Special Project Fund FINAL REPORT

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Special Project Fund FINAL REPORT"

Transcription

1 Special Project Fund FINAL REPORT Date Proposal Approved by Community Initiative October 6, 2017 Date Report Submitted June 30, 2018 Organization s Legal Name Project Name Project Contact (Dr./Ms./Mr.) Los Rios Foundation Foster Youth Planning Grant Dr. Victoria C. Rosario Telephone Office: Mobile: Address Address Web Address Report Dates: Entire term of grant (mm/dd/yyyy) to (mm/dd/yyyy) Los Rios Community College District 1919 Spanos Court Sacramento, CA October 2, June 30, 2017 GUIDELINES FOR FINAL REPORT We are interested in learning about your experiences from this grant and asks that you be candid, reflective, and succinct in this final report. Your report may include additional information and may disregard questions that do not apply to your grant. If you have any questions about this report, please contact your assigned contact at Community Initiatives. Project goals, objectives, activities, and outcomes. Please review your original proposal and describe whether the proposed activities, goals, and objectives were met, and what outcomes were achieved as a result. Please state clearly, whether you did or did not meet individual performance goals. Note any unanticipated challenges and what you did in response. If you were unable to accomplish a specific outcome, please explain why. In addition to discussing individual performance measures, please provide a contextual discussion of overall project progress. 4b. Goals and Positive Changes 1. Program Planning to outline a strategic direction to support college-aged foster youth. Los Rios Community College District Work Plan 4c. Key Activities 4d. Partners Resource Needs Within 30 days of receipt of funding: Evaluate existing services and identify gaps per best practices. Hire one classified staff to oversee planning activities. Los Rios District Office American River College Cosumnes River College Folsom Lake College Sacramento City College SPA (TEMP) $14.93hr X 8hr X 72 days = $9,116 (includes benefits) Status: Fully Met. On October 16, 2017 a final internal assessment report was prepared for our Board of Trustees. The report presents a comprehensive analysis of the existing services and resources available for our colleg foster youth and homeless youth student population. It is informed by data and is the result of the work by key stakeholders including administrative leads, staff, and faculty. The liaisons to these special populations were convened to discuss the existing services available. Further data was collected and collated by the District s Office of Institutional Research. While efforts were made to screen applicants to support the oversight of this planning grant, timing was such that we were unable to secure new temporary staff. As such, existing staff was reassigned to administer this planning grant and fulfill the objectives herein. A request was made, and subsequently approved, to amend the budget accordingly. (6/2/15)

2 2. Strengthen engagement efforts at the District and campus level to secure stakeholder buy-in and program sustainability. (6/2/15) Special Project Fund FINAL REPORT Within 60 days of receipt of funding: Form an Advisory Group composed of campus stakeholders to coordinate implementation strategies for services. Assess unintentional student barriers/obstacles. Schedule professional development opportunity for faculty/staff to better understand the emotional/legal needs of FY. Support campus liaisons to attend a professional conference focused on foster youth. Develop inter-departmental protocol to better serve foster youth. Designate a point-of-contact person at key departments to whom FY can be referred. Representatives to be included from the following offices/departments: o Admissions o Financial Aid o EOPS o o o o o o o o Counseling Services Disabled Students Programs and Services (DSPS) TRIO programs Academic Advising Instructional Faculty Foster Youth CalWORKs Other equity-minded programs as needed FY Conferences-- $ each X 2 staff = $3,203 Status: Fully met. An Advisory Group comprised of college and district personnel was established to include representation from faculty, administration, and support staff from various program areas including admissions, counseling, financial aid, CalWORKs, Human Resources, Institutional Research, and EOPS. The team conducted a SWOT analysis to identify opportunities to improve the college experience for our foster youth and developed a Logic Model of key program components. Representatives from the four colleges attended the 2018 California Foster Youth Ed Summit held in Pomona, April 8, The conference provided training to address critical issues related to foster youth education. Presentations by subject matter experts provided a forum for learning, collaboration, and networking to improve disparate educational outcomes for youth in foster care. Colleges discussed at length mechanisms for improving referrals from other program areas to foster youth leads. There are points of contact at each campus to which students can be referred for foster youth case management: ARC: Caitlyn Spencer; CRC: Aselia Valadez; FLC: Sharisse Estomo; SCC: Irma Rodriguez. 3. Create and sustain partnerships with community-based organizations and regional partners to strengthen the recruitment and referral process for college-going foster youth students. Within 90 days of receipt of funding: Form an Advisory Group to identify community resources and opportunities for coordination Consult with colleges outside of the LRCCD that have more established programs and processes. Invite community-based organizations and agencies to the campuses to participate in events/activities specific to the population. Identify outreach assistance strategies. Establish new partnerships, and renew and strengthen existing relationships to garner valuable resources for students, such as refurbished laptops, and school supplies. Establish presence at county meetings & legislative hearings regarding funding and support for FY initiatives. Develop a pipeline of resources/information for faculty/staff and external partners. Link colleges to identified ILP programs. Sacramento County Office of Education Sacramento County Child Welfare Office Sacramento County Probation Department THP-Plus providers Independent Living Programs (ILP) Sacramento State University Sierra College Butte College University of California Davis Foster Youth Education Fund Sacramento CASA John Burton Advocates for Youth Advisory Group Monthly Meetings (food and materials) $170 each X 5 meetings = $850

3 (6/2/15) Special Project Fund FINAL REPORT Status: Fully Met. An External Partner Directory was established and two external meetings were held. Representatives from various community based and county agencies were invited to participate from : Aspirant, Butte College, CDE, Children s HOPE FFA, CSU Sacramento, El Dorado County Office of Education, Environment Alternatives, Foster Awareness Network, Foster Youth Education Fund, John Burton Advocates for Youth, Lutheran Social Services, New Morning Youth & Family Services, Sacramento CASA, Sacramento County Child Welfare, Sacramento County Office of Education, Sacramento County Probation Department, Sacramento County Special Education Local Area Plan, Sierra College, and UC Davis. One of the two meetings allowed for an exchange between the external partners and college foster youth leads. The dialogue was rich and robust and resulted in a better understanding of the agencies represented, and the services provided by the colleges. External partners helped establish a road map, discussed data sharing opportunities, and informed a SWOT analysis. Members also participated in the development of the Logic Model, reflected and presented foster youth program goals from their perspective and helped to map the student experience from their K-12 enrollment through their identification by county agencies and private service providers to higher education. 4. Data Sharing to streamline the identification of prospective foster youth students and transmit essential data to provide targeted wrap-around services. Within 150 days of receipt of funding: Better understand how foster youth are identified/verified. Explore the exchange of data between LRCCD and CDSS. Collect population data, placing importance on the following data: o Foster youth (FY) on each campus o New and continuing FY students o Rate of retention o Student G.P.A.s o Units attempted and completed o Degree, certificate or transfer counts o Priority registration counts o Pell/Cal/Chafee Grants or BOG Fee Waiver recipients o Academic probation counts o Referrals made o How students hear about the program Establish a standardized protocol for identifying and verifying foster youth across all four colleges. California Department of Social Services (CDSS) Sacramento County Health and Social Services Status: Partially met. The data sharing discussion was rich and robust. It is a complicated system with a variety of data sources and documentation verifying foster youth: o Higher Education: California Community Colleges Chancellors Office Data Mart, CCC-Apply, CalPass, FAFSA, CHAFEE, Priority Registration, Self-identification. o K-12: Letter of Verification (dependency letter), Court liaison at court, LCFF Foster Youth definition. o County Child Welfare: CWS, CMS (data system to identify foster youth), o Child Protective Services: Transition Independent Living Plan (TILP), County Letter of Dependency, 390 documents (letter of dependency, birth certificate, social security number). o Housing Services Provider: EA 135 o Probation: Foster Care Eligibility Letter, Letter of Dependency. o Advocates: Foster Care Verification form, ILP, access CWS/CMS. o Mental Health: unknown. Colleges are clear on how to identify foster youth through our computer systems. The challenge lies with the types of evidence student present to verify their eligibility for services. Work needs to continue to streamline this.

4 (6/2/15) Special Project Fund FINAL REPORT A research report was prepared by the Office of Institutional Research in January The report focuses on foster youth from the time of Fall first census. It provides insights into the demographics, socioeconomic status and the educational goals of this population at the four Los Rios colleges. 5. Evaluation Plan to support continuous process improvements. Within 180 days of receipt of funding: Gather data on student needs. Understand campus climate via focus groups and surveys. Conduct institutional research to analyze foster youth performance and completion trends. LRCCD Office of Institutional Research ARC Foster Youth Program CRC Enriched Scholars Program FLC Fostering Success Program SCC Fostering Futures Outreach & Retention for Educational Success/Transfer Stipends to each College (materials and food for student focus groups)-- $180 each college X 4 colleges = $720 Status: Fully met. Four focus groups were conducted in collaboration with institutional research at each of the four colleges. A local protocol was developed based on the webinar materials presented in the California College Pathways document entitled, From Their Lips to Your Ears: Using Focus Groups to Inform Campus Support Program Design. The purpose of the focus groups was to create an evaluation plan to support continuous process improvements through gathering data on student needs and understanding campus climate. Transcripts from approximately students were analyzed and the Office of Institutional Research prepared a summary report in May A previous research brief was prepared in August 2017 that included the following outcomes: units attempted, grade point average, course success rates, and persistence. The data reveal significant gaps in the performance of foster youth compared to all LRCCD students. 1. Lessons Learned. Describe the key lessons learned (a) during this grant period, and (b) during the project as a whole. Identify the critical factors that promoted and/or inhibited the successful implementation of the grant. Add any other activities or successes achieved, in addition to those outlined in the proposal. Indicate what changes you would make if you were to do this work again. We were successful with this planning project because we outlined a strategic direction in support of foster youth that addresses the disparity in college-going and completion rates, and we carried the work associated with that plan. We engaged members of the college community as well other educational and communitybased organizations, through the Advisory Groups, in a dialogue that was focused on better identifying, referring, and enrolling college-aged foster youth. As a result, we explored opportunities for a data exchange that supports our effort and we engaged our foster youth on our campuses to involve them in the development of our project and help us better understand the barriers they face. All of these activities were instrumental in the successful execution of this planning grant. As the planning process was centered around the development of a Logic Model, college personnel were able to approach the planning process is a strategic and coordinated way. The resulting needs, inputs, assumptions and outputs were applied to the CAFYES grant, and most recently was a process encouraged for the development of a Veterans Resource Center grant. The collection of student input was invaluable in terms of creating programs and services that are responsive to student needs. And by engaging foster youth students in these focus groups, they learned the value of and importance of connecting with and engaging eachother for support. In summary, our lessons learned are: Collaboration and coordination with our community partners is critical to program sustainability. Communication and dialogue across the colleges is essential to identifying critical needs, reducing overlap, and capitalizing on the strengths of our individual campuses. Resources for planning are vital to strategic planning and allowed these cross functional dialogues that might

5 Special Project Fund FINAL REPORT not have taken place without them. Leveraging the learning from this planning grant allowed Los Rios to be successful in the state Chancellor s Office CAFYES grant process. 2. The Future. Describe whether the project will continue, how it will be funded and any expected changes to the project design. The colleges were successful in being funded by the State Chancellors Office. As this was a short-term planning grant, attention is now being directed to the implementation of the CAFYES grant. 3. Expenditure Report Current Project Budget. Review the project budget and report actual expenditures for this final report. (6/2/15)

6 Los Rios Community College District Foster Youth Planning Grant -Evidentiary Documents- June 15, 2018 Prepared by Dr. Victoria C. Rosario

7 FOSTER YOUTH PLANNING GRANT MEETING CALENDAR Meeting 1: Internal Stakeholders Advisory Group (College Leads only) February 2, :00 pm-4:30 pm/do Meeting 2: External Partners Advisory Group (with College Leads) February 28, :00 pm-2:30 pm/do Meeting 3: Internal Stakeholders Advisory Group (with College Leads) March 13, :00 pm-4:30 pm/do Meeting 4: External Partners Advisory Group (External Partners only) March 16, :00 pm-2:30 pm/do Meeting 5: Internal Stakeholders Advisory Group (with College Leads) April 4, :00 pm-4:30 pm/do

