History, Tradition and Adventure in The Chippewa Valley

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1 History, Tradition and Adventure in The Chippewa Valley «XiiiiK»» Wm. W. Barde«.i>iiii<» To My Grandchildren BARBARA RUTH BARTLETT WILLIAM BARTLETT KELLMAN WILLIAM CASWELL YOUNG PRINTED BY THE CHIPPEWA. PRINTERY CHIPPEWA FALLS, WIS. Copyrighted 1929 by Wm. W. Bartlett, Eau Claire, Wis. v".-rrm^ 'isäj^- <"* ' 'OlOGY

2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page I THE SIOUX-CHIPPEWA FEUD 1 II ARMSTRONG REMINISCENCES 67 III FUR TRADE LORE OF THE CHIPPEWA VALLEY 95 IV CARTWRIGHT REMINISCENCES 1. AN ADVENTUROUS TRIP TO CALIFORNIA EARLY ADVENTURES IN WISCONSIN 171 V JEAN BRUNET LIFE SKETCH 1. THE MAN JEAN BRUNET'S LEDGER 191 VI A CURIOUS OLD BILL 200 VII BIG GAME IN EAU CLAIRE COUNTY VIII OLD ABE - THE WAR EAGLE 225 IX LOGGING CAMP DIVERSION AND HUMOR X A TRIP TO THE LOGGING CAMPS 237

3 I- Wis. Co«. Qs^ U FOREWORD Forty or more years ago the writer began in a small way to gather pictures and other material pertaining to the early history, first, i of his own city and county of Eau Claire, and later as related to the larger field of the Chippewa Valley. There was no thought in mind of any public use being made of this material. ln fact, it was many years before any except a few intimate friends knew of its existence. ^ During the past twelve or fifteen years a very considerable amount of this \ historical matter has appeared in the local press. The credit, or blame, for this lies largely with William P. Welch, a former editor of the Eau Claire Telegram, and with his successor, Otto Lund. The insistence of these two newspaper men that the local history material was really worth while, and their continual re-.^' ^. quests for more, to meet a public demand, as they have stated, is the reason for ^ the numerous articles furnished. The writer wishes to express his appreciation of the interest shown and the painstaking care taken by them in the editorial oversight. It has been a pleasure to furnish them copy. No richer field for historical research can be found anywhere than that afforded by our own Chippewa Valley. In addition to many single articles on various phases of local history, several series of articles have appteared covering the early Indian occupancy of these parts, including the centuries-long Sioux-Chippewa feud, the early fur trade of this valley and northern Wisconsin, reminiscences of hunting and trapping, and perhaps more important than all these combined, the story of the great lumbering industry of this region. In so far as possible all material has been given in the wording of the original documents or of the narrators of the reminiscences secured. From heads of historical societies, librarians and educators has come a call that this material be put into more permanent and available form for public use. The volume now furnished is a partial response to these requests. Without touching to any extent upon the lumbering story, the material of which alone would make a fair sized book, the present volume includes a varied assortment of the other material referred to. TNÄ, The free, unconventional form of the original newspaper articles has been, retained with little change. ^ \ The book is not presented as a finished history of the subjects mentioned, but rather as source material, in a form which not only may be found of interest I to the general reader but also of assistance to those who in later years may wish ' to complete the work begun by the writer. ^*>^ With the above explanation, the book is presented to the reader. ^^xj^arch, 1929 William W. Bartlett CJ5 CD ««t

