Meteoroids 2010 Meeting Agenda Oral contributions

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2 Meteoroids 2010 Meeting Agenda Oral contributions Monday May 24 th 7:30 8:10 Continental Breakfast 8:10-8:20 Welcome, Acknowledgments and General Remarks, D. Janches 8:20 9:00 Opening Special Lecture The scientific legacy of Dr. Zdenek Ceplecha: Astronomer extraordinaire, D. ReVelle Comets and meteor showers: activity and forecasting 9:00 9:15 The study of the dynamical evolution of meteoroid streams over the last three decades, I. Williams 9:15 9:30 Stream lifetimes against planetary encounters, G. Valsecchi 9:30 9:45 The Working Group on Meteor Showers Nomenclature: a history, current status and a call for contributions, T. Jopek 9:45 10:00 Towards a semi-automated meteor shower calendar and alert system, J. Vaubaillon 10:00 10:30: Coffee break Comets and meteor showers: activity and forecasting (Cont.) 10:30 10:45 Mass distribution indices of meteor showers using radar data, R. Blaauw 10:45 11:00 Observations of the Leonids 2009 by Tajikistan fireball network, G. Kokhirova 11:00 11:15 Results of 2009 Leonid video experiment and comparison with other Leonid filaments observed within the last decade, P. Koten 11:15 11:30 Radar measurements during the Leonid campaign 2009, J. Vierinen 11:30 11:45 Orionids in recent years: Simulations and observed activities, M. Sato 11:45 12:00 Linking possible parent bodies to the α-capricornids, R. Musci 12:00 12:15 Precise data on shower fireballs observed within the Desert Fireball Network in SW Australia, L. Shrbeny 12:15 12:30 Development of a forward-scattering VHF interferometer system for quasi-real-time webcasting of meteor shower activities, M. Yamamoto 12:30 13:30: Lunch Break Comets and meteor showers: activity and forecasting (Cont.) 13:30 13:45 Meteor showers for Akatsuki at Venus and Curiosity at Mars, A. Christou 13:45 14:00 Lunar Meteoroid Impact Observations and the Flux of Kilogram-sized Meteoroids, R. Suggs 1

3 Asteroids and meteor showers: Case of Geminids 14:00 14:15 Perihelic Activity in Geminid Parent 3200 Phaethon?, D. Jewit 14:15 14:30 Multi-year CMOR observations of the Geminid meteor shower, A. Webster 14:30 14:45 Structure and density of Geminid and Quadrantid meteoroids, J. Borvicka Asteroids and Meteorites 14:45 15:00 Synergy between asteroid astronomy, bolide observations, and meteorite research, C. Chapman 15:00 15:30 Coffee break Asteroids and Meteorites (Cont.) 15:30 15:45 Multi-instrumental Observations of the Grimsby Meteorite Fall, P. Brown 15:45 16:00 Analysis of instrumental observations of the Jesenice meteorite fall on 9th April, 2009, P. Spurny 16:00 16:15 First identification of the statistically significant near-earth asteroid family, S. Abe 16:15 16:30 Asteroidal stream in the orbit of Pribram, J. Toth 16:30 16:45 The recovery of asteroid 2008 TC3, the location of the Ureilite Parent Body in the asteroid belt, and the source of the Geminids, P. Jenniskens 16:45 17:00 Physical observations of asteroid 1999YC: Breakup of the Geminid parent, T. Kasuga 18:00-21:00 Poster presentations Reception included Tuesday, May 25 th 7:30 8:30 Continental Breakfast Asteroids and Meteorites (Cont.) 8:30 8:45 Homogeneity of the 2008 TC3 asteroid (Almahata Sitta meteorites) revealed through magnetic susceptibility measurement, T. Kohout 8:45 9:00 The Near-Earth Objects Segment of the European Space Situational Awareness Programme, G. Drolshagen 9:00 9:15 ATLAS The Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System, R. Jedicke Sources of sporadic meteoroids and their relation to comet and asteroid populations. 9:15 9:40 The main belt as a source of meteorites and near-earth objects, B. Bottke Invited 9:40 9:55 Inferring sources in the interplanetary dust cloud, from observations and simulations of zodiacal light and thermal emission, A-C. Levasseur-Regourd 2

