other* Frequency Percent * married, but separated (x1), Catholic-nun (x1), co-habitant (x1), engaged (x1), free union (x1), in a relationship (x2), live together (x1), separated (x3), Z (x1) NIGHBORHOOD POSSIBILITIS 19. Please answer YS or NO to the following questions about Watts: Questions YS % NO% 19.1 Do you feel that your neighborhood needs improvement? Would you actively participate in an effort to improve your community? Do you think the history of Watts is interesting? Do you think others are interested in the history of Watts? Would you welcome other people who do not live in Watts to come learn about Watts? Do you know more than one place to visit in Watts? Would you prefer more local jobs in Watts? Would you benefit from trainings/workshops about how to get involved in local government? Would you benefit from a meeting to learn/share possible ideas about Watts and its future? What do you like about your community? Item 1 Services and Amenities 2 Nothing 3 Community Support 4 verything/general Improvement 5 Neighborhood s Improving 6 My Home/Grew Up/Family & Friends 7 Community Organizing 8 Centrally Located 9 Family Neighborhood 10 I like it! "!

97 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO Resident Needs Assessment 21. What challenges do you see in your community? Item 1 Violence/Dangerous 2 Gangs/Drugs 3 Dirty (need clean-up) 4 Unemployment/Jobs 5 Need Youth Programs 6 Racial Division/No unity 7 verything/general Improvement 8 Limited Resources 9 ducation 10 Need increased police 22. Do you have ideas on possibilities to improve your community? YS [143(53.36%)] NO[125(46.64%)] Item 1 Patrolling/Police 2 Community Organizing 3 Dirty/Need Clean-up 4 Violence/Dangerous 5 Need youth programs 6 Unemployment/Jobs 7 Services/Amenities 8 City or Local Gov t Improvement 9 Gangs/Drugs 10 conomic Development (fear of displacement) If so, what are they? FURTHR INFORMATION 23. Please answer YS or NO to the following questions: 23.1 Would you like further information about the Watts Community Studio? YS [391(59.97%)] NO [261(40.03)] 23.2 Would you like to participate in a discussion about this survey? YS [289(45.02)] NO [353(54.98)] If yes, please provide best way to contact you (circle one): PHON MAIL! "!

98 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO Resident Needs Assessment 24. Additional comments/questions/concerns: Do you have any other concerns or suggestions for the Watts area that you would like to provide? Item 1 Patrolling/Police 2 Dirty/Need Clean-up 3 Nothing 4 City involvement 5 Community Organizing 6 Youth Programs 7 Violence 8 Gangs/Drugs 9 Services 10 Street Improvement THANK YOU!! "#

99 Business Survey, nglish and Spanish APPNDIX F

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101 WATTS COMMUNITY UDIO SMALL BUSINSS SURVY Survey Administrator: Date: Business Name: Owner Name: Business Characteristics 1. How long have you been at your current location? a. Less than 1 year b. 1-2 years c. 2 5 years d years e. More than 10 years 2. How did you get started? What was the idea behind your business? 3. Did your business move from a different location? a. Yes b. No If yes, from what location? Why did you move? 4. Describe the products and/or services you offer. 5. Describe your customer/clients. 6. What language(s) do you speak with your customers? (circle all that apply) a. nglish b. Spanish c. Other: 7. Do you live in Watts? a. Yes b. No! "!

102 8. Do you lease or own your space? a. Lease b. Own 9. If lease, what is the remaining length of your lease, including lease extensions? a. Less than 3 years b. 3 5 years c years d. More than 10 years 10. Are you in touch with other business owners in Watts? mployment 11. Do you have any employees? If you do, how many? If you have no employees, skip to question What language(s) do you speak with your employees? (circle all that apply) a. nglish b. Spanish c. Other: 13. How do you find employees? Challenges 14. What are the top two problems facing your business? a. Competition from other small businesses b. Competition from big businesses c. Credit availability d. High taxes e. Labor costs f. Rising rent g. Rules and regulation h. Weak sales i. Other: 15. In the past 2 or 3 years, your sales have: a. Decreased b. Increased c. Stayed the same Why?! "!