4 WILLIAM W. BARTLETT

5 THE SIOUX-CHiPPEWA FEUD One of the interesting chapters in the story of Indian Ufe in America is that of the centuries long conflict commonly known as the Sioux-Chippewa feud. This designation is not entirely correct, as it implies that only two distinct tribes were concerned in it, which was not the case. Instead it was a conflict between two confederacies of tribes, complicated in some instances by the withdrawal of certain tribes, or parts of tribes, from further participation in the struggle, or, as in some cases, the going over and joining forces with their former opponents. Local interest is added by the fact that our own Chippewa Valley and Northern Wisconsin form a part of the battle ground of these warring tribes. The feud was so fierce and long continued that probably there are few areas of any considerable extent in this entire region which were not the scenes of these bloody encounters. The name Sioux is not of early origin and is an abbreviation of the word Naudouessioux, signifying enemy. They called themselves Dakotas. When Father Hennepin first came in contact with this tribe, in 1680, they were located in the vicinity of the Great Lakes but laid claim to indefinitely defined territory extending west to the Rocky Mountains. It is to be regretted that so little of the history and traditions of this tribe prior to the advent of the white races has been preserved. It was the common belief or understanding of the Sioux at that time that the tribe had its origin in the region of Mille Lac or the Thousand Lakes, in what is now Northern Minnesota, from whence they had later been driven by the Chippewas. No traditions had been handed down of any earlier place of residence. In general they were of the open country and were WILLIAM WHIPPLE WARREN expert horsemen. The name Chippewa is a corruption, by English speaking people, of the Indian name Ojibway. We are especially interested in this tribe. Not only did they represent a high type of Indian character, but our entire up>per Chippewa Valley, up to the time of its transfer to the U. S. government, less than a hundred years ago, had for several centuries been their home. The Chippewas are

6 THE SIOUX-CHIPPEWA FEUD the only Indians with whom residents of this region have come in contact to any appreciable extent. Although constantly at war with others of their own race, they were never in serious conflict with the whites. What few minor cases of individual trouble that did occur were in the majority of cases blamable to drunken or disolute members of the white race, rather than to the Indians. When, in 1862, soon after the massacre at New Ulm, Minnesota, by the Sioux, a general Indian scare swept the whole Northwest, rumors spread that the Chippewas had taken the war path and were about to attack the white residents. There was absolutely no foundation for the reports. Their falsity was soon established and in a few days the scare was over. There are persons still living who can recall the panic here in Eau Claire. Fortunately for us and largely to the credit of a single individual, William Whipple Warren, we are not, as in the case of the Sioux, left without record of Chippewa life, history and legends. The Warren family were of such high grade and were so intimately associated with the story of the Chippewa tribe in this region as to warrant somewhat extended mention and same will be found in connection with the fur trade story in this volume. Probably no person that ever lived was, by reason of racial and family connections, environment and education, better fitted to speak concerning the Chippewa tribe than William Whipple Warren. In general we will let him tell the Sioux-Chippewa story in his own words. Of course, only a limited portion of the text can be utilized, also, wherever practicable, the unpronouncable original Indian names will be omitted, the English equivalent being used instead. The Chippewas or Ojibways form one of the principal branches of the Algonquin or Algic stock, and they are a well marked type, and at present the most numerous section or tribe of this grand divbion of the aboriginal inhabitants of North America. They are now (1850) scattered over, and occupy a large extent of country comprising all that portion of the State of Michigan lying north of Green Bay and west of Straits of Michillmackinac bordering on Lake Superior, the northern half of Wisconsin and the northeastern half of Minnesota Territory. Besides this they occupy the country lying from the Lake of the Woods, over the entire north coast of Lake Superior to the falls of St. Mary's and extending even east of this point into Upp)er Canada. They literally girdle the great "Father of Lakes," and the largest body of fresh water in the world may emphatically be called their own 'Great Water' or We-che-gum-me. They occupy, through conquest in war against the Sioux or Dakotas, all those numerous lakes from which the Mississippi and Red River of the north derive their sources. The Chippewas reside almost exclusively in a wooded country; their lands are covered with deep and interminable forests abounding in beautiful lakes and murmuring streams, whose banks are edged with trees of the sweet maple, the useful birch, the tall pine, fir, balsam, cedar, spruce, tamarac, poplar, oak, ash, elm, basswood, and all the plants indigenous to the climate in which they reside. The Chippewas came in contact with the white race in the vicinity of La Pointe on Lake Superior, where they had resided for many generations. In fact, as far as the general knowledge of the tribe was concerned, they did not know