8 External Partners Directory Name Organization Phone Number Address Sheila Silan El Dorado County Office of (530) Foster Youth Education Liasion Education Dr. Ed Manansala El Dorado County Office of (530) County Superintendent of Schools, EDCOE Education Jeanne Martin Foster Awareness Network (FAN) (530) Jessica Belcher Foster Youth Launch Facilitator Valeri Garcia Guardian Scholars Program Advisor Alex Hill Guardian Scholars Program Coordinator Flo Charlie Guardian Scholars Program for former foster youth Program Coordinator Karen Micalizio Inspiring Scholoars Vance Edwards Inspiring Scholars, Program Coordinator Susan Roberts Inspiring scholars, Trish Kennedy Sacramento County Foster Youth Services Director Crystal Burns Transition Age Youth Coordinator & Senior Case Supervisor Laura Brown Outreach Coordinator Shawna Valverde Clinical Program Manager New Morning Youth & Family (530) Services UC Davis (530) CSU, Sacramento (916) Sierra College (916) Butte College (530) Butte College (530) Butte College (530) Sacramento County Office of Education (916) Sacramento CASA (916) Foster Youth Education Fund (916) Children s Receiving Home of Sacramento-Independent Living Program (916) x1014 Alexis W. Peters Aspiranet Heidi Hysmith Children's Hope FFA Anna Garrison Environmental Alternatives Shawn Gonzalez Lutheran Social Services Debbie Mia Stizzo Foster youth Education Task Force

9

10 SWOT ANALYSIS Helpful to achieving the objective Harmful to achieving the objective Internal Origin (attributes of the environment) External Origin (attributes of the environment) Strengths: Motivated Increase level of pride Increase level of maturity Adaptability Street smarts Increased level of life experience Resilience Thick skin Fights (good kind) Desire for connection and belonging Resourceful Survival skills now Self-reliant Hidden leaders Opportunities: District coordination Consistency Creating supports from front door to exit Knowing resources Counseling and advising Case management Follow-up is needed: - Academics - Personal Provide a space for students Peer support Study place after hours Alumni Financial resources Employability skills Soft skills Values inventory Peer/peer outreach (Some are) parents Life skills: inter-personal History of trauma Lack of knowledge of self-values Food insecurity Psych/Cognitive Lack of trust L.D. Hard exterior/soft interior Vulnerable Transient Easily frustrated Emotional scars Lack of support Fearful Lost Weaknesses: No self-identity Angry, tired of process Mental health concerns Trauma Nervous Lack of family/social capital Dependent Lack of cultural understanding Overwhelmed by system Housing support needed Hurt Challenge with keeping meaningful relationships Threats: Inconsistent support Not knowing how to access resources Stigma of Foster Youth Lack of knowledge of educational opportunities

11 Serving Foster Youth Logic Model Template NEEDS INPUTS ASSUMPTIONS OUTPUTS OUTCOME MEASURES SHORT-TERM (1-3 YRS) Clarity Address the needs of a growing population How large is FY pop. In our geographic footprint? How do we define FY? Shared responsibility Address needs of DI pop. To find success in education Poor FY educational outcomes Communication For community & CBO it would help for us to uniform things Clear boundaries between county/social vs college roles Bridge gap between K-12 & community college Increase CC understanding Institutionalized Program Professor development for faculty Support start to finish Identified space like Vet Center so all CBO & CO can come on campus Special circumstance petition (little more leniency) Understand each helper s role & where they are on support / responsibility pathway Dedicated college: financial aid, counseling Have adjunct counselor that FY can go to Clear & concise pathway / program guidelines College going culture w/ public agencies Student Focus Greater joy Improved student outcomes Reduce dropouts Better problem solving skills Retain students Reduce time with challenging students Transition to employment Increase graduation & transfer rate Stronger alumni culture Institutional Identify the student journey Increased customercentric organization Training exchange Better programming (support education) At least 1 FTE for each program Safe Space / Communication A space for our students More staffing A safe place & community Eliminate negative notion of moving from one program to another program Build stronger connections with the business community Safety nets in place Increase awareness of FY/TAY experience and increase sensitivity, equity Open communication between colleges and social workers (I.e. FFA & county) Institution prepared to MEDIUM- TERM (3-5 YRS) LONG-TERM (5 YRS +) 1

12 NEEDS INPUTS ASSUMPTIONS OUTPUTS OUTCOME MEASURES of this unique promising community Have more communication between agencies More connection between county agencies before students get to college level County CBO CC increase communication & shared case management County community based Org. CC Communication increase. Students High high school dropout rates Get them involved to share their voice Access to high education Increase college doing & completion rates Safe stable housing Help FY get clarity, resources to develop their future Decrease homelessness Staffing for outreach Point person in each department Direct bridge for establishing Educational accommodations (DSPS) Streamlined DSPS intake & assistance w/ gathering the documentation More staff to help students Program Supports Funding for books, transport, food & emergencies On-site domestic violence counselors / workshops Connecting to quality tutoring Support club & space Create TAY community experience Additional educational / career counseling Peer mentors Community mentors Extended counseling & coaching for students Triage on front end Increase mentors Central point of access receive FY FY feel welcomed Send message we see you, we know what you need & what we need to do to serve you better Data Accurate data Keep data current Using Cal Pass to track data Aggregate v. individual Improved Student Experience Clear pathway to education Better quality of life as a result of education Enhancing students social capital Helping students find their future Make FFY job ready, liveable wage Educational Outcomes Improved retention, completion Increase: GPA, retention, course success, graduation 2

13 NEEDS INPUTS ASSUMPTIONS OUTPUTS OUTCOME MEASURES Decrease steps TAY have to go through to enroll Increase graduation rates Why? To increase selfsufficiency & entrance to the quality of life for FY and their future families Best Practices Permanent staff OR LTT LRCCD increase flexibility re: hiring or LTT for FY staff. Faculty & Classified Grant writing successes Stay in your lane together TAY is served better Streamline services to help ensure academic success Job placement work study priority group Dedicated staff: counselor, outreach specialist, financial aid Putting faces to the programs on Los Rios campuses Space designated for FY to go to that always has someone available Ease of understanding & language for aid opportunities Open door all time every day # of checkins college vs. AB 12 EFC Do they have a CASA? If not, make referral for one Linkage to mental health support College workshops at community agencies Non-restrictive student aid to support different needs Create workshops for students in need of housing Support with housing Transition after AA/Certificate Connection between degrees and workforce Post-secondary preparation 3

14 NEEDS INPUTS ASSUMPTIONS OUTPUTS OUTCOME MEASURES Build positive relationships on campus for TAY as a means to drive their academic success Common consistent criteria for eligibility Alternative education components (approaches) 4-year college tours Transition plan upon college belt K-12 to College Outreach FY summer bridge program Marketing to FY in high school Financial literacy specific to FY including SAP standards Create college going culture, start outreach elementary / middle school level Barrier-free access College terminology Ensure FY are accessing all available financial aid Outreach in K-12 4

15 Developing a Foster Youth Research and Evaluation Plan Dr. Victoria Rosario, Los Rios Community College District, Sacramento, March 13, 2018 Foster Youth Program Goals Please list your program goal(s) below. Be as specific as you can about what outcome(s) you expect to see if your goals are met

16 Sample Aligned Goals and Measures *Short-term = 1-3 yrs; Medium-term = 3-5 yrs; Long-term = 5 + yrs Program goal Outcome Time-Period of Expected Outcome* Measure Education Segment Data source(s) DSA or MOU? 6

17 Los Rios Community College District Serving Foster and Homeless Youth A Status Report Published by the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor, Student Services October 6, 2017

18 TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Executive Summary... 3 II. History of State Efforts... 3 III. Description of Foster Youth and Homeless Youth Programs at LRCCD... 5 IV. Eligibility and Verification Process... 7 V. Students Served... 9 VI. Services Provided VII. Definitions VIII. College Level Efforts Program Development Staff Development Opportunities IX. References APPENDIX A: Foster Youth Success Initiative (FYSI) Outreach Toolkit APPENDIX B: Calendar of Ongoing FYSI Events and Training Opportunities APPENDIX C: Los Rios Foster Youth Enrollment Summary and Data APPENDIX D: Best Practices Sources... 26

19 Serving Foster and Homeless Youth A Status Report I. Executive Summary This status report presents a comprehensive analysis of the existing services and resources available for the Los Rios Community College District foster youth and homeless youth student population. It is informed by data and is the result of the work key stakeholders including administrative leads, staff, and faculty. In spring 2017, the Board of Trustees requested a review of services to students that are current or former foster youth as well as students that have or are experiencing homelessness. The liaisons to these special populations were convened to discuss the existing services available. Further data was collected and collated by the District s Office of Institutional Research. The report is divided into eight (8) sections: (1) Executive Summary, (2) History of State Efforts, (3) Description of Foster Youth and Homeless Youth Programs at LRCCD, (4) Eligibility and Verification Process, (5) Students Served, (6) Services Provided, (7) Definitions, and (8) College Level Efforts. II. History of State Efforts There exists a strong link between the experiences and resource needs of foster and homeless youth. Foster youth are those who has been removed from the custody of their parent(s) or guardian(s) by the juvenile court, and placed in a group home or foster home. Similarly, homeless youth are unaccompanied minors ages 12 through 17 who are living apart from their parents or legal guardians and young adults ages 18 through 24 who are economically or emotionally detached from their families and are experiencing homelessness or living in unstable or inadequate living situations. A 2013 national study by the John Burton Foundation found that by age 26, approximately 36% of former foster youth reported having had at least one experience with homelessness (Au and Hyatt, 2017). In California, there were an estimated 202,578 homeless youth and an estimated 37,715 foster youth enrolled in the state s K 12 system during the academic year (California Department of Education, DataQuest, 2017). Serving over 17,000 foster youth and potentially over 14,000 homeless youth, the California Community College system serves more foster and homeless youth than both the University of California and the California State University systems. In Sacramento County there are approximately 1,512 foster youth and approximately 6,855 homeless youth (California Department of Education, DataQuest, 2017). A number of factors impact the success of college students but individuals from special populations have elevated risks, particularly as it relates to mental health disorders. Additionally, foster youth and homeless youth have a history of complex and ongoing trauma in the form of abuse or neglect from family, exposure to criminal activity or violence within the home and immediate environment, as well as poverty and housing/food insecurity (American Academy of Pediatrics, n.d.; Au and Hyatt, 2017). This past and ongoing trauma leads youth to face greater challenges, such as stigma; lack of representation in local and state government; lack of services specific to foster youth and homeless youth; absence of 3

20 trust in government officials and agencies as a result of past negative experiences; feelings of disempowerment; substance abuse; mental health related issues; limited access to existing social services, such as housing assistance; and lack of understanding of the functioning of large institutions such as higher education (Au and Hyatt, 2017; California Youth Empowerment Network, n.d.; U.S. Government Accountability Office, 2016). All of these barriers make it difficult for those who have ventured on to our campuses to pursue their dreams of being a college student. A number of statewide initiatives and critical pieces of legislation have been passed to provide assistance to the unique needs of these two student populations. Table 1 provides a summary of these developments: Table 1 Policy Level Policy Description Foster Youth AB 2463 (1996) Provide greater outreach, access to critical information and resources, as well as retention services for those interested in attending a California State University or California Community College SB 1639 (2004) Increase access to information on admissions requirements and financial aid AB 1393 (2009) Priority housing on campuses that provide on campus housing. Homeless Youth AB 194 (2011) SB 1023 (2014) College Cost Reduction and Access Act (CCRCC) (2007) Higher Education Opportunity Act (2008); CA AB 801 (2016) CA AB 1228 (2016) CA AB 1995 (2016) Priority registration for enrollment at California State University and California Community Colleges Cooperating Agencies Foster Youth Educational Support (CAFYES) Program, which provides an additional funding source to selected EOPS programs strengthen the capacity of community college districts to support the academic success and overall well being of foster youth. Note: CAFYES is a program within EOPS and is currently a pilot. Homeless youth, like foster youth, qualify as independent students for purposes of federal financial aid thus allowing federal financial aid packages to be calculated based on their own income and assets rather than those of a parent or guardian. Greater access to federal programs such as TRIO programs and support services Priority registration and fee waivers at state universities and community colleges in California Priority housing at California colleges and universities Free access to campus shower facilities Efforts to further assist foster youth were strengthened by the implementation of the Foster Youth Success Initiative (FYSI) in 2007 (no additional funds were attached to this initiative). The FYSI was developed by the California Community College Chancellor s Office (CCCCO) to improve the ability of current and former foster youth access to our colleges and benefit from services and resources that may be vital to their success. The goals of the FYSI is to improve: a) access to student services and resources; b) access to academic support, retention; c) academic performance; d) completion of units; e) completion of programs and degree; and f) transfer rates to baccalaureate institutions. Liaisons at each community college provide supplementary assistance to foster youth enrolled in community college. FYSI liaisons have access to training via the Chancellor s Office that will enable them to provide educational services to foster youth, work to improve the quality of data gathered to better strategize successful educational outcomes, strengthen the Community College system s ability to implement new legislative and policy changes affecting foster youth, and improve collaboration between community 4