4 9:55 10:30: Coffee break Sources of sporadic meteoroids and their relation to comet and asteroid populations (Cont.) 10:30 10:45 A dynamical model of the zodiacal cloud, D. Nesvorny 10:45 11:00 Dynamical modeling of the sporadic meteoroids, P. Wiegert 11:00 11:15 The population of natural Earth satellites, M. Granvik 11:15 11:30 Origin of Sungraser Comets, A. Guliyev 11:30 11:45 Properties and comparison of orbital similarity functions, T. Jopek 11:45 12:00 Debiasing of asteroidal meteors from the sporadic background, P. Veres 12:00 12:15 Identification of optical component of North Toroidal source of sporadic meteors and its origin, J. Watanabe (for T. Hashimoto) 12:15 12:30 Distributions of orbital elements for meteoroids on near parabolic orbits according radar observation data, S. Kolomiyets 12:30 13:30: Lunch Break Origin of interstellar meteoroids. 13:30 13:45 IBEX Observations of the Heliosphere: Implications for Interstellar Meteors, D. Meisel 13:45 14:00 Preliminary results on the gravitational slingshot effect and the population of hyperbolic meteoroids at the Earth, P. Wiegert The satellite impact hazard 14:00 14:15 Probe Meets Meteoroid Stream: A method of predicting encounters between cometary dust trails and interplanetary spacecraft, A. Christou 14:15 14:30 Investigation of Electromagnetic Pulses Associated with Hypervelocity Particle Impacts on Satellites, S. Close 14:30 14:45 The 2011 Draconid shower risk to Earth-orbiting satellites, W. Cooke 14:45-15:00 An exponential luminous efficiency model for hypervelocity impact into regolith, W. Swift 15:00 15:30 Coffee break Artificial meteors 15:30 15:55 Preparations for the re-entry of the Hayabusa sample return capsule (and bus), P. Jenniskens Invited 15:55 16:10 Observation plan of HAYABUSA SRC reentry: for the third opportunity of manmade fireball from interplanetary orbit, M. Yamamoto Physical properties of meteoroids and meteorites 16:10 16:35 Micrometeorites: Sub-samples of the Solar System, S. Taylor Invited 16:35 16:50 Recognizing a cometary origin of Wild-2-like meteors, F. Rietmeijer 16:50 17:05 Hadean Eon Magnetic Properties of Meteorites, T. Schneck 3

5 18:30-20:00 Public Lecture: The Origin and evolution of Meteors showers and meteoroid streams., I. Williams Wednesday, May 26 th 7:30 8:30 Continental Breakfast Physical properties of meteoroids and meteorites 8:30 8:55 Organic coatings on individual grains in interplanetary dust, G. Flynn, Invited 8:55 9:20 What we learned so far from meteor spectra, J. Borovicka Invited 9:20 9:35 Constraining the physical properties of meteor stream particles by light curve shapes, D. Koschny 9:35 9:50 Calculation of luminous efficiency coefficients for the bright MORP fireballs, M. Grisevich 9:50 10:05 Meteoroids bulk densities and insight into their compositions, M. Grisevich 10:05 10:30: Coffee break Physical properties of meteoroids and meteorites (Cont.) 10:30 10:45 The density of small meteoroids, J.B. Kikwaya 10:45 11:00 Relationships between infrasonic, dynamic and photometric mass: Theoretical implications in the presence of fragmentation, D. ReVelle 11:00 11:15 Deceleration measurements of meteors using the high resolution system of the Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory, R. Musci 11:15 11:30 Meteorite electrical measurements: preliminary results and implications for meteor ablation, R. Hawkes (for L. Li) 11:30 11:45 Meteoroids in the solar corona: ablation modeling and possible applications, H. Lamy 11:45 12:00 Thermal stress in small meteoroids near the Sun, D. Capek 12:00 12:15 Mathematic modeling of meteoroid destruction, L. Egorova 12:15 12:30 Flares in meteor light curves due to fragmentation, shape alteration, and atmospheric fluctuations. E. Stokan 12:30 13:30: Lunch Break 4