7 THE SIOUX-CHIPPEWA FEUD 3 of any earlier home. Familiar as Wm. Whipple Warren was with their history and traditions it was many years before he learned differently. He states that on one occasion he heard an old medicine man at a sort of initiation ceremony make an address, one part of which was as follows: "While our forefathers were living on the great salt water toward the rising sun, the great Sea-shell (Megis) showed itself above the surface of the great water, and the rays of the sun for a long time were reflected from its glossy back. It gave warmth and light to the Red Race (An-ish-in-aub-ag). All at once it sank into the deep and for a time our ancestors were not blessed with its light. It rose to the surface and appeared again on the great river which drains the waters of the Great Lakes, and again for a long time it gave life to our forefathers, and reflected back the rays of the sun. Again it disafjpeared from sight and it rose not, till it appeared to the eyes of the Red Race on the shores of the first great lake. Again it sank from sight, and death daily visited the wigwams of our forefathers, till it showed its back, and reflected the ways of the sun once more at Sault Ste. Marie (Bow-e-ting). Here it remained for a long time, but once more, and for the last time it disappeared, and the Red Race was left in darkness and misery, till it floated and once more showed its bright back at La Pointe Island, where it has ever since reflected back the rays of the sun and blessed our ancestors with Ufe, light, and wisdom. Its rays reach the remotest village of the wide spread Ojibways." As the old man delivered the talk he continued to display the shell, which he represented as the emblem of the great "Megis" of which he was speaking. "A few days later," wrote Warren regarding this incident, "anxious to learn the true meaning of this allegory, I proceeded one evening to the lodge of the old priest and, presenting him with some tobacco and cloth for a pair of leggings, which is an invariable custom when any genuine information is wanted of them, connected with their religious beliefs, I requested him to explain to me the meaning of his Me-da-we harangue, "After filling his pipe and smoking of the tobacco I had presented, he proceeded to give me the desired information as follows: " 'My grandson,' he said, 'the Megis I spoke of, means the Me-da-we religion. Our forefathers, many string of lives ago, lived on the shores of the.great Salt Water in the east. Here it was, that while congregated in a great town, and while they were suffering the ravages of sickness and death, the Great Spirit granted them this rite wherewith life is restored and prolonged. Our forefathers moved from the shores of the great water, and proceeded westward. The Me-da-we lodge was pulled down and not again erected, till our forefathers again took a stand on the shores of the great river near where Montreal (Mo-ne-aung) now stands. " 'In the course of time this town was again deserted and our forefathers still proceeding westward, lit not their fires till they reached the shores of Lake Huron, where again the rites of the Me-da-we were practiced. " 'Again these rites were forgotten, and the Me-da-we lodge was not built till the Ojibways found themselves congregated at Bow-e-ting (outlet of Lake Superior), where it remained for many winters. Still the Ojibways moved westward, and for the last time the Me-da-we lodge was erected on the Island of La Pointe,

8 4 THE SIOUX-CHIPPEWA FEUD and here, long before the pale face appeared among them, it was practiced in its purest and most original form. Many of our fathers lived the full term of life granted to mankind by the Great Spirit, and the forms of many old people were mingled with each rising generation. This, my grandson, is the meaning of the words you did not understand; they have been repeated to us by our fathers for many generations.' "Thus it was that I first received particular corroborating testimony to the somewhat mooted point of the direction from which the Ojibways have reached their present geographical position. It is only from such religious and genuine traditions that the fact is to be ascertained. The common class of the tribe who are spread in numerous villages north and west of Lake Superior, when asked where they originally came from, make answer that they originated from La Pointe (No-min-wuna-kaun-ing) and the phrase is often used in their speeches to the whites, that La Pointe is the spot on which the Ojibway tribe first grew, and like a tree it has spread its branches in every direction, in the bands that now occupy the vast extent of the Ojibway earth; and also that 'it is the root from which all the far scattered villages of the tribe have sprung'." It is comparatively but a few generations back that this tribe had been known by their present distinctive name of Ojibway. It is certainly not more than three centuries, and in all probability much less. It is only within this term of time, that they have been disconnected as a distinct separate tribe from the Ottaways and Potta-wat-um-ies. The name by which they were known when incorporated in one body, is at the present day uncertain. The final separation of these three tribes took place at the Straits of Michilimacinac from natural causes, and the partition has been more and more distinctly defimed, and perpetuated through locality, and by each of the three divided sections assuming or receiving distinctive appellations The Ottaways remaining about the spot of their final separation, and being thereby the most easterly section, were first discovered by the white race, who bartered with them their merchandise for furs. They for many years acted as a medium between the white traders and their more remote western brethren, providing them in turn, at advanced prices, with their much desired commodities. The Potta-wat-um-ees moved up Lake Michigan, and by taking with them, or for a time perpetuating the national fire, obtained the name of those who make or keep the fire. The Ojibways, pressing northward and westward against fierce and inveterate enemies, were soon known as an important and distinctive body or tribe. It was at this time that, through practicing their old custom of torturing prisoners of war by fire, they obtaine dthe name Ojibway, which means, "to roast till puckered up. The original cause of their emigration from the shores of the Atlantic westward to the area of Lake Superior is uncertain. If pressed or driven back by more powerful tribes, which is a most probable conjecture, they are not willing to acknowledge it. It is a well-authenticated fact traditionally, that at the Falls of Sault Ste Marie, the outlet of Lake Superior, the Ojibways, after separating from the other two tribes, made a long and protracted stay. Their village occupied a large ex-