21 college system, K 12, and social services systems. Currently, there is not a similar statewide support structure for homeless youth. An outreach kit (Appendix A) and a FYSI calendar of events and training opportunities (Appendix B) can be found at the end of this document. In addition to the FYSI, in 2012, the CCCCO implemented the Student Success and Support Program (SSSP) as part of the Student Success Act (SB 1456). The mission of SSSP is to increase community college student access and success by providing effective core services, including: orientation, assessment and placement, counseling, academic advising, and early intervention. The core services provided by SSSP are critical for students that are foster youth and/or experience homelessness as their circumstances can compromise their academic progress because while these Steps to Success are essential for all students, they serve as a means for normalizing the college experience irrespective of a students background or life experience. Early intervention and follow up services via SSSP can provide these students with a strong foundation to reach their academic goals. The California Community College system offers an array of services and opportunities that provide students greater access to an affordable education. The Los Rios Community College District is working to be a leader in these efforts. Cosumnes River College, in particular, was showcased as a FYSI leader in Region 2 at the California Community Colleges Student Success Conference in Most recently the district has been invited to submit a grant application to the Walter S. Johnson Foundation for a 6 month planning proposal in support of foster youth. III. Description of Foster Youth and Homeless Youth Programs at LRCCD Each of the four colleges in the district has unique program(s) dedicated to serving the needs of foster youth and/or homeless youth. Operated out of different student services units at each of the colleges, all have close proximity to valuable resources such as EOP&S and have been developed with the same aim: ease the transition of current and former foster youth into the college setting by providing access to valuable resources that will be critical to their academic, personal and professional success. Each of the foster youth programs has designated a FYSI Liaison and many have a team of individuals from key programs such as Admissions and Records, Financial Aid, and EOP&S (see Table 2). With a focus on streamlining the transition process for foster youth, they assist in the process of verifying eligibility of services; provide a connection with on and off campus resources; refer students to other support services; gather valuable data; and stay up to date on pertinent foster youth legislation. Outreach efforts are enacted via attendance at conferences and summits, word of mouth, collaborations with personnel in the regional K 12 system(s) and county health and human services, juvenile probation, on campus advertisement of services, and program websites. Other outreach activities from service areas such as A&R and Financial Aid include fliers, s, and collateral materials housed at off site locations. All verified foster youth students are provided the opportunity for early registration during Priority 0. Expansion of outreach efforts is ongoing and intra departmental collaborations as well as collaborations across campuses are on the rise. 5

22 Currently the colleges do not have homeless youth support programs. However, student services applies a comprehensive case management approach to supporting homeless youth to increase their academic success. Homeless youth do, however, receive the opportunity for early registration during Priority 0 (CA AB 801, 2016). Table 2 Program Staff Contact Additional Staff Support Hours of Service American River College Foster Youth Foster Youth Program Homeless Youth Cosumnes River College Foster Youth Homeless Youth Folsom Lake College Foster Youth Enriched Scholars Program Fostering Success Program Homeless Youth Sacramento City College Foster Youth Fostering Futures Outreach and Retention for Educational Success and Jessica Pressley, Former Foster Youth Liaison EOPS/CARE Staff Dana McKnight, Foster Care & Education/YESS ILP Program Coordinator None NA NA Aselia Valadez Melo, Student Success and Support Program, ESP Operations Aselia Valdez Melo, Student Success and Support Program Specialist Sharisse Estomo, Student Services Supervisor Libby Cook, Coordinator, EOPS Irma Rodriguez, EOPS Faculty Coordinator Michelle Dean, ESP Student Personnel Assistant One SPA(PT) One Student Employee (PT) Janet Alvarado, Financial Aid Officer NA Sarah Aldea, Outreach Specialist Andrea Fuertes, Outreach Specialist Irina Randak, Chaffee Grant Specialist Lupe Martinez, A&R Clerk III Libby Cook, EOP&S Coordinator Christy Pimental, DSPS SPA Juan Flores, FYE Coordinator NA See Vang, Outreach Specialist Kathleen Dorn, EOPS SPA Blair McAnelly, EOPS SPA Mon. Fri: 8am 5pm Mon. Fri: 8am 5pm NA Mon. Fri: 8am 5pm NA Mon. Fri: 8am 5pm 6

23 Homeless Youth Program Staff Contact Additional Staff Support Hours of Service Transfer Pam Tuzza, Financial NA Aid Officer IV. Eligibility and Verification Process A variety of sources provide for the possible identification and referral of foster youth or homeless youth at our colleges. Students that self identify as current or former foster youth, or as a homeless youth are coded for reporting purposes in MIS. The source of this information can come from the Los Rios admission application, financial aid, Chaffee Roster, MIS, Independent Living Program referrals, EOP&S, staff referrals, Cal PASS Plus, or self report. a. CCC Apply Foster youth applicants are asked about their foster care status. They are offered a variety of choices (see below), which combined capture any person who was in foster care at any age. Homeless students can state their status in the Permanent Address fill in section of the application. b. FAFSA Independent Status Questions #53 #58 on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) ask the following in order to determine if a student qualifies as independent based on foster care and homeless experience. 7

24 c. CA Chaffee Grant for Foster Youth Students are identified through financial aid to be eligible for a Chafee grant. A student must have been in foster care on or after their 16th birthday and the student may not have reached their 22nd birthday as of July 1 of the award year. d. MIS Students are flagged as eligible for priority registration based on foster care or homeless status. e. ILP Referrals ILP s may track which foster youth have enrolled at local campus and may be able to provide this information. A youth must be under age 21 and in foster care at any time from their 16th to their 19th birthday. f. EOPS The program contains within its application and intake materials whether students identify as foster youth or homeless. g. Staff Referrals Campus staff may know of students who did not identify as a foster youth on the application or through financial aid but did self identify to them. h. Cal PASS Plus The data present within Cal PASS Plus comes as a result of each college individually uploading data to the Chancellor s Office. The Chancellor s Office stages that data, creates system wide variables, analyzes that data, and provides the system wide dataset to Cal PASS Plus. Using a variety of techniques, CalPASS Plus matches the MIS data to CALPADS and college/university data, creating an intersegmental system of data that provides opportunities to track students across and within the K 12, community colleges, and four year systems. Foster Youth. General qualifications include being a current or former foster youth who was a dependent or ward of the court, living in foster care, or in the Kin GAP program (children exiting the juvenile court dependency system to live with a relative legal guardian). In order to be eligible to receive certain services, eligible foster youth must first be verified. The process utilized to verify the status of a foster youth is consistent across all four colleges. Students submit documentation, such as foster youth card, court papers, reunification documents, or any official documentation from the county in which they were a foster youth to confirm the time frame they were in care. If students have the appropriate documentation, they will be coded as verified on the verified screen in PeopleSoft. For purposes of course enrollment, verified students will be moved in to the Priority 0 student group and receive Priority 0 registration appointments. If verified students come in after appointments are run, staff will be manually assigned a Priority 0 appointment. Homeless Youth. A verification process for purposes of federal financial aid has been established. Documentation, such as a letter, must be submitted to verify that the youth is homeless. Documentation must come from one of the following: 1. A Financial Aid Administrator (FAA) 2. A McKinney Vento Act school district liaison 3. A U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development homeless assistance program director or their designee 4. A Runaway and Homeless Youth Act program director or their designee If the student cannot provide documentation from the aforementioned authorities, the financial aid administrator from the college must determine if the student is indeed a homeless youth or at risk of becoming homeless. This determination can be based on a documented interview. An annual re verification process will occur to establish the status of homeless youth. 8

25 V. Students Served The following data reflect demographic information on foster youth currently served by the District reported by the Los Rios Community College District Office of Institutional Research (see Appendix C) and the number of homeless youth in the K 12 school districts in the regions surrounding the District as identified by the California Department of Education DataQuest. Currently, there is no enrollment data for homeless students. However, the CCC Apply application included a new field for homeless students, which went live March 31, Further implementations on CCC Apply in this area will go live October 27, Foster Youth. As of fall 2016 there were a total of 220 verified foster youth at the four colleges. This total number has remained relatively steady for the past four years (Figure 1). The majority of the District s foster youth are enrolled at ARC (41.8%) and SCC (44.1%), while 17.7% enrolled at CRC and 3.2% enrolled at FLC in Fall In addition, foster youth students are predominantly female (62.7%), below poverty (65.0%) or low income (16.8%), received a BOG fee waiver (96.4%), and have the intent of transferring to a 4 year college (72.7%). In addition, the majority of foster youth students in fall 2016 have indicated an educational goal of either transfer to a 4 year college (72.7%) or to earn an AA/AS or certificate (22.3%). While these numbers have been garnered via Los Rio s Office of Institutional Research, the total count of foster youth students in the district can be seen as variable depending on the source the data is retrieved and the metrics they utilize. For example, the Cal PASS Plus is an aggregate data source whose data is provided via MIS, CALPEDS and individual colleges and universities; MIS provides data on those students flagged as eligible for priority registration based on their foster youth status; and the LRCCD FY Liaisons provide numbers for students that are actively receiving program services irrespective of age. These different counts create a barrier for providing an accurate picture of the size and need of this population. One reliable source of data, however, is the Department of Social Services (DSS). Their data source can provide an estimate of the number of foster youth in our service areas that are within college are (18 24). Figure Foster Youth Count by College Fall 2012 Fall 2013 Fall 2014 Fall 2015 Fall 2016 American River Cosumnes River Folsom Lake* Sacramento City Source: Los Rios Community College District, Office of Institutional Research *Data not reported for less than ten students. 9

26 Homeless Youth. The numbers for homeless youth in Figure 2 reflect K 12 enrollment by academic year ( ) for the three major counties that surround Los Rios Community College District (El Dorado, Placer, and Sacramento). Enrollment over the past three academic years has increased for all three counties. El Dorado County has seen the greatest increase at 23.6% from 435 to 569; Placer County a 12.8% increase from 1064 to 1219; and Sacramento County a 7.6% increase from 6336 to An important note is that these numbers are conservative. It can be difficult to accurately capture the true number of homeless youth in the region because of the transitory nature of homeless youth. As such, the data is incomplete and these numbers most likely underestimate the number of homeless in our communities, making it an even greater challenge to serve this neediest of special populations. Figure Homeless Youth K 12 Enrollment by County El Dorado Placer Sacramento Source: California Department of Education, Data Quest VI. Services Provided A myriad of organizations at all levels of government National Association for the Education for Homeless Children and Youth, National Center for Homeless Education, California Community College Chancellor s Office, California Youth Empowerment Network (CAYEN), Casey Family Program, California College Pathways, California Community Colleges Student Mental Health Program, California Homeless Youth Project Sacramento State University, University of California Davis, and Sierra College have been working with a number of stakeholders throughout the state and their regions to expand efforts to most effectively assist the foster youth and homeless youth student populations. Various levels of best practices have been identified from a comprehensive literature review that are intended to provide a stronger network of support, a holistic approach to care, and a hand off to educational partners (see Appendix D for a list of resources). Table 3 below represents an inventory of these best practices and what foster and homeless youth support services are currently being offered by the four Los Rios colleges. 10