6 Physical and chemical processes resulting from the meteoroid interactions with Earth s atmosphere 13:30 13:45 Meteoroid fragmentation as revealed in head- and trail-echoes observed with the Arecibo UHF and VHF radars, J. Mathews (for A. Malhotra) 13:45 14:00 A study on various meteoroid disintegration mechanisms as observed from the Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radar (RISR), J. Mathews 14:00 14:15 First Observations of micrometeoroid differential ablation, D. Janches 14:15 14:40 Impacts of meteoric ablation on the earth s atmosphere, J. Plane Invited 14:40 14:55 A global model of meteoric sodium, D. Marsh 14:55 15:30: Coffee break Physical and chemical processes resulting from the meteoroid interactions with Earth s atmosphere (Cont.) 15:30 15:55 Quantifying the perturbation to atmospheric chemistry from medium-size asteroid impacts in the oceans, R. Garcia Invited 15:55 16:10 Composition of LHB impactors and their influence on the composition of the early Earth atmosphere, C. Tornow 16:10 16:25 Investigating the latitudinal and seasonal dependence of HPLA radar derived meteoric smoke particle properties, J. Fentzke 16:25 16:50 Massively parallel kinetic simulations of meteor plasma: 3D meteor plasma diffusion and evolution, M. Oppenheim Invited 16:50 17:05 Global variation of meteor trail plasma turbulence and implications for radar observations, L. Dyrud 19:00 Banquet Thursday, May 27 th 7:30 8:30 Continental Breakfast Physical and chemical processes resulting from the meteoroid interactions with Earth s atmosphere (Cont.) 8:30 8:45 Enhancement of Na column density due to Geminid meteor shower observed by a resonance scatter lidar. T. Nakamura 8:45 9:00 Signatures of the ionization trail of a fireball observed in the HF and VHF range above Middle-Europe on January 17, 2009, W. Singer 9:00 9:15 Polarization of meteor head echoes: Data Analysis and Numerical Modeling, L. Vertatschitsch 5

7 9:15 9:30 Meteor head echo polarization at 930 MHz studied with the EISCAT UHF HPLA radar, G. Wannberg 9:30 9:45 The implications of Low-Altitude Trail-Echoes (LATE) and aspect sensitive Range- Spread Trail-Echoes (RSTE) observed using the Jicamarca VHF and the Arecibo U/VHF radars, J. Mathews (for A. Malhotra) 9:45 10:00 Influence of background electron density on the radar backscatter from meteor trails, W. Singer 10:00 10:30 Coffee break Physical conditions in meteors, bolides, and impacts 10:30 10:55 Meteorite falls from instrumental records, P. Spurny Invited 10:55 11:10 The trajectory, orbit and preliminary fall data of the superbolide of July 23, 2008, N. Konovalova 11:10 11:25 Infrasonic detection and analysis of the Oct 8, 2009 Superbolide near Indonesia, E. Silber 11:25 11:40 Calculating meteor trajectories with drag coefficients as a function of mach number, R. Carter 11:40 11:55 Development and testing of a weak shock model of infrasonic propagation using regional observations of meteors, E. Silber 11:55 12:20 Meteor Generated Infrasound: The Silent Partner, W. Edwards Invited 12:20 13:30: Lunch Break Physical conditions in meteors, bolides, and impacts(cont.) 13:30 13:45 Passage of bolides through the atmosphere, O. Popova 13:45 14:00 Parameters governing the meteor observing altitudes, A. Pellinen-Wannberg 14:00 14:15 Simulation of meteoroid entries into the Earth's atmosphere with the SCARAB software, B. Fritsche The future of observational techniques and meteor detection programs. Progress from meteor observing networks: Status of ongoing projects, Preliminary results. 14:15 14:30 French meteor network for high precision orbits of meteoroids, P. Atreya 14:30 14:45 Slovak video meteor network status and results, J. Toth 14:45 15:00 Report on the Colorado Allsky Camera Network s first nine years of operation, C. Peterson 15:00 15:30 Coffee break Patrol and Large Aperture Radar observations: differences and similarities. 15:30 15:55 Observations of meteors by radars, P. Brown Invited 15:55 16:10 EISCAT meteor observations, N. Brosch (for I. Haggstrom) 16:10 16:25 New Results from the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, P. Brown 6

