Chapter 117. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts. Subchapter C. High School, Adopted 2013

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1 High School, Adopted C. Chapter 117. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts Subchapter C. High School, Adopted 2013 Statutory Authority: The provisions of this Subchapter C issued under the Texas Education Code, 7.102(c)(4), , and , unless otherwise noted Implementation of Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Fine Arts, High School, Adopted (a) (b) (c) (d) The provisions of of this subchapter shall be implemented by school districts. No later than August 31, 2014, the commissioner of education shall determine whether instructional materials funding has been made available to Texas public schools for materials that cover the essential knowledge and skills for fine arts as adopted in of this subchapter. If the commissioner makes the determination that instructional materials funding has been made available under subsection (b) of this section, of this subchapter shall be implemented beginning with the school year and apply to the and subsequent school years. If the commissioner does not make the determination that instructional materials funding has been made available under subsection (b) of this section, the commissioner shall determine no later than August 31 of each subsequent school year whether instructional materials funding has been made available. If the commissioner determines that instructional materials funding has been made available, the commissioner shall notify the State Board of Education and school districts that of this subchapter shall be implemented for the following school year. (e) Sections of this chapter shall be superseded by the implementation of under this section. Source: The provisions of this adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg Art, Level I (One Credit), Adopted (a) (b) General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following art courses: Art I, Art Appreciation, and Art and Media Communications I (one credit per course). Introduction. (1) The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child. (2) Four basic strands--foundations: observation and perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Each strand is of equal value and may be presented in any order throughout the year. Students rely on personal observations and perceptions, which are developed through increasing visual literacy and sensitivity to surroundings, communities, memories, imaginings, and life experiences as sources for thinking about, planning, and creating original artworks. Students communicate their thoughts and ideas with innovation and creativity. Through art, students challenge their imaginations, foster critical thinking, collaborate with others, and build reflective skills. While exercising meaningful problem-solving skills, students develop the lifelong ability to make informed judgments. July 2013 Update Page 1

2 117.C. High School, Adopted 2013 (c) (3) Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples. Knowledge and skills. (1) Foundations: observation and perception. The student develops and expands visual literacy skills using critical thinking, imagination, and the senses to observe and explore the world by learning about, understanding, and applying the elements of art, principles of design, and expressive qualities. The student uses what the student sees, knows, and has experienced as sources for examining, understanding, and creating original artwork. The consider concepts and ideas from direct observation, original sources, experiences, and imagination for original artwork; identify and understand the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork; identify and understand the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork; and make judgments about the expressive properties such as content, meaning, message, and metaphor of artwork using art vocabulary accurately. (2) Creative expression. The student communicates ideas through original artwork using a variety of media with appropriate skills. The student expresses thoughts and ideas creatively while challenging the imagination, fostering reflective thinking, and developing disciplined effort and progressive problem-solving skills. The use visual solutions to create original artwork by problem solving through direct observation, original sources, experiences, narrations, and imagination; communicate a variety of applications for design solutions; use an understanding of copyright and public domain to appropriate imagery constituting the main focal point of original artwork when working from images rather than direct observation or imagination; create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions; collaborate to create original works of art; and demonstrate effective use of art media and tools in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, fiber art, design, and digital art and media. (3) Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of art history and culture by analyzing artistic styles, historical periods, and a variety of cultures. The student develops global awareness and respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. The compare and contrast historical and contemporary styles while identifying general themes and trends; describe general characteristics in artwork from a variety of cultures, which might also include personal identity and heritage; collaborate on community-based art projects; and compare and contrast career and avocational opportunities in art. (4) Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and analyzes the artworks of self and others, contributing to the development of the lifelong skills of making informed judgments and reasoned evaluations. The Page 2 July 2013 Update

3 High School, Adopted C. interpret, evaluate, and justify artistic decisions in artwork by self, peers, and other artists such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites; evaluate and analyze artwork using a verbal or written method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist's intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork; construct a physical or electronic portfolio by evaluating and analyzing personal original artwork to provide evidence of learning; and select and analyze original artwork, portfolios, and exhibitions to form precise conclusions about formal qualities, historical and cultural contexts, intentions, and meanings. Source: The provisions of this adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg Art, Level II (One Credit), Adopted (a) (b) (c) General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following art courses: Art II, Drawing I, Painting I, Printmaking I, Fibers I, Ceramics I, Sculpture I, Jewelry I, Photography I, Design I, Digital Art and Media I, and Art and Media Communications II (one credit per course). The prerequisite for each art course listed in this subsection is one credit of Art, Level I. Introduction. (1) The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child. (2) Four basic strands--foundations: observation and perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Each strand is of equal value and may be presented in any order throughout the year. Students rely on personal observations and perceptions, which are developed through increasing visual literacy and sensitivity to surroundings, communities, memories, imaginings, and life experiences as sources for thinking about, planning, and creating original artworks. Students communicate their thoughts and ideas with innovation and creativity. Through art, students challenge their imaginations, foster critical thinking, collaborate with others, and build reflective skills. While exercising meaningful problem-solving skills, students develop the lifelong ability to make informed judgments. (3) Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples. Knowledge and skills. (1) Foundations: observation and perception. The student develops and expands visual literacy skills using critical thinking, imagination, and the senses to observe and explore the world by learning about, understanding, and applying the elements of art, principles of design, and expressive qualities. The student uses what the student sees, knows, and has experienced as sources for examining, understanding, and creating original artworks. The use visual comparisons to illustrate concepts and ideas from direct observation, original sources, experiences, narration, and imagination for original artworks; July 2013 Update Page 3

