Instructional Notes/Strategies. GLEs. Evidence / Assessments of learning Knowledge/Synthesis. Resources # SI-1 (E)

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1 Lafayette Parish School System Curriculum Map Honors Chemistry (Pearson) Unit 1: Introduction to Chemistry Time Frame 1 week August 15 August 21, 2011 Unit Description - This unit focuses on Why It Is Important to Study Chemistry? and How Chemists Solve Problems? Student Understandings - Students understand the value of chemistry in their everyday world and expand their knowledge of measurements in solving chemistry problems. GLE # SI-1 GLEs Write a testable question or hypothesis when given a topic (SI-H-A1) Evidence / Assessments of learning Knowledge/Synthesis Can students explain the importance of standard units of measurement? Instructional Notes/Strategies Pearson Textbook Correlation: Chapter 1 Introduction to Chemistry; pp Chapter 3- Scientific Measurement pp See detailed units for activities, textbook correlations, GLEs and websites Additional Resources Can students explain how measurements may be precise but not accurate? Activity 3: Accuracy and Precision of Scientific Equipment Focus: students will discover that measuring instruments may differ greatly in accuracy. : Word Grid Brainstorming Learning Log 1

2 SI-5 Utilize mathematics, organizational tools, an graphing skills to solve problems (SI-H-A3) Can students determine the precision of a measuring instrument and relate the number of significant figures to that precision? Can students explain how measurements may be precise but not accurate? Can students demonstrate their knowledge of expressing numbers in correct scientific notation and significant figures in experimental calculations and other problemsolving situations? Can students use the factor-label method of solving problems to perform metric conversions? Activity 2: Significant Figures Focus: Students will learn the roles significant digits play when calculating measurements. Activity 4: Accuracy Focus: Student will measure the mass and volume of metal samples, calculate the density and percent error to determine accuracy and precision using correct significant figures. Data Collection Activity 5: From What to What? Focus: Students will use the factor-label method (dimensional analysis) to convert a quantity expressed in one unit to another unit. Story Chain Memory Flash SI-7 Choose appropriate models to explain scientific knowledge or experimental results (e.g., objects, mathematical relationships, plans, schemes, examples, role-playing, computer simulations) (SI-H-A4) Can students convert measured quantities into other standard units? /Evaluation/Knowle dge Can students use the factor-label method of solving problems to perform metric conversions? Can students convert measured quantities into other standard units? Activity 5: From What to What? Focus: Students will use the factor-label method (dimensional analysis) to convert a quantity expressed in one unit to another unit. Story Chain Memory Flash 2

3 SI-10 Given a description of an experiment,, identify appropriate safety measures (SI-H-A7) Comprehension/Analysis Can students use lab safety procedures correctly and consistently? Can students explain the importance of standard units of measurement? Can students determine the precision of a measuring instrument and relate the number of significant figures to that precision? Activity 1: Safety in the Classroom Focus: Student will learn how to safely use common equipment Activity 3: Accuracy and Precision of Scientific Equipment Focus: students will discover that measuring instruments may differ greatly in accuracy. : Word Grid Brainstorming Learning Log SI-3 Plan and record step-by-step procedures for a valid investigation, select equipment and materials, and identify variables and controls (SI-H-A2) Can students explain how measurements may be precise but not accurate? Synthesis/Knowledge Can students explain the importance of standard units of measurement? Can students explain how measurements may be precise but not accurate? Activity 3: Accuracy and Precision of Scientific Equipment Focus: students will discover that measuring instruments may differ greatly in accuracy. : Word Grid Brainstorming Learning Log SI-4 Conduct an investigation that includes multiple trials and record, organize, and display data appropriately (SI-H-A2) Can students explain the importance of standard units of measurement? Activity 2: Significant Figures Focus: Students will learn the roles significant digits play when calculating measurements. Can students determine the precision of a measuring instrument and relate the number of significant figures to that precision? Can students explain how measurements may be precise but Activity 3: Accuracy and Precision of Scientific Equipment Focus: students will discover that measuring instruments may differ greatly in accuracy. : Word Grid Brainstorming Learning Log 3

4 15 Analyze the conclusion from an investigation by using data to determine its validity (SI-H-B4) SI- 1 SI-2 Convert metric system unit involving length, mass, volume, and time using dimensional analysis (i.e., factor-label method) (PS-H-A1) Differentiate between accuracy and precision and evaluate percent error(ps-h-a1) not accurate? Analyze Can students explain the importance of standard units of measurement? Can students explain how measurements may be precise but not accurate? Can students use the factor-label method of solving problems to perform metric conversions? Can students convert measured quantities into other standard units? Analysis Can students explain the importance of standard units of measurement? Can students determine the precision of a measuring instrument and relate the number of significant figures to that precision? Can students explain how measurements may be precise but not accurate? Activity 3: Accuracy and Precision of Scientific Equipment Focus: students will discover that measuring instruments may differ greatly in accuracy. : Word Grid Brainstorming Learning Log Activity 5: From What to What? Focus: Students will use the factor-label method (dimensional analysis) to convert a quantity expressed in one unit to another unit. Story Chain Memory Flash Activity 3: Accuracy and Precision of Scientific Equipment Focus: students will discover that measuring instruments may differ greatly in accuracy. : Word Grid Brainstorming Learning Log Activity 4: Accuracy Focus: Student will measure the mass and volume of metal samples, calculate the density and percent error to determine accuracy using correct significant figures. Data Collection 4