8 16:25 16:40 Comparison of methods of determining meteoroid range rates from LFM chirped data, R. Loveland 16:40 16:55 Meteoroid orbits calculated from interferometric MU radar measurements, T. Nakamura (for C. Szasz) Friday, May 28 th 7:30 8:30 Continental breakfast Patrol and Large Aperture Radar observations: differences and similarities (Cont.) 8:30 8:45 Monthly observation of meteor head echoes with the MU radar new interferometric system, T. Nakamura 8:45 9:00 Meteor head-echo interferometry measurements with two HPLA radars, J. Sparks 9:00 9:15 Fractional baud-length coding, J. Vierinen 9:15 9:30 Analysis of ALTAIR 1998 meteor radar data, J. Zihn 9:30 9:45 Hardware Architecture and Initial Results From an FPGA Based Digital Receiver for Multistatic Meteor Measurements, C. Vaudrin 9:30 9:45 The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER). Initial results and future upgrades, D. Janches Video and Optical observations 9:45 10:00 Video measurements of the sporadic meteoroid population, M. Campbell-Brown 10:00 10:30 Coffee break Video and Optical observations (Cont.) 10:30 10:45 Searching for meteoroid images in sky surveys, D. Clark 10:45 11:00 A saturation correction model for meteor photometry, J.B. Kikwaya 11:00 11:15 First results from the mirror system of the Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory, R. Musci 11:15 11:30 A novel infrared video rate imager for meteor detection and atmospheric transient phenomena SPOSH-IR, H. Svedhem Simultaneous optical and radar detections. Insights on meteor properties 11:30 11:45 Simultaneous observations of meteors with EISCAT UHF radar and intensified video, M. Campbell-Brown 11:45 12:00 High-precision meteor head echo analysis and simultaneous ICCD observations, T. Nakamura (for J. Kero) 12:00 12:15 Simultaneous radar and video meteors, R. Weryk 12:15 Final remarks and meeting adjourn 7

9 Meteoroids 2010 Meeting Agenda Poster contributions Monday May 24 th, :00-21:00 Reception Included Comets and meteor showers: activity and forecasting P1. Radar and Video Observation of the Daytime Sextantids. Y Fujiwara P2. Visual and Video Observations of the 2008 Aurigids. Y. Fujiwara P3. Video Quadrantids S. Gajdos P4. Large bodies among meteoroid streams. P. Babazhanov P5. The distribution of the orbits in the Geminid meteoroid stream based on the dispersion of their periods of revolution. M. Hajdukova P6. Double station observation of Orionids P. Koten P7. Luminous efficiency of hypervelocity meteoroid impacts on the Moon derived from the 2006 Geminids, 2007 Lyrids, and 2008 Taurids. D. Moser P8. Dynamical and radiative evolution of a persistent Leonid train. A. Pellinen-Wannberg P9. Meteor shower activity derived from Meteor Watching Public-Campaign in Japan. M. Sato P10. Meteoroids of the Taurid complex in the IAU MDC photographic database. J. Svoren P11. Stability of the Perseids filaments. Z. Kanuchova P12. Daily motions of the theoretical radiants of active meteor streams. M. Jakubik P13. Lyrids 2009 video orbits. J. Toth Asteroids and Meteorites P14. Preliminary shape model of asteroid (1095) Tulipa. M. Husarik P15. Grimsby meteorite fall: 26/09/2009: Entry dynamics, energetics and infrasound production. D. ReVelle Sources of sporadic meteoroids and their relation to comet and asteroid populations. P16. Preliminary data analyses of SOMN meteors. P. Brown P17. Variation of sporadic meteor background and solar activity. V. Porubcan P18. The updated IAU MDC catalogue of photographic meteor orbits, V. Porubcan Artificial meteors P19. Artificial meteors from small orbital debris population. J. Toth P20. Optical Trajectory Determination of Hayabusa Sample Return Capsule Using Ground-based Video Observation Systems. Y Fujiwara Physical properties of meteoroids and meteorites P21. Estimating meteoroid mass from radar head echo observations using two techniques. E. Baas P22. Numerical analysis of a body descending through the Earth s atmosphere. P. Jandir 8