103 16. In the next year, you expect your sales to: a. Decrease b. Increase c. Stay the same d. I don t know Why? 17. What are the top two disadvantages to being at your current location? a. Access to supplies for you business b. Crime rate c. Street cleanliness d. High traffic e. Lack of parking f. Lack of public transportation g. Not a major street h. Safety i. Other: 18. How would you improve the environment right outside your business? a. Clean sidewalk b. Improve buildings nearby c. Improve signage d. More trees e. Traffic improvements f. Other: 19. Are there advantages to being at your current location? If so, what are they? Planning 20. Do you have a plan for your business? If so, how far into the future do you plan your business? a. I do not have a plan b. 1 2 years ahead c. 3 5 years ahead d. Other: 21. Have you ever asked a bank for a loan for your business? a. Yes b. No If so, were you approved or denied? a. Approved b. Denied! "!

104 22. Are you aware of any business assistance programs? a. Yes b. No If yes, what programs? 23. Have you accessed these programs? What was your experience? 24. Do you have access to credit if your business needs additional financing? a. Yes b. No If yes, how? a. Business credit card b. Business line of credit c. Business loan d. Family and relatives e. Savings f. Other: 25. Do you plan on staying at your current location? a. Yes b. No 26. Do you plan on making additional investments in, or improvements to your business? a. Yes b. No If yes, what are you planning? Demographics 27. Gender: 28. Age: 29. thnicity/race: 30. Do you have children? If so, how many? 31. What is your current rent (per square foot)? 32. What was your annual revenue for last year? a. Less than $300,000 b. $300,000 - $500,000 c. $500,001 - $1,000,000 d. More than $1,000,000! "!

105 Neighborhood 33. Please rate the following neighborhood characteristics Banking services Neighborhood Aspect Good Fair Poor Affordability of rent Public transportation Parking Traffic Quality of streets, sidewalks and intersections Landscaping and trees Street lighting Storm drainage Garbage collection Cleanliness Safety Crime rate mployment opportunities Quality of housing I don't know Would you like to be contacted with the results of our local business research? If so, what is the best way to contact you? Are you interested in speaking with us more about these topics? Thank you!! "!

106 studio Comunitario de Watts NCUA PARA NGOCIOS PQUÑOS Nombre de ncuestador: Fecha: Características del Negocio Nombre del Negocio: Nombre del Dueño(a): 1. Cuánto tiempo ha estado en su ubicación actual? a. Menos de 1 año b. 1-2 años c. 2 5 años d años e. Más de 10 años 2. Cómo empezó su negocio? Qué ideas determinaron su negocio? 3. mpezó su negocio en un local distinto? a. Sí b. No Si se movió de otro lugar as su negocio actual cual fue la razón y de dónde se movió? 4. Describa los productos y/o servicios que ofrece. 5. Describa sus clientes. 6. n que idioma habla con sus clientes? a. Inglés b. spañol c. Otro idioma: 7. Vive usted en Watts? a. Sí b. No! "!

107 8. Renta o es dueño de su negocio? a. Renta b. Dueño 9. Si renta cuánto tiempo le falta en su contrato, por favor incluya extensiones? a. Menos de 3 años b. 3 5 años c años d. Más de 10 años 10. Se comunica usted con otros dueños de negocios en Watts? Trabajo 11. Tiene usted empleados? Si tiene empleados cuántos tiene? Si no tiene empleados, siga a la pregunta Si tiene empleados, qué idioma habla con ellos/ellas? a. Inglés b. spañol c. Otro idioma: 13. Si tiene empleados cómo encuentra empleados? Dificultades 14. Qué son las dos dificultades más importantes que enfrenta su negocio? a. Competencia entre negocios pequeños b. Competencia de negocios grandes c. Crédito d. Altos Impuestos e. Costo de los sueldos de sus empleados f. Aumento de la renta g. Reglamentos y regulaciones h. Ventas i. Otras razones: 15. n los últimos dos o tres años, sus ventas: a. Han bajado b. Han subido c. No han cambiado Por que?! "!