4 117.C. High School, Adopted 2013 identify and apply the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artworks; identify and apply the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity in personal artworks; and explore suitability of art media and processes to express specific ideas such as content, meaning, message, appropriation, and metaphor relating to visual themes of artworks using art vocabulary accurately. (2) Creative expression. The student communicates ideas through original artworks using a variety of media with appropriate skills. The student expresses thoughts and ideas creatively while challenging the imagination, fostering reflective thinking, and developing disciplined effort and progressive problem-solving skills. The create original artwork using multiple solutions from direct observation, original sources, experiences, and imagination in order to expand personal themes that demonstrate artistic intent; apply design skills in creating practical applications, clarifying presentations, and examining consumer choices in order to make successful design decisions; use an understanding of copyright and public domain to appropriate imagery constituting the main focal point of original artwork when working from images rather than direct observation or imagination; create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions; collaborate to create original works of art; and select from a variety of art media and tools to communicate specific ideas in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, fiber art, jewelry, mixed media, photography, and digital art and media. (3) Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of art history and culture by analyzing artistic styles, historical periods, and a variety of cultures. The student develops global awareness and respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. The examine selected historical periods or styles of art to identify general themes and trends; analyze specific characteristics in artwork from a variety of cultures; collaborate on community-based art projects; and examine and research career, entrepreneurial, and avocational opportunities in art. (4) Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and analyzes the artworks of self and others, contributing to the development of the lifelong skills of making informed judgments and reasoned evaluations. The interpret, evaluate, and justify artistic decisions in artwork by self, peers, and other artists such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites; evaluate and analyze artwork using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist's intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork; use responses to artwork critiques to make decisions about future directions in personal work; construct a physical or electronic portfolio by evaluating and analyzing personal original artworks to provide evidence of learning; and Page 4 July 2013 Update

5 High School, Adopted C. select and analyze original artwork, portfolios, and exhibitions to form precise conclusions about formal qualities, historical and cultural contexts, intentions, and meanings. Source: The provisions of this adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg Art, Level III (One Credit), Adopted (a) (b) (c) General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following art courses: Art III, Drawing II, Painting II, Printmaking II, Fibers II, Ceramics II, Sculpture II, Jewelry II, Photography II, Design II, Digital Art and Media II, Advanced Placement (AP) Studio Art: Drawing Portfolio, AP Studio Art: Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP Studio Art: Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP Art History, International Baccalaureate (IB) Visual Arts I Standard Level (SL), or IB Visual Arts I Higher Level (HL) (one credit per course). There are no prerequisites for AP Art History and all IB courses. One credit in an Art, Level II course is a recommended prerequisite for AP Studio Art: Drawing Portfolio, AP Studio Art: Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio, and AP Studio Art: Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio. The prerequisite for all other Art, Level III courses is one credit of Art, Level II in the corresponding discipline. Introduction. (1) The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child. (2) Four basic strands--foundations: observation and perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Each strand is of equal value and may be presented in any order throughout the year. Students rely on personal observations and perceptions, which are developed through increasing visual literacy and sensitivity to surroundings, communities, memories, imaginings, and life experiences as sources for thinking about, planning, and creating original artworks. Students communicate their thoughts and ideas with innovation and creativity. Through art, students challenge their imaginations, foster critical thinking, collaborate with others, and build reflective skills. While exercising meaningful problem-solving skills, students develop the lifelong ability to make informed judgments. (3) Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples. Knowledge and skills. (1) Foundations: observation and perception. The student develops and expands visual literacy skills using critical thinking, imagination, and the senses to observe and explore the world by learning about, understanding, and applying the elements of art, principles of design, and expressive qualities. The student uses what the student sees, knows, and has experienced as sources for examining, understanding, and creating original artwork. The analyze visual characteristics of sources to illustrate concepts, demonstrate flexibility in solving problems, create multiple solutions, and think imaginatively; compare and contrast the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork; July 2013 Update Page 5