5 SI-3 SI-4 Determine the significant figures based on precision of measurement for stated quantities (PS-H-A1) Use scientific notation to express large and small numbers (PS-H- A1) /Evaluation Can students determine the precision of a measuring instrument and relate the number of significant figures to that precision? Can students use the factor-label method of solving problems to perform metric conversions? Can students convert measured quantities into other standard units? Can students use the factor-label method of solving problems to perform metric conversions? Can students convert measured quantities into other standard units? Activity 2: Significant Figures Focus: Students will learn the roles significant digits play when calculating measurements. Activity 4: Accuracy Focus: Student will measure the mass and volume of metal samples, calculate the density and percent error to determine accuracy using correct significant figures. Data Collection Activity 5: From What to What? Focus: Students will use the factor-label method (dimensional analysis) to convert a quantity expressed in one unit to another unit. Story Chain Memory Flash Activity 5: From What to What? Focus: Students will use the factor-label method (dimensional analysis) to convert a quantity expressed in one unit to another unit. Story Chain Memory Flash 5

6 Lafayette Parish School System Curriculum Map Honors Chemistry (Pearson) Unit 2 : Matter and Change Time Frame 2 weeks August 22 September 6, 2011 Unit Description - This unit focuses on the classification, properties, and changes of matter. Student Understandings - Students will understand the organization of matter, its chemical and physical properties, and the chemical and physical changes it undergoes. Students will demonstrate their understanding by molecular level drawings, classifying various properties and changes as either chemical or physical, and providing evidence to support their decisions. GLE # GLEs Write a testable S question or hypothesis I when given a topic (SI- H- A1) - 1 Evidence / Assessments of learning Knowledge/Synthesis Additional Resources Instructional Notes/Strategies Pearson Textbook Correlation: Chapter 2 Matter & Change-pp SI-5 ( E ) Utilize mathematics, organizational tools, an graphing skills to solve problems (SI-H-A3) Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of elements, compounds, and mixtures? Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of physical properties, physical changes, chemical properties, and chemical changes? Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of solids, liquids and gases? Activity 1: Classification of Matter Focus: Students will classify matter according to physicals and chemical properties. : Brainstorming Concept Map BLM Activity 5: Density Discovery Focus: Students will calculate density of different substances. : Density BLM Data Collection 6

7 SI-7 Choose appropriate models to explain scientific knowledge or experimental results (e.g., objects, mathematical relationships, plans, schemes, examples, role-playing, computer simulations) (SI-H-A4) /Evaluation/Knowled ge Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of elements, compounds, and mixtures? Activity 1: Classification of Matter Focus: Students will classify matter according to physicals and chemical properties. : Brainstorming Concept Map BLM SI-9 SI-10 SI-3 SI-4 SI-15 Write and defend a conclusion based on logical analysis of experimental data (SI-H-A6) (SI- H-A2) Given a description of an experiment,, identify appropriate safety measures (SI-H-A7) Plan and record step-by-step procedures for a valid investigation, select equipment and materials, and identify variables and controls (SI-H-A2) Conduct an investigation that includes multiple trials and record, organize, and display data appropriately (SI-H-A2) Analyze the conclusion from an investigation by using data to determine its validity (SI-H-B4) Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of physical properties, physical changes, chemical properties, and chemical changes? Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of solids, liquids and gases? Knowledge/Evaluation Comprehension/Analysis Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of physical properties, physical changes, chemical properties, and chemical changes? Synthesis/Knowledge Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of physical properties, physical changes, chemical properties, and chemical changes? Analyze Activity 4: States of Matter Focus: Students will identify different states and changes of matter. : Brainstorming Venn diagram BLM Activity 3: Separation of a Mixture Focus: Students will write a step by step procedure to separate an unknown mixture and record their results. : Learning Log Data collection Activity 3: Separation of a Mixture Focus: Students will write a step by step procedure to separate an unknown mixture and record their results. : Learning Log Data collection 7

8 SI-1 SI-14 SI-1 SI-1 Convert metric system unit involving length, mass, volume, and time using dimensional analysis (i.e., factor-label method) (PS-H-A1) Identify unknowns as elements, compounds, or mixtures based on physical properties (e.g., density, melting point, boiling point, solubility) (PS-H-C1) Design and conduct a laboratory investigation in which physical properties are used to separate the substances in a mixture (PS- H-C4) Describe chemical changes and reactions using diagrams and descriptions of the reactants, products and energy changes (PS- H-D1) Analyze Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of elements, compounds, and mixtures? Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of physical properties, physical changes, chemical properties, and chemical changes? Synthesis Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of physical properties, physical changes, chemical properties, and chemical changes? Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of physical properties, physical changes, chemical properties, and chemical changes? Activity 2: Identifying Elements, Compounds and Mixtures Focus: Students will differentiate elements, compounds, and mixture. : Word Grid BLM Activity 3: Separation of a Mixture Focus: Students will write a step by step procedure to separate an unknown mixture and record their results. : Learning Log Data collection Activity 3: Separation of a Mixture Focus: Students will write a step by step procedure to separate an unknown mixture and record their results. : Learning Log Data collection Activity 6: Chemical and Physical Changes Lab Carousel Focus: Students will record observations and identify what type of change is observed based on chemical and physical properties. : Split page notetaking BLM Data Collection 8