27 Table 3 Theme Best Practices ARC CRC FLC SCC FY HY FY HY FY HY FY HY Increase Access to Institutional Program and Services Increase Awareness of Campus and Other Local Resources Providing Comprehensive Support Services Building Supportive Relationships Developing Partnerships to Enhance Resource Availability Improving Program Evaluation and Services Multiple sources for identification and verification 1 Coordination with state and education entities 2 Priority registration Financial Aid assistance (Chafee Grant) Outreach efforts 3 Targeted messaging to foster youth and college community 4 ** Assistance and services at night and online 5 Assistance locating year round housing 6 Staff/faculty professional development 7 ** Creating clear pathways to employment through workshops/training 8 Summer bridge programs 9 Academic advising and follow up 10 Utilizing a single point of contact 11 Creating a campus support program 12 * Post graduation career planning and assistance (referrals) 13 Assistance with affordable child care 14 Mental Health Services/Resources 15 Assistance garnering school materials, such as textbooks, backpacks, etc. 16 * Transportation assistance 17 * Graduation cap and gown 18 * Food assistance 19 Transfer assistance 20 Educational grants 21 On Campus Clothing Drives/Bank 22 Refurbished laptops 23 On campus health clinic or services 24 Mentoring programs 25 * Transitional life coaches 26 Peer to peer support programs 27 ** * Community building events 28 * Intra departmental collaborations 29 Collaborations with county and state Department of Health and Human Services 30 Continuous collection of population data 31 Service available. * Proposed services as part of a new foster youth program slated to go live fall **In progress. 11

28 VII. Definitions Due to the complexity that exists in understanding the challenges faced by the foster youth, it is critical to have a firm grasp on the various terms, program, and legislation associated with this population. Table 4 below provides definition to some of the most important terms associated with foster youth. Table 4 Student Group Term Definition Foster Youth AB 12 California Fostering Connections Act Provides access to federal funding for foster care services for dependents and wards beyond their 18th birthday (until age 21). AB 194 (Beall) (2011) Requires the California State University and California Community College districts, and requests the University of California, to grant priority registration for enrollment to foster youth or former foster youth up to the age 24. AB 1228 (2015) Expands priority housing at Community Colleges, UCs and CSUs for former foster youth to also include homeless youth. AB 1393 (Skinner) Foster youth (2009) Requires community college campuses that have on campus housing to give priority for housing to current and former foster youth during the academic year as well as during school breaks. California Chafee Grant Awards up to $5,000 annually during the academic year to qualified students who have been in the foster care system to pursue an academic college education or technical and skill training. Foster and Kinship Care Education Program (FKCE) Foster Youth Foster Youth Success Initiative (FYSI) Independent Living Program SB 1023 Cooperating Agencies Foster Youth Educational Support (CAFYES) Program Transitional Housing Placement Program (THPP) Transitional Housing Program Provide quality education and support opportunities to caregivers of children and youth in out of home care so providers may meet the educational, emotional, behavioral and developmental needs of children and youth in the foster care system. Any child who has been removed from the custody of their parent(s) or guardian(s) by the juvenile court, and placed in a group home or foster home. Their dependency was established or continued by the court on or after the youth s 16th birthday and who is no older than 25 years of age at the commencement of the academic year. An effort of the California Community Colleges. All California Community Colleges to have a FYSI Liaison to support current and former foster youth help find financial assistance and resources to go to and complete college. Provides training, services and programs to assist current and former foster youth achieve self sufficiency prior to and after leaving the foster care system. Each county in California has the discretion to design their program according to need of their communities. Authorizes the California Community Colleges Chancellors Office (CCCCO) to enter into agreements with up to 10 CCC districts to provide additional funds for services in support of postsecondary education for foster youth. Transitional housing placement opportunity for foster and probation youth who are at least 16 and not more than 18, who are currently in the child welfare system. The program s goal is to provide a safe living environment so youth can practice the skills necessary to live on their own upon leaving the foster care support system. Transitional housing placement opportunity for emancipated 12

29 Student Group Term Definition for Emancipated Foster/Probation (THP Plus) foster youth, aged 18 24, who emancipated from the child welfare system. Provide a safe living environment while helping youth achieve self sufficiency so that they can learn life skills upon leaving the foster care support system. Counties electing to participate in the program provide supervised independent living housing and support services. Homeless Youth AB 1228 (2016) Provide priority for campus housing to current and former homeless youth that is identical to that priority extended to current and former foster youth under existing law. Request that campuses provide housing in housing facilities that are open for uninterrupted year round occupation to current and former homeless youth and current and former foster youth at no extra cost during academic or campus breaks Campuses to develop a plan to ensure that current and former homeless youth and current and former foster youth can access housing resources during and between academic terms, including during academic and campus breaks. AB 1995 (2016) Requires the Community Colleges to allow homeless students free access to campus shower facilities. AB 801 Postsecondary Education: Success for Homeless Youth in Higher Education Act (2016) College Cost Reduction and Access Act (CCRAA) (2007) Higher Education Opportunity Act (2008) McKinney Vento Homeless Assistance Act (1987) Allow homeless youth to receive some of the same services and exemptions that are available to foster youth and former foster youth, such as priority enrollment and fee waivers at state universities and community colleges within California with the goal of helping reduce barriers to college attendance due to lack of financial support and resources. Unaccompanied homeless youth qualify as independent students for purposes of federal financial aid. Federal financial aid packages to be calculated based on their own income and assets, and not those of their parent(s) or guardian(s), and eliminates the need for the signature of a parent or guardian on the youths Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) Access to Federal TRIO programs, establishment of awareness campaigns, increased support services in colleges and universities. Establishes the definition of homeless youth. o Individuals who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence o Children and youths who are sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or similar reason; living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camping grounds due to the lack of alternative housing; living in emergency or transitional shelters; abandoned in hospitals; or are awaiting foster care placement o Children and youths who have a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings o Children and youths living in cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations, or similar settings 13

30 VIII. College Level Efforts PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT American River College 1. Fostering Achievement and Moving toward Excellence (FAME) Program Efforts Throughout the academic year American River College provided a plethora of services to its foster youth students along with a wide range of outreach efforts in the community. FAME services include: Academic, career, and personal advising Monthly resources including meal vouchers and transportation assistance Backpacks filled with school supplies for students completing monthly contacts Workshops on a variety of important topics Priority registration Financial aid application assistance (FAFSA, scholarships, Chafee) Study skills support Major exploration and transfer preparation Career development including assistance with job search, resume and cover letter development and interview support Connection to resources on and off campus Social events Book voucher through the John Burton Foundation Book lending library Drop in tutoring in math and science Peer mentoring University campus tours Referrals to off campus housing FAME outreach services provided within the community: Feeder high school visits ILP (Independent Living Program) classroom visits Attended High School/ County Resource Fairs to represent the Los Rios Community colleges Attended ILP resource fair to give information about foster youth services and EOPS Attended Local Group homes and AB 12 Housing sites to give information on college and the foster youth services available. Cosumnes River College 1. Cooperating Agencies Foster Youth Educational Support (CAFYES) Program Application Submission, 2016 While not successful in its first submission, CRC provided a $86,100 program proposal would expand EOP&S enrollment and increase services to meet the needs of foster youth attending Cosumnes River College and feeder school district students with transition plans to ensure proper matriculation and ease the from high school to community college and from community college to a university. The goal of the program is to strengthen partnerships with regional universities to increase transfer rates, build and strengthen partnerships in the community, and have a positive impact on the foster youth attending 14

31 Cosumnes River College by providing the support they need to meet their goals. Specific benefits of the program would include: Assistance in successfully completing the appropriate matriculation process Financial aid application and processing assistance Foster Youth Success (CAFYES) Liaison to assist with navigation of on and off campus resources. Departmental collaboration with EOP&S and DSPS to provide early assessment screenings to ensure all resources are available to students. New student and continuing student orientation available at the start of each semester. o CAFYES program information o Presentations: Program guidelines and Financial services and updates o Campus tours and Study group formation o Major exploration and Campus involvement A four to six week Summer Bridge Program for continuing students and required new students. o Intensive, targeted coursework and tutoring: Study skills and learning styles, Time management; Classroom etiquette and expectations; Career counseling; and Computer literacy Participation in Sacramento County Foster Youth Education Community College Orientation Day. Academic advising and Student Education Plan (isep) development. Assistance with employment and/or internship allocation. Housing referrals 2. Enriched Scholars Program (ESP) Events Throughout the academic year, Cosumnes River College provided a wide range of informational workshops as well as community building events for their foster youth student population to further provide valuable resources and skills. The developed workshops and events included: College Success Welcome Day Tips for Classroom Success CRC, CYC and FYEF Scholarship Workshops Money Management and Housing Options Learning Styles Employability Skils Training (3 day training, including Myers Briggs Assessment, resumé, mock interviewing, Launch Path App.) CSU Guardian Scholars Transfer Information End of Semester Celebration Luncheon (recognition of Honors GPA s degree/certificate graduates, personal development workshop) Targeted Notifications: employment, scholarship, and internship opportunities Folsom Lake College 1. Student Services Program Proposal Fostering Success Program (FSP), 2017 This $63,311 program will provide direct services to current and former foster youth attending Folsom Lake College for the lifespan of a student. The Program aims to equip and empower its students with the skills, awareness, services and support network that allow them to achieve personal and academic success. Specific services include: High Touch Connections: o Academic advising and tutoring o Counseling o Peer mentor program 15

32 Program Events: o Workshops o Priority 0 registration o End of the year celebration Day to Day Needs: o Book voucher and school supplies o Transportation assistance monthly gas card and parking permit o Graduation cap and gown and FSP sash 2. On and Off Campus Collaborations Though Folsom Lake College s foster youth program will not be active until fall 2017, college and its FY Liaison continue to be active in maintaining strong relationships with departments on the campus and with organizations off the campus to garner more resources for foster youth as well as provide information about the challenges and needs faced by this student population. Notable events include: Presentation to the Sacramento County of Education s Foster Youth Higher Education Collaborative on November 17, 2016: In collaboration between Folsom Lake College s Foster Youth and Disabled Students Programs & Services to present an overview of DSPS services. El Dorado County of Education s 2017 Foster Youth Summer Work Program: Folsom Lake College hosted the Summit at the El Dorado Center. The Summit consisted of a week long series of daily, one hour activities facilitated by FLC s Outreach, Foster Youth and EOP&S staff. Sacramento City College 1. Fostering Futures Outreach and Retention for Educational Success and Transfer (FFOREST) Equity funded program since 2016, provides all FY parallel supports to what EOPS offers eligible students. FFOREST supports those students that do not meet the 9 unit requirement with counseling, case management, academic monitoring, school supplies, registration support, textbook stipend, food stipend, transportation support, and community building activities. Student progress is monitored on a monthly basis. STAFF DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES Staff at all four colleges American River, Cosumnes River, Folsom Lake and Sacramento City Colleges continue to be engaged in the Chancellor s Office and statewide efforts to further support foster youth and homeless youth student populations California Foster Youth Education Summit District Foster Youth Liaisons as well as other personnel attended the Summit hosted at the Hyatt in Sacramento. The Summit included discussions, presenters and workshops on topics of interest to the stakeholders who support the educational achievements of foster youth from early childhood through college and career. Topics included the following: Beyond Graduation Rates: Leading Indicators for Foster Youth Education The Power of Partnerships and Multi Disciplinary Teams in Your School District Trauma Informed Practice for Schools Appropriately Increasing Foster/Probation/Homeless Graduation Rates 16

33 Setting up Students for College: Avoiding the "Remediation Trap" A2HE: A Multi Agency Collaborative Effort to get Foster Youth Students from High School to College and Career Ways Advocates, Providers, and Districts Can Partner to Serve the Needs of Foster Youth Maximizing CALPADS Foster Youth Data to Encourage Agency Collaboration Overcoming Adverse Childhood Experiences Foster Care and LGBTQIA Linking with Higher Ed: University Graduate Students Provide Content Workshops for College and Career Event New Statewide Data on Foster Students in CA California Community Colleges Extended Opportunity Programs and Services Association (CCCEOPSA) Conference The CCCEOPSA s fall conference serves to be the premier annual event that brings together EOP&S students, staff, faculty, and administrators from all 113 EOP&S programs across the state, as well as the Chancellor s Office staff in one local to address legislation and best practices to serve students who meet the Title 5 statutory requirements for eligibility. Keynote speakers and breakout sessions are dedicated to addressing pertinent and timely issues affecting the over 80,000 students who are economically and educationally disadvantaged and served in programs across the state. Five (5) breakout sessions at this year s conference provided insight on how to effectively and work with the foster youth population within the college setting. 3. Student Conference 2016, March The conference highlighted the best practices that facilitate partnerships and collaboration for the purpose of inspiring student learning and success. Presentations showcased innovations, model programs and policies, research projects, best practices, and further elaboration on the relationship between SSSP and Student Equity work in the California Community Colleges. 17