6 117.C. High School, Adopted 2013 compare and contrast the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork; and explore the suitability of art media and processes and select those appropriate to express specific ideas such as content, meaning, message, and metaphor relating to visual themes to interpret the expressive qualities of artwork. (2) Creative expression. The student communicates ideas through original artwork using a variety of media with appropriate skills. The student expresses thoughts and ideas creatively while challenging the imagination, fostering reflective thinking, and developing disciplined effort and progressive problem-solving skills. The create original artwork using multiple solutions from direct observation, original sources, experiences, and imagination in order to expand personal themes that demonstrate artistic intent; solve visual problems and develop multiple solutions for designing ideas, creating practical applications, clarifying presentations, and evaluating consumer choices in order to make successful design decisions; use an understanding of copyright and public domain to appropriate imagery constituting the main focal point of original artwork when working from images rather than direct observation or imagination; create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions; collaborate to create original works of art; and select from a variety of art media and tools to express intent in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, fiber art, design, digital art and media, photography, jewelry, and mixed media. (3) Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of art history and culture by analyzing artistic styles, historical periods, and a variety of cultures. The student develops global awareness and respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. The research selected historical periods, artists, general themes, trends, and styles of art; distinguish the correlation between specific characteristics and influences of various cultures and contemporary artwork; collaborate on community-based art projects; and examine, research, and develop a plan of action for relevant career, entrepreneurial, and avocational art opportunities within a global economy. (4) Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and analyzes the artworks of self and others, contributing to the development of the lifelong skills of making informed judgments and reasoned evaluations. The interpret, evaluate, and justify artistic decisions in artwork such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites based on evaluation of developmental progress, competency in problem solving, and a variety of visual ideas; evaluate and analyze artwork using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist's intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork; analyze personal artwork in order to create a written response such as an artist's statement reflecting intent, inspiration, the elements of art and principles of design within the artwork, and measure of uniqueness; Page 6 July 2013 Update

7 High School, Adopted C. use responses to artwork critiques to make decisions about future directions in personal work; construct a physical or electronic portfolio by evaluating and analyzing personal original artwork to provide evidence of learning; and select and analyze original artwork, portfolios, and exhibitions to demonstrate innovation and provide examples of in-depth exploration of qualities such as aesthetics; formal, historical, and cultural contexts; intentions; and meanings. Source: The provisions of this adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg Art, Level IV (One Credit), Adopted (a) (b) (c) General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following art courses: Art IV, Drawing III, Painting III, Printmaking III, Fibers III, Ceramics III, Sculpture III, Jewelry III, Photography III, Design III, Digital Art and Media III, Advanced Placement (AP) Studio Art: Drawing Portfolio, AP Studio Art: Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP Studio Art: Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio, AP Art History, International Baccalaureate (IB) Visual Arts II Standard Level (SL), and IB Visual Arts II Higher Level (HL) (one credit per course). There are no prerequisites for AP Art History. The prerequisites for the IB courses listed in this subsection are the corresponding Art, Level II IB courses. One credit in an Art, Level II course is a recommended prerequisite for AP Studio Art: Drawing Portfolio, AP Studio Art: Two-Dimensional Design Portfolio, and AP Studio Art: Three-Dimensional Design Portfolio. The prerequisite for all other Art, Level IV courses is one credit of Art, Level III in the corresponding discipline. Introduction. (1) The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child. (2) Four basic strands--foundations: observation and perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Each strand is of equal value and may be presented in any order throughout the year. Students rely on personal observations and perceptions, which are developed through increasing visual literacy and sensitivity to surroundings, communities, memories, imaginings, and life experiences as sources for thinking about, planning, and creating original artworks. Students communicate their thoughts and ideas with innovation and creativity. Through art, students challenge their imaginations, foster critical thinking, collaborate with others, and build reflective skills. While exercising meaningful problem-solving skills, students develop the lifelong ability to make informed judgments. (3) Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples. Knowledge and skills. (1) Foundations: observation and perception. The student develops and expands visual literacy skills using critical thinking, imagination, and the senses to observe and explore the world by learning about, understanding, and applying the elements of art, principles of design, and expressive qualities. The student uses what the student sees, knows, and has experienced as sources for examining, understanding, and creating original artwork. The July 2013 Update Page 7

8 117.C. High School, Adopted 2013 consider concepts and themes for personal artwork that integrate an extensive range of visual observations, experiences, and imagination; compare and contrast the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, form, space, and value, as the fundamentals of art in personal artwork; compare and contrast the principles of design, including emphasis, repetition/pattern, movement/rhythm, contrast/variety, balance, proportion, and unity, in personal artwork; and discriminate between art media and processes to express complex visual relationships such as content, meaning, message, and metaphor using extensive art vocabulary. (2) Creative expression. The student communicates ideas through original artworks using a variety of media with appropriate skills. The student expresses thoughts and ideas creatively while challenging the imagination, fostering reflective thinking, and developing disciplined effort and progressive problem-solving skills. The produce an original body of artwork that integrates information from a variety of sources, including original sources, and demonstrates sustained self-directed investigations into specific themes such as a series or concentration of works; evaluate and justify design ideas and concepts to create a body of personal artwork; use an understanding of copyright and public domain to appropriate imagery constituting the main focal point of original artwork when working from images rather than direct observation or imagination; create original artwork to communicate thoughts, feelings, ideas, or impressions; collaborate to create original works of art; and create artwork, singularly and in a series, by selecting from a variety of art materials and tools appropriate to course work in drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, ceramics, fiber art, design, digital art and media, photography, jewelry, and mixed media. (3) Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of art history and culture by analyzing artistic styles, historical periods, and a variety of cultures. The student develops global awareness and respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. The research and report on selected historical periods, artists, general themes, trends, and styles of art; analyze and evaluate the influence of contemporary cultures on artwork; collaborate on community-based art projects; and examine, research, and develop a plan of action for relevant career or entrepreneurial art opportunities within a global economy, justifying the choice. (4) Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and analyzes the artworks of self and others, contributing to the development of the lifelong skills of making informed judgments and reasoned evaluations. The develop evaluative criteria to justify artistic decisions in artwork such as that in museums, local galleries, art exhibits, and websites based on a high level of creativity and expertise in one or more art areas; evaluate and analyze artwork using a method of critique such as describing the artwork, analyzing the way it is organized, interpreting the artist's intention, and evaluating the success of the artwork; Page 8 July 2013 Update