9 Lafayette Parish School System Curriculum Map Honors Chemistry (Pearson) Unit 3 : Atoms and the Periodic Table Time Frame 5 weeks September 7 October 14, 2011 Unit Description - This unit focuses on the development of the modern atomic theory, atomic structure and the periodic table. Student Understandings - Students will understand the history of the development of the atomic theory and the periodic table. They will understand how atomic and electron structure affect the periodic trends. They will understand how periodic trends can be used to predict whether an element is a metal, nonmetal, or metalloid as well as predicting ion formation and bond type based on an element s location on the periodic table. Atomic timelines, models, and documentation throughout the activities will provide evidence of students understanding of these items. GLE GLEs Evidence / Assessments of learning Instructional Notes/Strategies Additional Resources # SI-2 Describe how investigations can be observation, description, literature survey, classification, or experimentation (SI-H-A2) Knowledge/Comprehension Pearson Textbook Correlation: Chapter 4: Atomic Structure, pp Chapter 5: Electrons in Atoms, pp Chapter 6: The Periodic Table, pp SI-5 SI-6. Utilize mathematics, organizational tools, an graphing skills to solve problems (SI-H-A3) Use technology when appropriate to enhance laboratory investigations and presentations of findings. (SI-H-A3) Can students differentiate between mass number and atomic mass and relate these terms to isotopes of elements? Activity 2: Isotopes of Pennies Focus: Student will demonstrate that isotopes of an element have different masses, that isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons, and that atomic mass is the weighted average of the naturally occurring isotopes of an element. : arkid=4&docid=176 9

10 SI-9 SI-13. SI-4 Write and defend a conclusion based on logical analysis of experimental data (SI-H-A6) (SI- H-A2) Identify scientific evidence that has caused modifications in previously accepted theories (SI- H-B2) Conduct an investigation that includes multiple trials and record, organize, and display data appropriately (SI-H-A2) Knowledge/Evaluation Can students differentiate between mass number and atomic mass and relate these terms to isotopes of elements? Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of physical properties, physical changes, chemical properties, and chemical changes? Comprehension/Analysis Can students trace the development of the atomic theory through modern times? Can students predict the physical properties and chemical properties of an element based on its location on the periodic table and provide the rationales for the predictions? Can students differentiate between mass number and atomic mass and relate these terms to isotopes of elements? Activity 2: Isotopes of Pennies Focus: Student will demonstrate that isotopes of an element have different masses, that isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons, and that atomic mass is the weighted average of the naturally occurring isotopes of an element. : arkid=4&docid=176 Activity 1: Periodic Table Trends Focus: Students will the compare various periodic trends. : GISTing BLM Activity 1: Atomic Theory Timeline Focus: Students will do a web quest and create a product of scientists involved with the development of the atomic theories. : Scientific investigation Abstract Activity 3: The Periodic Table Focus: Students will group and compile a list of similarities, differences, and trends for elements. : Periodic Table BLM Professor know-it-all Activity 2: Isotopes of Pennies Focus: Student will demonstrate that isotopes of an element have different masses, that isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons, and that atomic mass is the weighted average of the naturally occurring isotopes of an element. : arkid=4&docid=176 10

11 SI-8 (C) SI-11 (C) SI-14 (C) SI-16 (C) Give an example of how new scientific data can cause an existing scientific explanation to be supported, revised, or rejected (SI-H-A5) Evaluate selected theories based on supporting scientific evidence (SI-H-B1) Cite examples of scientific advances and emerging technologies and how they affect society (e.g., MRI, DNA in forensics) (SI-H-B3) Use the following rules of evidence to examine experimental results: (a) Can an expert's technique or theory be tested, has it been tested, or is it simply a subjective, conclusive approach that cannot be reasonably assessed for reliability? (b) Has the technique or theory been subjected to peer review and publication? (c) What is the known or potential rate of error of the technique or theory when applied? (d) Were standards and controls applied and maintained? Has the technique or theory been generally accepted in the scientific community? (SI-H-B5) (SI-H-B1) (SI-H-B4) Comprehension Can students trace the development of the atomic theory through modern times? Evaluation Can students trace the development of the atomic theory through modern times? /Evaluation /Evaluation Activity 1: Atomic Theory Timeline Focus: Students will do a web quest and create a product of scientists involved with the development of the atomic theories. : Scientific investigation Abstract Activity 1: Atomic Theory Timeline Focus: Students will do a web quest and create a product of scientists involved with the development of the atomic theories. : Scientific investigation Abstract Activity 6: Nuclear Chemistry Focus: Students will develop a time line for significant discoveries associated with radioactivity. 11

