The Chicken or the Egg? Infrastructure provision and urban development: A transport perspective.

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "The Chicken or the Egg? Infrastructure provision and urban development: A transport perspective."

Transcription

1 The Chicken or the Egg? Infrastructure provision and urban development: A transport perspective. CAMERON MARTYN Associate GTA Consultants ABSTRACT The timely delivery of transport infrastructure required to support growing populations across Australia is critical to achieving good urban development and Government policy outcomes. The right infrastructure ensures people are well connected, with access to jobs, family, recreation, and services essential to maintain a high standard of living. The level of investment committed to transport infrastructure, usually by Government, means these projects are usually accompanied by a high degree of public and political scrutiny. Careful and well informed planning is required to ensure the right infrastructure is delivered at the appropriate time to provide maximum benefit from the investment and resources committed to the project. AITPM 2011 National Conference 1

2 1. Infrastructure planning in Australia 1.1 Introduction The timely delivery of transport infrastructure required to support growing populations across Australia is critical to achieving good urban development and Government policy outcomes. The right infrastructure ensures people are well connected, with access to jobs, family, recreation, and services essential to maintain a high standard of living. The level of investment committed to transport infrastructure, usually by Government, means these projects are usually accompanied by a high degree of public and political scrutiny. Careful and well informed planning is required to ensure the right infrastructure is delivered at the appropriate time to provide maximum benefit from the investment and resources committed to the project. This paper aims to: outline the contemporary urban development context as it relates to transport infrastructure requirements and delivery consider the range of transport infrastructure needed to facilitate urban growth explore different scenarios for delivery of transport infrastructure present issues for consideration by transport professionals when planning infrastructure provision 1.2 Government Infrastructure Planning The Australian, State and Territory governments and some agencies develop infrastructure plans that outline infrastructure investment opportunities over the medium term. These plans contain approved projects as well as potential projects, some of which may be delivered as Public Private Partnerships. The plans evolve and are amended based on emerging issues and priorities Federal Government Role The statutory body Infrastructure Australia was established under the Infrastructure Australia Act Infrastructure Australia advises governments, investors and infrastructure owners on a wide range of issues, including: Australia's current and future infrastructure needs mechanisms for financing infrastructure investments, and policy, pricing and regulation and their impacts on investment and on the efficiency of the delivery, operation and use of national infrastructure networks. Infrastructure Australia's focus is on assisting Australian governments to develop a strategic blueprint for unlocking infrastructure bottlenecks and to modernise the nation's economic infrastructure. AITPM 2011 National Conference 2

3 2. Contemporary urban context The major urban centres in Australia are currently experiencing unprecedented levels of growth due to factors such as migration, urbanisation trends and natural population increase. For example, the most recent population data for Melbourne shows that population increased by 1500 residents per week in the year to June 2010, a total increase of 79,000 per annum. Figure 1 Melbourne Population change 1 The Melbourne 2030 planning update released by the Victorian State Government in December 2008, anticipates a population increase of 1.8million residents by It is estimated this increase will require the construction of 600,000 new dwellings in the next 20 years, with around half of these to be in established residential areas and the remainder in new growth areas. Significant investment and planning for infrastructure provision is required to service this level of population growth. 2.1 Planning Response Victorian State Government The Victorian State Government s response to the planning requirements associated with such rapid growth is outlined in two key documents: - Melbourne 2030 and the updated - The Victorian Transport Plan These documents combined to set out a blueprint for long term planning for the growth and development of Melbourne. It is noted that these planning documents and the policies contained in each were introduced by the previous Labor State Government. The Coalition State Government was elected to power in December 2010 and has indicated an intention to revisit the current Metropolitan AITPM 2011 National Conference 3