108 16. n el último año, usted espera que sus ventas: a. Suban b. Bajen c. Queden igual d. No sabe Por qué? 17. Cuáles son las dos dificultades en su área? a. Acceso a provisiones para usted negocio b. Crimen c. Limpieza de la calle d. Tráfico e. stacionamiento limitado f. Transporte público limitado g. No esta en una calle grande h. Seguridad i. Otras opciones: 18. Cómo se podría mejorar el área donde esta su negocio? a. Limpiar la banqueta b. Mejorar los locales en el área c. Mejorar los cartelones d. Más árboles e. Mejorar tráfico f. Otras opciones: 19. Hay ventajas de estar en su área? Si su respuesta fue sí cuáles son las ventajas? Planeación 20. Tiene usted un plan de negocios para su negocio? Si su respuesta fue sí cuánto tiempo tiene planeado para su futuro? a. No tengo plan b. 1 2 años en el futuro c. 3 5 años en el futuro d. Otras opciones: 21. Alguna vez le ha pedido un préstamo a un banco para su negocio? a. Sí b. No Si si, le negaron el préstamo? a. Préstamo b. Negaron! "!

109 22. sta informado sobre programas de asistencia para negocios? a. Sí b. No Si respondió sí cuáles son? 23. Ha recibido asistencia para negocios? Si su respuesta fue sí cuál fue su experiencia? 24. Tiene usted acceso a crédito si su negocio ocupa más dinero? a. Sí b. No Si su respuesta fue sí cuál es la forma de financiamiento? a. Tarjeta de crédito para negocios b. Línea de crédito comercial c. Préstamo para negocio d. Familiares o amigos e. Ahorros f. Otras opciones: 25. Planea usted mantenerse en su área? a. Sí b. No 26. Si su respuesta fue sí planea hacer más inversiones mejoras a su negocio? a. Sí b. No Si su respuesta fue sí qué está planeando? Demográficas 27. Sexo: 28. dad: 29. tnicidad/origen: 30. Tiene hijos? Si su respuesta fue sí cuántos? 31. Cuál es su renta actual (por pie cuadrado)? 32. Cuál fue su ingreso anual para el año pasado? a. Menos de $300,000 b. $300,000 - $500,000 c. $500,001 - $1,000,000 d. Mas de $1,000,000! "!

110 Barrio 33. Por favor califique las características de su barrio. Características Bien Justo Mal No sé Servicios del Banco Costo de la renta Transportación Publica stacionamiento Tráfico Calidad de las calles Naturaleza Iluminación de la calle Drenaje de aguas de tormenta Recolección de basura Limpieza Seguridad Crimen Oportunidades de Trabajo Calidad de alojamiento Gustaria saber los resultados de nuestra investigación? Si si, por favor dejenos saber la mejor forma de contactarle. staría interesado en hablar con nosotros acerca de estos temas? Gracias!! "!

111 Appendix G BUSINSS SURVY RSULTS 50 businesses completed the survey. 42 of the surveys were completed by small business owners. The other 8 were ecompleted by management or employees of chain businesses. The results below include only the responses of small business owners unless otherwise noted. Results are rounded to the nearest whole number. Questions are not in the order of the original survey; they are organized here in a thematic sequence for clarity.! Business, Location How long have you been at your current location? 42 responses Less than 1 year 2% 1-2 years 19% 2-5 years 17% 5-10 years 26% More than 10 years 36%!! Do you plan on staying at your current location? 40 responses Yes 100% No 0% Do you plan on making additional investments in, or improvements to your business? 39 responses Yes 85% No 15% If yes, what are you planning? 19 responses (open-ended, coded) Increase selection 7 xpand or improve capactiy 6 Remodeling 3 Marketing 3 Change selection of products 2 Install cameras 1 Do you live in Watts? 41 responses Yes 51% No 49%! APPNDIX G 1

112 Do you lease or own your space? 40 responses Lease 60% Own 40% If lease, what is the remaining length of your lease, including extensions? 22 responses Less than 3 years 45% 3-5 years 32% 5-10 years 5% More than 10 years 18% Did your business move from a different location? 42 responses Yes 33% No 67% If yes, from what location? Why did you move? 7 responses (open-ended, coded) From where From outside Watts 2 From within Watts 3 Why Bought property/moved 2 Improved location 2 conomy 1 How did you get started? What was the idea behind your business? 30 responses (open-ended, coded) What was the idea behind your business? Needed to provide for family, needed jobs/no work 10 Wanted to own my own business/work for myself 3 Personal talent or field interest 4 Family business 2 For the community 3 How did you get started? With money saved 2 Specific narrative 2 ducation 2 Started at home 2! 2 APPNDIX G!

