PRODUCT LIABILITY FORECASTING FOR ASBESTOS-RELATED PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS: A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "PRODUCT LIABILITY FORECASTING FOR ASBESTOS-RELATED PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS: A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH"

Transcription

1 PRODUCT LIABILITY FORECASTING FOR ASBESTOS-RELATED PERSONAL INJURY CLAIMS: A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH Eric Stallard, A.S.A., M.A.A.A. Research Professor of Demographic Studies Center for Demographic Studies Duke University Durham, North Carolina Paper presented at the National Institute on Aging Conference: Demography and Epidemiology: Frontiers in Population Health and Aging. Washington, DC, February 9-10, The research in this paper was supported by the U.S. District Court, Eastern District of New York, using funds provided on court order by the Manville Personal Injury Settlement Trust. The models developed for this application benefited from prior and concurrent research support from the National Institute on Aging and the National Science Foundation. Copyright? 2001 by Eric Stallard. All rights reserved.

2 Abstract: The paper focuses on three aspects of forecasting models for asbestos-related disease/injuries relating to the Manville asbestos case: (1) The structure of forecasting models for asbestos-related personal injuries. (2) The epidemiological evidence supporting the selected model structure and the constraints on the modeling assumptions imposed by that evidence. (3) The range of uncertainty associated with projections based on these forecasting models and issues relating to decision-making under uncertainty. 1

3 I. INTRODUCTION: A MULTIDISCIPLINARY APPROACH The Manville asbestos claims experience is ideally suited as a case study of connections between epidemiology and the demographic subdiscipline of medical demography (Manton and Stallard, 1994). Commonalities between these disciplines are documented in papers presented at this conference. For example, both disciplines are concerned with the study of disease and health-related conditions in human populations, especially the study of noncommunicable and chronic diseases among the elderly. Moreover, identical databases are frequently used by investigators from both disciplines. The differences are, perhaps, less well documented. One critical distinction can be drawn between the epidemiological goal of control and elimination of disease and the medical-demographic goal of quantifying the consequences of disease for a population. This distinction frequently leads to the use of different models and methods of analysis and different ways of describing and communicating research results within the two disciplines. For example, epidemiological methods such as logistic and Cox regression analysis provide estimates of relative risk differentials for multiple putative risk factors subject to intervention and control. Demographic methods such as single-state multipledecrement life-tables and multistate increment-decrement life-tables provide estimates of population and subpopulation life expectancies and the impact on life expectancy of diseases and covariates that may not be subject to intervention and control. The Manville asbestos case presents an analytic problem that cannot be fully resolved using methods from either discipline alone. Its resolution requires inputs from both disciplines using an integrated multidisciplinary approach that exemplifies the connections and overlaps between the disciplines. This creates a synergism not otherwise possible. The fundamental problem in the Manville asbestos case is that the standard occurrence-exposure formulas employed in estimating rates for demographic projections do not apply because the size and distribution of the exposed workforce are unknown. To estimate these unknown exposure quantities, reliance must be made on epidemiological analyses of specific well-defined groups of workers. Thus, the essence of the problem is multidisciplinary. II. BACKGROUND: THE MANVILLE ASBESTOS CASE Asbestos is the commercial name for silicate fibers from two mineral groups, serpentine and amphibole, distinguished by their crystalline structure (NRC, 1984). Chrysotile (a white serpentine), amosite (a brown amphibole), and crocidolite (a blue amphibole) are the most common in the U.S., with chrysotile historically accounting for 90-95% of use, and amosite and crocidolite following in rank. In the U.S., actinolite, anthophyllite, and tremolite were rarely used amphiboles that are generally found as contaminants in other minerals. Commercially desirable properties of asbestos include high tensile strength, flexibility, resistance to heat and fire, corrosion resistance, and resistance to chemical attack. These properties made asbestos ideally suited for use in over 3000 products including cement pipes, flooring, friction, and roofing products, cement sheets, packing and gaskets, and coatings and compounds (Selikoff, 1981). Annual U.S. consumption of asbestos increased exponentially from 20,000 metric tons in 1900 to 600,000 metric tons in 1948 (NRC, 1984). This was followed by a period of slow growth peaking at 800,000 metric tons per year in This was followed 2

4 by precipitous declines to 250,000 metric tons in 1982 with further declines to 55,000 metric tons in 1989 (NCI, 1996) and 32,000 metric tons in 1993 (AIA/NA, 1998). Today asbestos use in the U.S. continues to be highly regulated with total consumption at historically low levels. In contrast, ten European countries including France, Germany, and Italy have imposed a near-total ban on the use of asbestos, allowing exceptions only where there is no safe substitute. The history of the Johns-Manville Corporation parallels the rise and fall of the asbestos industry in the U.S. (Macchiarola, 1996). Founded in 1858 as the H.W. Johns Manufacturing Company, its main product was fire-resistant asbestos roofing material. The Johns-Manville Corporation was established in 1901 when Charles Manville bought the business from the Johns family, three years after H.W. Johns had died. By 1925, the company was producing over 200 different asbestos products. The company continued to grow and prosper, becoming the world's largest manufacturer of asbestos and gaining entry into the listing of Fortune 500 companies. The Manville market share of asbestos products has been estimated in the range 25-40%, which far exceeded that of its major competitors Owens-Corning (10-15%), Owens-Illinios (5%), and Armstrong World (<5%) (Hersch, 1992). The development of the epidemiological databases and analyses that support our current understanding of the health risks associated with asbestos fibers occurred over a period of nearly 80 years. The earliest reported death due to an asbestos-related disease occurred in London in 1900 in a man whose asbestos exposure occurred over a 12-year period (Murray, 1907). The first case of asbestosis reported in the medical literature was in Cooke (1924, 1927). The first cases of asbestos-related lung cancer were reported in 1935 (Lynch and Smith, 1935; Gloyne, 1935) and the first cases of asbestos-related malignant mesotheliomas were reported in the early 1950s (Weiss, 1953; Leicher, 1954). Quantitive epidemiological analyses of excess asbestos-related lung cancer risk were conducted for asbestos factory workers by Doll (1955), and for asbestos insulation workers by Selikoff et al. (1964). The connection between asbestos exposure and malignant mesothelioma was firmly established in the epidemiological analyses conducted by Wagner et al. (1960). The results of these initial studies have been confirmed and refined in dozens of follow-up studies (NRC, 1984; EPA, 1986). Johns-Manville executives were informed of the health hazards connected with asbestos in 1924 and, in the 1930s, they quietly settled a number of asbestos-related personal injury lawsuits (Macchiarola, 1996). Following Selikoff et al.'s (1964) report, a new stream of lawsuits against the Johns-Manville Corporation began, growing slowly at first (e.g., 159 cases were filed in 1976), and then explosively (e.g, about 6,000 cases were filed in 1982). At the time Johns-Manville filed for bankruptcy protection under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code in August 1982, the company had settled 3,570 lawsuits at an average cost of about $20,000 per claim; yet 16,500 claims remained to be settled and thousands more were being filed each year. The company had assets worth $2.25 billion, and a net worth of $830 million (Macchiarola, 1996). The Manville Plan of Reorganization was authorized by Judge Burton R. Lifland (Chief Bankruptcy Judge, Southern District of New York) in December 1986 and given final approval by the U.S. Court of Appeals (Second District) in October This plan established two distinct trusts, one to provide compensation for personal injuries (the Manville Personal Injury Settlement Trust MPIST) and the second to provide 3

5 compensation for property damage (the Manville Property Damage Trust). Under the plan, claims could be filed against either trust but not against the reorganized (and renamed) Manville Corporation. Whereas the property damage trust had assets in excess of $100 million, the personal injury trust had assets in excess of $2 billion and an 80% ownership interest in the Manville Corporation. Our interest in this analysis is restricted to the experience of the personal injury trust (henceforth referred to as the "Trust" or the "Manville Trust", for brevity). At the time of its inception in November 1988, the Trust had a backlog of 16,500 claims filed prior to the 1982 Manville bankruptcy and a projected total of 83, ,000 new claims to be filed over the life of the trust. The Plan of Reorganization required that these 99, ,500 claims be paid on a first-in/first-out basis at 100% of the liquidated value of the victims' claims (Macchiarola, 1996). By the end of 1989, the Trust had received 140,000 claims and new claims were arriving at a rate of 17,000 per year. Not only had the existing number of claims already exceeded the projected total for the life of the Trust, but the settlement costs were averaging $41,150 per claim -- 65% higher than the $25,000 cost assumed in the projections (Macchiarola, 1996). The Trust was running out of cash, the Trust Plan was failing, and the Trust had been named in 89,000 lawsuits with tens of thousands more expected. The Trust sought legal protection. III. PROJECT HISTORY Jurisdiction over the Trust was assigned to Judge Jack B. Weinstein (Senior U.S. District Judge, Eastern District of New York). In July 1990, Judge Weinstein issued a stay order temporarily suspending all Trust payments, except those for exigent health circumstances or extreme economic hardships. Testimony in early November 1990 by Special Master Marvin E. Frankel indicated that the Trust was "deeply insolvent" (Weinstein, 1994). Shortly thereafter, on November 19, 1990, a class-action suit against the Trust was filed on behalf of all Trust beneficiaries jointly in the Eastern and Southern Districts of New York under the jurisdiction of Judges Weinstein and Lifland. Pursuant to Rule 706 of the Federal Rules of Evidence, in April 1991, Judge Weinstein ordered that a panel of independent neutral experts be assembled to develop a statistical model that would ensure reliable projections of future claims against the Trust. The Rule 706 Panel comprised: Margaret A. Berger, Associate Dean of Brooklyn Law School, Head of Panel Joel E. Cohen, Professor of Populations, Rockefeller University Alan M. Ducatman, Professor of Medicine, West Virginia University Kenneth G. Manton, Research Professor of Demographic Studies, Duke University Burton H. Singer, Professor of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University Eric Stallard, Associate Research Professor of Demographic Studies, Duke University The panel's projections were developed by Stallard and Manton, with input and review by Cohen. Further internal peer-review and comments on the epidemiological assumptions and statistical/demographic methods employed were provided by Ducatman and Singer. Additional reviews and comments on the methods and assumptions were provided by outside experts advising parties to the Trust class-action suit. Two distinct projection models were developed and introduced as evidence during testimony by Berger, Cohen, and Stallard in March and May The first model (Stallard and Manton, 1993) was based on Walker s (1982) projections, updated to reflect 4