4 planning framework to supersede the previous Labor Government s Melbourne 2030 and planning policy documents. There has currently been no indication on the content or timeframe for the delivery of this updated urban planning framework. The Coalition Government has also committed to establishing an independent Public Transport Development Authority to plan, co-ordinate and manage Victoria s public transport system, along with a new Urban Renewal Authority to facilitate urban renewal in areas close to central Melbourne that traditionally had an industrial base but can accommodate change. The Government has not released any indication on timeframes for the development of these Authorities. Until new policy documentation is released by the Coalition State Government, the and Victorian Transport Plan remain as current policy million was released in December 2008 by the State Government as an update to the Melbourne 2030 planning policy. This updated document was required to address higher than expected population growth since Melbourne 2030 was released in 2002, and focussed on delivering 2 : i A more compact city Designation of six new Central Activities Districts with CBD-like functions. Employment corridors to improve accessibility to jobs and services and reduce congestion on the transport network. Established areas to accommodate 53 per cent of new dwellings. ii Better management of growth Growth areas to accommodate 47 per cent of new dwellings. Investigation areas in the north and west, with a small proportion in the south east, for potential extensions to the growth areas. More efficient use of greenfield land with a target of 15 dwellings per hectare. Amendment to the operation of the growth areas infrastructure contribution and the removal of the requirement for the contribution from land included in the Urban Growth Boundary prior to The objectives set out in are reliant on significant investment in new infrastructure to enable both existing and new suburban areas to accommodate the increase in population and deliver equality of services and access to all residents Victorian Transport Plan The Victorian Transport Plan was released in 2008 by the State Government to set out a strategic direction for the delivery of transport projects over a 30 year timeframe. The plan sets out how transport infrastructure will shape Victoria for the 21st century and proposes six priorities for action 3 : i. Shaping Victoria - Linking jobs, services and homes. ii. Linking rural, regional and metro Victoria - Strengthening the connections between regional, rural and metropolitan Victoria so all parts of the State share in prosperity. AITPM 2011 National Conference 4

5 iii. Creating a Metro System - Taking practical steps to increase the frequency, reliability and safety of trains and trams, and move towards a Metro System. iv. Moving around Melbourne - Linking our communities by closing gaps, reducing congestion and improving safety on the road network. v. Taking practical steps for a Sustainable Future - Moving towards a sustainable and lower emissions transport system to support a greener Victoria. vi. Strengthening Victoria s and Australia s economy - New links to drive jobs, economic growth and build Victoria s prosperity. In order to realise these key priorities, more than $38 billion in projects and initiatives has been proposed, including: New trains, new tracks More trams and buses Regional Rail Link, Multi-billion dollar upgrade to major regional transport infrastructure Truck Action Plan. Completing the missing link in Melbourne s ring road Peninsula Link Rail extensions to provide more transport choice in growth areas, Bus upgrades Principal Freight Network Outer suburban roads - $1.9 billion to improve links to Melbourne s newest communities. Regional roads - $1.2 billion package to drive investment in regional Victoria to support 2.2 Summary The Victorian State Government response to contemporary urban development and population growth issues relies heavily upon the timely provision of appropriate infrastructure to support policy objectives and desirable urban outcomes for Melbourne. The relationship between urban development and infrastructure is explored further in Section 3 below. 3. Urban Development Infrastructure 3.1 Transport and Land Use Integration Integration of transport and land use is a key urban development principle. Government policy aims for connected and accessible regions based on an integrated transport system that is planned and managed to support more compact urban growth and efficient travel; connect people, places, goods and services; and promote public transport use, walking and cycling. AITPM 2011 National Conference 5

6 Transport planning professionals are judged on their ability to plan, coordinate and deliver regional infrastructure and services in a timely manner to support the regional settlement pattern and desired community outcomes. The ideal urban environment is considered to be a compact urban structure of well-planned communities, supported by a network of accessible and convenient centres and transit corridors linking residential areas to employment locations establishes the context for achieving a consolidated urban settlement pattern. Infrastructure delivery is an integral part of the triple bottom line assessment of successful urban development, which looks to provide a transport system that supports the lifestyle enjoyed by residents and visitors, enhances economic vitality and protects the natural environment. 3.2 Summary of Infrastructure Planning Trends Within Victorian State planning, there are several key trends emerging that reinforce the important links between infrastructure investment and achieving a range of Government policy initiatives, such as: i. Several billion dollars of State and Federal Government investment in infrastructure expected to deliver wider urban development outcomes ii. New legislation to mandate land use and transport integration in Victoria (Transport Integration Act 2010) iii. iv. Large budget projects (multi-billion $ RRL, Eastlink) Government infrastructure projects considered a catalyst for high multiples of private sector investment ie $1 in public sector investment = aim for $10 private sector investment v. Announcement of $500m Regional Infrastructure Development Funding in May 2011 Budget 4. Transport infrastructure requirements Table 1 Infrastructure Considerations AITPM 2011 National Conference 6