9 High School, Adopted C. analyze personal artwork in order to create a written response such as an artist's statement reflecting intent, inspiration, the elements of art and principles of design within the artwork, and the measure of uniqueness; use responses to artwork critiques to make decisions about future directions in personal work; construct a physical or electronic portfolio by evaluating and analyzing personal original artwork to provide evidence of learning; and evaluate a wide range of artwork to form conclusions about formal qualities, aesthetics, historical and cultural contexts, intents, and meanings. Source: The provisions of this adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg Dance, Level I (One Credit), Adopted (a) (b) (c) General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following dance courses: Principles of Dance I, Ballet I, Modern/Contemporary Dance I, Jazz I, Tap I, World Dance Forms I, Dance Composition/Improvisation I, Dance Theory I, Dance Performance/Ensemble I, Dance and Media Communication I, Dance Production I, and Dance Wellness I (one credit per course). The prerequisite for Dance and Media Communication I is Dance, Middle School 1, 2, or 3. Introduction. (1) The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child. (2) Four basic strands--foundations: perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Dance students develop perceptual thinking and movement abilities in daily life, promoting an understanding of themselves and others. Students develop movement principles and technical skills and explore choreographic and performance qualities. Students develop self-discipline and healthy bodies that move expressively, efficiently, and safely through space and time with a sensitive kinesthetic awareness. Students recognize dance as a vehicle for understanding historical and cultural relevance, increasing an awareness of heritage and traditions of their own and others, and enabling them to participate in a diverse society. Evaluating and analyzing dance allows students to strengthen decision-making skills, develop critical and creative thinking, and develop artistic and creative processes. Students continue to explore technology and its application to dance and movement, enabling them to make informed decisions about dance. (3) Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples. Knowledge and skills. (1) Foundations: perception. The student develops an awareness of the body's movement using sensory information while dancing. The define basic kinesthetic and spatial awareness individually and in groups; identify a comprehensive understanding of health, safety, and wellness for dancers; July 2013 Update Page 9

10 117.C. High School, Adopted 2013 recognize knowledge of dance genres, styles, and vocabulary; and identify images found in the environment through movement. (2) Creative expression: artistic process. The student develops knowledge and skills of dance elements, choreographic processes, and forms in a variety of dance genres and styles. The student is expected to: explain basic principles of proper body alignment; explore, improvise, and demonstrate original movement during the creative process; express ideas and emotions through movement; and create basic compositional forms using fundamental dance elements for choreographic processes. (3) Creative expression: performance. The student demonstrates knowledge and execution of technical dance skills in a variety of dance genres and styles through performing. The perform memorized movement sequences with rhythmical accuracy in dance genres and styles such as ballet, modern dance, tap, jazz, musical theatre dance, and world dance forms; identify the effective use of dance elements in practice and performance; perform basic compositional forms using fundamental choreographic processes; and understand the principles of an effective warm-up and cool-down, implementing elements of proper conditioning for performing skills. (4) Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of cultural, historical, and artistic diversity. The perform the characteristics of dances from several diverse cultures or historical periods; perform dance phrases or dances from several time periods with an understanding of historical and social contexts; identify historical figures in dance history and their significance; and identify dance in various media and content areas. (5) Critical evaluation and response. The student makes informed personal judgments about dance and the meaning and role of dance in society. The incorporate appropriate movement vocabulary when identifying qualities and discussing meaning of performance or production in dance; demonstrate appropriate audience behavior and etiquette in the classroom and at performances; identify relationships between dance and other content areas; and identify knowledge and skills of technology in dance. Source: The provisions of this adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg Dance, Level II (One Credit), Adopted (a) General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following dance courses: Principles of Dance II, Ballet II, Modern/Contemporary Dance II, Jazz II, Tap II, World Dance Forms II, Dance Composition/Improvisation II, Dance Theory II, Dance Performance/Ensemble II, Dance Production II, Dance Wellness II, and Dance and Media Communications II (one credit per course). The prerequisite for each Dance, Level II course is one credit of Dance, Level I in the corresponding discipline. Page 10 July 2013 Update