6 more recent data. This model projected 460,000 unisex claims The second model (Stallard and Manton, 1994) was based on a hybrid model combining the first model with occupational-specific relative risk parameters from Selikoff's (1981) model. This model projected 377,000 unisex claims In both cases, an additional 3% has been added to the male projections to account for female claims. Sensitivity analyses indicated that the projected numbers could be expected to vary by up to?50%. An indepth review of the epidemiological assumptions and evidence providing scientific support for these models will be published later this year (Stallard, Manton, and Cohen, 2001). The second model was the preferred model of the Rule 706 Panel. Cohen and Stallard both testified that this model had an internal structure that allowed it to more faithfully represent salient factors in the claim filing process, including occupational differences in risk related to differences in durations and intensities of exposure to asbestos, and processing differences between cancer and non-cancer claims in cases where prior cancer claims have been filed. These factors accounted for most of the differences between the first and second models. The Manville Trust case was settled in July 1994, with final approval to the revised Trust claim settlement and distribution process given by Judge Weinstein in January 1995, effective February The Trust Distribution Process (TDP) required the Trust s assets to be distributed to qualifying claimants on a pro rata share basis based on scheduled settlement values for seven classes of disease/injuries, with the initial pro rata share set at 10%, a rate set about 25% lower than estimated using the Rule 706 Panel s preferred projection to allow a reasonable margin for uncertainty. This was sufficient to accommodate a 33% increase in projected claims over the life of the Trust. The 10% payout rate continues to be used by the Trust, despite the fact that the aggregate annual number of claims filed was about 90% higher than projected, and the more costly cancer claims were filed at a rate about 25% higher than projected. The maintenance of a constant payout rate means that the Trust can fulfill its goal of delivering fair, adequate, and equitable compensation to bona fide beneficiaries. In the following sections, we review selected model assumptions, evaluate the evidence supporting these assumptions, identify sources of uncertainty in the projections, and discuss the reasons for increases in annual filing rates following the 1995 settlement. IV. FORECASTING MODEL STRUCTURE In an ideal world, one could match the distribution of claims by disease/injury with the distribution of exposed asbestos workers by age, sex, occupation, date of first exposure, duration of exposure, intensity of exposure, and type of asbestos fiber. With these two distributions, one could generate estimates of hazard rates for asbestos-related diseases that could be combined with general population mortality hazard rates for nonasbestos-related causes of death to project survivorship and asbestos-related disease/injury claims among exposed asbestos workers throughout their residual lifetime. This type of projection could be generated using standard demographic models. In reality, the size and distribution of the exposed workforce population is unknown. The administrative records required to establish such information simply do not exist. However, for those filing asbestos-related disease claims, reliable information is generally available for age, sex, occupation, date of first exposure, and type of disease/injury. Information on the duration of exposure is generally incomplete and no 5

7 information is available on the intensity of exposure or the type of asbestos fiber (Stallard and Manton, 1993). Thus, to apply demographic projection methods to forecast future claims, one needs a strategy for estimating the size and distribution of the exposed population by age, sex, occupation, and date of first exposure. The strategy chosen by the Rule 706 Panel exploited auxiliary inputs available from epidemiological analyses. This strategy was originally proposed by Peto et al. (1981) as a method for forecasting national mesothelioma mortality rates. It was adopted by Walker (1982) as the preferred method for inferring the size and distribution of the exposed worker population when the national incidence of mesothelioma diagnoses was known. The essence of the method is easy to describe and understand, although the mathematical implementation involves some complicated notation (see Stallard, Manton, and Cohen, 2001). For a given subgroup of exposed workers at a common age, sex, occupation, and date of first exposure, the incidence rate of mesothelioma can be estimated from epidemiological analyses of longitudinally followed cohorts of workers. The expected number of mesothelioma diagnoses in such a subgroup is the product of the incidence rate and the subgroup size. Conversely, an estimator of the subgroup size can be defined by dividing the observed number of mesothelioma diagnoses in that subgroup by the incidence rate. This calculation can be performed for all subgroups in the analysis, thereby yielding an estimator of the size and distribution of the exposed population by age, sex, occupation, and date of first exposure. Walker (1982) performed this calculation without the occupation stratification. The incidence rates he employed were estimated from data on mesothelioma mortality among insulation workers (Peto et al., 1982). Therefore, he characterized his exposed worker population estimates as "insulation-worker equivalents" (IWEs). This same strategy was adopted by Stallard and Manton (1993). In contrast, Stallard and Manton (1994) introduced the occupation stratification and produced bona fide estimates of the exposed worker population. This required use of occupation-specific relative risk estimates from epidemiological analyses conducted by Selikoff (1981). V. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL EVIDENCE Epidemiological evidence supporting the strategy of indirect estimation of the atrisk population for projections of asbestos-related disease/injury claims is extensive and compelling. Key references include Selikoff (1981), Walker (1982), OSHA (1983, 1986, 1994), Manton (1983), Cohen et al. (1984), NRC (1984), EPA (1986), Lippmann (1988, 1990), Mossman et al. (1990), Selikoff (1990), Landrigan and Kazemi (1991), Stayner et al. (1996), and Bocchetta et al. (2000). An updated literature review is provided in Stallard, Manton, and Cohen (2001, Ch. 2). Epidemiological findings relevant to the indirect estimation strategy include the following:?? Asbestos exposure is associated with the occurrence of malignant mesothelioma, lung cancer, colon-rectal cancer, and other cancers of the digestive tract, as well as with asbestosis and pleural plaques and thickening.?? In the U.S., human malignant mesothelioma is almost exclusively associated with asbestos exposure. Among males diagnosed with mesothelioma, about 75% can 6

8 identify employment activities in asbestos-related occupations and industries that were potentially responsible for the disease.?? The absolute risk of mesothelioma is small enough that it takes years or more for the full impact of asbestos exposures to become manifest.?? Mesothelioma risk is associated with simian virus 40 (SV40), a DNA tumor virus that may function as a co-carcinogen with asbestos, and which appeared as a contaminant in a small number of polio vaccines in the 1960s.?? Mesothelioma risk is independent of health risks associated with tobacco use.?? Lung cancer and asbestosis risks are jointly associated with asbestos exposure and tobacco use. Among workers with documented exposure to asbestos?? The risk of mesothelioma increases as the third power of time since first exposure, allowing for a 10-year latency period for the tumor to reach a clinically detectable size.?? The risk of mesothelioma increases linearly with the intensity of exposure, as measured by the 8-hour time-weighted-average number of airborne asbestos fibers 5 microns or greater in length in each milliliter of air in the work environment.?? There appears to be no threshold below which mesothelioma ceases to occur.?? Cessation of asbestos exposure does not remove existing mesothelioma risk; however, it does prevent accumulation of additional risk.?? The risk of lung cancer can be separated into two components: (1) one which represents a "background" level of risk that increases approximately as the sixth power of age, roughly proportional to intensity of tobacco use; and (2) one which represents "excess" risk associated with asbestos by multiplying the first component by a term that represents the duration and intensity of exposure, allowing for a 10-year latency period for the tumor to reach a clinically detectable size.?? At high exposure intensities, the form of the incidence function for asbestosis is similar to that for mesothelioma; it is unclear what form applies for lower exposure intensities, or if there exists a threshold below which asbestosis does not occur. Quantitative estimates of mesothelioma and lung cancer incidence functions have been developed by the EPA (1986) for a variety of exposure circumstances and types of asbestos fibers:?? Dose-response parameters for lung cancer vary by a factor of five; and, for mesothelioma, by a factor of ten.?? Amphibole exposures produce comparable numbers of pleural and peritoneal mesotheliomas; but chrysotile exposures rarely produce peritoneal mesothelioma.?? For pleural mesothelioma, the potency ratios for chrysotile, amosite, and mixedfiber exposures were roughly comparable, while the ratios for crocidolite were 2-3 times greater.?? For peritoneal mesothelioma, the potency ratios for pure chrysotile exposures were significantly lower than for amphiboles or mixed-fiber exposures. 7