34 IX. References American Academy of Pediatrics (n.d.) Mental and Behavioral Health. Retrieved from us/advocacy and policy/aap health initiatives/healthy foster careamerica/pages/mental and Behavioral Health.aspx. Au, Nancy and Hyatt, Shahera (2017) Resources Supporting Homeless Students at California s Public Universities and Colleges. California Homeless Youth Project. Retrieved from pdf. California Department of Education, DataQuest, Enrollment Multi Year Summary by Grade Retrieved from California Youth Empowerment Network (n.d.) Challenges Faced by TAY. Retrieved from 101/challenges faced by tay/. U.S. Government Accountability Office (2016) Actions Needed to Improve Access to Federal Financial Assistance for Homeless and Foster Youth. Higher Education. Retrieved from

35 APPENDIX A: Foster Youth Success Initiative (FYSI) Outreach Toolkit 19

36 20

37 21

38 APPENDIX B: Calendar of Ongoing FYSI Events and Training Opportunities Even or Training Description Date Contact Webinar: On Campus Support & Resources for Foster Youth in College, John Burton Advocates for Youth Webinar: Data to Promote Foster Youth Success Regional Calls Regional Drive In Events Blueprint Conference FYSI Connect Featured speaker: Deborah Pruitt, John Burton Advocates for Youth; Jessica Smith, Statewide FYSI Liaison with the Foundation for California Community Colleges; Kalynda Webber McLean, Dean of Student Success at Pierce College; and Kizzy Lopez, Renaissance Scholars Program with CSU Fresno. Attendees learned about the support and resources available to current and former foster youth on college campuses. Attendees learned about tools to access and gather data, and how this can be used to inform FYSI programs and services. Guest Speaker: Debbie Raucher, California College Pathways The calls are an opportunity to receive important updates and information, as well as troubleshoot problems together. Regional Drive In Events are designed for FYSI Liaisons and their local community partners in a spirit of collaboration to support foster youth pursuing higher education. Presented by John Burton Advocates for Youth: This dynamic event combines meaningful networking opportunities with in depth workshops presented by professionals with a passion and aptitude for supporting foster youth. FYSI CONNECT will present opportunities for FYSI Liaisons to: connect foster youth students to financial aid and other important services, connect with statewide FYSI partners to learn about resources, and connect with each other to exchange ideas and best practices. March 9, 2017 Available here: m/watch?v=r8097okdm Zg&feature=youtu.be April 20, 2016 Available here: u/portals/1/sssp/fysi/ %20Data%20to% 20Promote%20FY%20Suc cess%20(final%20slides ).pdf Region 6 Call: Tuesday, August 8 Region 3 Call: Thursday, August 10 Region 6 Event: Monday, September 11 October 16 17, 2017 at Sheraton Gateway LAX October 18, 2017 at Four Points Sheraton LAX, directly after Blueprint Conference Region 6: Anaisa Alonzo Region 3 Call: Tia Holiday Region 6: Anaisa Alonzo 22

39 APPENDIX C: Los Rios Foster Youth Enrollment Summary and Data 23

40 24

41 25

42 APPENDIX D: Best Practices Sources 1. Student Mental Health Program (2015) Supporting Transition Aged Foster Youth. Retrieved from 2. Supporting Transition Aged Foster Youth. 3. Casey Family Programs (2016) Supporting Success: Improving higher education outcomes for students from foster care. Retrieved from 4. Supporting Transition Aged Foster Youth. 5. Supporting Transition Aged Foster Youth. 6. Supporting Transition Aged Foster Youth. 7. Supporting Transition Aged Foster Youth. 8. The White House Office of the Vice President (2014) Fact Sheet: Improving Outcomes for Our Nation s Foster Youth. Retrieved from pressoffice/2014/12/08/fact sheet improving outcomes our nation s foster youth 9. Supporting Success: Improving higher education outcomes for students from foster care. 10. Deborah Lowe Martinez (2014) Accessing Resources for Foster Youth in Higher Education. UC Berkeley. Retrieved from California College Pathways (2014) AB 194 in Action: A Review of Implementation of Priority Registration for Foster Youth at California s Public Post Secondary Institutions. Retrieved from content/uploads/2016/01/ab_194_in_action_final.pdf 12. Accessing Resources for Foster Youth in Higher Education. 13. The Walter S. Johnson Foundation, The Annie E. Casey Foundation, Casey Family Programs, California College Pathways, and Great Expectations (2013) 2013 National Convening on Foster Youth and Higher Education, Conference Proceedings. Retrieved from content/uploads/2016/01/2013 nationalconvening_proceedings 1.pdf 14. No Time to Lose: A Policy Agenda for Foster Youth. 15. Supporting Success: Improving higher education outcomes for students from foster care. 16. Sierra College CAFYES 17. Supporting Success: Improving higher education outcomes for students from foster care. 18. Sierra College Guardian Scholars Cooperating Agencies Foster Youth Educational Support (CAFYES) Program Application (2015). 19. Supporting Success: Improving higher education outcomes for students from foster care. 20. Supporting Success: Improving higher education outcomes for students from foster care. 21. Sierra College CAFYES 22. California Community Colleges Chancellor s Office Student Financial Assistance Programs Unit Foundation for California Community Colleges (2015). Foster Youth Success Initiative (FYSI) Manual: A Guide for Financial Aid Administrators and Student Support Services. Retrieved from 015)%202.pdf. 23. Foster Youth Success Initiative (FYSI) Manual. 24. No Time to Lose: A Policy Agenda for Foster Youth. 25. Accessing Resources for Foster Youth in Higher Education. 26. Supporting Transition Aged Foster Youth. 26

43 27. Supporting Transition Aged Foster Youth. 28. Accessing Resources for Foster Youth in Higher Education. 29. Supporting Transition Aged Foster Youth. 30. Supporting Transition Aged Foster Youth. 31. Supporting Success: Improving higher education outcomes for students from foster care. 27

44 Los Rios Community College District Office of Institutional Research Fall 2017 Foster Youth Student Profile A Mini Profile Based upon Fall First Census Data January 2018 The Fall 2017 Foster Youth Student Profile is the first in a series of companion reports to the 2017 Fall Student Profile with a focus on special populations at the time of Fall first census. The purpose of this report is to provide insights into the demographics, socioeconomic status indicators, and the educational goals of special population students who attend Los Rios colleges. The data from this report were generated from the official Fall first census research database. Because there are a relatively small number of Foster Youth attending Los Rios colleges the profile is primarily from a district-wide perspective. For the purposes of this report Foster Youth are identified as those students who have been verified as being in a court ordered Foster Youth program. Students are then matched against the Los Rios Community College Office of Institutional Research (LRCCD OIR) Fall first census database to verify enrollment at a Los Rios college. LRCCD Foster Youth First Census Enrollment Chart 1: LRCCD Foster Youth Student Enrollment: Fall 2013 to Fall Note: District-wide data based on unduplicated enrollment counts. Enrollment data for purpose of this report is based on LRCCD OIR Research database. Overall, enrollment of Foster Youth attending Los Rios colleges at first census has declined slightly from 212 students in Fall 2013 to 197 students in Fall LRCCD Foster Youth Student Demographic Profile at First Census The next section of the Foster Youth Profile presents a demographic profile including gender, age, race and ethnicity of Foster Youth students attending Los Rios colleges at Fall 2017 first census. ] Chart 2: LRCCD Foster Youth Enrollment by Gender: Fall Fall 2013 Fall 2014 Fall 2015 Fall 2016 Fall (64.5%) 66 (33.5%) 4 (2.0%) Female Male Unknown Enrollment by gender illustrates a higher proportion of Foster Youth attending Los Rios colleges are female (64.5%) while 33.5% are male. Chart 3: LRCCD Foster Youth Enrollment by Age Group: Fall (38.1%) 71 (36.0%) 47 (23.9%) 4 (2.0%) 20 and Under Foster Youth attending Los Rios colleges tend to be young; 38.1% are 20 and under while 36.0% are

45 Over thirty percent, 32.5%, of Foster Youth district-wide are the first in the family to attend college, known as First Generation) which is slightly higher than the 28.0% of all students who are first generation students. Chart 4: LRCCD Foster Youth Enrollment and All LRCCD Enrollment by Race/Ethnicity: Fall 2017 First Census African American All Asian/Pacific Islander Hispanic/Latino Multi-Race White Foster Youth All LRCCD Enrollment Note: LRCCD have Native American, Other, and Unknown race/ethnic categories; these categories have been eliminated due to small N s. Substantially higher proportions of Foster Youth attending Los Rios colleges are African American when compared to all LRCCD students, 28.4% and 9.6%, respectively. It is important to note the small numbers of Foster Youth which can impact the proportional distribution. Higher proportions of Foster Youth identify as multi-race (13.2%) than do all students (6.7%) across the district in Fall Demographic Profile of LRCCD Foster Youth by Socioeconomic Status (SES) Indicators Important to understanding the demographic profile of LRCCD Foster Youth enrollment is to provide additional information about the income and poverty level as these factors may have an impact on students journey to success. Employment and BOGW fee waiver (now the California College Promise Grant) data are also provided in this section of the Profile report. Chart 5: LRCCD Foster Youth Student Enrollment Proportions by Income Level: Fall (63.5%) 41 (20.8%) 7 (3.6%) Below Poverty Low Middle And Above Unable to Determine 24 (12.2%) Over half, 63.5%, of Foster Youth indicate income levels below poverty while 20.8% indicate low income levels. Chart 6: LRCCD Foster Youth Student and All LRCCD Student Enrollment Proportions by Employment Status: Fall Full Time Half Time or More Less Than Half Time Not Seeking Unemployed Foster Youth All Students Note: Proportion of unknown/unspecified employment status not included Slightly higher proportions of Foster Youth are employed half-time or more or are unemployed when compared to all Los Rios students in Fall Conversely, lower proportions of Foster Youth are employed full-time than are all Los Rios students. Chart 7: LRCCD Foster Youth Student Enrollment Proportions with California College Promise Grant* by College: Fall *formerly BOG Fee Waiver ARC (61) CRC (45) FLC (8) SCC (87) LRCCD (190) With the higher unemployment proportions of Foster Youth it is important to note that 96.4% of all Foster Youth attending Los Rios colleges received a California College Promise Grant (formerly BOG Fee Waiver) in Fall

46 Foster Youth Enrollment by Educational Goal, Major, and Unit Load at Fall 2017 First Census The educational goals of Foster Youth attending Los Rios colleges generally reflect the goals of all Los Rios students. Transfer being the goal of almost eighty percent of Foster Youth it is important to present an overview of enrollment by student major specifically focused on the Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT) majors and unit load; all important measures of the student pathway to transfer. Chart 8: LRCCD Foster Youth Student Enrollment Proportions by Educational Goal by Colleges: Fall ARC CRC FLC SCC LRCCD Transfer to 4-Year College AA Degree or Certificate All Other Substantial proportions of Foster Youth, 78.7%, indicate a goal of transferring to a 4-year college which is higher than the 60.5% of all students across the district. With almost eighty percent of Foster Youth indicating a goal of transfer it is important to provide an overview of the Top 5 Majors Foster Youth students indicate as their major which follow: General Education/Transfer (13.7%), Psychology (12.7%), Business Administration (7.1%), Biology (7.1%), and Administration of Justice (6.1%). Chart 9: LRCCD Foster Youth Student Enrollment Proportion by ADT Majors: Fall 2015 to Fall ARC CRC FLC SCC Fall 2015 Fall 2016 Fall 2017 Note: Data reflects students interest in an ADT major but may not necessarily align with student s course-taking behavior Chart 9 provides the proportions of Foster Youth who have indicated an ADT major ranging from 33.9% at ARC to 22.9% at CRC. The proportions of Foster Youth who have indicated an ADT transfer pathway as their educational goal have increased over the three years especially at ARC and SCC. Table 1: LRCCD Foster Youth Student Enrollment Proportion by Unit Load: Fall 2017 Up to to to or Over Full-Time Unit Load (based on 12 units or more) ARC CRC FLC SCC LRCCD Of all the Foster Youth attending Los Rios colleges, 30.5%, were full-time taking 12 or more units at Fall first census. Higher proportions, 40.0%, of SCC Foster Youth took 12 or more units. Worth noting are the 13.3% of the Foster Youth students attending SCC who took 15 or more units which may qualify these students for the Community College Completion Grant (CCCG) which requires students to enroll in 15 units per term. Chart 10: Enrollment Proportions of LRCCD Foster Youth Student with a Goal of Transfer by Unit Load: Fall (15.5%) 81 (52.3%) 36 (23.2%) 14 (9.0%) Up to to to or Over As noted above, almost eighty percent of Foster Youth attending Los Rios colleges indicate a goal of transfer, however, over half (52.3%) of Foster Youth students with a goal of transfer are taking mid unit loads between 6 to units in Fall 2017 while a lower 32.2% are taking full unit loads of 12 or more units. 3