11 High School, Adopted C. (b) (c) Introduction. (1) The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child. (2) Four basic strands--foundations: perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Dance students develop perceptual thinking and movement abilities in daily life, promoting an understanding of themselves and others. Students develop movement principles and technical skills and explore choreographic and performance qualities. Students develop self-discipline and healthy bodies that move expressively, efficiently, and safely through space and time with a sensitive kinesthetic awareness. Students recognize dance as a vehicle for understanding historical and cultural relevance, increasing an awareness of heritage and traditions of their own and others, and enabling them to participate in a diverse society. Evaluating and analyzing dance allows students to strengthen decision-making skills, develop critical and creative thinking, and develop artistic and creative processes. Students will continue to explore technology and its application to dance and movement, enabling them to make informed decisions about dance. (3) Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples. Knowledge and skills. (1) Foundations: perception. The student develops an awareness of the body's movement using sensory information while dancing. The demonstrate kinesthetic and spatial awareness individually and in groups; expand a comprehensive understanding of health, safety, and wellness for dancers; demonstrate effective knowledge of dance genres, styles, and vocabulary; and interpret details in movement in natural and constructed environments. (2) Creative expression: artistic process. The student develops knowledge and skills of dance elements, choreographic processes, and forms in a variety of dance genres and styles. The student is expected to: expand a comprehensive understanding of principles of proper body alignment; explore, improvise, and perform original movement during the creative process; expand the expression of ideas and emotions through movement; and create enhanced compositional forms using fundamental dance elements for choreographic processes. (3) Creative expression: performance. The student demonstrates knowledge and execution of technical dance skills in a variety of dance genres and styles through performing. The perform extended movement patterns with rhythmical accuracy in dance genres and styles such as ballet, modern dance, tap, jazz, musical theatre dance, and world dance forms; demonstrate the elements of dance effectively; July 2013 Update Page 11

12 117.C. High School, Adopted 2013 perform enhanced compositional forms using sound choreographic processes; and implement an effective warm-up and cool-down, implementing the elements of proper conditioning for performing skills. (4) Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of cultural, historical, and artistic diversity. The analyze dances of various cultures or historical periods; choreograph short dance phrases that exhibit an understanding of various historical periods and social contexts; perform dances in various media and content areas; and interpret historical and cultural dance forms using technology. (5) Critical evaluation and response. The student makes informed personal judgments about dance and the meaning and role of dance in society. The identify characteristics of a variety of dances; analyze qualities of performance and proper etiquette in dance; identify similarities of form and expression in dance and other content areas; and apply knowledge and skills of technology in dance. Source: The provisions of this adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg Dance, Level III (One Credit), Adopted (a) (b) General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following dance courses: Principles of Dance III, Ballet III, Modern/Contemporary Dance III, Jazz III, Tap III, World Dance Forms III, Dance Composition/Improvisation III, Dance Theory III, Dance Performance/Ensemble III, Dance Production III, Dance Wellness III, Dance History I, and International Baccalaureate (IB) Dance I (one credit per course). The prerequisite for each Dance, Level III course is one credit of Dance, Level II in the corresponding discipline, excluding Dance History I and IB Dance I courses. Introduction. (1) The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child. (2) Four basic strands--foundations: perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Dance students develop perceptual thinking and movement abilities in daily life, promoting an understanding of themselves and others. Students develop movement principles and technical skills and explore choreographic and performance qualities. Students develop self-discipline and healthy bodies that move expressively, efficiently, and safely through space and time with a sensitive kinesthetic awareness. Students recognize dance as a vehicle for understanding historical and cultural relevance, increasing an awareness of heritage and traditions of their own and others, and enabling them to participate in a diverse society. Evaluating and analyzing dance allows students to strengthen decision-making Page 12 July 2013 Update

13 High School, Adopted C. (c) skills, develop critical and creative thinking, and develop artistic and creative processes. Students continue to explore technology and its application to dance and movement, enabling them to make informed decisions about dance. (3) Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples. Knowledge and skills. (1) Foundations: perception. The student develops an awareness of the body's movement using sensory information while dancing. The analyze kinesthetic and spatial awareness individually and in groups; distinguish a comprehensive understanding of health, safety, and wellness for dancers; compare knowledge and skills of dance genres, styles, and vocabulary; and differentiate designs and images in natural and constructed environments. (2) Creative expression: artistic process. The student develops knowledge and skills of dance elements, choreographic processes, and forms in a variety of dance genres and styles. The student is expected to: create dance studies using original movement based on theme and variation; experiment, improvise, and perform original movement during the creative process; compare and contrast the expression of ideas and emotions through movement; and differentiate compositional forms using intermediate dance elements for choreographic processes. (3) Creative expression: performance. The student demonstrates knowledge and execution of technical dance skills in a variety of dance genres and styles through performing. The perform and examine memorized complex movement sequences with rhythmical accuracy in dance genres and styles such as ballet, modern dance, tap, jazz, musical theatre dance, and world dance forms; execute a wide range of dynamics in quality movement; perform with projection, confidence, and expression when executing dance movements; and distinguish an effective warm-up and cool-down, implementing the elements of proper conditioning for performing skills. (4) Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of cultural, historical, and artistic diversity. The compare similarities and differences in steps, styles, and traditions from various cultures or historical periods; recognize and evaluate dances as they relate to various historical periods and social contexts; create and experiment with dances in various media and content areas; and research historical and cultural dance forms using technology. (5) Critical evaluation and response. The student makes informed personal judgments about dance and the meaning and role of dance in society. The compare characteristics and qualities of a variety of dances; July 2013 Update Page 13