10 P23. Dependences ratio of the luminosity to ionization from velocity and chemical structure of meteors. M. Narziev P24. Investigation of meteoroid ablation modeling using direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC). E. Stokan P25. A study of atmospheric entry effects on micrometeoroids impacting Saturn s moon Titan. M. Templeton Physical and chemical processes resulting from the meteoroid interactions with Earth s atmosphere P26. Formation of metal oxides during the entrance of big meteoroids into Earth s atmosphere. A. Berezhnoy P27. Atmospheric photochemistry of meteor-derived compounds. M. Kress P28. The micrometeoritic contribution of volatile organics to a family of plausible Earth-like worlds. A. Pevyhouse P29. Formation in Earth s atmosphere and dynamics of the aerosol of space origin, P. Kozak The future of observational techniques and meteor detection programs. P30. Automatic video system for continues monitoring of the meteor activity. P. Koten P31. Efficiency of meteor observations: Super-isocon vs. CCD. P. Kozak P32. BRAMS: the Belgian RAdio Meteor Stations. H. Lamy P33. Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar observations of optical meteor trails. R. Mitchell P34. This new meteor radar at Penn State: design and first observations. J. Urbina P35. The effects of video compression on photometry and astrometry. R. Weryk P36. Maximizing the performance of automated low cost all sky cameras, F. Bettonvil 9

11 Opening Special Lecture 10

12 The scientific legacy of Dr. Zdenek Ceplecha: Astronomer extraordinaire Douglas O. ReVelle 1 1 Department of Physics and Astronomy University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 3K7Canada Zdenek Ceplecha wanted very much to be a stellar astronomer in the fall of 1946 while working on his PhD at the Charles University in Prague. WWII was over and a new era in Czechoslovak Astronomy had begun with Dr. Lubor Kresak coincidentally in Bratislava doing cometary and solar system related research. In October 1946 when the famous Draconid meteor shower erupted with a meteor storm, Zdenek, a direct witness on his way home from the library decided then and there to become a meteor astronomer instead. Zdenek and I made our first contact while I was a graduate student at the University of Michigan in 1969 and subsequently as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the NRCC (National Research Council of Canada) in Ottawa. Zdenek has single-handedly been involved in almost every aspect of our science for the last 63 years starting with his earliest mentor, Professor Guth who I was also fortunate to meet in Until his untimely death late last year, including along the way the photographic recovery of the first ever meteorite fall in April 1958 (Pribram), to compositional group classification schemes based upon dynamics and photometry, etc. of both meteors and bolides, Dr. Ceplecha has been active in almost every aspect of work in our field of meteor science. One of his most wonderful accomplishments was the publication of the extensive 1998 Space Science Reviews article, Meteor Phenomena and Bodies. Zdenek and I first wrote extensive letters back and forth starting in 1969 (with a minimum 4 week turnaround time with the Communist government reading our mail, plus 2-3 weeks of travel time each way). I finally came to meet with him in May 1980, under the auspices of the US National Academy of Sciences in a 6 week Exchange Grant to the Ondrejov Observatory in Ondrejov, Czechosolvakia. Zdenek and I took numerous trips together all over the world such as to the Lowell Observatory Centennial Conference in Flagstaff in 1994, to Dushanbe, U.S.S.R. in 1985 for the Middle Atmosphere Project workshop, to Meteoroids at the Smolonice Castle in 1993, to the Los Alamos bolide workshop in 2001, to Meteoroids in Kiruna in 2001 and finally to the ACM (Asteroids, Comets and Meteors) Conference in Berlin in 2002, etc. Due to Zdenek s help I was an honored witness to the Gold Medal Award Ceremony (normally only for native Czechs) for Peter Millman s research in meteor spectroscopy which was presented at the Charles University during my exchange visit. My first tour of the Czechlands (as Zdenek liked to call his homeland) included many fruitful discussions at the Ondrejov Observatory and which culminated at Spartakiade, with Millman, myself and my wife, Ann and with Jiri Borovicka on the field as a sports participant. Jiri Borovicka and Pavel Spurny and others in the Interplanetary Matter Department in Ondrejov are his living scientific legacy today. 11