47 Next Steps for Research Of the Foster Youth attending Los Rios colleges in Fall 2017 first census how many persisted to the end of the Fall 2017 term? Did students successfully complete their courses? Did students who enrolled in full-time unit loads remain full-time at end of semester? Identify milestones markers for Foster Youth students; for both those students with a goal of transfer as well as those on a CTE program pathway. Have Foster Youth students who took classes in Fall 2017 enroll in Spring 2018? Continue to follow these students on their educational pathway to completion either earning a degree or certificate or successful transfer. This report was written by Betty Glyer-Culver, Director of Institutional Research based on Fall first census data generated from the Los Rios Research Database managed by Petr Lensky. Thanks to De Doan, former Research Analyst, for initial analysis of special population data. For further information please LRCCD Office of Institutional Research (OIR). All district reports are available on the LRCCD OIR website at: 4

48 LRCCD: Foster Youth Table Talk Discussions Protocol Spring 2018

49 TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Introduction... Error! Bookmark not defined. II. Discussions Calendar... Error! Bookmark not defined. III. Recruitment/Insentives... 5 IV. Informed Consent... 7 V. Protocol... 8 VI. Analysis & Reporting... 8

50 I. INTRODUCTION Los Rios Community College District (LRCCD) received a planning grant from the Walter S. Johnson Foundation to establish a comprehensive planning process to develop strategies for improving and expanding support for enrolled foster youth. This includes: a) An assessment of existing systems; b) The creation of formal partnerships with community-based organizations and regional partners; c) An evaluation of current data tracking systems; and d) Gathering student input. Additionally, one of the goals of this planning grant consists of an evaluation plan to support continuous process improvements through gathering data on student needs, understanding campus climate via focus groups and surveys and conducting institutional research to analyze foster youth performance and completion trends. Page 3

51 II. DISCUSSIONS CALENDAR Focus group sessions will be held throughout the college from March 12-16, American River College Cosumnes River College Folsom Lake College Sacramento City College Date Wed., March14 Fri., March 16 Mon., March 12 Fri., March 16 Time 11am-12:30pm 11am-12:30pm 12-1:30pm 1-2:30pm Location TBD Bookstore Conference Room TBD City Café #2 Lead Facilitator Staff Contact Tyler Rollins Heather Tilson Jill Bradshaw Tiffanie Ho Caitlyn Spencer Aselia Valadez Sharisse Estomo Irma Rodriguez Page 4

52 III. RECRUITMENT/VOUCHERS INVITATION Greetings, You have been selected to participate in a Foster Youth Table Talk Discussion on how your college can support foster youth. We want to hear directly from current and former foster youth like yourself to learn about your experiences and how we can best help foster youth who are enrolled in college succeed. Discussions will be kept confidential and will only be used to inform how we can best support foster youth students succeed in their educational goals. The Table Talk Discussion will take place at each campus as follows: American River College Cosumnes River College Folsom Lake College Sacramento City College Date Wed., March14 Fri., March 16 Mon., March 12 Fri., March 16 Time 11am-12:30pm 11am-12:30pm 12-1:30pm 1-2:30pm Location TBD Bookstore Conference Room TBD City Café #2 Staff Contact Caitlyn Spencer Aselia Valadez Sharisse Estomo Irma Rodriguez Foster youth who attend will receive: Free lunch $100 worth of gift cards Your voice is important. Please don t miss this opportunity to join other students like yourself to share your experiences. To RSVP click HERE or contact Zitlali Torres at RSVP by March 6 th Page 5

53 Kind Regards, FLYER INCENTIVES & REFRESHMENTS Refreshments Incentives Panera Bread Sandwiches, cookies, chips and bottled water. $100 worth of gift cards Page 6

Supporting Transition-Aged Foster Youth

Supporting Transition-Aged Foster Youth Supporting Transition-Aged Foster Youth Background A Vulnerable Population. Each year, roughly 4,000 foster youth ages 18 21 leave California s foster care system, and strive to achieve self sufficiency.

More information

SUPPORTING SUCCESS IN POST- SECONDARY EDUCATION M AY 1 5, 2 0 1 4

SUPPORTING SUCCESS IN POST- SECONDARY EDUCATION M AY 1 5, 2 0 1 4 SUPPORTING SUCCESS IN POST- SECONDARY EDUCATION M AY 1 5, 2 0 1 4 Statewide initiative CA COLLEGE PATHWAYS Includes CCC, CSU, UCs and Private Campuses Goal is to increase college access, retention & graduation

More information

Senate Bill 1023: Suppor3ng foster youth in California community colleges

Senate Bill 1023: Suppor3ng foster youth in California community colleges Senate Bill 1023: Suppor3ng foster youth in California community colleges Authored by Senator Carol Liu, signed into law in September 2014 SB 1023 allows the California Community College Chancellor s Office

More information

Enter your school name here

Enter your school name here Financial Literacy Project Implementation Plan For Enter your school name here Overview This financial literacy plan is being created as a vehicle to increase financial literacy at the College, as part

More information

2013-14 Program Year. Audit Report. Prepared for the California Community Colleges Chancellor s Office

2013-14 Program Year. Audit Report. Prepared for the California Community Colleges Chancellor s Office 2013-14 Program Year Audit Report Prepared for the California Community Colleges Chancellor s Office Purpose The California Community Colleges Chancellor s Office (CCCCO) requested an audit for the 2013-14

More information

Assembly Bill 12 Primer

Assembly Bill 12 Primer California Fostering Connections to Success Act Assembly Bill 12 Primer December 13, 2011 Developed by the Alliance for Children s Rights, the John Burton Foundation, and the Children s Law Center For

More information

System Improvement Plan

System Improvement Plan R o a d m a p f o r S u p e r i o r S e r v i c e Children and Family Services and the Probation Department driving to: IMPROVE SAFETY IMPROVE PERMANENCY IMPROVE WELL-BEING THE CALIFORNIA CHILD AND FAMILY

More information

Each year, millions of Californians pursue degrees and certificates or enroll in courses

Each year, millions of Californians pursue degrees and certificates or enroll in courses Higher Education Each year, millions of Californians pursue degrees and certificates or enroll in courses to improve their knowledge and skills at the state s higher education institutions. More are connected

More information

Substantive Change Proposal

Substantive Change Proposal Substantive Change Proposal Addition of New Programs: Certificates of Achievement in Project Management and Public Management Folsom Lake College 10 College Parkway Folsom, CA 95630 Los Rios Community

More information

GUIDELINES FOR THE INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAM

GUIDELINES FOR THE INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAM GUIDELINES FOR THE INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAM June 1999 STATE OF CALIFORNIA Gray Davis, Governor HEALTH AND WELFARE AGENCY Grantland Johnson, Secretary CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES Rita Saenz,

More information

Bakersfield College Program Review Annual Update

Bakersfield College Program Review Annual Update Bakersfield College Program Review Annual Update I. Program Information: Program Name: Counseling and Advising Department Program Type: Instructional Non Instructional Program Mission Statement: Academic

More information

Creating a Pathway. for Academic Success. Commitment to Prosperity. Former Foster Youth Services. Mission. Values

Creating a Pathway. for Academic Success. Commitment to Prosperity. Former Foster Youth Services. Mission. Values Former Foster Youth Services Creating a Pathway for Academic Success Commitment to Prosperity Mission The Enriched Scholars Program is a support service committed to advocacy, providing personal growth

More information

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR ALTERNATIVE LEARNING PROGRAMS AND SCHOOLS GRADES K-12

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR ALTERNATIVE LEARNING PROGRAMS AND SCHOOLS GRADES K-12 POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR ALTERNATIVE LEARNING PROGRAMS AND SCHOOLS GRADES K-12 Adopted September 2003 Updated August 2014 North Carolina Department of Public Instruction Safe & Healthy Schools Support

More information

San Diego Continuing Education. Student Equity Plan 2014-2017

San Diego Continuing Education. Student Equity Plan 2014-2017 Student Equity Plan 2014-2017 November 6, 2014 2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (SDCE) provides adult education for the San Diego Community College District. SDCE is the largest, separately accredited continuing education

More information

M E M O R A N D U M. Ruth Fernández, LPC Coordinator/Manager, Educational Services

M E M O R A N D U M. Ruth Fernández, LPC Coordinator/Manager, Educational Services M E M O R A N D U M DATE: March 9, 2015 TO: FROM: SUBJECT: CC: Supervisor Federal D. Glover, District V, Chair Supervisor Candace Andersen, District II Ruth Fernández, LPC Coordinator/Manager, Educational

More information

Senate Bill (SB) 855: Housing Support Program Orange County Application

Senate Bill (SB) 855: Housing Support Program Orange County Application Submitted by: Orange County Contact: Sumit Sapra, 714-541-7782, Sumit.Sapra@ssa.ocgov.com Topic: Senate Bill (SB) 855: Housing Support Program 1. Describe the problem of homelessness and housing instability

More information

Welcome to the Financial Aid Online Orientation at Folsom Lake College (FLC). As you go through this presentation, you will gain a greater

Welcome to the Financial Aid Online Orientation at Folsom Lake College (FLC). As you go through this presentation, you will gain a greater Welcome to the Financial Aid Online Orientation at Folsom Lake College (FLC). As you go through this presentation, you will gain a greater understanding of financial aid policies, procedures, and timelines.

More information

Community-School Partnerships to Support Youth Development

Community-School Partnerships to Support Youth Development REACH Issue Brief Series N u m b e r T W O Community-School Partnerships to Support Youth Development By James Fabionar and David Campbell with support from Lisceth Cruz Carrasco, Nancy Erbstein and Whitney

More information

Summary of Counseling Program SLO Assessment Fall 2012 Review & Spring 2013 Plans (Compiled from data submitted by February 13, 2013)

Summary of Counseling Program SLO Assessment Fall 2012 Review & Spring 2013 Plans (Compiled from data submitted by February 13, 2013) Summary of Counseling Program SLO Assessment Fall 2012 Review & Spring 2013 Plans (Compiled from data submitted by February 13, 2013) Summary prepared by Kathleen Mitchell Table of Contents Introduction

More information

Schools Uniting Neighborhoods: Community Schools Anchoring Local Change

Schools Uniting Neighborhoods: Community Schools Anchoring Local Change Schools Uniting Neighborhoods: Community Schools Anchoring Local Change By Diana Hall, Multnomah County Across the United States, communities are thinking differently about the challenges they face to

More information

Division of Undergraduate Education 2009-2014 Strategic Plan Mission

Division of Undergraduate Education 2009-2014 Strategic Plan Mission Mission The mission of the Division of Undergraduate Education is to promote academic excellence through collaboration with colleges and support units across the University. The mission is realized through

More information

Report on Improvements Made and Gaps Identified in the Prior Year

Report on Improvements Made and Gaps Identified in the Prior Year Human Resources Department Annual Unit Plan for Academic Year 2016-2017 October 2015 Describe Department/Unit Mission/Connection to College Mission Human Resources at Cerro Coso Community College contributes

More information

EDUCATION FOR HOMELESS CHILDREN AND YOUTH PROGRAM

EDUCATION FOR HOMELESS CHILDREN AND YOUTH PROGRAM EDUCATION FOR HOMELESS CHILDREN AND YOUTH PROGRAM TITLE VII-B OF THE McKINNEY-VENTO HOMELESS ASSISTANCE ACT AS AMENDED BY THE NO CHILD LEFT BEHIND ACT OF 2001 NON-REGULATORY GUIDANCE INDIANA DEPARTMENT

More information

AB12 The California Fostering Connections to Success Act

AB12 The California Fostering Connections to Success Act AB12 The California Fostering Connections to Success Act April 7, 2011 C I T Y & C O U N T Y O F S A N F R A N C I S C O Human Services Agency H U M A N S E R V I C E S A G E N C Y Assembly Bill 12: Extended

More information

PARTNERSHIPS FOR OPENING DOORS

PARTNERSHIPS FOR OPENING DOORS A summit on integrating employment and housing strategies to prevent and end homelessness Community Profile CHICAGO Chicago is working on our second Plan to End Homelessness Plan 2.0 A Home for Everyone.