7 Transport Mode Infrastructure required Costs Timeframe Considerations trains land stations and interchanges Heavy Rail tracks signals bridges grade separation electrification and structure storage areas $10m - $1bn + Long project lead in and delivery timeframes, often spanning political election cycles. Expectation/requirement from funding providers for a wider range of benefits to meet cost-benefit ratio and triple bottom line assessment criteria. Heavy infrastructure, high cost, longer construction timeframes, higher risk profile, more significant political commitment. Extensive corridor requirements land acquisition IT and communication systems Passenger information systems Operation and maintenance trams Light Rail land tracks stops and interchanges electricity connection and structures storage areas separation from road traffic $10m - $100m+ Long project lead in and delivery timeframes, often spanning political election cycles. Infrastructure requirement substantial, disruption to road network, long construction timeframes Road space requirements, impact on car parking and local business opposition Land acquisition Passenger Information Systems Operation and maintenance buses Bus bus Stops bus lanes bus priority measures signals, dedicated infrastructure Passenger Information systems $1m - $10m+ Can be delivered relatively quickly (new buses) but major infrastructure (interchanges) projects can be measured in months/years. Infrastructure requirements and cost commitment not as high, ie Smartbus scheme, Doncaster Rapid Transit Road space requirements, impact on parking and local business opposition Operation and maintenance Road Road structure Land Intersections and interchanges Signals Operation and maintenance $1m - $1bn+ Long project lead in and delivery timeframes, often spanning political election cycles. Access for private vehicles, freight, Public Transport, active travel Connections to regional freight and road networks Connections to the arterial road network Parking provision AITPM 2011 National Conference 7

8 Active Transport (cycling/walking) dedicated paths and road space end of trip facilities priority measures $10,000 - $10m+ Can be delivered quickly but major projects (cycleways) will take longer. Easier to retro-fit, less cost commitment, faster delivery, less construction risk Less effective for mass transit requirements AITPM 2011 National Conference 8

9 5. Timing of Infrastructure Provision An infrastructure project usually required significant upfront investment. If the flow of benefits does not materialise until later than expected, the provider may incur a large (opportunity) cost in resources tied up unnecessarily. Similarly, excessive delay in provision of infrastructure may prevent the realisation of considerable net benefits which may have resulted from more immediate investment. Included below is a brief analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of infrastructure delivery being undertaken at different project stages. 5.1 Pre-development provision Table 2 Pre-development provision assessment Advantages Lower cost Less disruption to services, urban activity Flexibility for construction access to site Encourage developer commitment Less project construction risk Attractive to prospective residents, private sector investment Disadvantages Time lag between infrastructure provision and full use Political risk Cost to public of funding while infrastructure not fully utilised Risk that development will never require level of infrastructure provided Less accuracy in estimates of level, type and timeframe for development Difficult to justify spend and priority over other projects The benefits to developing transport infrastructure prior to urban development are generally realised only when the urban growth is experienced, and therefore are subject to risks inherent in development cycles and private sector investment. It would be considered a very high political risk to commit public sector funding to transport infrastructure delivery in order to enable an urban development project that was not guaranteed to proceed. Developer commitment and timing play a central part in any infrastructure funding decisions. There may also be issues with political commitment beyond election cycles and the need for a unilateral agreement across political parties. This can be achieved for large investments, but is generally a slower and more onerous funding process. Although there are undoubtedly benefits in early delivery of transport infrastructure, planners must consider how to prove a case relating to the costs of a missed opportunity cost if the project is delayed until after development has commenced. In the case where benefits must be quantified, methods of calculating these may not be subjective and not universally accepted. In the case of seeking funding for public transport infrastructure, the preparation of a business case for consideration by Government Treasury departments will be assessed against all other current funding and project priorities. Therefore, it can be difficult to justify a decision to spend for future benefits that may not be realised for several years when more pressing needs may exist. AITPM 2011 National Conference 9