13 Comets and meteor showers: activity and forecasting 12

14 The study of the dynamical evolution of meteoroid streams over the last three decades Iwan P. Williams 1 1 Astronomy Unit, Queen Mary University of London, E1 4NS As soon as reliable methods for observationally determining the heliocentric orbits of meteoroids and hence the mean orbit of a meteoroid stream in the 1950 s and 60 s, astronomers strived to investigate the evolution of the orbit under the effects of gravitational perturbations from the planets. At first, the limitations in the capabilities of computers, both in terms of speed and memory, placed severe restrictions on what was possible to do. As a consequence, secular perturbation methods, where the perturbations are averaged over one orbit became the norm. The most popular of these is the Halphen-Goryachev method which was used extensively until the early 1980 s. The main disadvantage of these methods lies in the fact that close encounter can be missed, however they remain useful for performing very long-term integrations. Direct integration methods determine the effects of the perturbing forces at many points on an orbit. This give a better picture of the orbital evolution of an individual meteoroid, but many meteoroids have to be integrated in order to obtain a realistic picture of the evolution of a meteoroid stream. The first use of a direct integration method was probably by Hamid & Youssef 1 who integrated the orbits of 6 actual Quadrantid meteoroids. The notion of generating a family of hypothetical meteoroids to represent a stream and directly integrate the motion of each was probably first used by Williams Murray & Hughes 2 in 1979, also to investigate the Quadrantids. Because of computing limitations, only 10 test meteoroids were used. Only two years later, Hughes Williams and Fox 3 go had increased the number of particles 20-fold to 200 while after a further year, Fox Williams and Hughes 4 used test meteoroids to model the Geminid stream. With such a number of meteoroids it was possible for the first time to produce a realistic cross-section of the stream as it crossed the ecliptic. From that point on there has been a continued increase in the number of meteoroids, the length of time over which integration is carried out and the frequency with which results can be plotted so that it is now possible to produce moving images of the stream. In this presentation we will discuss some of the scientific highlights arising from this development as well as the development itself. 1 S. E. Hamid, M. N. Youssef, J. Smithson. Cont. Astrophys., 7, 309 (1963). 2 I. P. Williams, C. D. Murray, D. W. Hughes, Mon. Not. R. Astr. Soc., 189, 483 (1979). 3 D. W. Hughes, I. P. Williams, K. Fox, Mon. Not. R. Astr. Soc., 195, 625 (1981). 4 K. Fox, I. P. Williams, D. W. Hughes, Mon. Not. R. Astr. Soc., 205, 1155 (1983). 13

15 Stream lifetimes against planetary encounters Giovanni B. Valsecchi 1, Elena Lega 2, and Claude Froeschlé 2 1 IASF-Roma, INAF, Roma, Italy 2 OCA, Nice, France We study, both analytically and numerically, the perturbation induced by an encounter with a planet on a meteoroid stream. Our analytical tool is the extension of Öpik's theory of close encounters 5, that we apply to streams described by geocentric variables 6. The resulting formulae are used to compute the rate at which a stream is dispersed by planetary encounters into the sporadic background. We have then set up a numerical test of the analytical model, in order to test its accuracy. We discuss the implications of our results for the lifetime of real and fictitious meteoroid streams. 5 G. B. Valsecchi, A. Milani, G. F. Gronchi, S. R. Chesley, Astron. Astrophys. 408, 1179 (2003). 6 G. B. Valsecchi, T. J. Jopek, Cl. Froeschlé, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 304, 743 (1999). 14

16 The Working Group on Meteor Showers Nomenclature: a history, current status and a call for contributions Tadeusz J. Jopek 1, Peter Jenniskens 2 1 Institute Astronomical Observatory, UAM, Poznan, PL SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA A brief history of the Task Group on Meteor Shower Nomenclature established at the IAU GA in Prague is given. At the Meteoroids 2007 meeting, the Task Group adopted a process to add new showers to the Working List. In 2009, during the IAU GA in Rio, at the business meeting of Commission 22, the Task Group adopted a list of 64 established meteor showers that received officially names. A two-step process is followed for showers to receive an official name from the IAU: i) all showers discussed for the first time in new literature are first added to the Working List of Meteor Showers (with IAU numbers and three-letter codes), ii) all showers which come up to the verification criterion will be selected for inclusion in the List of Established Meteor Showers. Both lists are accessible on the Web. During the IAU GA meeting in Rio, the members of Commission 22 agreed that the Task Group on Meteor Shower Nomenclature be transformed into the Working Group on Meteor Shower Nomenclature for the next triennium ( ). 15