9 ?? On average, pure amosite exposure has a risk about twice that of pure chrysotile exposure, while pure crocidolite exposure has a risk about four times that of pure chrysotile exposure.?? Within fiber type, significant differences appear to be related to the type of processing conducted. In one comparison, chrysotile asbestos was found to be 50 times more potent in inducing lung cancer in textile operations than it was in mining and milling operations. Stanton and Wrench (1972) proposed that the carcinogenicity of asbestos was primarily related to its structural shape rather than to its physiochemical properties. This could explain the wide variation in dose-response parameters obtained from epidemiological studies (Lippmann, 1988, 1990):?? Asbestosis risk is associated with the surface areas of asbestos fibers longer than two microns with diameters in the range microns.?? Lung cancer risk is associated with the number of asbestos fibers microns in length having diameters greater than 0.15 microns.?? Mesothelioma risk is associated with the number of asbestos fibers 5-10 microns in length having diameters less than 0.10 microns.?? Differences in lung-tissue retention rates between the serpentine (chrysotile) and amphibole (crocidolite and amosite) fiber shapes may explain apparent differences in carcinogenic potencies.?? Optical microscopy techniques mandated by OSHA (1994) are incapable of detecting fibers having diameters below 0.5 microns -- suggesting incomplete coverage of existing measurements of effective doses. V. DATA Four sources of data were employed in estimating the parameters of the two forecasting models developed by the Rule 706 panel:?? Claims data (from the Manville Trust).?? National vital statistics and population data (from the National Center for Health Statistics and the U.S. Bureau of the Census).?? Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program data (from the National Cancer Institute).?? Supplementary epidemiological model-based inputs (from Selikoff, 1981, and Selikoff and Seidman, 1991). The Manville Trust claims data are documented in Stallard and Manton (1993). Under the procedure in Stallard and Manton (1994), claims data for the period January 1, 1990 to June 30, 1992 were extrapolated to December 31, 1994, assuming constant claim filing counts within subgroups defined by age and date of first exposure to asbestos. The imputed five-year totals were used to estimate the size and distribution of the at-risk population of males for eight occupational/industry groups. Data summarizing the recent experience of the Manville Trust were made available in 2000 to aid in characterizing deviations between the Rule 706 Panel projections and the claim filing patterns that actually occurred. These data yielded several insights into the nature of the discrepancies between the Panel s preferred projections and the actual number and characteristics of the claims filed in the interim period. 8

10 National vital statistics and population data were employed to develop estimates of general population mortality, as observed , and as projected using constant percentage declines consistent with the analysis of Lee and Carter (1992). Updated mortality data through 1998 were used to assess recent trends in asbestosis mortality. SEER data were employed to develop age-specific estimates of mesothelioma incidence during the period (SEER, 1992, 1993). More recent data covering the period were obtained to evaluate the consistency of trends in actual mesothelioma claims against the Manville Trust with independent trends in national mesothelioma incidence (SEER, 2000). Epidemiological follow-up data containing 20 years of observation on a cohort of 17,800 insulation workers were summarized in Selikoff and Seidman (1991). These data were used to re-estimate the mesothelioma incidence functions originally estimated by Peto et al. (1982), and used by Walker (1982) and the EPA (1986). Stallard, Manton, and Cohen (2001, Ch. 6) rigorously demonstrated that the Selikoff and Seidman (1991) data yield parameter estimates that also accurately apply to the OSHA (1983, 1986) form of the mesothelioma incidence function. Previously, Stallard and Manton (1994) had assumed, but not demonstrated, that this could be done to a high degree of approximation. The OSHA form of the mesothelioma incidence function is required to conduct low-dose extrapolations that are consistent with epidemiological evidence on the impact of duration and cessation of exposure. Epidemiological data on relative intensities and average durations of exposure in 11 occupational/industry groups were obtained from Selikoff (1981; Table 2-13 and 2-16), and were collapsed to eight groups in the Rule 706 Panel projections (Stallard and Manton, 1994; Stallard, Manton, and Cohen, 2001). In this paper, we take the Rule 706 Panel projections as given and consider the nature of discrepancies between those projections and the actual outcomes reported in the Manville Trust files released in VI. RESULTS Claims were grouped into two filing periods for detailed analysis and comparison, and For both filing periods, the original Manville male projection was compared with the actual claim counts, by age and disease. Table 1 shows that the claim filing rates were just over 1 percent higher than projected based on the data used to calibrate the original model, albeit with some upward shifts in the proportion of compensable claims due to reallocation of non-asbestos-related diseases (e.g., mesothelioma [+10%], asbestosis [+6%]). Table 1 also exhibits results for two types of adjustments to the original projection: 1. Under the " Disease-Adjusted" projection, the projected numbers of claims for each disease were rescaled to match the final observed counts for in the Manville Trust files released in These files indicated that there were substantial revisions in claim assignments to the non-asbestos-related and unknown disease/injury categories. The total number of claims projected increased about 3% under this adjustment. 2. Under the " Cohort/Disease-Adjusted" projection, the projected number of claims for each combination of disease and cohort were rescaled to match the final 9

11 observed counts for in the Manville Trust files released in The total number of claims projected increased about 15% under this adjustment, with the greater increase for this adjustment indicating that the adjustment had greater impact at younger ages. In both cases, the increase based on the revised claims data was well within the?50% uncertainty interval established in Stallard and Manton (1993, 1994). In contrast, the claim filing rates were just over double the projected rate based on the data. The increase was smallest for mesothelioma (+39%; 26% higher than expected based on the reallocated 1994 projection) and largest for asbestosis (+170%; 160% higher than expected based on the reallocated 1994 projection). The overall increase was more than double up to age 74 after which it gradually declined to 7% at age 90+. The mesothelioma excess was concentrated below age 80. Tables 2 and 3 display the adjusted unisex projections under the two types of adjustments described above. Also contained in these tables are comparisons with the 1999 ARPC unisex projection used by the Manville Trust in its own financial calculations (Houser and Austern, 1999), as well as the approximate constant-dollar (i.e., with no inflation and no discounting) costs of these claims under the 1995 Trust Distribution Process (TDP). One can see that the constant-dollar costs fall in the range $ billion, which includes the $23.1 billion constant-dollar cost based on the ARPC projection. Taking account of the Trust s current assets of about $2 billion, it would appear that only modest assumptions regarding inflation and investment returns would be required to maintain the 10% pro rata share payout rate for the life of the Trust. On the other hand, it appears that most of the original safety margin built into the current payout rate has been expended. This raises the question of what has changed since the original projections were generated. Analysis of the National Cancer Institute's SEER data showed that there was no increase in mesothelioma incidence (diagnosis) rates over essentially the same period, (Table 4). This contrasts with a separate analysis of national mortality data for which there appears to be substantial increases in male asbestosis mortality in the age range years during the period (Table 5). The significance of these differences in trends should be viewed in the context of the relationship of the incidence/mortality counts to potential claim counts. For mesothelioma, the incidence counts are more than double the claim counts and they appear to form a natural upper limit to the number of claims that could ever be filed. For asbestosis, the mortality counts are less than 2 percent of the claim counts, and they may reflect only the most extreme cases of asbestos-related disease/injury. The original 1994 Manville Trust projections were based on the assumption that mesothelioma claims and mesothelioma incidence were both governed by stable predictable biological processes. The data to date suggest that this assumption is true for national mesothelioma incidence. Nonetheless, mesothelioma claims against the Manville Trust appear to have increased by more than 25% in a period of stable national mesothelioma incidence counts. One theory is that the claim filing process achieved a new equilibrium when the TDP was instituted in Under this new equilibrium, the total number of unisex claims in was 88% higher than projected. However, stratification by disease/injury indicated that the increase was about 25% each for mesothelioma and lung 10

12 cancer, 18% for other cancers, and 102% for non-cancers. This supports the interpretation that there was a real increase of about 25% in cancer claims that could be demonstrably linked to Manville asbestos products, and that the excess 77% increase for non-cancers reflected an enhanced increase in the capacity of plaintiffs law firms to successfully present these cases. This new equilibrium reflects short-term rapid changes that impact the long-term level of the claim runoff process, whose shape (i.e., relative timing) is primarily governed by stable biological processes rather than by unstable legal processes. The adjustments exhibited in Tables 2 and 3 can help in evaluating the implications of this theory. In each case, the original 1994 male projection was rescaled to the actual unisex level of and the projected claims runoffs were allowed to proceed at the same relative rate. For , the first model (Table 2) produced a projection of 402,007 claims; the second model (Table 3) produced a projection of 462,095 claims. The second model better represents the systematic age differences in the forecasted discrepancies for noted above, and this explains the higher total claims projected by this model. Thus, the second model appears to be the preferred model. The second model produced 42,560 fewer claims than the ARPC projection of 504,655 claims for This discrepancy was well within ARPC s low-high projection range of 437, ,000 claims for (Houser and Austern, 1999) and this provides independent confirmation of the consistency and likely validity of both sets of projections. Nonetheless, there were notable differences in the disease-specific claim projections, with the adjusted unisex projection under the second model producing 26,831 more cancer and 69,392 fewer non-cancer claims than the ARPC projection. These differences were expected on the basis of the internal structure and assumptions of the ARPC model and are consistent with differences noted previously in Stallard and Manton (1994) when the models were compared using the Manville data for to conduct the projections. In particular, the ARPC model assumes that the non-cancer claim runoff can be predicted by applying a regression equation to the mesothelioma and lung cancer claim runoffs. While this may be reasonable for the short term, as the length of the projection increases the different shapes of the disease incidence curves will dominate the process and the non-cancers will decline more rapidly than the cancers. This will lead to overprediction of non-cancer claims by regression-based methods. The alternative is to develop independent projection calculations for the noncancers, as in the original Manville male projections (Stallard and Manton, 1993, 1994), and implicitly in the updated adjusted Manville unisex projection. This has the advantage that the population at risk to filing a claim can be appropriately reduced as each new claim is filed so that the model does not permit the same person to file another noncancer claim against the Trust (the ARPC model allows this to happen). However, to do this one must stratify the projection by occupation to accurately characterize the population at risk (the ARPC model ignores occupation). VII. DISCUSSION Given the stability of the shape (relative timing) of the claim runoff process, the methods used to update the projections in this paper could be periodically reapplied on an annual, semi-annual, or quarterly basis as soon as claim data for the most recent period 11