10 5.2 Post-development provision Table 3 Post-development provision assessment Advantages More certainty on requirement and type of infrastructure Infrastructure fully utilised from date of delivery Easier to justify spend Certainty that private sector investment will occur Prioritising project more straightforward Disadvantages Higher construction costs More disruption to services and urban activity Less construction flexibility Higher construction risk Harder to attract investment without commitment up front The justification of investment decisions based on existing demand is a more traditional approach to the delivery of transport infrastructure. This approach lessens political and planning risk through simplifying forecasting of the type, function and demand for transport infrastructure. For example, whilst it is relatively straightforward to anticipate the number of additional traffic movements generated by a greenfield development onto a transport network, it is significantly more difficult to determine the take up of a new tram line or advantages of a new train station within a growth area or existing urban environment. In such cases, it may seem more appealing to wait for public pressure to provide additional public transport services to ensure latent demand exists before moving to meet such a demand. It is more straightforward to develop a business case for investment at this stage, due to less risk and uncertainty in the planning process. However, delivery of new transport infrastructure into an existing system, such as extending a tram line within an existing road corridor, also offers less flexibility for construction access and space requirements, additional disruption to existing services and potentially higher delivery costs. 6. Example Projects Below are four brief examples of different scenarios for transport infrastructure delivery (based on real projects) and some important issues that need to be considered around each. 6.1 Existing Activity Centre Transport Interchange Upgrade/Retrofit Upgrade and refurbishment of existing bus interchange within an activity centre to facilitate urban development and better access to transport, enhanced interchange with other transport modes. Issues: i. Difficulty and cost of rebuilding in existing active facility above operating shopping centre and rail station ii. Relocation of interchange iii. Retaining access during construction iv. Space required on local streets to relocate v. Facilities required for relocation vi. Traffic disruption vii. Working with existing lease arrangements. AITPM 2011 National Conference 10

11 6.2 Inner urban brownfields development Major brownfield site intended for mixed use and residential development within existing urban area experiencing rapid expansion and population growth. Issues: i. How to develop and link into existing arterial network and a major ring road ii. Restrictions on access due to existing road network nearing operational capacity iii. Costs to developer of upgrade to road network due to amount of traffic generated iv. Who pays, who benefits? When to deliver road upgrades? v. What happens if other local sites develop and take up additional capacity provided before the site is fully developed? 6.3 Growth Area Rail Provision of a new rail station on an existing rail line within a proposed activity centre, in a greenfields growth area on the urban fringe. Issues: i. Greenfields development no latent demand for public transport provision ii. Desire to sink rail line for better urban development, connectivity, and amenity outcomes for the proposed activity centre iii. Opportunity to do this now at lower cost but how to provide justification to funding providers iv. If left to after development = higher project cost, construction risk, disruption, track occupations v. If delivered now = possibility of public backlash in relation to Government funding priorities, political risk 6.4 Growth Area Road link Selection of a corridor for the provision of major roading infrastructure to enable development of an urban growth area and to function as a freight link. Issues: i. Local authority and community objection to the need for infrastructure justified through Regional Planning Policy ii. Predominantly through traffic and freight link how to sell to affected local community. iii. Impact of existing infrastructure (incl social) in determining link location. Infrastructure that is developed early can influence or restrict options for future infrastructure provision. iv. Preservation of a corridor for motorway and development implications of this impact on local investment, positive and negative. v. Timing of property acquisition required, need for political commitment across levels of Government. AITPM 2011 National Conference 11