9 THE SIOUX-CHIPPEWA FEUD 5 tent of ground, and their war-p»rties numbered many warriors who marched eastward against the Iroquois and westward against the Dakotas or Sioux, with whom at this point they first came into collision. At this point the Ojibway tribe again separated into two divisions, which we will designate as the Northern and Southern. At the partition of the Ojibway tribe into two divisions, at Sault Ste. Marie, the main body pressed their way gradually up along the southern shores of Lake Superior. At a council (in which the writer acted as interpreter), held some years ago at La Pointe, between the principal chiefs of the Ojibways and the United States Government Agent the subject came up as to which family or clan belonged the chieftainship of the Ojibway tribe at La Pointe. Great Buffalo was at this time, tho stricken with years, still in the prime of his great oratorical powers. On this occasion he opened the council by delivering a most eloquent harangue in praise of his own immediate ancestors, and claiming for the Loon family the first place and chieftainship among the Ojibways. After he had finished and again resumed his seat, the head chief of the Crane family, Tug-waug-aun-ay, a very modest and retiring man, seldom induced to speak in council, calmly arose, and gracefully wrapping his blanket about his body, leaving but the right arm free, he pointed toward the eastern skies, and exclaimed: "The Great Spirit once made a bird, and he sent it from the skies to make its abode on earth. The bird came, and when it reached half way down, among the clouds, it sent forth a loud and far sounding cry, which was heard by all who resided on the earth, and even by the spirits who make their abode within its bosom. When the bird reacheid within sight of the earth, it circled slowly above the Great Fresh Water Lakes, and again it uttered its echoing cry. Near and nearer it circled, looking for a resting place, till it lit on a hill overlooking Sault Ste. Marie; here it chose its first resting place, pleased with the numerous white fish that glanced and swam in the clear waters and sparkling foam of the rapids. Satisfied with its chosen seat, again the bird sent forth its loud but solitary cry; and the different clans all gathered at his call. A large town was soon congregated, and the bird whom the Great Spirit sent presided over all. "Once again it took its flight, and the bird flew slowly over the waters of Lake Superior. Pleased with the sand point of Chequamegon, it circled over it, and viewed the numerous fish as they swam about in tlxe clear depths of the Great Lake. It lit there and from thence again it uttered its solitary cry. A voice came from the calm bosom of the lake, in answer; the bird, pleased with the musical sound of the voice, again sent forth its cry, and the answering bird matde its appearance in the wampum-breasted loon. The bird spoke to it in gentle tone, 'Is it thou that gives answer to my cry?' The Loon answered, 'It is I'. The bird then said to him, 'Thy voice is music it is melody it sounds sweet in my ear, frpm henceforth I appoint thee to answer my voice in Council.' "Thus", continued the chief, "the Loon became the first in council, but he who made him chief was the Crane or Echo Maker. These are the words of my ancestors, who, from generation to generation, have repeated them into the ears of their children. I have done."