14 117.C. High School, Adopted 2013 analyze dance from a variety of perspectives such as those of dance critic, performer, choreographer, and audience member; understand the relationship of dance performance skills and other content areas; and experiment with knowledge and skills of technology through a dance portfolio. Source: The provisions of this adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg Dance, Level IV (One Credit), Adopted (a) (b) (c) General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following dance courses: Principles of Dance IV, Ballet IV, Modern/Contemporary Dance IV, Jazz IV, Tap IV, World Dance Forms IV, Dance Composition/Improvisation IV, Dance Theory IV, Dance Performance/Ensemble IV, Dance Production IV, Dance Wellness IV, Dance History II, and International Baccalaureate (IB) Dance II (one credit per course). The prerequisite for each Dance, Level IV course is one credit of Dance, Level III in the corresponding discipline. Introduction. (1) The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child. (2) Four basic strands--foundations: perception; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Dance students develop perceptual thinking and movement abilities in daily life, promoting an understanding of themselves and others. Students develop movement principles and technical skills and explore choreographic and performance qualities. Students develop self-discipline and healthy bodies that move expressively, efficiently, and safely through space and time with a sensitive kinesthetic awareness. Students recognize dance as a vehicle for understanding historical and cultural relevance, increasing an awareness of heritage and traditions of their own and others, and enabling them to participate in a diverse society. Evaluating and analyzing dance allows students to strengthen decision-making skills, develop critical and creative thinking, and develop artistic and creative processes. Students continue to explore technology and its application to dance and movement, enabling them to make informed decisions about dance. (3) Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples. Knowledge and skills. (1) Foundations: perception. The student develops an awareness of the body's movement using sensory information while dancing. The evaluate kinesthetic and spatial awareness individually and in groups; develop a working knowledge of health, safety, and wellness for dancers; demonstrate and evaluate a working knowledge and skills of dance genres, styles, and vocabulary; and create designs and images found in natural and constructed environments. Page 14 July 2013 Update

15 High School, Adopted C. (2) Creative expression: artistic process. The student develops knowledge and skills of dance elements, choreographic processes, and forms in a variety of dance genres and styles. The student is expected to: create and improvise dance studies using original movement based on theme and variation to successfully communicate an idea; improvise, construct, and evaluate original movement studies; evaluate the expression of ideas and emotions through movement; and design compositional forms implementing advanced dance elements for choreographic processes. (3) Creative expression: performance. The student demonstrates knowledge and execution of technical dance skills in a variety of dance genres and styles through performing. The assess performance of memorized complex movement sequences with rhythmical accuracy in dance genres and styles such as ballet, modern dance, tap, jazz, musical theatre dance, and world dance forms; perform dance movements with a refined sense of musicality and expressiveness and a wide range of spatial qualities; evaluate the performance of projection, confidence, and expression in the movement; and design an effective warm-up and cool-down, implementing the elements of proper conditioning for performing skills. (4) Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of cultural, historical, and artistic diversity. The evaluate choreography in dances from various cultures or historical periods; research and create a project using technology to illustrate an understanding of significant dance events or historical figures in appropriate social, historical, and cultural contexts; improvise and construct dances in various media and content areas; and evaluate historical and cultural dance forms using technology. (5) Critical evaluation and response. The student makes informed personal judgments about dance and the meaning and role of dance in society. The evaluate personal dance compositions and the work of others; create and reconstruct a choreographic study using varied media and environments; create a portfolio based on personal artistic works, performance works, or research; and perform and evaluate a choreographic study using varied media and environments. Source: The provisions of this adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg Music, Level I (One Credit), Adopted (a) (b) General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following music courses: Band I, Choir I, Orchestra I, Jazz Ensemble I, Jazz Improvisation I, Instrumental Ensemble I, Vocal Ensemble I, World Music Ensemble I, Applied Music I, Mariachi I, Piano I, Guitar I, and Harp I (one credit per course). Introduction. (1) The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem July 2013 Update Page 15