12 7. Project Evaluation and Funding The timing of infrastructure provision is dependent upon funding availability and the formulation of a compelling case for investment. This evaluation process is undertaken within both private and public sector project environments, with assessment criteria and weighting of certain factors fundamental to the eventual funding decision. It is this weighting of investment decision factors that holds the key to determining the timing and staging of infrastructure provision. Therefore, careful consideration must be given to triple bottom line assessments and selection of the ultimate determinants in the process. 7.1 Government Processes Public sector investment decisions are ultimately determined by a State or Federal Treasury department, with business cases prepared to support a bid for project funding. The evaluation process is based on a determinant of need through multi-criteria analysis of triple bottom line factors, which is often then translated into a score to enable ranking against other project bids. Projects can then be prioritised for delivery. The public sector process also has a political component, where projects may be bumped up the priority list for funding depending upon a Government s desire to deliver election promises, the location in a safe or marginal seat, public opinion and pressure, or an evaluation of the political gain that may be gained through delivery of a certain project over another that may have ranked more highly. The public sector process is committed to consideration of triple bottom line components, and must consider elements such as public benefit and community concerns. This may be seen as compromising investment decisions from a purely economic standpoint, but is essential in delivery of socially and environmentally appropriate sustainable development. 7.2 Private Sector Funding Whilst infrastructure investment decisions made within a private sector context follow a similar evaluation process to the public sector model, it is likely that return on investment and economic factors may be given a greater weighting in the ultimate decision. However, that is not to imply that private sector organisations do not take triple bottom line factors into consideration in the decision making process. Indeed, decisions may be influenced by such factors as public perception of the organisation, being good corporate citizens or following industry best practice charters and leading on environmental and social issues. Private sector funding may often need to compete with international supply and demand for capital, and therefore consider a very wide range of alternative investment opportunities and decisions. Governments can have a strong influence on the flow of private capital into infrastructure through legislative and tax incentives, Public Private Partnerships (PPP s), or decreasing investment risk in other ways. 7.3 Investment Decisions Infrastructure investment decisions can be influenced by a range of factors in both the public and AITPM 2011 National Conference 12

13 private sector funding environment. Although it would generally be expected that private sector evaluation is more strongly influenced by economic factors, and public sector by a wider range of social, environmental and community benefit, this may not always be the case. The appropriate timing of infrastructure provision is influenced by the evaluation process and the components to which the greatest weighting or influence is based. Due to the costs and complexities involved with preparation of funding bids for large infrastructure projects, a business case may often only be prepared once there is certainty that a funding allocation is available and the chance of a successful outcome is strong. Therefore, a decision on the appropriate investment timing is likely to be made prior to the preparation of a business case. This is an important consideration when contemplating the most effective methods of influencing decision makers. 8. What does it all mean? 8.1 Approach to Infrastructure Provision The approach to transport infrastructure planning and delivery will ultimately be based on number of factors, including: Infrastructure project type Investment requirements and funding methods Public sector funding environment Governmental policy objectives Specific urban context Political context and election cycles Triple bottom line benefits of investment The transport professional must have at their disposal the correct tools to assess the impact of infrastructure delivery at different stages of a project, and the ability to make a judgement on the most appropriate time for transport infrastructure to be planned and delivered. A wide range of data is required to make such an assessment, on factors such as growth projections, travel behaviour, origin-destination, vehicle ownership, socio-economic trends, fuel prices and public transport patronage models. Although the current methods of justifying transport infrastructure delivery are generally reacting to public demand, a more proactive stance may carry significant cost and ease of delivery especially in greenfield growth areas. However, the difficulties in upgrading or retrofitting existing systems to meet urban growth and settlement patterns, in particular costs and other issues associated with land acquisition and service disruption, can impact upon the successful realisation of Government policy objectives within these growth areas. 8.2 Future Considerations for infrastructure planning There are a number of issues for transport professionals to consider when planning for transport infrastructure investment and delivery, including: Quantifying the benefits of the timing of infrastructure delivery AITPM 2011 National Conference 13

14 Seeking bi-partisan political agreement for early funding of major infrastructure Considering the most appropriate time to try and influence the decision making process Techniques required for building a convincing case for early infrastructure delivery Undertaking a full assessment or disclosure of costs of later infrastructure delivery, including service disruption and potential facility relocation, temporary works, construction access, risk and timeframes Different delivery models for investment PPP s, developer infrastructure contributions, Federal Government funding through Infrastructure Australia The requirements for transport infrastructure to meet investment decisions based on triple bottom line analysis not just transport outcomes The risks and costs of retro-fitting transport infrastructure into existing facilities Methods for assessing private sector investment decisions based around availability of transport infrastructure AITPM 2011 National Conference 14

15 References 1) Melbourne 2030: a planning update State Government of Victoria, December ) Melbourne 2030: a planning update State Government of Victoria, December ) The Victorian Transport Plan, State Government of Victoria, AITPM 2011 National Conference 15