12 SI-9 E) SI-10 SI-11 SI-13 SI-17 SI-8 Draw accurate valence electron configurations and Lewis dot structures for selected molecules, ionic and covalent compounds, and chemical equations (PS-H-B1) Differentiate among alpha, beta, and gamma emissions (PS-H-B2) Calculate the amount of radioactive substance remaining after a given number of half-lives has passed (PS-H-B2) Identify the number of bonds an atom can form given the number of valence electrons (PS-H-B3) Use the periodic table to compare electronegativities and ionization energies of elements to explain periodic properties, such as atomic size (PS-H-C2) Analyze the development of the modern atomic theory from a historical perspective (PS-H-B1) Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of physical properties, physical changes, chemical properties, and chemical changes? Analysis Can students identify the types of radiation and radioactive decay and give an example of each? Comprehension Can students explain what is meant by half-life of a radioactive substance? Analyze Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of physical properties, physical changes, chemical properties, and chemical changes? /Comprehension Can students describe, differentiate, and provide examples of physical properties, physical changes, chemical properties, and chemical changes? Analyze Can students trace the development of the atomic theory through modern times? Activity 6: Nuclear Chemistry Focus: Students will develop a time line for significant discoveries associated with radioactivity. Activity 6: Nuclear Chemistry Focus: Students will develop a time line for significant discoveries associated with radioactivity. Activity 5: A Date with Chemistry Focus: Students will research certain elements and analyze for bond formation. Activity 4: Periodic Table Trends Focus: Students will the compare various periodic trends. : GISTing BLM Activity 1: Atomic Theory Timeline Focus: Students will do a web quest and create a product of scientists involved with the development of the atomic theories. : Scientific investigation Abstract 12

13 SI-12 Describe the uses of radioactive isotopes and radiation in such areas as plant and animal research, health care, and food preservation (PS-H-B2) Knowledge Can students trace the development of the atomic theory through modern times? Can students identify the types of radiation and radioactive decay and give an example of each? Can students explain what is meant by half-life of a radioactive substance? Activity 1: Atomic Theory Timeline Focus: Students will do a web quest and create a product of scientists involved with the development of the atomic theories. : Scientific investigation Abstract Activity 6: Nuclear Chemistry Focus: Students will develop a time line for significant discoveries associated with radioactivity. SI-15 SI-16 Predict the physical and chemical properties of an element based only on its location in the periodic table (PS-H-C2) Predict the stable ion(s) an element is likely to form when it reacts with other specified elements (PS-HC2) Can students describe the benefits of using radioactive substances? Can students predict the physical properties and chemical properties of an element based on its location on the periodic table and provide the rationales for the predictions? Activity 3: The Periodic Table Focus: Students will group and compile a list of similarities, differences, and trends for elements. : Periodic Table BLM Professor know-it-all? Activity 1: Atomic Theory Timeline Focus: Students will do a web quest and create a product of scientists involved with the development of the atomic theories. : Scientific investigation Abstract 13

14 Lafayette Parish School System Curriculum Map Honors Chemistry (Pearson) Unit 4 : Chemical Bonding and The Formation of Compounds Time Frame 4 weeks October 19 November 16, 2011 Unit Description - The focus of this unit is bonding, molecular shape, intermolecular forces, and chemical formulas. Student Understandings - The student will understand how to predict the type of chemical bond in a compound by using the periodic table and Lewis dot structures to model bond type. The student will be able to understand how to predict the shape of simple molecules by drawing Lewis Structures showing the correct molecular geometry. The student will understand intermolecular forces of attraction and their impact on the physical and chemical properties of substances by writing a RAFTing paragraph. GLE GLEs Skills/Guiding Questions Instructional Notes/Strategies Additional Resources # SI-5 Utilize mathematics, organizational tools, an graphing skills to solve problems (SI-H-A3) Pearson Textbook Correlation: Chapter 7: Ionic Compounds and Metallic, pp Chapter 8: Covalent Bonding, Chapter 9: Chemical Names and Formulas, pp SI-7 Choose appropriate models to explain scientific knowledge or experimental results (e.g., objects, mathematical relationships, plans, schemes, examples, roleplaying, computer simulations) (SI-H- A4) /Evaluation/Knowledge Chapter 20: Oxidation-Reduction reactions, pp

15 SI-7 SI-9 SI-10 SI-5 Choose appropriate models to explain scientific knowledge or experimental results (e.g., objects, mathematical relationships, plans, schemes, examples, roleplaying, computer simulations) (SI-H- A4) Write and defend a conclusion based on logical analysis of experimental data (SI-H-A6) (SI- H-A2) Given a description of an experiment,, identify appropriate safety measures (SI-H-A7) Write and name formulas for ionic and covalent compounds (PS-H- A2) /Evaluation/Knowledge Knowledge/Evaluation Comprehension/Analysis Knowledge/ Can students predict the bond type of a compound? Can students write formulas and name compounds? Activity 4: Experimental Indicators of Bond Type Focus: Students will identify the various bond types of given compounds. : BLM-Chemical Bond Type Data collection Activity 4: Experimental Indicators of Bond Type Focus: Students will identify the various bond types of given compounds. : BLM-Chemical Bond Type Data collection Activity 2: Modeling Formation of Compounds Focus: Students will predict how ionic compounds are formed. : BLM Ion Cards Activity 3: Molecular Compounds Focus: Students will illustrate covalent bonding with Lewis Dot formulas, structural formulas. : BLM-Chemical formulas and nomenclature 15