16 117.C. High School, Adopted 2013 (c) solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child. (2) Four basic strands--foundations: music literacy; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. The foundation of music literacy is fostered through reading, writing, reproducing, and creating music, thus developing a student's intellect. Through creative expression, students apply their music literacy and the critical-thinking skills of music to sing, play, read, write, and/or move. By experiencing musical periods and styles, students will understand the relevance of music to history, culture, and the world, including the relationship of music to other academic disciplines and the vocational possibilities offered. Through critical listening, students analyze, evaluate, and respond to music, developing criteria for making critical judgments and informed choices. (3) Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples. Knowledge and skills. (1) Foundations: music literacy. The student describes and analyzes music and musical sounds. The student develops organizational skills, engages in problem solving, and explores the properties and capabilities of various musical idioms. The experience and explore exemplary musical examples using technology and available live performances; identify and describe melodic and harmonic parts when listening to and performing music using a melodic reading system such as solfège, numbers, letter names, note names, or scale degrees; define concepts of music notation, intervals, and chord structure using appropriate terminology; define concepts of rhythm and meter using appropriate terminology and counting system; explore elements of music such as rhythm, meter, melody, harmony, key, expression markings, texture, form, dynamics, and timbre through literature selected for performance; and apply health and wellness concepts related to music practice such as body mechanics, hearing protection, vocal health, hydration, and appropriate hygienic practices. (2) Foundations: music literacy. The student reads and writes music notation using an appropriate notation system. The read and notate music that incorporates rhythmic patterns in simple, compound, and asymmetric meters; and interpret music symbols and expressive terms referring to dynamics, tempo, and articulation. (3) Creative expression. The student demonstrates musical artistry by singing or playing an instrument individually and in groups. The student performs music in a variety of genres at an appropriate level of difficulty. The student performs from notation and by memory as appropriate. The student develops cognitive and psychomotor skills. The demonstrate mature, characteristic sound appropriate for the genre; Page 16 July 2013 Update

17 High School, Adopted C. demonstrate psychomotor and kinesthetic skills such as appropriate posture, breathing, text, diction, articulation, vibrato, bowings, fingerings, phrasing, independent manual dexterities, and percussion techniques; demonstrate rhythmic accuracy using appropriate tempo; demonstrate observance of key signature and modalities; demonstrate correct intonation, appropriate phrasing, and appropriate dynamics; and create and notate or record original musical phrases. (4) Creative expression. The student sight reads, individually and in groups, by singing or playing an instrument. The student reads from notation at an appropriate level of difficulty in a variety of styles. The demonstrate mature, characteristic sound appropriate for the genre while sight reading; demonstrate psychomotor and kinesthetic skills such as use of appropriate posture, breathing, text, diction, articulation, vibrato, bowings, fingerings, phrasing, independent manual dexterities, and percussion techniques while sight reading; demonstrate rhythmic accuracy while sight reading using a counting system within an appropriate tempo; demonstrate observance of key signature and modalities while sight reading; demonstrate use of a melodic reading system such as solfège, numbers, letter names, note names, or scale degrees while sight reading; and demonstrate correct intonation, appropriate phrasing, and appropriate dynamics while sight reading. (5) Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates music to history, culture, and the world. The compare and contrast music by genre, style, culture, and historical period; identify music-related vocations and avocations; identify and describe the uses of music in societies and cultures; identify and explore the relationship between music and other academic disciplines; identify and explore the impact of technologies, ethical issues, and economic factors on music, performers, and performances; and identify and explore tools for college and career preparation such as social media applications, repertoire lists, auditions, and interview techniques. (6) Critical evaluation and response. The student listens to, responds to, and evaluates music and musical performance in both formal and informal settings. The practice informed concert etiquette as a performer and as an audience member during live and recorded performances in a variety of settings; design and apply criteria for making informed judgments regarding the quality and effectiveness of musical performances; develop processes for self-evaluation and select tools for personal artistic improvement; and evaluate musical performances by comparing them to exemplary models. Source: The provisions of this adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg July 2013 Update Page 17

18 117.C. High School, Adopted Music, Level II (One Credit), Adopted (a) (b) (c) General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following music courses: Band II, Choir II, Orchestra II, Jazz Ensemble II, Jazz Improvisation II, Instrumental Ensemble II, Vocal Ensemble II, World Music Ensemble II, Applied Music II, Mariachi II, Piano II, Guitar II, and Harp II (one credit per course). The prerequisite for each Music, Level II course is one credit of Music, Level I in the corresponding discipline. Introduction. (1) The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child. (2) Four basic strands--foundations: music literacy; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. The foundation of music literacy is fostered through reading, writing, reproducing, and creating music, thus developing a student's intellect. Through creative expression, students apply their music literacy and the critical-thinking skills of music to sing, play, read, write, and/or move. By experiencing musical periods and styles, students will understand the relevance of music to history, culture, and the world, including the relationship of music to other academic disciplines and the vocational possibilities offered. Through critical listening, students analyze, evaluate, and respond to music, developing criteria for making critical judgments and informed choices. (3) Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples. Knowledge and skills. (1) Foundations: music literacy. The student describes and analyzes music and musical sounds. The student develops organizational skills, engages in problem solving, and explores the properties and capabilities of various musical idioms. The (H) compare and contrast exemplary musical examples using technology and available live performances; compare and contrast melodic and harmonic parts using a melodic reading system such as solfège, numbers, letter names, note names, or scale degrees; compare and contrast concepts of music notation, intervals, and chord structure using appropriate terminology; compare and contrast concepts of rhythm and meter using appropriate terminology and counting system; compare and contrast musical forms such as song, binary, ternary, and rondo selected for performance and listening; compare and contrast concepts of balance and blend using appropriate terminology; compare and contrast concepts of music such as rhythm, meter, melody, harmony, key, expression markings, dynamics, and timbre; and apply health and wellness concepts related to music practice such as body mechanics, hearing protection, vocal health, hydration, and appropriate hygienic practices. Page 18 July 2013 Update