2 Integrated planning. Chapter 2. Integrated Planning. 2.4 State highway categorisation and integrated planning

2 Integrated planning. Chapter 2. Integrated Planning. 2.4 State highway categorisation and integrated planning 2 Integrated planning Chapter 2 Integrated Planning This chapter contains the following sections: Section No. Topic 2.1 Introduction to integrated planning 2.2 Transit s Integrated Planning Policy 2.3

More information

Major & State Significant Projects Committee. East West Link Consolidated Business Case SUBMISSION PROPOSAL

Major & State Significant Projects Committee. East West Link Consolidated Business Case SUBMISSION PROPOSAL Cabinet Secretariat Reference Submission No. MSSPC 12 Copy No. Submission to: Submission Title: Portfolio/s: Major & State Significant Projects Committee East West Link Consolidated Business Case Roads,

More information

BUSINESS REGULATION BENCHMARKING: PLANNING, ZONING AND DEVELOPMENT ASSESSMENTS

BUSINESS REGULATION BENCHMARKING: PLANNING, ZONING AND DEVELOPMENT ASSESSMENTS 42/120 Collins Street GPO Box 1472 Telephone +613 8664 2664 Melbourne 3000 Melbourne 3001 Facsimile +613 8664 2666 www.bca.com.au 31 August 2010 Ms Christine Underwood Business Regulation Benchmarking

More information

Department of State Development, Infrastructure and Planning. State Planning Policy state interest guideline. State transport infrastructure

Department of State Development, Infrastructure and Planning. State Planning Policy state interest guideline. State transport infrastructure Department of State Development, Infrastructure and Planning State Planning Policy state interest guideline State transport infrastructure July 2014 Great state. Great opportunity. Preface Using this state

More information

21.08 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. Retail

21.08 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT. Retail 21.08 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Retail Retailing is an important component of Melbourne s Capital City function. The Hoddle Grid will remain the State s pre-eminent retail centre and retailing in its Retail

More information

Guidelines for future developments: preparing a sustainability framework plan and business case

Guidelines for future developments: preparing a sustainability framework plan and business case Armstrong Creek Building a sustainable future Guidelines for future developments: preparing a sustainability framework plan and business case This document shows you how to develop a comprehensive framework

More information

4 Adoption of Asset Management Policy and Strategy

4 Adoption of Asset Management Policy and Strategy 4 Adoption of Asset Management Policy and Strategy Abstract The report recommends the adoption of an updated Asset Management Policy 2014 and an Asset Management Strategy 2014-2019. Both documents are

More information

Coventry Development Plan 2016 Appendix 89. Glossary of Key Terms

Coventry Development Plan 2016 Appendix 89. Glossary of Key Terms Coventry Development Plan 2016 Appendix 89 Glossary of Key Terms Area Action Plan A Development Plan Document which focuses upon a specific location or an area subject to significant change. Affordable

More information

1. a) How effective is the current Climate Change Act 2010 in driving climate change action by:

1. a) How effective is the current Climate Change Act 2010 in driving climate change action by: Public Submission Review of Climate Change Act 2010 City of Melbourne Questions 1. a) How effective is the current Climate Change Act 2010 in driving climate change action by: Government? (tick one only)

More information

Melbourne Airport Rail Link Study. Study overview and findings

Melbourne Airport Rail Link Study. Study overview and findings Melbourne Airport Rail Link Study Study overview and findings Melbourne Airport caters for 28 million air passenger trips each year and this figure is expected to double in the next 20 years. Transport

More information

This document is part of a series of Building a Stronger South Australia policy initiatives from the Government of South Australia.

This document is part of a series of Building a Stronger South Australia policy initiatives from the Government of South Australia. 3. Public Transport This document is part of a series of Building a Stronger South Australia policy initiatives from the Government of South Australia. 1. Future Fund 2. Jobs and Skills 3. Public Transport

More information

Examples of Transportation Plan Goals, Objectives and Performance Measures

Examples of Transportation Plan Goals, Objectives and Performance Measures Examples of Transportation Plan Goals, Objectives and Performance Measures The next step in the Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) process is to develop goals, objectives, and performance measures.