13 were available in the required form. For example, for annual updating this could be done in two steps: 1. The most recent projections would be stratified by single-year claim filing intervals using the existing 5-year projection intervals as inputs. This would then allow one to reassemble new 5-year projections for arbitrary starting/ending years. The first pass would involve projections calibrated to , , etc. In the following year, the second pass would involve projections calibrated to , , etc., and so on for each new year. 2. The Trust's data would be retabulated for the calibration interval , and all of the computations would be repeated in an identical manner as in the currrent projections which are calibrated to data, except for the 1-year shift in each time interval. Since the data for are already available, the only new data that would be needed for the first pass would be the data for There are several desirable aspects of this procedure:?? It would be simple to implement and it involves no new assumptions.?? The annual updating could be done on a schedule that is reasonable and easily justified.?? The use of 5-year calibration periods would ensure that spikes in claim filing counts that occasionally occur would be dampened significantly by being pooled with the four prior years claim counts.?? To the extent that such spikes represent real changes in the asbestos litigation environment in which a new equilibrium is reached for the intensity of claim filings, the procedure would gradually increase the projections of claim counts and costs and thus avoid the problem of having to recognize a large reduction in the pro rata payout rate at one time due to these changes.?? Conversely, to the extent that there was a more rapid decline in claims due to unrecognized shifts of future claims to the current or prior years, the procedure would gradually decrease the projections of claim counts and costs and thus facilitate the recognition of a gradual decrease in liabilities due to this more favorable process. In carrying out such an updating procedure, one should also consider periodic global re-estimation of the entire model. This would not be expected to change the nearterm projected values from those already established in the current update of the projections. Instead, its purpose would be to allow gradual long-term changes in the claim runoff rates to be recognized and incorporated into the model. Because of the longer operational time frame and greater stability due to the primary dependence of the claim runoff rates on biological rather than legal processes, such global re-estimation could be performed less frequently than the periodic updates considered in this paper. VIII. CONCLUSION The claim filing process can be decomposed into two sub-processes: (1) an underlying biological process in which the manifestation of disease follows a predictable and stable pattern of increasing rates of occurrence as a function of time since first exposure to asbestos and the operation of co-carcinogens such as tobacco; and (2) a complex human behavioral process in which the diagnosis of an asbestos-related disease triggers a series of actions that terminate with a legal claim against one or more asbestos defendants. Mesothelioma provides fundamental information on the stability of the underlying biological process. The National Cancer Institute s SEER data for

14 indicate that mesothelioma diagnoses reached a plateau in the period , with the actual peak occurring in This provides strong evidence of the stability of the underlying biological process and it provides strong support for the assumption that there is, in fact, an upper bound to the number of claims that can be filed. 13

15 REFERENCES Asbestos Information Association/North America (AIA/NA) A Factual Review of Current Asbestos Regulations in the USA. Asbestos Information Association/North America, Arlington, VA. Bocchetta, M., Di Resta, I., Powers, A., Fresco, R., Tosolini, A., Testa, J.R., Pass, H.I., Rizzo, P., and Carbone, M Human mesothelial cells are unusually susceptible to simian virus 40-mediated transformation and asbestos cocarcinogenicity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 97 (18): Cohen, J.E., Shy, C.M., Checkoway, H., Kupper, L.L., Waldman, G.T., Wilcosky, T.C., and Yoshizawa, C.N An Analysis of Alexander M. Walker s "Projections of Asbestos-Related Disease ". Unpublished Manuscript. Cooke, W. E Fibrosis of the lungs due to the inhalation of asbestos dust. British Medical Journal 2: 147. Cooke, W. E Pulmonary asbestosis. British Medical Journal 2: Doll, R Mortality from lung cancer in asbestos workers. British Journal of Industrial Medicine 12: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Airborne Asbestos Health Assessment Update. Office of Health and Environmental Assessment, Pub. EPA/600/8.84/003F, June 1986, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C. Gloyne, S.R Two cases of squamous carcinoma of the lung occurring in asbestosis. Tubercle 17: Hersch, J Charting the Asbestos Mine Field: An Investor s Guide. Lehman Brothers, New York. Houser, P.G., and Austern, D.T Manville Personal Injury Settlement Trust. Presented at Mealey s Asbestos Conference, September Landrigan, P.J., and Kazemi, H. (Eds.) The Third Wave of Asbestos Disease: Exposure to Asbestos In-place -- Public Health Control. Special issue of Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (Vol. 643), New York Academy of Sciences, New York. Lee, R.D., and Carter, L Modeling and forecasting the U.S. mortality. Journal of the American Statistical Association 87: Leicher, F Primary mesothelioma of peritoneum in a case of asbestosis. Arch. Gewerbepath 13: Lippmann, M Asbestos exposure indices. Environmental Research 46: Lippmann, M Effects of fiber characteristics on lung deposition, retention, and disease. Environmental Health Perspectives 88: Lynch, K.M., and Smith, W.A Pulmonary asbestosis. Carcinoma of the lung in asbestos-silicosis. American Journal of Cancer 24: Macchiarola, F.J The Manville Personal Injury Settlement Trust: Lessons for the future. Cardozo Law Review 17(3): Manton, K.G An Evaluation of Strategies for Forecasting the Implications of Occupational Exposure to Asbestos. Congressional Research Service (Contract No ), Washington, D.C. 14

16 Manton, K.G., and Stallard, E Medical demography: Interaction of disability dynamics and mortality. Chapter 7 in Demography of Aging (Martin, L.G., and Preston, S.H., eds.). National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. Mossman, B.T., Bignon, J., Corn, M., Seaton, A., and Gee, J.B.L Asbestos: Scientific developments and implications for public policy. Science 247: Murray, H.M Report of the Committee on Compensation for Industrial Diseases. Minutes of Evidence, CD3946 Her Majesty's Stationery Office, London, UK.,pp National Cancer Institute (NCI) Questions and Answers about Asbestos Exposure. National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD. National Research Council (NRC) Asbestiform Fibers: Nonoccupational Health Risks. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Occupational exposure to asbestos: Emergency temporary standard. Federal Register 48(215): Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Occupational exposure to asbestos, tremolite, anthophyllite, and actinolite: Final rules. Federal Register 51(119): Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Occupational exposure to asbestos. Federal Register 59: Peto, J., Henderson, B.E., and Pike, M.C Trends in mesothelioma incidence in the United States and the forecast epidemic due to asbestos exposure during World War II. Chapter in Banbury Report No. 9. Cold Spring Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York, pp Peto, J., Seidman, H., and Selikoff, I.J Mesothelioma mortality in asbestos workers: Implications for models of carcinogenesis and risk assessment. British Journal of Cancer 45: Selikoff, I.J Disability Compensation for Asbestos-Associated Disease in the United States. Report to the U.S. Department of Labor, Contract Number J-9-M Environmental Sciences Laboratory, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, City University of New York, June 1981 (Reissued June 1982). Selikoff, I.J Historical developments and perspectives in inorganic fiber toxicity in man. Environmental Health Perspectives 88: Selikoff, I.J., Churg, J., and Hammond, E.C Asbestos exposure and neoplasia. Journal of the American Medical Association 188: Selikoff, I.J., and Seidman, H Asbestos-associated deaths among insulation workers in the United States and Canada, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 643:1-14. Stallard, E., and Manton, K.G Estimates and Projections of Asbestos-Related Diseases and Exposures among Manville Personal Injury Settlement Trust Claimants, Center for Demographic Studies, Duke University, Durham, N.C. Entered into testimony in re. Findley v. Falise, United States District Court, Eastern District of New York and Southern District of New York, March 15, Stallard, E., and Manton, K.G Projections of Asbestos-Related Injury Claims against the Manville Personal Injury Settlement Trust, Males , by Occupation, Date of First Exposure, and Type of Claim. Center for Demographic Studies, Duke University, Durham, N.C. Entered into testimony in re. Findley v. 15

17 Falise, United States District Court, Eastern District of New York and Southern District of New York, March 15, Stallard, E., Manton, K.G., and Cohen, J.E Forecasting Product Liability Claims: Epidemiology and Modeling in the Manville Asbestos Case. Springer-Verlag, New York. (In review) Stanton, M.F., and Wrench, C Mechanisms of mesothelioma induction with asbestos and fibrous glass. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 48: Stayner, L.T., Dankovic, D.A., and Lemen, R.A Occupational exposure to chrysotile asbestos and cancer risk: A review of the amphibole hypothesis. American Journal of Public Health 86(2): Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program Special Public Use Tape ( ), National Cancer Institute, DCPC, Surveillance Program, Cancer Statistics Branch, Bethesda, MD., November Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program Special Public Use Tape ( ), National Cancer Institute, DCPC, Surveillance Program, Cancer Statistics Branch, Bethesda, MD., November Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program Public Use CD- ROM ( ), National Cancer Institute, DCCPS, Cancer Surveillance Research Program, Cancer Statistics Branch, Bethesda, MD., released April 2000, based on the August 1999 submission. Wagner, J.C., Sleggs, C.A., and Marchand, P Diffuse pleural mesothelioma and asbestos exposure in the North Western Cape Province. British Journal of Industrial Medicine 17: Walker, A.M Projections of Asbestos-Related Disease Epidemiology Resources, Inc., Chestnut Hill, MA. Weinstein, J.B In re. Findley v. Blinken: Memorandum, Orders, and Judgement. United States District Court, Eastern District of New York and Southern District of New York, Dec. 15, Weiss, A Pleurakrebs bei lungenasbestose, in vivo morphologisch gesichert. Medizinische 1:

18 Table 1 -- Manville Trust Projection Comparisons -- Disease Adjustment Model Original 1994 Male Projection (Stallard and Manton, 1994, Table F) Alleged Disease Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Colon/Rectal Cancer Other Cancer Asbestosis Pleural Disease Non-Asbestos Related Unknown Total Disease-Adjusted Male Projection Rescaled to Match Observed Counts for Males for in the Manville Trust Files for 2000 Alleged Disease Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Colon/Rectal Cancer Other Cancer Asbestosis Pleural Disease Non-Asbestos Related Unknown Total Disease-Adjusted Male Projection as a Percentage of Original 1994 Male Projection Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Colon/Rectal Cancer Other Cancer Asbestosis Pleural Disease Non-Asbestos Related Unknown Total Cohort/Disease-Adjusted Male Projection Rescaled to Match Observed Counts for Males for in the Manville Trust Files for 2000 Alleged Disease Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Colon/Rectal Cancer Other Cancer Asbestosis Pleural Disease Non-Asbestos Related Unknown Total

19 Table 2 -- Manville Trust Unisex Comparisons -- Disease Adjustment Model Disease-Adjusted Unisex Projection Rescaled to Match Observed Unisex Counts for in the Manville Trust Files for 2000 Alleged Disease Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Colon/Rectal Cancer Other Cancer Asbestosis Pleural Disease Non-Asbestos Related Unknown Total Disease-Adjusted Unisex Projection as a Percentage of Original 1994 Male Projection Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Colon/Rectal Cancer Other Cancer Asbestosis Pleural Disease Non-Asbestos Related Unknown Total ARPC Unisex Projection, August 1999 Alleged Disease Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Other Cancer (inc. CRC) Asbestosis Pleural Disease Unknown Total ARPC Unisex Projection as a Percentage of Disease-Adjusted Unisex Projection Alleged Disease Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Other Cancer (inc. CRC) Asbestosis Pleural Disease Unknown Total

20 Table 3 --Manville Trust Unisex Comparisons -- Disease and Cohort Adjustment Model Cohort/Disease-Adjusted Unisex Projection Rescaled to Match Observed Unisex Counts for in the Manville Trust Files for 2000 TDP Total Cohort Alleged Disease Rate Cost ($000s) Total Mesothelioma $200,000 $6,770,235 Lung Cancer $78,000 $3,486,500 Colon/Rectal Cancer $40,000 $326,243 Other Cancer $40,000 $201,220 Asbestosis $40,000 $12,607,133 Pleural Disease $12,000 $659,639 Non-Asbestos Related $0 Unknown $0 Total $24,050, Cohort/Disease-Adjusted Unisex Projection as a Percentage of Original 1994 Male Projection Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Colon/Rectal Cancer Other Cancer Asbestosis Pleural Disease Non-Asbestos Related Unknown Total Cohort/Disease-Adjusted Unisex Projection as a Percentage of Disease-Adjusted Unisex Projection Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Colon/Rectal Cancer Other Cancer Asbestosis Pleural Disease Non-Asbestos Related Unknown Total ARPC Unisex Projection as a Percentage of Cohort/Disease-Adjusted Unisex Projection Alleged Disease Mesothelioma Lung Cancer Other Cancer (inc. CRC) Asbestosis Pleural Disease Unknown Total

Scientific Update on Safe Use of Asbestos. Robert P. Nolan, PhD International Environmental Research Foundation New York, New York www.ierfinc.

Scientific Update on Safe Use of Asbestos. Robert P. Nolan, PhD International Environmental Research Foundation New York, New York www.ierfinc. Scientific Update on Safe Use of Asbestos Robert P. Nolan, PhD International Environmental Research Foundation New York, New York www.ierfinc.org When We Talk about Asbestos What Do We Mean? Anthophyllite

More information

Current Usage and Health Significance of the Modern Use of Chrysotile Products: Review of Recently Published Evidence

Current Usage and Health Significance of the Modern Use of Chrysotile Products: Review of Recently Published Evidence Current Usage and Health Significance of the Modern Use of Chrysotile Products: Review of Recently Published Evidence John Hoskins Health & Safety Consultant, Haslemere, Surrey, UK ASBESTOS SERPENTINE

More information

ANNEX 2: Assessment of the 7 points agreed by WATCH as meriting attention (cover paper, paragraph 9, bullet points) by Andy Darnton, HSE

ANNEX 2: Assessment of the 7 points agreed by WATCH as meriting attention (cover paper, paragraph 9, bullet points) by Andy Darnton, HSE ANNEX 2: Assessment of the 7 points agreed by WATCH as meriting attention (cover paper, paragraph 9, bullet points) by Andy Darnton, HSE The 7 issues to be addressed outlined in paragraph 9 of the cover

More information

Asbestos. General information

Asbestos. General information Asbestos General information Key Points Fire Non flammable and non combustible under normal conditions Chemically inert under normal conditions. Resistant to most solvents, acids and alkalis In the event

More information

NHS Barking and Dagenham Briefing on disease linked to Asbestos in Barking & Dagenham

NHS Barking and Dagenham Briefing on disease linked to Asbestos in Barking & Dagenham APPENDIX 1 NHS Barking and Dagenham Briefing on disease linked to Asbestos in Barking & Dagenham 1. Background 1.1. Asbestos Asbestos is a general name given to several naturally occurring fibrous minerals

More information

Ms. Jennifer L. Biggs

Ms. Jennifer L. Biggs Testimony of Ms. Jennifer L. Biggs June 4, 2003 Committee on the Judiciary United States Senate Solving the Asbestos Litigation Crisis: S.1125, the Fairness in Asbestos Injury Resolution Act of 2003 June

More information

Update of the scientific evidence on asbestos and cancer. Kurt Straif, MD MPH PhD. The IARC Monographs

Update of the scientific evidence on asbestos and cancer. Kurt Straif, MD MPH PhD. The IARC Monographs Update of the scientific evidence on asbestos and cancer Kurt Straif, MD MPH PhD International Agency for Research on Cancer Lyon, France World Health Organisation Asturias, 17 March 2011 The IARC Monographs

More information

Call for an International Ban on Asbestos

Call for an International Ban on Asbestos Call for an International Ban on Asbestos To eliminate the burden of disease and death that is caused worldwide by exposure to asbestos, The Collegium Ramazzini calls for an immediate ban on all mining

More information

PROTOCOL TO ASSESS ASBESTOS-RELATED RISK

PROTOCOL TO ASSESS ASBESTOS-RELATED RISK Contract No. DTRS57-01-C-10044. DRAFT PROTOCOL TO ASSESS ASBESTOS-RELATED RISK Prepared for: Mark Raney Volpe Center U.S. Department of Transportation 55 Broadway Kendall Square Cambridge MA 02142 and

More information

Francine Lortie-Monette, MD, MSc, CSPQ, MBA Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics University of Western Ontario 2003

Francine Lortie-Monette, MD, MSc, CSPQ, MBA Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics University of Western Ontario 2003 ASBESTOS Francine Lortie-Monette, MD, MSc, CSPQ, MBA Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics University of Western Ontario 2003 Asbestosis Asbestosis is a model for other dust diseases as well as

More information

Lung cancer and asbestos

Lung cancer and asbestos Lung cancer and asbestos Bureau Veritas Training Bill Sanderson For the benefit of business and people To begin with.. There are known knowns, that is there are things we know that we know. There are known

More information

Asbestos and Mesothelioma a briefing document for the Metropolitan Police

Asbestos and Mesothelioma a briefing document for the Metropolitan Police Asbestos and Mesothelioma a briefing document for the Metropolitan Police Prepared by Professor John Cherrie, Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh, UK. Introduction The purpose of this document is to provide

More information

Asbestos: health effects and risk. Peter Franklin Senior Scientific Officer, EHD Senior Research Fellow, UWA

Asbestos: health effects and risk. Peter Franklin Senior Scientific Officer, EHD Senior Research Fellow, UWA Asbestos: health effects and risk Peter Franklin Senior Scientific Officer, EHD Senior Research Fellow, UWA What is asbestos Naturally occurring mineral that has crystallised to form long thin fibres and

More information

Influence of Fiber Type, Size, and Number in Human Disease: Conclusions from Fiber Burden Analysis

Influence of Fiber Type, Size, and Number in Human Disease: Conclusions from Fiber Burden Analysis Influence of Fiber Type, Size, and Number in Human Disease: Conclusions from Fiber Burden Analysis Andrew Churg, MD Department of Pathology University of British Columbia Vancouver, BC, Canada Techniques,

More information

Testimony of. Dr. James Crapo. April 26, 2005

Testimony of. Dr. James Crapo. April 26, 2005 Testimony of Dr. James Crapo April 26, 2005 Written Statement of Dr. James D. Crapo, Professor of Medicine, National Jewish Medical and Research Center and University of Colorado Health Sciences Center

More information

Testimony of. Mark Lederer. Chief Financial Officer Claims Resolution Management Corporation (aka The Manville Trust) November 17, 2005

Testimony of. Mark Lederer. Chief Financial Officer Claims Resolution Management Corporation (aka The Manville Trust) November 17, 2005 Testimony of Mark Lederer Chief Financial Officer Claims Resolution Management Corporation (aka The Manville Trust) November 17, 2005 Testimony United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary Recent Developments

More information

ASBESTOS DISEASES. Dr Alastair Robertson

ASBESTOS DISEASES. Dr Alastair Robertson ASBESTOS DISEASES Dr Alastair Robertson Occupational Health Department University Hospital Birmingham Birmingham B29 6JF 01216278285 Alastair.robertson@uhb.nhs.uk Occupational Lung Disease Unit Birmingham

More information

ASBESTOS AWARENESS. Environmental Health And Safety. www.uoguelph.ca/ehs MAINTENANCE CONTRACTORS

ASBESTOS AWARENESS. Environmental Health And Safety. www.uoguelph.ca/ehs MAINTENANCE CONTRACTORS ASBESTOS AWARENESS MAINTENANCE CONTRACTORS Environmental Health And Safety www.uoguelph.ca/ehs March 2007 ASBESTOS AWARENESS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF GUELPH What is Asbestos? The term asbestos refers to a

More information

IWU PHYSICAL PLANT SAFETY PROGRAM. Toxic and Hazardous Substances, Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1910.1001, Subpart Z Asbestos

IWU PHYSICAL PLANT SAFETY PROGRAM. Toxic and Hazardous Substances, Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1910.1001, Subpart Z Asbestos STANDARDS Toxic and Hazardous Substances, Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1910.1001, Subpart Z Asbestos 1. INTRODUCTION IWU has a responsibility to provide a safe environment for students,

More information

June 20, 2002. 2002.06.20: Wagner Testimony on Workplace Exposure to Asbestos. This is an archive page. The links are no longer being updated.