113 Finances What was your annual revenue for last year? 29 responses Less than $300, $300,000 - $500,000 3 $500,000 - $1,000,000 3 More than $1,000,000 0 In the past 2 or 3 years, your sales have: 39 responses Decreased 64% Increased 15% Stayed the same 21% Why? 22 responses (open-ended, coded) Decreased 14 conomy 12 Competition 3 Gangs 1 Lack of parking 1 I don't know 1 Increased 2 Clients recommeneded me to others 1 I've been investing in the business 1 Stayed the same 5 conomy 3 Steady business 2 In the next year, you expect your sales to: 39 responses Decrease 5% Increase 56% Stay the same 8% I don't know 31%! APPNDIX G 3

114 Why? 22 responses Decrease 2 conomy 1 Compeition from street vendors 1 Increase 12 Planned improvements/investments 4 I want my business to do better 3 If it doesn't improve, I'll have to close 2 Demand for services 1 conomy 1 Businesses coming back to the area, gangs going away 1 Stay the same 2 conomy 1 Regulations 1 I don't know 6 Don't know if economy will improve 5 Don't know if I'll get more parking to improve sales 1 What are the top two problems facing your business? 34 responses Weak sales 38% High Taxes 29% Competition from other small businesses 24% Competition from big businesses 15% Credit availability 12% Rising rents 12% Rules and regulation 12% Labor costs 6% Other: Security/Need more police patrol (3 owners; 9% of respondents) Competition from street vendors (2 owners; 6% of respondents) 1 each: Bug infestation; high electricity bill; parking; marketing; nothing! 4 APPNDIX G!

115 What is your current rent (per square foot)? 16 responses Owners answered this question either with their rent per square foot, or with total rent. As such, the answers are not comparable to each other. With the low response rate, WCS cannot report the results to this question with confidence in the representative nature of the responses. Of the responses given, rent per square foot ranged from $1.00 to $7.00, and total rent ranged from $750 to $1,600. Planning Do you have a business plan for your business? If so, how far into the future do you plan? 39 responses I do not have a plan 45% 1-2 years ahead 24% 3-5 years ahead 26% Other (1 response): Be a bigger business with multiple locations Have you ever asked a bank for a loan for your business? 46 responses Yes 29% No 71% If so, were you approved or denied? 8 responses Approved 38% Denied 63% Are you aware of any business assistance programs? 40 responses Yes 5% No 95% If yes, what programs? 1 response SBA, Dept of Commerce, DA Have you accessed these programs? 1 response No! APPNDIX G 5

116 Do you have access to credit if your business needs additional financing? 42 responses Yes 33% No 67% If yes, how? 13 responses Business credit card 38% Business loan 23% Family and relatives 23% Savings 23% Business line of credit 15% Other (3 responses): Foundation; personal money and personal business contacts; bank and funders Demographics Gender 37 responses Female 20 Male 17 Age 36 responses or older 1 Race/thnicity 37 responses Asian American 8% Black or African American 14% Hispanic or Latino 76% White or Caucasian 3%! 6 APPNDIX G!

117 Do you have children? 37 responses Yes 34 No 3 If so, how many? 33 responses 1-2 children children children 4 Other Owners, Customers and mployees Are you in touch with other business owners in Watts? 39 responses Yes 49% No 51% Comments 10 responses (open-ended, coded) Yes 7 A little, very few 2 Sometimes 3 With businesses like mine 1 With businesses nearby 1 No 3 Not much, I'm too busy 2 I'm in touch with other people in the community 1 What language(s) do you speak with your customers? 48 responses, small business and chain Total 48 Responses Small Businesses 40 Responses Chain 8 Responses nglish and Spanish 90% 88% 100% nglish alone 8% 10% 0% Spanish alone 2% 3% 0% Other (Sign Language) 2% 3% 0%! APPNDIX G 7