More information

PROJECT PREPARATORY TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

PROJECT PREPARATORY TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE A. Justification PROJECT PREPARATORY TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 1. The Government of Azerbaijan, the Ministry of Transport and Baku Metro Company requested ADB to help improving its urban transport system and

More information

Latrobe City Council Submission Emissions Reduction Fund Green Paper February 2014

Latrobe City Council Submission Emissions Reduction Fund Green Paper February 2014 Latrobe City Council Submission Emissions Reduction Fund Green Paper February 2014 For further information in relation to this submission please contact Allison Jones General Manager Economic Sustainability

More information

City Plan Part 1 Sustainability Appraisal Summary February 2012

City Plan Part 1 Sustainability Appraisal Summary February 2012 City Plan Part 1 Sustainability Appraisal Summary February 2012 1.0 Introduction The Council is in the process of preparing its new Local Plan in consultation with the public, developers, landowners and

More information

City of Stonnington Melbourne Metro Rail Project & South Yarra Station. March 2016

City of Stonnington Melbourne Metro Rail Project & South Yarra Station. March 2016 City of Stonnington Melbourne Metro Rail Project & South Yarra Station March 2016 City of Stonnington, Melbourne Metro Rail Project & South Yarra Station 3 contents background 4 council advocacy position

More information

Transport Mobility Management: Small Changes - Big Impacts

Transport Mobility Management: Small Changes - Big Impacts Transport Mobility Management: Small Changes - Big Impacts Understanding TMM in the Urban Context Damian PRICE and Amy LEATHER Abstract Although Transport Mobility Management (TMM) is still considered

More information

Vision for Salisbury Quality Bus Partnership. 25 July 2012

Vision for Salisbury Quality Bus Partnership. 25 July 2012 Vision for Salisbury Quality Bus Partnership 25 July 2012 Vision for Salisbury Quality Bus Partnership Signed on 25 July 2012 Sir Christopher Benson J.P., D.L. Chairman... Salisbury Vision Partnership

More information

Northern Territory ROAD TRANSPORT FATIGUE MANAGEMENT

Northern Territory ROAD TRANSPORT FATIGUE MANAGEMENT Northern Territory Code of Practice Northern Territory Northern Territory Code of Practice Contents 1 Background 4 2 Operator Duty of Care Responsibilities 5 3 Codes of Practice 6 4 Who should use the

More information

11. Managing our Transport Assets

11. Managing our Transport Assets 11. Managing our Transport Assets 11.1 The Need for an Asset Management Plan 11.1.1 A key challenge is to make transport assets work for the city in a way which fully contributes to the delivery of corporate

More information

Redoubt - Mill Road Corridor Project NoR 1-3: Route Selection (incl. existing Mill Road Alignment)

Redoubt - Mill Road Corridor Project NoR 1-3: Route Selection (incl. existing Mill Road Alignment) Memorandum AECOM New Zealand Limited 121 Rostrevor Street Hamilton 3204 PO Box 434, Waikato MC Hamilton 3240 New Zealand www.aecom.com +64 7 834 8980 tel +64 7 834 8981 fax To Richard Black Page 1 CC Subject

More information

RESPONSE TO SYDNEY OLYMPIC PARK MASTER PLAN 2030 DRAFT

RESPONSE TO SYDNEY OLYMPIC PARK MASTER PLAN 2030 DRAFT 20 August 2008 Director Strategic Assessments Department of Planning GPO Box 39 Sydney NSW 2001 To whom it may concern, RESPONSE TO SYDNEY OLYMPIC PARK MASTER PLAN 2030 DRAFT TOURISM & TRANSPORT FORUM

More information

26 Connecting SEQ 2031

26 Connecting SEQ 2031 26 Connecting SEQ 2031 Part B Priorities for taking action Part B Priorities for taking action 27 4. Six priorities for action Connecting SEQ 2031 contains more than 150 strategic policies, actions and

More information

Better Bus Area Monitoring and Evaluation Framework

Better Bus Area Monitoring and Evaluation Framework Do Better Bus Area Monitoring and Evaluation Framework March 2014 The Department for Transport has actively considered the needs of blind and partially sighted people in accessing this document. The text