17 Towards a semi-automated meteor shower calendar and alert system Jeremie Vaubaillon 1, Frederic Vachier 1 1 Institut de Mecanique Celeste, Paris, France The past decade has seen an increasing number of successful forecasting of meteor showers often followed by on-alert campaigns. The usefulness of such alerts has been proven many times for scientists to plan how to gather data, space agencies to protect (or not) their satellites, and for the public to enjoy a celestial show. In a first part we will present a few results of the past and coming meteor showers (2009 Leonids, 2010 June-Bootids, 2011 Draconids). In the second part we will present a reflection on the process leading to an observation on alert: observation - computation discovery of an interesting event communication new observation aso. In particular we will show how IMCCE has started a new project called PoDET which scheme is broader than just the meteors, and that will allow one to efficiently broadcast astronomical events alerts. Following this talk we are interested in discussing the different needs of the scientists and space agencies in terms of how and what to communicate in order to better design this future service. 16

18 Mass distribution indices of meteor showers using radar data Rhiannon Blaauw 1, Margaret Campbell-Brown 1 and Robert Weryk 1 1 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada Knowing the mass index of a meteor shower has both theoretical and practical applications. It can give us a history of its meteoroid stream, physical parameters of its parent comet, and is necessary in characterizing the dangers to spacecraft, especially crewed vehicles. We have found the mass indices of the major meteor showers using data from The Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR). CMOR has been in operation since 2002, collecting approximately 8,000 meteor echoes daily. The mass index is a measure of the distribution of masses of particles, assuming they follow a power law. A mass index greater than 2 indicates more mass in small particles, whereas a mass index less than two indicates more mass in large particles. The mass index of sporadic meteors is thought to be around 2.3 7, whereas the indices of showers vary from 1.5 to 2.0. Correctly identifying the meteors from all mass bins in the radar data is key to measuring the mass index, so we have written a new selection algorithm to ensure we are only counting true meteors, then pulled out echoes associated with major meteor showers. We present the results of our investigation of the mass index of meteor showers, including an investigation of changes in the index of showers with solar longitude and as a function of mass. 7 M. Simek, B.A. McIntosh, Physics and Dynamics of Meteors, IAU Symp. No. 38, 362 (1968). 17

19 Observations of the Leonids 2009 by Tajikistan fireball network G.I.Kokhirova Institute of Astrophysics of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tajikistan The fireball network in Tajikistan operates from stations of the network covering the territory of near eleven thousands square kilometers are equipped by the all-sky cameras with the Zeiss Distagon "fish-eye" objectives (f=30 mm, D/f = 1:3.5) and by the digital SLR cameras "NikonD2X" and "NikonD300" with the Nikkor "fish-eye" objectives (f=10.5 mm, D/f=1:2.8). Observations of the Leonids activity in 2009 were carried out during November For this period 12 Leonid fireballs have been photographed. As a result of astrometric and photometric reductions, the precise data including atmospheric trajectories, velocities, orbits, light curves, photometric masses and densities were determined. 18

20 Results of 2009 Leonid video experiment and comparison with other Leonid filaments observed within the last decade Pavel Koten 1, Jiří Borovička 1, Gulchehra I. Kokhirova 2, Mahmud I. Gulyamov 2, and Umed Hamroev 2 1 Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences, CZ Ondřejov Observatory, Czech Republic 2 Institute of Astrophysics, Tajik Academy of Sciences, TJ Dushanbe, Tajikistan According to the predictions of several authors, another high activity of the Leonid meteor shower was expected on November 17 th, The geometrical conditions favoured the region of central Asia. We therefore organized a video expedition into Tajikistan. We carried out double station observation from the Gissar observatory and Kurgan Tube station. The enhanced activity indeed occurred and we were able to record a number of Leonid meteors. In this paper we will present the activity profile of the meteor shower as well as the atmospheric properties of meteors. According to preliminary analyses the maximum of the activity occurred within the expected time but the rate was lower than predicted. The activity was caused by the encounter with the 1466 and 1533 filaments of the meteoroid stream. Because we already observed several other encounters with different filaments within the last decade, we can make comparison of the properties of meteors belonging to those filaments, i.e. of meteors with different time of the ejection from the parent comet. Such comparison will be presented in the second part of the talk. 19

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