June 20, 2002. 2002.06.20: Wagner Testimony on Workplace Exposure to Asbestos. This is an archive page. The links are no longer being updated. Page 1 of 6 skip navigational links This is an archive page. The links are no longer being updated. Statement by Gregory R. Wagner, M.D. Director, Division of Respiratory Disease Studies National Institute

More information

What has changed to justify the US Senate s bill to ban asbestos now?

What has changed to justify the US Senate s bill to ban asbestos now? Comments of Professor Richard Wilson Department of Physics & Center for Risk Analysis Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts On the Proposed Asbestos Ban Senate Employment and Workplace Safety Subcommittee

More information

Changing Trends in Mesothelioma Incidence. Hans Weill, M.D. Professor of Medicine Emeritus Tulane University Medical Center

Changing Trends in Mesothelioma Incidence. Hans Weill, M.D. Professor of Medicine Emeritus Tulane University Medical Center Changing Trends in Mesothelioma Incidence Hans Weill, M.D. Professor of Medicine Emeritus Tulane University Medical Center International Conference on Chrysotile Montreal, May 23, 2006 Global Mesothelioma

More information

NISG Asbestos. Caroline Kirton

NISG Asbestos. Caroline Kirton NISG Asbestos Caroline Kirton 1 The Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012, Regulation 10 requires every employer to ensure that adequate information, instruction and training is given to their employees

More information

Burns and Roe Asbestos Personal Injury Settlement Trust Claim Form

Burns and Roe Asbestos Personal Injury Settlement Trust Claim Form Burns and Roe Asbestos Personal Injury Settlement Trust Claim Form General Instructions for filing this Claim Form: This claim form must be completed as thoroughly as possible to ensure prompt resolution

More information

Toxicity of Amphibole Asbestos

Toxicity of Amphibole Asbestos Toxicity of Amphibole Asbestos Disclaimer: The material presented in these slides has been reviewed by the U.S. EPA and approved for presentation. Approval does not signify that the contents necessarily

More information

HEALTH CARE FOR EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS. 2010 The SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research Memorial University www.safetynet.mun.

HEALTH CARE FOR EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS. 2010 The SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research Memorial University www.safetynet.mun. HEALTH CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS 2010 The SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research Memorial University www.safetynet.mun.ca HEALTH CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH EXPOSURE

More information

Occupational respiratory diseases due to Asbestos. Dirk Dahmann, IGF, Bochum

Occupational respiratory diseases due to Asbestos. Dirk Dahmann, IGF, Bochum Occupational respiratory diseases due to Asbestos Dirk Dahmann, IGF, Bochum Contents Introduction Diseases Further Effects Preventive Strategies Conclusion Asbestos minerals Woitowitz, 2003 Imports (+

More information

Mesothelioma incidence modeling and forecasting

Mesothelioma incidence modeling and forecasting Mesothelioma incidence modeling and forecasting 214 Casualty Loss Reserve Seminar Jorge Gallardo-Garcia, PhD 1973 1976 1979 1982 1985 1988 1991 1994 1997 2 23 26 29 212 215 218 221 224 227 23 233 236 239

More information

ASBESTOS. Know what it is and how you can protect yourself. environmental affairs Department: Environmental Affairs REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

ASBESTOS. Know what it is and how you can protect yourself. environmental affairs Department: Environmental Affairs REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA ASBESTOS Know what it is and how you can protect yourself environmental affairs Department: Environmental Affairs REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA 1 What is asbestos? The term asbestos designates a group of naturally

More information

Mesothelioma in Australia: Incidence (1982 to 2013) and Mortality (1997 to 2012)

Mesothelioma in Australia: Incidence (1982 to 2013) and Mortality (1997 to 2012) Mesothelioma in Australia: Incidence (1982 to 213) and Mortality (1997 to 212) 215 Disclaimer The information provided in this document can only assist you in the most general way. This document does not

More information

Defense Costs Dropped in 2014, While Claim Filings, Dismissal Rates, and Indemnity Dollars Remained Steady

Defense Costs Dropped in 2014, While Claim Filings, Dismissal Rates, and Indemnity Dollars Remained Steady 4 June 2015 Defense Costs Dropped in 2014, While Claim Filings, Dismissal Rates, and Indemnity Dollars Remained Steady Snapshot of Recent Trends in Asbestos Litigation: 2015 Update By Mary Elizabeth Stern

More information

Testimony of. Laura Welch, M.D. Medical Director Center to Protect Workers Rights November 17, 2005

Testimony of. Laura Welch, M.D. Medical Director Center to Protect Workers Rights November 17, 2005 Testimony of Laura Welch, M.D. Medical Director Center to Protect Workers Rights November 17, 2005 Testimony of Laura Welch, MD Medical Director, Center to Protect Workers Rights On Asbestos Related Diseases

More information

All About Asbestos. Read this booklet to learn more about:

All About Asbestos. Read this booklet to learn more about: All About Asbestos Read this booklet to learn more about: identifying asbestos-containing material in you home the health risks of asbestos what you can do about asbestos. What Is Asbestos? Asbestos is

More information

Asbestos - Frequently Asked Questions

Asbestos - Frequently Asked Questions Asbestos - Frequently Asked Questions 1. What is asbestos? Asbestos is the name given to a group of fibrous minerals which occur naturally in the earth. These are grouped into two mineral types known as

More information

ASBESTOS AWARENESS. For workers and building occupants

ASBESTOS AWARENESS. For workers and building occupants ASBESTOS AWARENESS For workers and building occupants Asbestos Awareness Asbestos is a serious health hazard commonly found in our environment today. This module is designed to provide an overview of asbestos

More information

PATTERNS OF MORTALITY IN ASBESTOS FACTORY WORKERS IN LONDON*

PATTERNS OF MORTALITY IN ASBESTOS FACTORY WORKERS IN LONDON* PATTERNS OF MORTALITY IN ASBESTOS FACTORY WORKERS IN LONDON* M. L. Newhouse TUC Centenary Institute of Occupational Health London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine London WCIE 7HT. England G. Berry

More information

April 2011. Asbestos in the university and higher education sector

April 2011. Asbestos in the university and higher education sector April 2011 Asbestos in the university and higher education sector Contents Introduction... 1 Executive summary... 1 Background to asbestos... 2 Closer look: Research report results, and their impact on

More information

Asbestos-Related Lung Cancer: How big business lawyers are hurting cancer patients efforts to secure justice. By J. Conard Metcalf

Asbestos-Related Lung Cancer: How big business lawyers are hurting cancer patients efforts to secure justice. By J. Conard Metcalf Asbestos-Related Lung Cancer: How big business lawyers are hurting cancer patients efforts to secure justice By J. Conard Metcalf TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary 1 Introduction 2 The Problem: Creative

More information

Asbestos Diseases. What Is Asbestos?

Asbestos Diseases. What Is Asbestos? 1 Asbestos Diseases What Is Asbestos? Asbestos is a term applied to a group of minerals formed into rock and mined in a similar way to coal. In this form, asbestos is made up of strong, fine and flexible

More information

Instructions for Filing Asbestos Personal Injury Claims

Instructions for Filing Asbestos Personal Injury Claims The Congoleum Plan Trust (the Trust ) was established pursuant to the Fourth Amended Joint Plan of Reorganization Under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code of the Debtors, the Official Asbestos Claimants

More information

Mesothelioma mortality in Great Britain 1968-2009. Summary 2. Overall scale of disease including trends 3. Region 6. Occupation 7

Mesothelioma mortality in Great Britain 1968-2009. Summary 2. Overall scale of disease including trends 3. Region 6. Occupation 7 Health and Safety Executive Mesothelioma Mesothelioma mortality in Great Britain 1968-2009 Contents Summary 2 Overall scale of disease including trends 3 Region 6 Occupation 7 Estimation of the future

More information

Mesothelioma among brake mechanics: an expanded analysis of a casecontrol

Mesothelioma among brake mechanics: an expanded analysis of a casecontrol 1 Risk Anal. 2004 Jun;24(3):547-52. Related Articles, Links Mesothelioma among brake mechanics: an expanded analysis of a casecontrol study. Hessel PA, Teta MJ, Goodman M, Lau E. Exponent, Wood Dale, IL

More information

Instructions for Filing Claims

Instructions for Filing Claims The T H Agriculture & Nutrition, L.L.C. Asbestos Personal Injury Trust (the Trust ) was established as a result of the bankruptcy of T H Agriculture & Nutrition, L.L.C. ( THAN ). The Trust was created

More information

Asbestos related health risks

Asbestos related health risks Asbestos related health risks Pascal DUMORTIER *,** & Paul DE VUYST** *a-ulab ** Chest Department Hopital ERASME Asbestos related health risks Asbestos : some facts Asbestos related diseases Detection

More information

Asbestos Health Risks. Dr Andrew Pengilley Acting Chief Health Officer

Asbestos Health Risks. Dr Andrew Pengilley Acting Chief Health Officer Asbestos Health Risks Dr Andrew Pengilley Acting Chief Health Officer Asbestos Asbestos is a name given to several different fibrous minerals Three main commercial types are Chrysotile (white asbestos)

More information

The Management of Asbestos at the University of Manitoba

The Management of Asbestos at the University of Manitoba The Management of Asbestos at the University of Manitoba WHAT IS ASBESTOS? Asbestos is a name given to a group of minerals which occur naturally as masses of long silky fibres. Asbestos is known for its

More information

What is Asbestos? Asbestos was also used in household items, such as: oven gloves ironing board pads simmer mats for stoves fire blankets.