More information

Adolescent Substance Abuse Recovery Support Services Proposal

Adolescent Substance Abuse Recovery Support Services Proposal Adolescent Substance Abuse Recovery Support Services Proposal Report and Recommendations to the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration by the Designated Advisory Group Advisory Group Participants (note

More information

The 411 On CSU Transfer

The 411 On CSU Transfer The 411 On CSU Transfer Advising Your High School Seniors on the Transfer Pathway Karen Simpson- Alisca Assistant Director, Transfer Program CSU Office of the Chancellor Topics for today Taking the Community

More information

Program Planning and Assessment (PPA) for Services, Offices & Non-Instructional Programs. Comprehensive Review, Annual Review & Action Plan

Program Planning and Assessment (PPA) for Services, Offices & Non-Instructional Programs. Comprehensive Review, Annual Review & Action Plan Program Planning and Assessment (PPA) for Services, Offices & Non-Instructional Programs Comprehensive Review, Annual Review & Action Plan Spring 2015 The purpose of Program Planning and Assessment at

More information

PROPOSAL FOR FULL-TIME CWA COUNSELOR

PROPOSAL FOR FULL-TIME CWA COUNSELOR PROPOSAL FOR FULL-TIME CWA COUNSELOR A. Department/Discipline/Program Criteria 1. Identify current Comprehensive Program Review (in cycle) and current Annual Program Plan documents with position need and

More information

Assembly Bill 12 Primer

Assembly Bill 12 Primer California Fostering Connections to Success Act Assembly Bill 12 Primer October 29, 2010 Developed by the AB 12 Bill Authors & Co-Sponsors For more information, contact the individuals below: California

More information

Office of Student Programs Strategic Plan FY 2013 - FY2018

Office of Student Programs Strategic Plan FY 2013 - FY2018 Office of Student Programs Strategic Plan FY 2013 - FY2018-0 - Introduction Dynamic leadership focused on producing meaningful outcomes will characterize our future. For the Office of Student programs,

More information

STAFF DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING

STAFF DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING Manual of Policies and Procedures STAFF DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING STATE OF CALIFORNIA HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES AGENCY DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES Distributed Under the Library Distribution Act This page

More information

BRIDGING THE GAP. From Foster Care to College Success in New York

BRIDGING THE GAP. From Foster Care to College Success in New York BRIDGING THE GAP From Foster Care to College Success in New York Feb 2015 Table of Contents Introduction 1 Proposal Blueprint 2 Program Components & Financial Aid 4 Cost-Benefit Analysis of a College Success

More information

Catherine Meister, Chairman. Susan Brewster. Frank Browning. Betty Hornbrook. Elaine Marable. Melinda O Connor. Kelly Potter.

Catherine Meister, Chairman. Susan Brewster. Frank Browning. Betty Hornbrook. Elaine Marable. Melinda O Connor. Kelly Potter. human services COMMITTEE Catherine Meister, Chairman Susan Brewster Frank Browning Betty Hornbrook Elaine Marable Melinda O Connor Kelly Potter Frank Travis HUMAN SERVICES COMMITTEE The Human Services

More information

The Massachusetts Homeless Post- Secondary Students Network A network to support homeless youth in access to public education

The Massachusetts Homeless Post- Secondary Students Network A network to support homeless youth in access to public education 2013 The Massachusetts Homeless Post- Secondary Students Network A network to support homeless youth in access to public education The Network s purpose is to create strategies that prepare and support

More information

Putting Youth to Work Series

Putting Youth to Work Series Putting Youth to Work Series Examples of Effective Practice in Distressed Communities By Sara Hastings July 2009 Baltimore, MD Best Practice Examples in: Convening Body Delivery Agent Workforce and Employer

More information

HR 2272 Conference Report STEM Education Provisions Summary

HR 2272 Conference Report STEM Education Provisions Summary HR 2272 Conference Report STEM Education Provisions Summary Title I Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) Directs the President to convene a National Science and Technology Summit not more than

More information

Y.E.S. (Youth Education Scholars) to Higher Education

Y.E.S. (Youth Education Scholars) to Higher Education Y.E.S. (Youth Education Scholars) to Higher Education 2012-2013 End of Year Report Sherri L. Brooks, MSW Program Manager Ashley M. Matysiak, MSW Program Coordinator 1 P age Table of Contents Introduction

More information

Turning Dreams into Degrees

Turning Dreams into Degrees Turning Dreams into Degrees Past, Present, and Future of California College Pathways October 2012 There is a shocking disparity between the number of foster youth who aspire to a college-level education

More information

Los Angeles YouthSource Centers

Los Angeles YouthSource Centers Los Angeles YouthSource Centers Contents Collaboration Overview... 1 Collaboration Purpose... 2 About the Collaboration... 2 Collaboration Structure... 3 Promising Practices... 4 Lessons Learned... 6 Accomplishments...

More information

Developing Supported Education Programs at California Universities: Possibilities and Potential Applications

Developing Supported Education Programs at California Universities: Possibilities and Potential Applications Developing Supported Education Programs at California Universities: Possibilities and Potential Applications Tim Stringari, MA, MFT Educational Consultant DMH/DOR Cooperative Programs Coordinator, Human

More information

Proposal Guidelines. Projects with Scholarship Component

Proposal Guidelines. Projects with Scholarship Component Proposal Guidelines Projects with Scholarship Component These proposal guidelines are intended to help you prepare your proposal and gather the required documentation. The guidelines include a checklist

More information

SENATE BILL No. 625 AMENDED IN SENATE APRIL 4, 2013. Introduced by Senator Beall. February 22, 2013

SENATE BILL No. 625 AMENDED IN SENATE APRIL 4, 2013. Introduced by Senator Beall. February 22, 2013 AMENDED IN SENATE APRIL 4, 2013 SENATE BILL No. 625 Introduced by Senator Beall February 22, 2013 An act to amend Section 10601.2 of of, and to add Section 16521.6 to, the Welfare and Institutions Code,

More information

Each year, millions of Californians pursue degrees and certificates or enroll in courses

Each year, millions of Californians pursue degrees and certificates or enroll in courses Higher Education Each year, millions of Californians pursue degrees and certificates or enroll in courses to improve their knowledge and skills at the state s higher education institutions. More are connected

More information

Program Review List Logout How it works

Program Review List Logout How it works Program Review Submission Program Review List Logout How it works 2014-2015 Student Services Program Review Program Name: Counseling Services Program Contact: Ramezane, Marsha Academic Year: 2014-2015

More information

Basic Skills Initiative http://www.cccbsi.org. Academic Senate http://www.asccc.org. Center for Student Success http://css.rpgroup.

Basic Skills Initiative http://www.cccbsi.org. Academic Senate http://www.asccc.org. Center for Student Success http://css.rpgroup. Basic Skills Initiative http://www.cccbsi.org Academic Senate http://www.asccc.org Center for Student Success http://css.rpgroup.org California Community Colleges Chancellor s Office http://www.cccco.edu

More information

FY 2010 PERFORMANCE PLAN Department on Disability Services

FY 2010 PERFORMANCE PLAN Department on Disability Services FY 2010 PERFORMANCE PLAN Department on Disability Services MISSION The mission of the Department on Disability Services (DDS) is to provide innovative high quality services that enable people with disabilities

More information

Community College of Philadelphia. Administrative Function and Support Service Audit. Counseling Department

Community College of Philadelphia. Administrative Function and Support Service Audit. Counseling Department Community College of Philadelphia Administrative Function and Support Service Audit History of the Department Counseling Department August 2007 Executive Summary Introduction to Function/Service The Counseling

More information

Counseling/Social Work Internship Program San Francisco Unified School District

Counseling/Social Work Internship Program San Francisco Unified School District Counseling/Social Work Internship Program San Francisco Unified School District 2015-2016 school year Placement Options SELECT FROM PLACEMENTS IN: Student Intervention Team Mental Health Services High

More information

Transfer Intelligence: How Community College Transfer Students Work toward a Bachelor s in Criminal Justice

Transfer Intelligence: How Community College Transfer Students Work toward a Bachelor s in Criminal Justice Transfer Intelligence: How Community College Transfer Students Work toward a Bachelor s in Criminal Justice Lisel Blash, Darla Cooper, Kelley Karandjeff, Nathan Pellegrin, Diane Rodriguez-Kiino, Eva Schiorring

More information

Aging and Disability Resource Centers: Five Year Plan for Expanding ADRCs Statewide

Aging and Disability Resource Centers: Five Year Plan for Expanding ADRCs Statewide Aging and Disability Resource Centers: Five Year Plan for Expanding ADRCs Statewide Florida Department of Elder Affairs Charles T. Corley, Interim Secretary April 1, 2011 FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ELDER AFFAIRS

More information

1. Improve CLIMATE AND INSTITUTIONAL CULTURE for all employees, in partnership with the community.

1. Improve CLIMATE AND INSTITUTIONAL CULTURE for all employees, in partnership with the community. HUMAN RESOURCES WORKING GROUP: ACTION PLAN VISION PRIORITY: MAXIMIZING OUR HUMAN RESOURCES Diversity of viewpoints, diversity of backgrounds, including gender and ethnic differences, as well as variety

More information

Human Resources FY 2014-16 Performance Plan

Human Resources FY 2014-16 Performance Plan Contents I. Mission Statement... 1 II. Department Overview... 1 III. Program Description and Responsibilities... 2 Administration... 2 Organization Development and Training... 2 Staffing and Recruitment...

More information

Within the context of this policy, the following definitions apply:

Within the context of this policy, the following definitions apply: BOARD OF EDUCATION POLICY 9300 HOMELESS CHILDREN AND YOUTH Effective: June 9, 2011 I. Policy Statement The Board of Education of Howard County is committed to ensuring that all children and youth have

More information

HOW THE LOCAL CONTROL FUNDING FORMULA (LCFF) CAN FIX SCHOOL DISCIPLINE

HOW THE LOCAL CONTROL FUNDING FORMULA (LCFF) CAN FIX SCHOOL DISCIPLINE HOW THE LOCAL CONTROL FUNDING FORMULA (LCFF) CAN FIX SCHOOL DISCIPLINE Summary: We need more solutions to help students struggling with behavior in California, not suspensions. Two decades of research

More information

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING Between the California Community Colleges Chancellor s Office and Dillard University This agreement is effective as of fall 2015 between Dillard University, an independent,

More information

DOE/AHS Interagency Agreement: Strengths, Challenges and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

DOE/AHS Interagency Agreement: Strengths, Challenges and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) DOE/AHS Interagency Agreement: Strengths, Challenges and Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) The DOE/AHS Interagency Agreement kick-off event held on May 1 st inspired rich dialogue about how best to address

More information

Helping Unaccompanied Homeless Youth Access College Financial Aid

Helping Unaccompanied Homeless Youth Access College Financial Aid NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE EDUCATION OF HOMELESS CHILDREN AND YOUTH Helping Unaccompanied Homeless Youth Access College Financial Aid Who Are Unaccompanied Homeless Youth? Unaccompanied homeless youth

More information

50 / ADMISSION: TRANSFER STUDENTS CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SACRAMENTO

50 / ADMISSION: TRANSFER STUDENTS CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SACRAMENTO ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY: TRANSFER STUDENTS Pre-Enrollment Assistance CAN Numbering System Admission Requirements International Students TOEFL Requirement Special Admission Catalog Rights Auditors Transfer

More information

Student Equity Plan. Mt. San Antonio College - Student Equity Plan - December 2014 Page 1

Student Equity Plan. Mt. San Antonio College - Student Equity Plan - December 2014 Page 1 Student Equity Plan Mt. San Antonio College - Student Equity Plan - December 2014 Page 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY An executive summary that includes, at a minimum, the student group for whom goals have been set,

More information

ATLANTA TECHNICAL COLLEGE

ATLANTA TECHNICAL COLLEGE ATLANTA TECHNICAL COLLEGE STRATEGIC PLAN FY 2008 2012 Mission and Vision ATC Mission Atlanta Technical College, a unit of the Technical College System of Georgia, located in the city of Atlanta, is an

More information

Twin Falls School District 411 Migrant Education Program. Updated September 3, 2013

Twin Falls School District 411 Migrant Education Program. Updated September 3, 2013 Twin Falls School District 411 Migrant Education Program Updated September 3, 2013 Mission Statement The mission of the Twin Falls School District Migrant Education Program is to provide comprehensive,