118 Describe your customers/clients. 41 responses, small business and chain (open-ended, coded) Local vs. Non-local 10 Local 5 Mostly local, some from outside Watts 4 Customers mostly non-local 1 Race 13 Hispanics/Latinos and Black/African Americans 11 (within the above subset) Half Hispanic/Latino and half Black/African American 2 "All races" 1 Mostly Black customers 1 Descriptors 11 verybody, diverse 6 Families 2 Low-income 2 At-risk youth and adults out of prison (social assistance) 1 Descriptors, personal characteristics 10 Two each: Nice, Rude, Special One each: Attentive, Faithful, Good, Loyal, Rowdy, Upset easily, Violent Do you have any employees? 38 responses, small business and chain Total 38 Responses Small Businesses 33 Responses Chain 5 Responses Yes 66% 61% 100% No 34% 39% 0% If you do, how many? 22 responses, small business and chain Total 22 Responses Small Businesses 17 Responses Chain 5 Responses Less than 5 employees 68% 76% 40% 5-10 employees 9% 0% 40% employees 5% 6% 0% employees 9% 6% 20% "Family" 9% 12% 0%! 8 APPNDIX G!

119 What language(s) do you speak with your employees? 27 responses, small business and chain Total 27 Responses Small Businesses 20 Responses Chain 7 Responses nglish and Spanish 33% 25% 57% nglish alone 41% 40% 43% Spanish alone 26% 35% 0% How do you find employees? 22 responses, small business and chain Total 22 Responses Job seekers fill out applications or drop off resumes 5 They are family 5 Advertisements 3 Through a friend, or word of mouth 3 They visit or call the business looking for work 3 Community outreach 1 DD 1 Student trainees (Pharmacy program) 1 Neighborhood What are the top two disadvantages to being at your current location? 45 responses, small business and chain Total 45 Responses Small Businesses 40 Responses Chain 5 Reponses Safety 53% 54% 60% Crime rate 49% 46% 80% Lack of parking 33% 38% 0% Street cleanliness 29% 26% 60% Access to supplies for your business 9% 10% 0% High traffic 4% 5% 0% Not a major street 4% 5% 0% Lack of public transportation 0% 0% 0% Other (8 respondents, 10 responses): Bad publicity; reputation of community to the outside world; lack of visibility to larger community; competition; competition from street vendors; cleanliness; nearby liquor store; gangs; lack of assistance from the police; I m not sure why businesses on this block fail! APPNDIX G 9

120 How would you improve the environment right outside your business? 42 responses, smal business and chain Total 42 Responses Small Businesses 36 Responses Chain 6 Responses Clean sidewalk 60% 54% 67% Improve buildings nearby 43% 41% 33% Improve signage 21% 18% 33% More trees 14% 13% 17% Traffic improvements 12% 13% 0% Increased police patrol, regulation of crime or removal of gangs 12% 14% 0% Other (4 responses): Create a more friendly environment; inspections of sreet cleanliness and businesses; crosswalk; more people Are there advantages to being at your current location? 34 responses, small business and chain Total 34 Responses Small Businesses 31 Responses Chain 3 Responses Yes 79% 77% 100% No 21% 23% 0% If so, what are they? 20 responses, small business and chain High traffic 7 Far from other businesses (no competition) 4 Close to a school or church 3 Close to a park 3 We have regulars, the community know us 2 Close to the Metro 1 Near other businesses 1 Near parking 1 The majority of the neighborhood know each other as family 1 We have clients of different races 1! 10 APPNDIX G!