16 SI-9 SI-24 Draw accurate valence electron configurations and Lewis dot structures for selected molecules, ionic and covalent compounds, and chemical equations (PS-H-B2) Describe the influence of intermolecular forces on the physical and chemical properties of covalent compounds (PS-H- C5) Predict the physical and chemical properties of an element based only on its location in the periodic table (PS-H-C2) SI- 15 SI-16 Predict the stable ion(s) an element is likely to form when it reacts with other specified elements (PS-H-C2) Can students predict the bond type of a compound? Can students predict the molecular geometry of simple compounds? Knowledge Can students predict the molecular geometry of simple compounds? Can students predict the physical and chemical properties of a substance based on the type of bond and intermolecular forces present in the substance? Can students predict the molecular geometry of simple compounds? Can students predict the physical and chemical properties of a substance based on the type of bond and intermolecular forces present in the substance? Can students write formulas and name compounds? Activity 2: Modeling Formation of Compounds Focus: Students will predict how ionic compounds are formed. : BLM Ion Cards Activity 3: Molecular Compounds Focus: Students will illustrate covalent bonding with Lewis Dot formulas, structural formulas. : BLM-Chemical formulas and nomenclature Activity 5: Intermolecular Forces Focus: Students will compare intermolecular forces of attraction. : Data collection Activity 1: Predict the Bonding Types Focus: Students will use the periodic table to understand key terms involved in bonding. : BLM Vocabulary Self Awareness Activity 2: Modeling Formation of Compounds Focus: Students will predict how ionic compounds are formed : BLM Ion Cards 16

17 SI-23 Model chemical bond formation by using Lewis dot diagrams for ionic, polar, and nonpolar compounds (PS-H-C5) /Comprehension Can students predict the bond type of a compound? Can students predict the molecular geometry of simple compounds? Activity 2: Modeling Formation of Compounds Focus: Students will predict how ionic compounds are formed : BLM Ion Cards Activity 3: Molecular Compounds Focus: Students will illustrate covalent bonding with Lewis Dot formulas, structural formulas. : BLM-Chemical formulas and nomenclature SI-22 SI-46 Predict the kind of bond that will form between two elements based on electronic structure and electronegativity of the elements (e.g., ionic, polar, nonpolar) (PS-H-C5) Identify and compare intermolecular forces and their effects on physical and chemical properties (PS-H- E1) /Comprehension Can students predict the bond type of a compound? Can students predict the molecular geometry of simple compounds? Can students predict the physical and chemical properties of a substance based on the type of bond and intermolecular forces present in the substance? Analyze Can students predict the physical and chemical properties of a substance based on the type of bond and intermolecular forces present in the substance? Activity 6: Predicting Properties Focus: Students will differential types of bonds between selected compounds. : BLM - RAFT Activity 1: Predict the Bonding Types Focus: Students will use the periodic table to understand key terms involved in bonding. : BLM Vocabulary Self Awareness Activity 6: Predicting Properties Focus: Students will differential types of bonds between selected compounds. : BLM - RAFT Activity 5: Intermolecular Forces Focus: Students will compare intermolecular forces of attraction. : Data collection 17

18 Lafayette Parish School System Curriculum Map Honors Chemistry (Pearson) Unit 5 : Moles, Reactions and Stoichiometry Time Frame 8 weeks November 17 February 10, 2012 Unit Description - The focus of this unit is bonding, molecular shape, intermolecular forces, and chemical formulas. Student Understandings - The student will understand how to predict the type of chemical bond in a compound by using the periodic table and Lewis dot structures to model bond type. The student will be able to understand how to predict the shape of simple molecules by drawing Lewis Structures showing the correct molecular geometry. The student will understand intermolecular forces of attraction and their impact on the physical and chemical properties of substances by writing a RAFTing paragraph. GLE GLEs Skills/Guiding Questions Instructional Notes/Strategies Additional Resources # SI-5 Utilize mathematics, organizational tools, and graphing skills to solve problems (SI-H-A3) Pearson Textbook Correlation: Chapter 10: Chemical Quantities, pp Chapter 11: Chemical Reactions, pp Chapter 12: Stoichiometry, pp See detailed units for activities, textbook correlations, GLEs and websites Activity 1- How Large is a Mole? Focus: Students should write and defend a conclusion about the relationship among the number of particles, containers, and mass based on logical analysis of the data obtained from this activity. BLM-How large is a mole? Answers Activity 2- Determining Empirical Formulas for Ionic Compounds Focus: Students will determine the empirical formula of an ionic compound. 18

19 SI-9 SI-10 PS-5 PS-6 PS-17 Write and defend a conclusion based on logical analysis of experimental data (SI-H-A6) (SI- H-A2) Give a description of an experiment and identify appropriate safety measures (SI-H- A7) Write and name formulas for ionic and covalent compounds (PS-H- A2) Write and name the chemical formula for the products that form from the reaction of selected reactants (PS-H- A2) Use the periodic table to compare electronegativities and ionization energies of elements to explain periodic properties, such as atomic size (PS-H-C2) Knowledge/Evaluation Comprehension/Analysis Knowledge/ Can students experimentally determine a chemical formula of a compound? Can students mathematically determine a chemical formula of a compound? Knowledge/ Can students experimentally determine a chemical formula of a compound? Can students mathematically determine a chemical formula of a compound? /Comprehension Activity 1- How Large is a Mole? Focus: Students should write and defend a conclusion about the relationship among the number of particles, containers, and mass based on logical analysis of the data obtained from this activity. BLM-How large is a mole? Answers Activity 2- Determining Empirical Formulas for Ionic Compounds Focus: Students will determine the empirical formula of an ionic compound. Activity 3- Observing chemical reactions Focus: Students will cite evidence to indicate that a chemical reaction has occurred. Activity 3- Observing chemical reactions Focus: Students will cite evidence to indicate that a chemical reaction has occurred. 19