10 THE SIOUX-CHIPPEWA FEUD The old man took his seat in silence, and not a chief in that stricken and listening crowd arose to gainsay his words. All understood the allegory perfectly well, and as the curling smoke of their lips arose from the lips and nostrils of the quiet listeners, there ascended with it the universal whispter, "It is true; it is true." To further support their pretensions, the Crane family hold in their possession a circular plate of virgin copper, on which is rudely marked indentations and hieroglyphics denoting the number of generations of the family who have passed away since they first pitched their lodges at Chequamegon Point and took possession of the adjacent country, including the Island of La Pointe, When I witnessed this curious family register, in 1842, it was exhibited by Tug-waug-aun-ay to my father. The old chief kept it carefully buried in the ground, and seldom displayed it. On this occasion he only brought it to view at the entreaty of my mother, whose maternal uncle he was. Father, mother, and the old chief, have all since gone to the land of spirits, and I am the only one still living who witnessed, on that occasion, this sacred relic of former days. On this plate of copper was marked eight deep indentations, denoting the number of his ancestors who had passed away since they first lighted their fire at Chequamegon Point. By the rude figure of a man with a hat on its head, placed opposite one of these indentations, was denoted the period when the white race first made his appearance among them. This mark occurred in the third generation, leaving five generations which had passed away since that important era in their history. Tug-waug-aun-ay was about sixty years of age at the time he showed this plate of copper, which he said had descended to him direct through a long line of ancestors. He died two years since, and his death has added the ninth indentation thereon; making, at this period, nine generations since the Ojibways first resided at La Pointe, and six generations since their first intercourse with the whites. The Ojibways never count a generation as passed away until the oldest man in the family has died, and the writer assumes from these, and other facts obtained through observation and inquiry, forty years as the term of an Indian generation. According to this estimate, it is now three hundred and sixty years since the Ojibways first collected in one grand central town on the Island of La Pointe, and two hundred and forty years since they were first discovered by the white race. Note: As Warren's story of the Ojibways was written about 1850, approximately 75 years should be added to the above to bring the calendar up to the present date. It may be of interest to note that William Whipple Warren's mother, who induced the old medicine man to show the copper calendar, lived with her husband Lyman Warren some years at his trading post y.ear Chippewa City. She died and was buried in Chippewa Falls in 1843 but the following summer her body was taken to La Pointe and placed in the cemetery there.

11 THE SIOUX-CHIPPEWA FEUD {Father Brunson, the noted early day Methodist missionary, writes of visit- IP g Warren's post in the early 40's and mentions his comfortable house, his fine library and notes especially what a nexcellent cook and housekeeper his part Chippewa wife was. In this visit Father Brunson met Michel Cadotte the younger, then about 60 years of age, who said he was born at his father's trading post a few miles down river, probably at what is now the south side of Chippewa Falls.) In the Sioux-Chippewa narative thus far, principally from Wm. Whipple Warren's story, the migration of the Ojibways has been traced from their home on the Atlantic coast until settled in the vicinity of La Pointe on Lake Superior. At this stage in the recital we will introduce briefly a few statements by another author. Back in Civil War days Geo. Gale, a scholarly man, founder of Gale College and after whom the city of Galesville, Wisconsin, was named, published a book entitled The Upper Mississippi, in which he deals at some length with the history of the Indian tribes of the Northwest. The Sacs and Foxes were of the Algonquin nation as were the Ojibways, yet we will soon find the Ojibways in fierce conflict with these" two tribes. We quote from Gale's book as follows: "The aggressions of the fugitive Algonquins and Hurons upon the Sioux becoming unbearable, in the spring of 1671, they attacked these tribes at the head of Lake Superior and cleared the lake of their enemies. The Chippeways returned to Sault Ste. Marie, the Ottawas to the islands on the north side of Lake Huron, while the Sacs, Foxes, Miamies, Mascotens and Kickapoos returned to the Fox and Wisconsin rivers. The Sacs and Foxes and their confederates, becoming dissatisfied with the Chippeways, were in 1702 induced by the Sioux to make peace and join the latter tribe. Here commenced the great GEORGE GALE war which, in later years has been called the 'hereditary war between the Sioux and the Chippeways'." We will now return to the Warren story. When settled on Lake Superior in the vicinity of La Pointe the Ojibways were surrounded by their fierce and inveterate enemies, the Foxes and the Sioux. These tv/o tribes claimed the country bordering on Lake Superior toward the