121 Appendix H COMMUNITY ASST MAPPING Description Community asset mapping is an engagement tool that encourages participants to identify the spatial locations of the resources and strengths within predetermined geographic boundaries in or around their neighborhood or community. Two asset mapping exercises took place throughout the duration of the Watts Community Studio project. The two community asset mapping sessions were composed of young people from Inspire Youth Academy High School and Summer Youth mployment Program participants. Methods Depending on the objective of the mapping session, emphasis can be geared toward identifying assets within a specific topic area. For the asset mapping sessions conducted in Watts, a community asset was predefined as a quality, person or thing that is a resource or of value for the neighborhood. Within that definition was the three-level framework for asset identification using the following definition: Level 1 Gifts, skills and capacities of individuals in Watts Level 2 Organizations or networks where local people unite for a common purpose Level 3 Institutions in the community such as educational centers, medical facilities, service providers and local government agencies. The introductory session focused on the concepts of geospatial tools and how basic geospatial analysis works. Using free accounts with Google Collaborative applications, youth participating in the asset mapping sessions were shown how to create live basic digital maps complete with links and information for the locations identified as assets. Identifying the assets was a process that included scanning the neighborhood on foot or via car, reflecting on places highly frequented by participants for positive activities and discussion about these assets and the impact they have, and creating a basic digital map with accurate spatial designations for asset sites. Participants Two groups of youth ranging from ages 14 to 20 participated in multiple asset mapping sessions in Watts over the 2013 summer. The first group was composed of students participating in a civic engagement course at the Inspire Academy high school. Of the student participants, only two individuals self-identified as being very familiar with Watts, while the other student participants lived in different communities. The other group of young people that participated in an asset mapping exercise was the Summer Youth mployment Program (SYP) participants that worked as survey administrators for the Watts Community Studio. These youth were raised in the community and had a deeper knowledge of the geography.! APPNDIX H 1

122 Session I September 2013 Inspire Youth Academy High School Fig. 1 The majority of the youth from the Inspire Academy High School did not self-identify as being from Watts or familiar with Watts. Two students from the session were familiar with Watts and identified as residents of the neighborhood. On foot, the students were accompanied by adults and conducted field work around the area where Inspire Academy is located on 103 rd Street and Compton Avenue. Notable assets included schools, the Blue Line Metro Station, bus stops, and the Bougainvillea Community Garden. As one of the students observed the assets during fieldwork and reflected on what are some of the commonly unseen sites within in Watts, she stated the following: I look at Watts as art. It s art because of the Watts Towers, because of the graffiti artists that make beautiful drawings. The Watts Towers Art Center hosts lectures, jazz festivals and art classes. People make music videos in this neighborhood and get tattoos of the Towers. Look around and you see art everywhere The students were able to document and describe how art in Watts is a meaningful asset to the entire community.! 2 APPNDIX H

123 Session II September 2013 Summer Youth mployee Program, Watts Community Studio Fig. 2 Participants from the SYP/WCS brought an inherently different lens into the asset mapping session exercise. These youth had spent four weeks canvassing the neighborhood on foot soliciting residents and small businesses for survey participation. Additionally, all the SYP/WCS youth were from Watts and had spent significantly more time in the community than the Session I participants. Utilizing their Watts knowledge, experience from WCS surveying and ride-alongs, the Session II youth plotted points they identified as being assets in Watts. Similar to the Session I youth, assets were concentrated along Compton Avenue and the103 rd Street intersection and the Watts Towers. Session II participants identified medical facilities, educational institutions and non-profit organizations as assets. Session II participants took special notice of the religious institutions that exist in Watts and reflected o on the impact they have in the community. They also noticed a local pharmacy that has served the community for over 20 years and added that they saw the housing developments as assets. In the description for the Jordan Downs Housing Development, one youth noted the following: Jordan Downs is an asset in the community because it s an affordable place to live -even if you don't have money, they accept benefits and they have schools nearby.! APPNDIX H 3

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125 Maps APPNDIX I Boundaries Council District 15 Neighborhood Council Neighborhood Council Areas Census Tracts About Watts Income Tenure Year Household Moved In Business Locations

126

127 CITY COUNCIL DIRICT 15, LOS ANGLS WATTS AND CD15 BOUNDARIS Watts Community Studio aims to affect City-directed policy and planning. As such, WCS analyzed secondary data and survey responses from within City boundaries, which coincide with CD15 boundaries pictured above. CITY COUNCIL DIRICT BOUNDARIS, LOS ANGLS City Council District 15 boundary map acquired through the City Council Redistricting Commission ( Map of all City Council Districts acquired through the Los Angeles County GIS Data Portal (