20 PS-34 PS-36 Describe chemical changes by developing word equations, balanced formula equations, and net ionic equations (PS-H- D3) Identify the substances gaining and losing electrons in simple oxidationreduction reactions (PS-H-D3) Knowledge/ Can students experimentally determine a chemical formula of a compound? Can students express chemical reactions using correct, balanced formula equations? Analysis Can students predict the products of simple reactions, oxidation/reduction, and formation of precipitates? Activity 4- Classifying Reactions Focus: Students should research and determine two simple types of reactions that can be performed as a demonstration to the class, explaining solubility rules and activity series when applicable. Split-page notetaking Activity 7- An Introduction to Oxidation-Reduction Reactions Focus: Students will discover the definitions associated with redox reactions. Vocabulary Self-Awareness BLM-Vocabulary Self-Awareness Sheet, Introduction to Oxidation-Reduction Reactions Activity 7- An Introduction to Oxidation-Reduction Reactions Focus: Students will discover the definitions associated with redox reactions. Vocabulary Self-Awareness BLM-Vocabulary Self-Awareness Sheet, Introduction to Oxidation-Reduction Reactions PS-38 Relate the law of conservation of matter to the rearrangement of atoms in a balanced chemical equation (PS-H-D5) Comprehension/Evaluation Can students explain the law of conservation of matter in ordinary chemical reactions? Can students write balanced chemical equations? Activity 5- Stoichiometry and Conservation of Mass Focus: Students use paperclips to model chemical reactions and explain the Law of Conservation of matter. Split-page note taking PS-39 Conduct an investigation in which the masses of the reactants and products from a chemical reaction are calculated (PS- H-D5) Can students express chemical reactions using correct, balanced formula equations? Can students describe the mole as a counting word/quantity and demonstrate the ability to solve mole conversion problems? Activity 6- Can You Make Two Grams? Focus: Students will use the skills of writing and balancing equations, predicting products, using a solubility chart to predict the formation of a precipitate, and solving stoichiometry problems. BLM-Can You Make Two Grams? Answer Sheet 20

21 PS-40 SI-7 Compute percent composition, empirical formulas, and molecular formulas of selected compounds in chemical reactions (PS-H-D5) Write a balanced symbolic equation from a word equation (PS-H-A2) Can students describe the mole as a counting word/quantity and demonstrate the ability to solve mole conversion problems? Can students experimentally determine a chemical formula of a compound? Can students mathematically determine a chemical formula of a compound? Can students express chemical reactions using correct, balanced formula equations? Can students identify the basic types of chemical reactions? Activity 2- Determining Empirical Formulas for Ionic Compounds Focus: Students will determine the empirical formula of an ionic compound. Activity 4- Classifying Reactions Focus: Students should research and determine two simple types of reactions that can be performed as a demonstration to the class, explaining solubility rules and activity series when applicable. Split-page note taking Can students write balanced chemical equations? SI-31 Describe chemical changes and reactions using diagrams and descriptions of the reactants, products and energy changes (PS-H-D1) Can students explain the law of conservation of matter in ordinary chemical reactions? Can students write balanced chemical equations? Activity 3- Observing chemical reactions Focus: Students will cite evidence to indicate that a chemical reaction has occurred. Activity 4- Classifying Reactions Focus: Students should research and determine two simple types of reactions that can be performed as a demonstration to the class, explaining solubility rules and activity series when applicable. Split-page note taking 21

22 SI-35 SI-41 SI -5 (C) SI -7 (C) Predict products (with phase notations) of simple reactions, including acid/base, oxidation/reductio n, and formation of precipitates (PS-H- D3) Apply knowledge of stoichiometry to solve mass/mass, mass/volume, and mole/mole problems (PS-H- D5) Give examples of common chemical reactions, including those found in biological systems (PS-H-D7) Assess environmental issues related to the storage, containment, and disposal of wastes associated with energy production and use (PS-H-G4) /Synthesis Can students predict the products of simple reactions, oxidation/reduction, and formation of precipitates? Can students express chemical reactions using correct, balanced formula equations? Can students write balanced chemical equations? Can students explain the law of conservation of matter in ordinary chemical reactions? Can students use balanced equations to solve mass/mass, mass/volume, volume/volume, mole/mole problems, and limiting reactant problems? Can students describe the mole as a counting word/quantity and demonstrate the ability to solve mole conversion problems? Can students identify the basic types of chemical reactions? Can students predict the products of simple reactions, oxidation/reduction, and formation of precipitates? Knowledge/Evaluation Can students discuss environmental issues related to the use and storage of chemicals? Activity 6- Can You Make Two Grams? Focus: Students will use the skills of writing and balancing equations, predicting products, using a solubility chart to predict the formation of a precipitate, and solving stoichiometry problems. BLM-Can You Make Two Grams? Answer Sheet Activity 2- Determining Empirical Formulas for Ionic Compounds Focus: Students will determine the empirical formula of an ionic compound. Activity 5- Stoichiometry and Conservation of Mass Focus: Students use paperclips to model chemical reactions and explain the Law of Conservation of matter. Split-page note taking Activity 3- Observing chemical reactions Focus: Students will cite evidence to indicate that a chemical reaction has occurred. Activity 8- Chemicals in the Home and Community Focus: Students will determine types and natures of household chemicals in their home. Brainstorm RAFT 22