12 THE SIOUX-CHIPPEWA FEUD south and west, and of which, the migrating Ojibways now took possession as intruders. The opposition to their further advance westward commenced when the Ojibways first lighted their fires at Sault Ste. Marie. At every step of their westward advance along the southern shores of the Great Lakes, the Ojibways battled with the Foxes and Sioux; but they pressed onward, gaining foot by foot, till they finally lit their fires on the sand point of Chequamegon. On this spot they remained not long, for they were harassed by their warlike foes, and for greater security they were obliged to move their camp to the adjacent island known as La Pointe. But though the island is located at its highest point about two miles from the main shore of the Great Lake, yet were the Ojibways not entirely secure from the attacks of their inveterate and indefatigable foes, who found means, not only of waylaying their stray hunters on the main shore, but even to secure scalps on the island of their refuge itself. On one occasion a war party of Sioux found their way to a point off the main shore directly opposite the western end of the island, and during the night, two of their number crossed over, a distance of two miles and a half, each swimming by the side of a log, and attacked a family who were fishing by torchlight along the eastern shore of the island. With four scalps, and the canoe of those they had killed, they returned to their friends, who immediately retreated, satisfied with their success. Early in the morning, the mangled bodies of the slain were discovered, the Ojibways, collecting their warriors, made a long but unavailing pursuit. Shortly after this occurrence, a party of one hundred and fifty Sioux warriors again found their way to the lake shore and, taking a p>osition on the extreme point of Chequamegon, immediately opposite the Ojibway village, they laid in ambush for some stray enemy to come within their reach. Chequamegon is a narrow neck or point of land about four miles long and lying nearly parallel to the island of La Pointe, toward the western end of which it converges, till the distance from point to point is not more than two miles. In former times the distance is said to have been much less, the action of the waves having Isince gradually washed away the sand of which it is composed. "Early one morning, two Ojibway lads crossed over to the point to hunt ducks. On landing they were attacked by the ambushed war-party of the Sioux with loud yells. For some time the two youths, protected by the numerous sand hills, defended themselves, and evaded the attempts of their enemies, who wished to make them captives. In the meantime, the Ojibway town being aroused by the distant yelling, and seeing the p>oint covered with the forms of numerous men, the men of war, grasping their bows and arrows, spears and war clubs, jumped into their canoes, and paddled with great speeid to the scene of action. They crossed over in two divisions, one party proceeding straight to the point where the Sioux were still to be seen hunting the two lads, while the other party living at the lower end of the great village, crossed over to that portion of the peninsula lying nearest to their wigwams. These landed about two miles below the extreme point, and taking their ptosition on where Chequamegon is but a few rods wide, and covered with scrubby oaks, they entirely cut off the retreat or egress of the Sioux. Meanwhile the two unfortunate boys had been dispatched

13 THE SIOUX-CHIPPEWA FEUD and scalped; but their friends who had crossed straight over from the village, landed on the point and proceeded to revenge their death, by bravely attacking the now retreating Sioux. These being pressed by an enemy increasing in numbers at every moment, turned their backs and fled down the point, merely keeping up a running fight, till they were met by the main body of the Ojibways who had collected in their rear, and cut them off effectually from escape. Discovering too late the fearful position which their rashness and want of foresight had brought them to, the Sioux warriors took shelter in a thick grove of oak, and fought to the last gasp. Overwhelmed by numbers, all were killed but two, who were seen to throw themselves into the lake and swim off towards the opposite shore of the deep bay. They were never heard of afterwards, but the probability is that by swimming two miles to the nearest point of the main shore, they saved their lives, and returned to their people with the sad tale of the almost total destruction of their war-party. Over the whole point the Chequamegon are still strewn small particles of bones, which are said to be Little Crow the younger, cunning, energetic, unscrupulous, an inveterate liar. Took leading part in ceding Sioux lands in Northern Minnesota to government, but began almost immediately to create discord. Was leading spirit in the Sioux uprising which culminated in the Massacre at New Ulm, Minnesota in Escaped and went west. Was discovered and shot by a settler by the name of Lamson {or Lampson) and his son in {NOTE Little Crow the Older, father of the above was an entirely different character from his son. He is described as reliable, industrious, a firm friend of the Americans, and was one of the signers of the Sioux- Chippewa treaty, 1825 at Prairie du Chien.) the remains of the warriors who fell in this bloody fight. On another occasion a party of four hundred Fox warriors floated along the Ontonagun river in their small inland bark canoes, and coasting along the lake shore, they landed in the night time on the island of La Pointe, and at early dawn in the morning, they succeeded in waylaying and capturing four young women who had gone from the village to cut wood. The spot is pointed out to this day, where they were taken. The Foxes, satisfied with their success, hastily retreated to their canoes, and under cover of a dense fog silently paddled homeward. Confident, however, in their numbers, and full of exaltation at having bearded their enemies even on the island of their refuge, feeling also secure

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