What is Asbestos? Asbestos was also used in household items, such as: oven gloves ironing board pads simmer mats for stoves fire blankets. All About Asbestos Read this booklet to learn more about: identifying asbestos-containing material in your home the health risks of asbestos what you can do about asbestos. What is Asbestos? Asbestos is

More information

BE.104 Spring Evaluating Environmental Causes of Mesothelioma J. L. Sherley

BE.104 Spring Evaluating Environmental Causes of Mesothelioma J. L. Sherley BE.104 Spring Evaluating Environmental Causes of Mesothelioma J. L. Sherley Outline: 1) Toxicological mechanisms and causation evaluations 2) An environetics case: Asbestos and Mesothelioma Toxicological

More information

Primary reason asbestos is used, is its special resistance to heat. Asbestos fibers are also virtually indestructible.

Primary reason asbestos is used, is its special resistance to heat. Asbestos fibers are also virtually indestructible. ASBESTOS AWARENESS Asbestos Awareness Asbestos is a serious health hazard commonly found in our environment today. This module is designed to provide initial education of asbestos and its associated hazards.

More information

Instructions for Filing Unliquidated Asbestos Personal Injury Claims

Instructions for Filing Unliquidated Asbestos Personal Injury Claims The ASARCO Asbestos Personal Injury Settlement Trust (the Trust ) was established pursuant to the ASARCO Incorporated and Americas Mining Corporation s Seventh Amended Plan of Reorganization for the Debtors

More information

ASBESTOS AWARENESS TRAINING. For workers and building occupants

ASBESTOS AWARENESS TRAINING. For workers and building occupants University of Nevada, Reno ASBESTOS AWARENESS TRAINING PROGRAM For workers and building occupants John A Braun, CSP Asbestos Awareness OSHA Standards for Asbestos are: 29 CFR 1910.1001 applies to all occupational

More information

Asbestos and Mesothelioma in Ontario

Asbestos and Mesothelioma in Ontario Asbestos and Mesothelioma in Ontario May 29, 2010 CARWH Conference: Worker Health in a Changing world of work Loraine Marrett, PhD Outline Part I: Asbestos & its uses Part II: Asbestos & cancer Part III:

More information

Health Effects of Asbestos Exposure

Health Effects of Asbestos Exposure Health Effects of Asbestos Exposure Jill Dyken, PhD, PE John Wheeler, PhD, DABT Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Asbestos Science Seminar Folsom, California August 18-19, 2004 Agency for

More information

INSTRUCTIONS FOR FILING A CLAIM WITH THE CELOTEX ASBESTOS SETTLEMENT TRUST

INSTRUCTIONS FOR FILING A CLAIM WITH THE CELOTEX ASBESTOS SETTLEMENT TRUST INSTRUCTIONS FOR FILING A CLAIM WITH THE CELOTEX ASBESTOS SETTLEMENT TRUST The Celotex Asbestos Settlement Trust (Celotex Trust) was established as a result of the bankruptcy of the Celotex Corporation

More information

Asbestos. The Claiming Game MEALEY S LITIGATION REPORT. A commentary article reprinted from the February 3, 2010 issue of Mealey s Litigation Report:

Asbestos. The Claiming Game MEALEY S LITIGATION REPORT. A commentary article reprinted from the February 3, 2010 issue of Mealey s Litigation Report: MEALEY S LITIGATION REPORT Asbestos The Claiming Game by Charles E. Bates, Ph.D., Charles H. Mullin, Ph.D., and Marc C. Scarcella Bates White Washington, D.C. A commentary article reprinted from the February

More information

Asbestos Awareness at the University of Toronto

Asbestos Awareness at the University of Toronto Asbestos Awareness at the University of Toronto What is Asbestos? Asbestos is a general term given to a group of naturally occurring mineral silicates that are made up of long thin fibres. These fibrous

More information

Combustion Engineering 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust Claim Form

Combustion Engineering 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust Claim Form Combustion Engineering 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust Claim Form General Instructions for filing this Claim Form: This claim form must be completed as thoroughly as possible to ensure prompt resolution of claims;

More information

Table 2.4. Summary of design and findings from mesothelioma case-control studies

Table 2.4. Summary of design and findings from mesothelioma case-control studies categories Agudo et al. (2000) Barcelona and Cadiz, Spain 32 cases (77% males) of histologically con rmed malignant pleural mesothelioma identified from hospital in the region between //993 and 2/3/996.

More information

Actuarial projections for mesothelioma: an epidemiological perspective Mark Clements, Geoffrey Berry and Jill Shi

Actuarial projections for mesothelioma: an epidemiological perspective Mark Clements, Geoffrey Berry and Jill Shi Actuarial projections for mesothelioma: an epidemiological perspective Mark Clements, Geoffrey Berry and Jill Shi 27 slides to go Who are we? I am an epidemiologist/biostatistician from the Australian

More information

Instructions for Filing Unliquidated Asbestos Personal Injury Claims

Instructions for Filing Unliquidated Asbestos Personal Injury Claims The United Gilsonite Laboratories Asbestos Personal Injury Trust (the Trust ) was established pursuant to the Modified First Amended Plan of Reorganization of United Gilsonite Laboratories Under Chapter

More information

Elimination of Asbestos- Related Diseases WHO action. Dr Ivan D. Ivanov Public Health and Environment WHO Headquarters

Elimination of Asbestos- Related Diseases WHO action. Dr Ivan D. Ivanov Public Health and Environment WHO Headquarters Elimination of Asbestos- Related Diseases WHO action Dr Ivan D. Ivanov Public Health and Environment WHO Headquarters Worldwide 125 million people are exposed to asbestos (mostly chrysotile) 75 million

More information

Where Are Mesothelioma Claims Heading?

Where Are Mesothelioma Claims Heading? December 7, 2006 Where Are Mesothelioma Claims Heading? Paul Hinton, Ron Miller, Faten Sabry, and Fred Dunbar NERA Economic Consulting i Table of Contents I. Introduction...1 II. III. Background...1 Evidence

More information

Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) General Overview

Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) General Overview Naturally Occurring Asbestos (NOA) General Overview Lee R. Shull PhD Health, Ecology and Risk Practice MWH Global Sacramento, CA CASH NOA Workshop January 24, 2006 Presentation Outline Brief background

More information

Other Asbestos Disease (Level I) Asbestosis/Pleural Disease (Level II) Asbestosis/Pleural Disease (Level III)

Other Asbestos Disease (Level I) Asbestosis/Pleural Disease (Level II) Asbestosis/Pleural Disease (Level III) Congoleum Plan Trust Claim Form for Asbestos Personal Injury Claims General Instructions for filing this Claim Form: This Claim Form for Asbestos Personal Injury Claims should be completed only by holders

More information

Your Guide to Asbestos Related Disease Claims

Your Guide to Asbestos Related Disease Claims Your Guide to Asbestos Related Disease Claims www.colemans-ctts.co.uk enquiries@colemans-ctts.co.uk 100 Talbot Road, Stretford, Manchester M16 0PG 1-3 Union Street, Kingston-Upon-Thames, Surrey KT1 1RP

More information

The Trend in Airborne Asbestos Concentrations at Plants Manufacturing Asbestos-Containing Products in Japan

The Trend in Airborne Asbestos Concentrations at Plants Manufacturing Asbestos-Containing Products in Japan Industrial Health 2001, 39, 127 131 Original Article The Trend in Airborne Asbestos Concentrations at Plants Manufacturing Asbestos-Containing Products in Japan Koji YOSHIZUMI 1 *, Hajime HORI 2, Toshihiko

More information

Instructions for Filing a Claim with the ABB Lummus Global Inc. 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust

Instructions for Filing a Claim with the ABB Lummus Global Inc. 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust Subject: Instructions for Filing a Claim with the ABB Lummus Global Inc. 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust Dear Plaintiff Counsel: The ABB Lummus Global Inc. 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust (the Trust ) was established

More information

INGERSOLL RAND CO LTD

INGERSOLL RAND CO LTD INGERSOLL RAND CO LTD FORM 8-K (Current report filing) Filed 01/11/08 for the Period Ending 01/10/08 Address 155 CHESTNUT RIDGE ROAD MONTVALE, NJ 07645 Telephone 2015730123 CIK 0001160497 Symbol IR SIC

More information

Instructions for Filing a Claim with the Combustion Engineering 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust

Instructions for Filing a Claim with the Combustion Engineering 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust Subject: Instructions for Filing a Claim with the Combustion Engineering 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust Dear Plaintiff Counsel: The Combustion Engineering 524(g) Asbestos PI Trust (the Trust ) was established

More information

Mesothelioma. Mesothelioma and Asbestos 11/21/2009

Mesothelioma. Mesothelioma and Asbestos 11/21/2009 Mesothelioma Michele Carbone, M.D.,PH.D. Director Cancer Research Center of Hawaii Professor and Chairman, Dept. of Pathology J.A. Burns Medical School University of Hawaii Honolulu, HI 96813 Mesotheliomas