23 Lafayette Parish School System Curriculum Map Honors Chemistry (Pearson) Unit 6 : States of Matter, Energy Changes, and LeChatelier s Principle Time Frame 6 weeks February 13 March 29, 2011 Unit Description - This unit focuses on developing a quantitative understanding of the behavior of gases and energy changes that occur during the substance phase changes and chemical reactions. Additional focus is placed on understanding the shift in equilibrium and LeChatelier s Principle. Student Understandings - Students will develop an understanding of the relationships between temperature, pressure, volume, and moles of gases by solving gas law problems. Students will also comprehend state changes at the molecular level and exothermic and endothermic processes by reading and interpreting graphs, as well as doing the various lab activities of this unit. Students will be able to predict the direction of a shift in equilibrium in a system as a result of stress by using LeChatelier's principle in a lab activity, as well as solving. GLE # SI-1 GLEs Skills/Guiding Questions Instructional Notes/Strategies Additional Resources Write a testable question or hypothesis when given a topic (SI-H-A1) Synthesis/Knowledge Pearson Textbook Correlation: Chapter 13: States of Matter, pp Chapter 14: Behavior of Gases, pp Chapter 15: Water and Aqueous Systems, pp Chapter 17-Thermochemistry: pp See detailed units for activities, textbook correlations, GLEs and websites Activity 4 Inter-State Matters: Exploring phase transitions of Gases, Liquids, and Solids Focus: Students should explore the phase and temperature changes that occur as ice changes to water and steam. BLM-Heating Curve, Phase Diagram Activity 7 Calorimetry Focus: Students will determine the heat of solution and specific heat of metals. 23

24 SI-5 Utilize mathematics, organizational tools, an graphing skills to solve problems (SI-H-A3) Activity 1-3 Gas Laws Focus: Students will describe the relationships between gas volume, temperature, and pressure while viewing teacher demonstrations. Split-page note taking SI-6. Use technology when appropriate to enhance laboratory investigations and presentations of findings. (SI-H-A3) Activity 4 Inter-State Matters: Exploring phase transitions of Gases, Liquids, and Solids Focus: Students should explore the phase and temperature changes that occur as ice changes to water and steam. BLM-Heating Curve, Phase Diagram Activity 1-3 Gas Laws Focus: Students will describe the relationships between gas volume, temperature, and pressure while viewing teacher demonstrations. Split-page note taking Activity 4 Inter-State Matters: Exploring phase transitions of Gases, Liquids, and Solids Focus: Students should explore the phase and temperature changes that occur as ice changes to water and steam. BLM-Heating Curve, Phase Diagram Activity 6 Exothermic and Endothermic Reactions Focus: Students will determine whether a reaction is endothermic or exothermic and if it needs activation energy. BLM-Endothermic and Exothermic Energy Diagram Activity 7 Calorimetry Focus: Students will determine the heat of solution and specific heat of metals. 24

25 SI-7. SI-9 SI-10 SI-4 SI-15 PS-29 Choose appropriate models to explain scientific knowledge or experimental results (e.g., objects, mathematical relationships, plans, schemes, examples, role-playing, computer simulations) (SI-H-A4) Write and defend a conclusion based on logical analysis of experimental data (SI-H-A6) (SI-H-A2) Given a description of an experiment,, identify appropriate safety measures (SI-H-A7) Conduct an investigation that includes multiple trials and record, organize, and display data appropriately (SI-H-A2) Analyze the conclusion from an investigation by using data to determine its validity (SI-H-B4) Predict the properties of a gas based on gas laws (e.g., temperature, pressure, volume) (PS-H-C7) Knowledge// Evaluation Knowledge/Evaluation Comprehension/Analysis Analysis Can students predict the behavior of a known quantity of gas using Boyle s Law, Charles Law, Gay Lussac s Law, Avogadro s Law, Dalton s Law, and Ideal Gas Law? Activity 1-3 Gas Laws Focus: Students will describe the relationships between gas volume, temperature, and pressure while viewing teacher demonstrations. Split-page note taking Activity 9 Heat of Combustion of Magnesium Focus: Students will use Hess s Law to determine the heat of combustion of magnesium. Data Collection Activity 1-3 Gas Laws Focus: Students will describe the relationships between gas volume, temperature, and pressure while viewing teacher demonstrations. Split-page note taking Vocabulary self-awareness chart 25

26 PS-30 PS-42 PS-43 SI-31 Solve problems involving heat flow and temperature changes by using known values of specific heat and latent heat of phase change (PS-H-C7) Differentiate between activation energy in endothermic reactions and exothermic reactions (PS-H- D6) Graph and compute the energy changes that occur when a substance, such as water, goes from a solid to a liquid state, and then to a gaseous state (PS-H-D6) Describe chemical changes and reactions using diagrams and descriptions of the reactants, products and energy changes (PS-H- D1) Can students describe the experimental study known as calorimetry and how it incorporates specific heat and latent heat of fusion or vaporization? Can students produce and interpret a temperature-time graph as a substance passes through phase changes? Analysis Can students compare the amount of activation energy for an endothermic reaction and an exothermic reaction? Synthesis/ Can students produce and interpret a temperature-time graph as a substance passes through phase changes? Can students compare the amount of activation energy for an endothermic reaction and an exothermic reaction? Activity 4 Inter-State Matters: Exploring phase transitions of Gases, Liquids, and Solids Focus: Students should explore the phase and temperature changes that occur as ice changes to water and steam. BLM-Heating Curve, Phase Diagram Activity 5 Heat of Fusion of Ice Focus: Students will determine heat of fusion while melting ice. Data Collection Activity 7 Calorimetry Focus: Students will determine the heat of solution and specific heat of metals. Data Collection Activity 6 Exothermic and Endothermic Reactions Focus: Students will determine whether a reaction is endothermic or exothermic and if it needs activation energy. BLM-Endothermic and Exothermic Energy Diagram Activity 4 Inter-State Matters: Exploring phase transitions of Gases, Liquids, and Solids Focus: Students should explore the phase and temperature changes that occur as ice changes to water and steam. BLM-Heating Curve, Phase Diagram Activity 6 Exothermic and Endothermic Reactions Focus: Students will determine whether a reaction is endothermic or exothermic and if it needs activation energy. BLM-Endothermic and Exothermic Energy Diagram Activity 9 Heat of Combustion of Magnesium Focus: Students will use Hess s Law to determine the heat of combustion of magnesium. Data Collection 26