128 LIN LM BLU HN BL- 93RD 95TH CROSUS PL 96TH MAI 96TH 1100 PL 98TH 99TH PL 99TH BLVD 101 PL 104TH MARY 105TH 107TH 108TH TH ANFORD 109TH 110TH ANTWRP 111TH 112TH GRAHAM 113TH MAI PARML ZAMORA CLOVIS 1600 DILLON ROBIN LOU 118TH 118TH LYNWOOD LAURL PL BLVD BAUDIN P 2700 TOP FIRON LDN RR 89TH PZ TH WILLOW WILLOW PL GLNWOOD 90TH MAI 91 ZAMORA PL PL MINR S S COMPTON GLNWOOD SOUTHRN ND IOWA 9200 BLVD IOWA ILLINOIS 93RD 94TH JUNIPR 94TH MTRO 94T H ILLINOIS OHIO 95TH 95TH WADSWORTH FIRTH OHIO KANSAS 9500 ANFORD KANSAS MISSOURI 96TH LAURL KALMIA HICKORY GRAP ANZAC WILMINGTON 9500 GRAHAM BANDRA MISSOURI ANFORD TRUBA INDIANA 97TH PARML BAIRD PL VRS ANTWRP PAC INDIANA 2600 NBRASKA S DFIANC 99TH MCKINLY 9800 NBRASKA LAURL BACH HOLMS TWDY 100TH BLVD ALAMDA PROJCT CNTURY ZAMORA BLVD TRUBA WISCONSIN GRAP ANZAC WISCONSIN 102ND COURTNY JUNIPR 102ND 102ND SUCCSS ANFORD RD WADSWORTH 103RD ANSLMO SQUOIA PL 103RD 103RD PL 104TH DR TH RD SQUOIA S BANDRA HOLMS BACH SAN KIMBRLY TH ANFORD MONTARA 105TH PL ZAMORA ZAMORA SMINOL CLOVIS DOLORS SANTA F W 106TH ALAMDA 106TH ANTWR P PARML PSCADRO PAC JUNIPR GRAHAM DILLON H FIRT107TH GRAND ZAMORA MARTIN LUTHR WIGAND HICKORY WADSWORTH S CNTURY CNTURY JR BL KING BLVD GORMAN SANTA 900 LOU BLVD (MARTIN KING 108TH JUNIPR ANA TH CROSUS PL WATTS KALMIA 109TH PL LN 110TH SANTA WILLOWBROOK LORRAIN MONA BLVD GRAP CNTRAL PL ANZAC HOOPR 110TH 111TH ANA F S 111TH RR DRURY CAPIRANO 111TH SANTA NORTON N BLVD PL 111TH SLATR LANZIT POPLAR TH UP LOS 112TH S 111TH PL DR FLORS PL LOS 112TH CT WILMINGTON 112TH TH BL ALAMO GRANT 113TH MONITOR 113TH OAKWOOD BLLINGR P NN FRNWOOD WATTS 114TH G ORMAN 114TH COMPTON ALVARO BLHN FRANKLIN 114TH GRAP HOOPR IMPRIAL 114TH 115TH S HWY 115TH VRS PL 115TH 115TH S FRNWOOD 115TH CROSUS IMPRIAL GRAND S HWY MTRO GRN LIN AL VARO GLNN BLLHN PHILADLPHIA WY 10 TRANSIT WY TH S 117TH S RDWOOD DPUTY YAMAMOTO 9 ALAMDA PL MONA HARMAN FRWY) PLUM 117TH PL 117TH PAR GORMAN FRANKLIN CROSUS HUGO PARML ALAMDA INDURY WILLOWBROOK MTRO BLU LIN CLOVIS PL BANDRA HOLMS SUCCSS ALABAMA SLATR BLHN ANFORD BLLINGR ANTWRP RIC GARCTTI MAYOR WATTS NIGHBORHOOD COUNCIL DPARTMNT OF NIGHBORHOOD MPOWRMNT CITY OF LOS ANGLS GARY L MOOR, P.. CITY NGINR Pacific Ocean SOUTH ARA COUNCIL DIRICT: 15 WATTS NC CRTIFID: 12/03/2002 Department of Neighborhood mpowerment (213) or dial Watts NC Police Station Fire Station Library Park Water Freeway Street LA City Boundary NOT TO SCAL Copyright 2013 City of Los Angeles Prepared by :\BO\GIS MAPPING DIVISION : 11/2013 This shall not be copied or reproduced, all or any part thereof, whether for distribution or resale, without the prior written permission of the CITY NGINR WADSWORTH Streets Copyright 2008 Rand McNally & Co.