More information

Asbestos Awareness Training

Asbestos Awareness Training Asbestos Awareness Training Topics Uses and forms of asbestos; Common locations of asbestos containing building materials (ACBM); Health effects from exposure; Recognition of ACM damage and deterioration;

More information

Review of Eliminating occupational cancer in Europe and globally by J. Takala

Review of Eliminating occupational cancer in Europe and globally by J. Takala Review of Eliminating occupational cancer in Europe and globally by J. Takala There primary concerns of this manuscript are outlined below. More detail discussion of these points is presented on the following

More information

M E S O T H E L I O M A Questions & Answers

M E S O T H E L I O M A Questions & Answers M E S O T H E L I O M A Questions & Answers A G U I D E F O R M E S O T H E L I O M A P A T I E N T S A N D T H E I R L O V E D O N E S MORGAN & MORGAN FORTHEPEOPLE.COM 877-667-4265 Mesothelioma Questions

More information

Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral, with many physical forms, of which the three most important are:

Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral, with many physical forms, of which the three most important are: Asbestos Awareness 1. Introduction This presentation contains: The properties of asbestos Its effects on health Its interaction with smoking The types of product and materials likely to contain asbestos

More information

Andrews Publications Tobacco Litigation 2000 THEORIES FOR THE REDUCTION OF DAMAGES

Andrews Publications Tobacco Litigation 2000 THEORIES FOR THE REDUCTION OF DAMAGES THEORIES FOR THE REDUCTION OF DAMAGES By Steven Wright Brita J. Forssberg SYNERGISM Effect of cigarette smoking is greater than that of asbestos. Synergism Synergism Lung cancer incidence rates, expressed

More information

Health effects of occupational exposure to asbestos dust

Health effects of occupational exposure to asbestos dust Health effects of occupational exposure to asbestos dust Authors: N.Szeszenia-Dąbrowska, U.Wilczyńska The major health effects of workers' exposure to asbestos dust include asbestosis, lung cancer and

More information

The Carcinogenicity of Chrysotile Asbestos A Review

The Carcinogenicity of Chrysotile Asbestos A Review Industrial Health 2001, 39, 57 64 Review Article The Carcinogenicity of Chrysotile Asbestos A Review William J. NICHOLSON Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY, NY, USA Received December 23, 2000 and accepted

More information

ASBESTOS CONTRIBUTION ( INDIRECT ) CLAIM FORM

ASBESTOS CONTRIBUTION ( INDIRECT ) CLAIM FORM ASBESTOS CONTRIBUTION ( INDIRECT ) CLAIM FORM CELOTEX ASBESTOS SETTLEMENT TRUST Submit completed claims to: Celotex Asbestos Settlement Trust PO Box 1036 Wilmington, DE 19899-1036 Instructions for the

More information

C162 Asbestos Convention, 1986

C162 Asbestos Convention, 1986 C162 Asbestos Convention, 1986 Convention concerning Safety in the Use of Asbestos (Note: Date of coming into force: 16:06:1989.) Convention:C162 Place:Geneva Session of the Conference:72 Date of adoption:24:06:1986

More information

Executive summary. Background

Executive summary. Background Executive summary Health Council of the Netherlands. Asbestos: Risks of environmental and occupational exposure. The Hague: Health Council of the Netherlands, 2010; publication no. 2010/10. Background

More information

Sir William Osler: Listen to the patient; the patient tells you everything.

Sir William Osler: Listen to the patient; the patient tells you everything. Sir William Osler: Listen to the patient; the patient tells you everything. Jean-Martin Charcot: The patient is a liar. Epidemiology of Mesothelioma Jeffrey H. Mandel, MD, MPH Division of Environmental

More information

Case 10-31607 Doc 4432 Filed 03/16/15 Entered 03/16/15 09:10:55 Desc Main Document Page 1 of 9

Case 10-31607 Doc 4432 Filed 03/16/15 Entered 03/16/15 09:10:55 Desc Main Document Page 1 of 9 Document Page 1 of 9 IN THE UNITED STATES BANKRUPTCY COURT FOR THE WESTERN DISTRICT OF NORTH CAROLINA Charlotte Division ) In re: ) ) Case No. 10-31607 GARLOCK SEALING TECHNOLOGIES ) LLC, et al., ) Chapter

More information

Asbestos and the diseases it causes

Asbestos and the diseases it causes Asbestos and the diseases it causes October 2013 Liz Darlison Mesothelioma UK University Hospitals of Leicester Contents What is asbestos Why is it such an issue in the UK Disease Statistics Asbestos Related

More information

Instructions for Filing Unliquidated Asbestos Personal Injury Claims

Instructions for Filing Unliquidated Asbestos Personal Injury Claims The G-I Holdings Inc. Asbestos Personal Injury Settlement Trust (the Trust ) was established pursuant to the Eighth Amended Plan of Reorganization of G-I Holdings Inc and ACI Inc. under Chapter 11 of the

More information

ASBESTOS. By Robert L. Virta

ASBESTOS. By Robert L. Virta ASBESTOS By Robert L. Virta Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Subina W. Pandey, statistical assistant, and the world production table was prepared by Regina R. Coleman, international data

More information

ASARCO Asbestos Personal Injury Settlement Trust

ASARCO Asbestos Personal Injury Settlement Trust ASARCO Asbestos Personal Injury Settlement Trust Claim Form for Unliquidated Asbestos Personal Injury Claims General Instructions for filing this Claim Form: This Claim Form for Unliquidated Asbestos Personal

More information

Asbestos Presence in a Factory that Produced Asbestos-Containing Products

Asbestos Presence in a Factory that Produced Asbestos-Containing Products Asbestos Presence in a Factory that Produced Asbestos-Containing Products Hana Fajkovi Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Horvatovac 95, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia, e-mail: (hanaf@geol.pmf.hr)

More information

Burns and Roe Asbestos Personal Injury Settlement Trust Instructions for Filing Claims

Burns and Roe Asbestos Personal Injury Settlement Trust Instructions for Filing Claims The Burns and Roe Asbestos Personal Injury Settlement Trust (the "Trust") was established pursuant to the Plan of Reorganizaton of Burns and Roe Enterprises, Inc., and Burns and Roe Construction Group,

More information

Mesothelioma Trends as Predictors of the Asbestos- Related Lung Cancer Burden

Mesothelioma Trends as Predictors of the Asbestos- Related Lung Cancer Burden Mesothelioma Trends as Predictors of the Asbestos- Related Lung Cancer Burden Valerie McCormack UICC World Cancer Congress Montreal August 2012 Outline Background Estimating the lung cancer mortality burden

More information

Asbestos and the Interface of Multiple Compensation Systems

Asbestos and the Interface of Multiple Compensation Systems Asbestos and the Interface of Multiple Compensation Systems National Asbestos Litigation Conference San Francisco, CA Francis E. McGovern Professor of Law Duke Law School September 23, 2009 Multiple Compensation

More information

Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corporation Asbestos PI Trust. Filing Instructions

Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corporation Asbestos PI Trust. Filing Instructions The Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corporation Asbestos PI Trust (the "Trust") was established as a result of the bankruptcy of the Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corporation. The Trust was created to process,

More information

CRS Report for Congress

CRS Report for Congress CRS Report for Congress Received through the CRS Web Order Code RS22081 Updated April 26, 2005 Summary S. 852: The Fairness in Asbestos Injury Resolution Act of 2005 Nathan Brooks Legislative Attorney

More information

ACandS Asbestos Settlement Trust Claim Form

ACandS Asbestos Settlement Trust Claim Form ACandS Asbestos Settlement Trust Claim Form General Instructions for filing this Claim Form: This claim form must be completed as thoroughly as possible to ensure prompt resolution of claims; submitting

More information

IN RE GARLOCK SEALING TECHNOLOGIES LLC, ET AL.

IN RE GARLOCK SEALING TECHNOLOGIES LLC, ET AL. IN RE GARLOCK SEALING TECHNOLOGIES LLC, ET AL. STATEMENT OF JOSEPH W. GRIER, III, THE FUTURE CLAIMANTS REPRESENTATIVE, IN SUPPORT OF THE DEBTORS SECOND AMENDED PLAN OF REORGANIZATION In asbestos bankruptcy

More information

Asbestos. Endereço eletrônico http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/asbestos/asbestos_whatis.html. What Is Asbestos? General Definition.

Asbestos. Endereço eletrônico http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/asbestos/asbestos_whatis.html. What Is Asbestos? General Definition. Endereço eletrônico http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/asbestos/asbestos_whatis.html Search Index Home Glossary Contact Us CONTENTS Asbestos What Is Asbestos? Polarized Light Microscopy Slide of Asbestos Fibers.

More information

Occupational Heath and Safety Section American Public Health Association

Occupational Heath and Safety Section American Public Health Association Occupational Heath and Safety Section American Public Health Association THE ELIMINATION OF ASBESTOS (Resolution No. 20096, Adopted 11/10/2009) As early as 1898, British government factory inspectors recognized

More information

Case 1:05-cv-00059-JHR Document 27 Filed 04/26/2005 Page 1 of 49 IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF DELAWARE

Case 1:05-cv-00059-JHR Document 27 Filed 04/26/2005 Page 1 of 49 IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF DELAWARE Case 1:05-cv-00059-JHR Document 27 Filed 04/26/2005 Page 1 of 49 IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF DELAWARE In re: Federal Mogul Global, Inc., et al (Bankruptcy #01-10578)(RTL) Debtors.

More information

Denise Martin, Ph.D.

Denise Martin, Ph.D. Testimony of Denise Martin, Ph.D. Sr. Vice President National Economic Research Associates November 17, 2005 WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF DR. DENISE NEUMANN MARTIN NERA ECONOMIC CONSULTING FOR THE HEARING ON RECENT

More information