27 SI-37 SI-44 Predict the direction of a shift in equilibrium in a system as a result of stress by using LeChatelier's principle (PS-H-D4) Measure and graph energy changes during chemical reactions observed in the laboratory. (PS-H-D6) Can students predict the direction of a shift in equilibrium in a system as a result of stress by using Le Chatelier s Principle? Evaluation/Synthesis Can students compare the amount of activation energy for an endothermic reaction and an exothermic reaction? Activity 10 Chemical Equilibrium and Le Chatelier s Principle Focus: Students will investigate Le Chatelier s Principle using the chromate-dichromate equilibrium. Reciprocal teaching Activity 8 Heat of Reaction Focus: Students will determine the heat of reaction when vinegar reacts with sodium hydroxide. Data Collection 27

28 Lafayette Parish School System Curriculum Map Honors Chemistry (Pearson) Unit 7 : Solutions and Acids and Bases Time Frame 6 weeks March 30 May 11, 2012 Unit Description - The focus of this unit is solutions, colligative properties, and acid-base chemistry. Student Understandings - The student will understand solutions, including the effect of the action of solute particles on the properties of the solvent, by solving math problems and investigating the change in freezing points and boiling points of sugar and salt water solutions. The student will understand the relationship between acids, bases, salts, ph, and titration by investigating the properties of acids and bases and their reactions with various acid-base indicators. Titrations, both experimentally and mathematically, will be used to explain the connection between acids, bases, and ph. GLE # PS-6 PS-9 PS-10 SI-4 GLEs Skills/Guiding Questions Instructional Notes/Strategies Additional Resources Use technology when appropriate to enhance laboratory investigations and presentations of findings. (SI-H-A3) Write and defend a conclusion based on logical analysis of experimental data (SI-H-A6) (SI-H-A2) Given a description of an experiment, identify appropriate safety measures. (SI-H-A7) Conduct an investigation that includes multiple trials and record, organize, and display data appropriately (SI-H-A2) Knowledge/Evaluation Can students explain the difference between mixtures and solutions? Knowledge/Comprehension/ Analysis Pearson Textbook Correlation: Chapter 14: Mixtures and Solutions, pp Chapter 16: Solutions, pp Chapter 17: Thermochemistry, pp Chapter 18: Acids and Bases, pp Chapter 19: Acids, Bases and Salts, pp Chapter 20: Oxidation-Reduction Reactions, pp Chapter 21: Electrochemistry, pp See detailed units for activities, textbook correlations, GLEs and websites Activity 1- Mixtures as Solutions or Colloids Focus: Students will classify mixtures as solutions or colloids by virtue of the Tyndall Effect. Vocabulary Self-Awareness BLM Vocabulary Self-Awareness Activity 6- Investigating the Properties of Acids and Bases Focus: Students will should compare and contrast the various acid-base theories and their reactions. Split-page note taking Activity 2- Chromatography of Markers Focus: Students will separate the components of the solutions in ink. Graphing organizer 28

29 PS-18 Given the concentration of a solution, calculate the predicted change in its boiling and freezing points (PS-H-C3) Comprehension Can students demonstrate their knowledge of various concentration units through problem solving that involves real and hypothetical solutions? Activity 5- Freezing Point Depression and Boiling Point Elevation Calculations Focus: Students will determine quantitatively the effects of solutes at the freezing point and boiling point of water. BLM Ice Cream Recipe PS-20 PS-32 Express concentration in terms of molarity, molality, and normality (PS-H-C3) Determine the concentration of an unknown acid or base by using data from a titration with a standard solution and an indicator (PS-H-D2) Can students predict and determine the conductivity, freezing point, and boiling point from the known concentration of a solution? Comprehension Can students demonstrate their knowledge of various concentration units through problem solving that involves real and hypothetical solutions? Can students demonstrate their knowledge of various concentration units through problem solving that involves real and hypothetical solutions? Can the students describe the process of acid-base titrations and demonstrate knowledge applications through experimental calculations? Activity 3- Expressing Solution Concentrations Focus: Students will compare three concentration terms and solve problems using each. BLM Solution Concentrations Activity 7- ph Focus: Students will test and calculate the ph of selected solutions. BLM Lab Carousel BLM Activity 8- Acid-Base Titration Focus: Students will determine the concentration of a solution of hydrochloric acid using acid-base titration. Data Collection Can students describe the role of indicators in acid-base titrations? 29

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