More information

Monthly THP Plus & THP+FC Conference Call

Monthly THP Plus & THP+FC Conference Call Monthly THP Plus & THP+FC Conference Call THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 10: 10:00 TO 11:00 A.M. Technical Details Call in number is 1 (702) 489 0008 and access code is 928 441 384 To submit questions, click on the

More information

INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAM KERN COUNTY ILP NEWS LETTER FALL 2014

INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAM KERN COUNTY ILP NEWS LETTER FALL 2014 Inside this issue: Volume 8, Issue 7 Fall 2014 What is ILP 1 2014 Summer 2 Life Skills Class Summer Life 3 Skills Pictures Tier classes info 4 What is ILP? 100 E. California Ave. Bakersfield, CA 93307

More information

AB 86: Adult Education

AB 86: Adult Education AB 86: Adult Education Webinar Series http://ab86.cccco.edu 1-23-2015 Agenda for Today s Webinar Governor s Budget Highlights Next Steps on the proposal Questions? Partnering between K-12 Adult and Community

More information

DARRON D. GARNER, PHD; LCSW

DARRON D. GARNER, PHD; LCSW DARRON D. GARNER, PHD; LCSW E-mail: ddgarner@pvamu.edu SUMMARY OF EXPERIENCE Nine years of experience an independent social work practitioner in Houston Texas. Combined eight years of demonstrated student

More information

Improving Family Outcomes Using Treatment Engagement Strategies

Improving Family Outcomes Using Treatment Engagement Strategies Improving Family Outcomes Using Treatment Engagement Strategies Nancy K. Young, Ph.D. Julia Maestas, M.S. Presented at The 5th National CONFERence on Behavioral Health for Women and Girls Health, Empowerment,

More information

The School Counselor s Role in College and Career Readiness

The School Counselor s Role in College and Career Readiness College and Career Readiness Counseling for All Students 1 The School Counselor s Role in College and Career Readiness Judy Petersen, M. Ed. Director, College and Career Readiness Granite School District

More information

CCCSFAAA Summer Training BOG Fee Manual

CCCSFAAA Summer Training BOG Fee Manual CCCSFAAA Summer Training BOG Fee Manual Mt. San Jacinto College Menifee Campus July 13 Fullerton College July 14 LA Mission College July 15 Modesto Junior College July 29 Sierra College July 30 2015 CCCSFAAA

More information

An outline of National Standards for Out of home Care

An outline of National Standards for Out of home Care Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs together with the National Framework Implementation Working Group An outline of National Standards for Out of home Care A Priority

More information

Higher Education includes the California Community Colleges (CCC), the California

Higher Education includes the California Community Colleges (CCC), the California Higher Education Higher Education includes the California Community Colleges (CCC), the California State University (CSU), the University of California (UC), the Student Aid Commission, and several other

More information

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE BRIEF. Introduction. Getting Started YOUTH WORKER CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS. Prepared for the READY BY 21 QUALITY COUNTS INITIATIVE

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE BRIEF. Introduction. Getting Started YOUTH WORKER CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS. Prepared for the READY BY 21 QUALITY COUNTS INITIATIVE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE BRIEF YOUTH WORKER CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS Prepared for the READY BY 21 QUALITY COUNTS INITIATIVE Introduction The following lessons have been compiled based on several years of experience

More information

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. A. Planning Process

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. A. Planning Process EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Provide a narrative describing the program and concise summaries for Evaluation Criteria A-J of the proposal. Label section headings. (Limit 1200 words) Institution: Florida State College

More information

Master of Social Work Program. Application Instructions for Fall 2015

Master of Social Work Program. Application Instructions for Fall 2015 Master of Social Work Program Application Instructions for Fall 2015 I. Admission Admission to the Master of Social Work (MSW) program is limited to the Fall semester only. Application materials may be

More information

Family Drug Courts: The Solution By Judge Katherine Lucero

Family Drug Courts: The Solution By Judge Katherine Lucero Family Drug Courts: The Solution By Judge Katherine Lucero The first Drug Court was in Miami-Dade County, Florida in 1989. Tired of the same faces and the same cases repeatedly appearing before the court,

More information

OFFICE FOR Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Unit Plan 2014 17

OFFICE FOR Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Unit Plan 2014 17 OFFICE FOR Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Unit Plan 2014 17 Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Built on collaboration and innovation, UC San Diego is a preeminent student-centered, research-focused, service-oriented

More information

We look forward to hearing from you!!

We look forward to hearing from you!! CAPC, the Child Abuse Prevention Council of San Joaquin County, has a number of new programs beginning in the new fiscal year. Below you will find a brief description of each program and the positions

More information

Assembly Bill 12 Primer

Assembly Bill 12 Primer CALIFORNIA FOSTERING CONNECTIONS TO SUCCESS ACT Assembly Bill 12 Primer Updated January 1, 2014 Developed by: JOHN BURTON FOUNDATION FOR CHILDREN WITHOUT HOMES For more information, contact the individuals

More information

Provide open houses each year for all currently enrolled students. Existing Effort

Provide open houses each year for all currently enrolled students. Existing Effort The University of Tennessee Diversity Plan College/Dept. College of Business Administration Goal One: Create and sustain a welcoming, supportive and inclusive campus climate. Responsible Objectives Strategy/Tactics

More information

Scholarship and Financial Aid Terminology

Scholarship and Financial Aid Terminology Scholarship and Financial Aid Terminology FAFSA: The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (known as the FAFSA) is a form that can be prepared annually by current and prospective college permanent resident

More information

An Assessment of Capacity Building in Washington State

An Assessment of Capacity Building in Washington State An Assessment of Capacity Building in Washington State The Nonprofit Ecosystem Framework Executive Summary prepared by The Giving Practice A consulting service of Philanthropy Northwest February 2012 About

More information

Youth Career Development

Youth Career Development GUIDE TO GIVING Youth Career Development HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE STEP 1 EDUCATION AND YOUTH DEVELOPMENT Understanding the Recommended Approach to Youth Career Development Are you interested in youth career

More information

Orange County is located between Los Angeles and San Diego

Orange County is located between Los Angeles and San Diego This document was peer reviewed through the NWI. Supporting Wraparound Implementation: Chapter 5d.3 The Wraparound Orange County Model Denise Churchill, Program Manager Orange County Children and Family

More information

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING Between the California Community Colleges Chancellor s Office and Bennett College This agreement is effective as of fall 2015 between Bennett College, an independent, nonprofit,

More information

School Counseling Programs and Services

School Counseling Programs and Services REGULATION Related Entries: IJA Responsible Office: Special Education and Student Services MONTGOMERY COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS IJA-RA School Counseling Programs and Services I. PURPOSE A. To ensure that a

More information

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY INDEPENDENT LIVING SKILLS PROGRAM (ILSP) 2010/2011 PROGRAM REPORT FAMILY AND HUMAN SERVICES COMMITTEE

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY INDEPENDENT LIVING SKILLS PROGRAM (ILSP) 2010/2011 PROGRAM REPORT FAMILY AND HUMAN SERVICES COMMITTEE CONTRA COSTA COUNTY INDEPENDENT LIVING SKILLS PROGRAM (ILSP) 2010/2011 PROGRAM REPORT FAMILY AND HUMAN SERVICES COMMITTEE November 14, 2011 Joan Miller, Division Manager Neely McElroy, Division Manager

More information

Dean: Erin Vines, Faculty Member: Mary Gumlia 12/14/2009

Dean: Erin Vines, Faculty Member: Mary Gumlia 12/14/2009 SOLANO COMMUNITY COLLEGE PROGRAM REVIEW COUNSELING COURSES Dean: Erin Vines, Faculty Member: Mary Gumlia 12/14/2009 Introduction The mission of the Solano College Counseling Division is to provide services,

More information

Handbook. Statewide Career Pathways: Creating School to College Articulation. Handbook for articulating with secondary schools and ROCPs.

Handbook. Statewide Career Pathways: Creating School to College Articulation. Handbook for articulating with secondary schools and ROCPs. Handbook Statewide Career Pathways: Creating School to College Articulation Handbook for articulating with secondary schools and ROCPs April 2008 Handbook for articulating with secondary schools and ROCPs

More information

NGA Center for Best Practices Honor States Grant Program Phase Two Awards

NGA Center for Best Practices Honor States Grant Program Phase Two Awards NGA Center for Best Practices Honor States Grant Program Phase Two Awards Increase Course Rigor ($140,000 Grant; $40,000 Match Required) Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania will work with NGA and ACT

More information

Distance Education Annual Report 2008-2009

Distance Education Annual Report 2008-2009 Distance Education Annual Report 2008-2009 Prepared by Howard Story Faculty Coordinator, Distance Education/Media Alice Grigsby Director, Learning Resources Table of Contents Program Overview... 3 5 Statistical

More information

Registry and College Scholarships

Registry and College Scholarships Approved July 2015 Registry and College Scholarships I. INTENT OF STRATEGY The intent of this evidence informed Professional Development strategy is to provide access to higher education for the early

More information

Tulsa Public Schools District Secondary School Counseling Program

Tulsa Public Schools District Secondary School Counseling Program Tulsa Public Schools District Secondary School Counseling Program Excellence and High Expectations with a Commitment to All Tulsa School Counseling Program A school counseling program is comprehensive

More information

Texas Southern University

Texas Southern University Texas Southern University College of Education Bylaws 2012 [Type text] 2 College of Education Bylaws Preamble Texas Southern University was founded in 1927 and became a state institution in 1947. Texas

More information

GUIDANCE. Rocky River City School District. Globally Competitive Exceptional Opportunites Caring Environment Successful Students

GUIDANCE. Rocky River City School District. Globally Competitive Exceptional Opportunites Caring Environment Successful Students GUIDANCE K 12 Rocky River City School District Globally Competitive Exceptional Opportunites Caring Environment Successful Students DISTRICT GUIDANCE PROGRAM PHILOSOPHY Our philosophy is to be pro-active,

More information

AmeriCorps*VISTA PROGRAM 2015 2016 HOST CAMPUS APPLICATION. Proposals due 4/1/15. Intent to Apply Form due 3/6/15

AmeriCorps*VISTA PROGRAM 2015 2016 HOST CAMPUS APPLICATION. Proposals due 4/1/15. Intent to Apply Form due 3/6/15 AmeriCorps*VISTA PROGRAM 2015 2016 HOST CAMPUS APPLICATION Proposals due 4/1/15 Intent to Apply Form due 3/6/15 ISSUED BY: MASSACHUSETTS CAMPUS COMPACT, INC IN PARTNERSHIP WITH: MASSACHUSETTS STATE OFFICE

More information

The California Transitional Kindergarten Stipend Program. May 27, 2015

The California Transitional Kindergarten Stipend Program. May 27, 2015 The California Transitional Kindergarten Stipend Program May 27, 2015 1 Welcome Araceli Sandoval-Gonzalez Statewide Field Director, Early Edge California Andrea Ball Senior Policy Advisor, Early Edge California

More information

A Master Plan for Nursing Education In Washington State

A Master Plan for Nursing Education In Washington State A Master Plan for Nursing Education In Washington State Implementation Recommendations Washington Center for Nursing www.wacenterfornursing.org December 2009 This work was funded by Grant N14191 from the

More information

Best Practices for Engaging Youth in Mental Health Programming

Best Practices for Engaging Youth in Mental Health Programming Best Practices for Engaging Youth in Mental Health Programming An overview of youth engagement principles and mental health programming resources for high school students. Webinar Housekeeping Everyone

More information

INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAM KERN COUNTY ILP NEWS LETTER SPRING 2014

INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAM KERN COUNTY ILP NEWS LETTER SPRING 2014 In this Issue Volume 7, Issue 5 Spring What is ILP 1 AB-12 2 AB-12 Facts 3 AB-12 questions 3 Q &A AB-12 4 John Burton Info 5 CYC Information 6 CYC Pictures 7 Credit Information 8 What is ILP? INDEPENDENT

More information

PREPARATION & APPLICATION ASSISTANCE PART 4 OF E4FC'S 2016 GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP GUIDES

PREPARATION & APPLICATION ASSISTANCE PART 4 OF E4FC'S 2016 GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP GUIDES PREPARATION & APPLICATION ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PART 4 OF E4FC'S 2016 GRADUATE SCHOLARSHIP GUIDES In This Mini-Guide: Programs listed below are intended to prepare students to apply to graduate or professional

More information