129 WATTS NIGHBORHOOD COUNCIL PLANNING ARAS The Watts Neighborhood Council area is divided into 10 areas to ensure geographic representation on the council. Watts Community Studio used these geographies to organize survey administration in order to ensure geographic representation in survey responses. COUNCILMAN JO BUSCAINO

130 CNSUS TRACTS, WATTS As mentioned earlier, Watts Community Studio focused on Watts within City boundaries in order to affect City-directed policy and planning. The Census Tracts highlighted below correspond to Watts within City boundaries, and CD15 boundaries. They were used in collecting secondary data about Watts. COUNCILMAN JO BUSCAINO

131 !"23,'"()!"*+,)-&."/01' *=78)=,">1+!"#$%&'"()!"#$%&'()*+,-&./- (">0:7+':"()!"#$%&#""" (:,):">,:"/01'!"#$%&#'"" A&:5:7">1+ A&:,'++">1+!"#$%&%%"" 678+&9:0";<. ("*+,)&:0">1+!"#$%&%"""!"#$%&%!""!"#$%&%'""!"#$%&%$"" INCOM!"#$%&%#"" Less than $10,000 $10,000-$14,999 $15,000-$24,999 $25,000-$34,999 $35,000-$49,999 $50,000-$74,999 $75,000-$99,999 $100,000-$149,999 $150,000-$199,999 $200,000 or more

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134 !"##$%&'()*+,-*,,.%/(0(#$!"##$%&'()*+,-*,,.%/(0(#$!"##$%&'()*$ +(,&)"-#$.-)/!"##$%&'()*$ +(,&)"-#$.-)/!-00*$1(2"&) 3(20()$%&*( 4-)5(2!-00*$1(2"&) 3(20()$%&*( 4-)5(2 +-)/6-, +"55#($176&&# +-)/6-, +"55#($176&&# 8&)5-2 9"'6$176&&# 8&)5-2 9"'6$176&&#!("'-25$:;(2<( =#(,(20-)>$176&&#!("'-25$:;(2<( =5<7-0"&2$3(20() 8&)5-2$B&C2* %(7)(-0"&2$3(20() 8&)5-2$B&C2* %(7)(-0"&2$3(20() D"2(0>$1"06$10)((0 =#(,(20-)>$176&&# D"2(0>$1"06$10)((0 =#(,(20-)>$176&&# F,G()"-#$3&<)0* %(7)(-0"&2$3(20() F,G()"-#$3&<)0* %(7)(-0"&2$3(20()!-00*$H"##-'( :)0*$3(20()!-00*$H"##-'( :)0*$3(20() I#<($J"2( +(0)&$10-0"&2 I#<($J"2( +(0)&$10-0"&2 =$3(20<)>$I#;5 =$LA25$10 =$??A06$10 F,G()"-#$9C> 3&,G0&2$:;( 1$3(20)-#$:;( 1$!"#,"2'0&2$:;( 4)-6-,$:;( 4)-25(($:;( 1-20-$:2-$I#;5 1$:#-,(5-$10!"##&CN)&&/$:;( 12345%6'7#8-9%:;9 studio Comunitario de Watts Watts Com munity Studio!"#$!%&'($)*"+),#-!(%$"

135

136 Watts Community Studio would like to thank the following people, organizations and offices: Councilman Joe Buscaino Advancement Project Alma Reaves Woods, Watts Library Bethel MBC of South Los Angeles Charles Mingus Youth Arts Center & Watts Towers Arts Center Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science Community Health Councils, Inc. Community Police Advisory Board, Southeast Community Relations Office ast Side Riders Bike Club Gang Reduction Youth Development Program, Summer Night Lights Human Relations Commission Inspire Research Academy Instituto de ducacion Popular del Sur de California Los Angeles Department of Public Works Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Los Angeles Food Policy Council Los Ryders Bike Club Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Hospital Pioneers of Watts Saint Lawrence of Brindisi Catholic Church San Miguel Catholic Church UCLA Labor Center Watts Business Association Watts Gang Task Force Watts Labor Community Action Committee Watts Neighborhood Council Kaiser Permanente, Watts Counseling and Learning Center Watts/Century Latino Organization WorkSource Yo! Watts

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