19 High School, Adopted C. (2) Foundations: music literacy. The student reads and notates music using an appropriate notation system. The read and notate music that incorporates rhythmic patterns in simple, compound, and asymmetric meters; and interpret music symbols and expressive terms referring to dynamics, tempo, and articulation. (3) Creative expression. The student demonstrates musical artistry by singing or playing an instrument individually and in groups. The student performs music in a variety of genres at an increasing level of difficulty. The student performs from notation and by memory as appropriate. The student develops cognitive, affective, and psychomotor skills. The demonstrate increasingly mature, characteristic sound appropriate for the genre; refine and apply psychomotor and kinesthetic skills such as appropriate posture, breathing, text, diction, articulation, vibrato, bowings, fingerings, phrasing, independent manual dexterities, and percussion techniques; demonstrate rhythmic accuracy using appropriate tempo; demonstrate observance of key signatures and modalities; demonstrate correct intonation, appropriate phrasing, and appropriate dynamics; and create and notate or record original musical phrases at an appropriate level of difficulty. (4) Creative expression. The student sight reads, individually and in groups, by singing or playing an instrument. The student reads from notation at an increasing level of difficulty in a variety of styles. The exhibit increasingly mature, characteristic sound appropriate for the genre while sight reading; demonstrate, refine, and apply psychomotor and kinesthetic skills such as appropriate posture, breathing, text, diction, articulation, vibrato, bowings, fingerings, phrasing, independent manual dexterities, and percussion techniques while sight reading; demonstrate correct articulation and rhythmic accuracy while sight reading using a counting system within an appropriate tempo; demonstrate observance of multiple key signatures and changing modalities while sight reading; demonstrate use of a melodic reading system such as solfège, numbers, letter names, note names, or scale degrees while sight reading; demonstrate application of dynamics and phrasing while sight reading; and demonstrate accurate intonation while sight reading using concepts such as vowel shapes, ensemble blend, and just intonation. (5) Historical and cultural relevance. The student relates music to history, culture, and the world. The compare and contrast music by genre, style, culture, and historical period; define uses of music in societies and cultures; identify and explore the relationships between music and other academic disciplines; identify music-related vocations and avocations; identify and explore the impact of technologies, ethical issues, and economic factors on music, musicians, and performances; and July 2013 Update Page 19

20 117.C. High School, Adopted 2013 identify and explore tools for college and career preparation such as personal performance recordings, social media applications, repertoire lists, auditions, and interview techniques. (6) Critical evaluation and response. The student listens to, responds to, and evaluates music and musical performance in formal and informal settings. The exhibit informed concert etiquette as a performer and as an audience member during live and recorded performances in a variety of settings; design and apply criteria for making informed judgments regarding the quality and effectiveness of musical performances; develop processes for self-evaluation and select tools for personal artistic improvement; and evaluate musical performances by comparing them to exemplary models. Source: The provisions of this adopted to be effective July 28, 2013, 38 TexReg Music, Level III (One Credit), Adopted (a) (b) (c) General requirements. Students may fulfill fine arts and elective requirements for graduation by successfully completing one or more of the following music courses: Band III, Choir III, Orchestra III, Jazz Ensemble III, Jazz Improvisation III, Instrumental Ensemble III, Vocal Ensemble III, World Music Ensemble III, Applied Music III, Mariachi III, Piano III, Guitar III, and Harp III (one credit per course). The prerequisite for all Music, Level III music courses is one credit of Music, Level II in the corresponding discipline. Introduction. (1) The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child. (2) Four basic strands--foundations: music literacy; creative expression; historical and cultural relevance; and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. The foundation of music literacy is fostered through reading, writing, reproducing, and creating music, thus developing a student's intellect. Through creative expression, students apply their music literacy and the critical-thinking skills of music to sing, play, read, write, and/or move. By experiencing musical periods and styles, students will understand the relevance of music to history, culture, and the world, including the relationship of music to other academic disciplines and the vocational possibilities offered. Through critical listening, students analyze, evaluate, and respond to music, developing criteria for making critical judgments and informed choices. (3) Statements that contain the word "including" reference content that must be mastered, while those containing the phrase "such as" are intended as possible illustrative examples. Knowledge and skills. (1) Foundations: music literacy. The student describes and analyzes music and musical sounds. The student develops organizational skills, engages in problem solving, and explores the properties and capabilities of various musical idioms. The evaluate exemplary musical examples using technology and available live performances; Page 20 July 2013 Update

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