More information

Moving Together Corporate Plan

Moving Together Corporate Plan Moving Together Corporate Plan 2010-2014 CONTENTS Vision 4 Our values 5 Ministers message 6 Director General s message 7 Transport NSW at a glance 8 Delivering our transport vision 11 Organisational structure

More information

A new Garden Neighbourhood for West Guildford An opportunity for Smart Growth. university of surrey November 2013

A new Garden Neighbourhood for West Guildford An opportunity for Smart Growth. university of surrey November 2013 A new Garden Neighbourhood for West Guildford An opportunity for Smart Growth university of surrey November 2013 A new Garden Neighbourhood for West Guildford Preface Since the County and Borough Councils

More information

Energy and. Resources

Energy and. Resources Tasmaniann Government 20122 Submission to Nation Buildin g 2 Program Domain Highway Planning (Part of Brooker Highway Upgrades submission to Infrastructure Australia) September 2012 Department of Infrastructure,

More information

Significant investment and improvement of infrastructure and transport networks, delivered at no cost and no risk

Significant investment and improvement of infrastructure and transport networks, delivered at no cost and no risk December 2014 FACT SHEET: TRANSPORT AND INFRASTRUCTURE Significant investment and improvement of infrastructure and transport networks, delivered at no cost and no risk The Gold Coast Integrated Resort

More information

We would be pleased to discuss these issues with you at your convenience.

We would be pleased to discuss these issues with you at your convenience. Public Transport Users Association Inc. Ross House, 247 Flinders Lane Melbourne 3000 Reg. No. A-6256L Email: office@ptua.org.au Dear Councillor Queen Victoria Market Redevelopment Project The Public Transport

More information

IPENZ TRANSPORTATION GROUP CONFERENCE 2013 KEEP CHRISTCHURCH MOVING FORWARD CHRISTCHURCH TRANSPORT STRATEGIC PLAN

IPENZ TRANSPORTATION GROUP CONFERENCE 2013 KEEP CHRISTCHURCH MOVING FORWARD CHRISTCHURCH TRANSPORT STRATEGIC PLAN Keep Christchurch moving forward Foxon R. Kurucz R. Cheeseborough T. Page 0 IPENZ TRANSPORTATION GROUP CONFERENCE 2013 KEEP CHRISTCHURCH MOVING FORWARD CHRISTCHURCH TRANSPORT STRATEGIC PLAN RUTH FOXON

More information

CAPACITY AND LEVEL-OF-SERVICE CONCEPTS

CAPACITY AND LEVEL-OF-SERVICE CONCEPTS CHAPTER 2 CAPACITY AND LEVEL-OF-SERVICE CONCEPTS CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION...2-1 II. CAPACITY...2-2 III. DEMAND...2-2 IV. QUALITY AND LEVELS OF SERVICE...2-2 Service Flow Rates...2-3 Performance Measures...2-3

More information

SB 360 Article Series: Factors to be Considered in Transitioning from a Road Impact Fee to a Mobility Fee

SB 360 Article Series: Factors to be Considered in Transitioning from a Road Impact Fee to a Mobility Fee January 2010 SB 360 Article Series: Factors to be Considered in Transitioning from a Road Impact Fee to a Mobility Fee Contributing Authors: Steven A. Tindale, P.E., AICP Robert P. Wallace, P.E., AICP

More information

ORANGE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY. Final Long-Range Transportation Plan - Destination 2035. Attachment A

ORANGE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY. Final Long-Range Transportation Plan - Destination 2035. Attachment A ORANGE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY Final Long-Range Transportation Plan - Destination 2035 Attachment A DESTINATION 2035 DESTINATION 2035 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ATTACHMENT A Moving Toward a Greener Tomorrow

More information

Long Term Financial Plan 2014 2023 Adopted December 2013

Long Term Financial Plan 2014 2023 Adopted December 2013 Long Term Financial Plan 2014 2023 Adopted December 2013 District Council of Mallala CONTENTS 1 Introduction 1 2 Planning Framework 2 3 Assumptions 7 4 Summary & Financial Statements 10 Estimated Comprehensive

More information

Long Term Financial Planning

Long Term Financial Planning Long Term Financial Planning Framework and Guidelines Long Term Financial Planning Framework and Guidelines for Western Australian Local Governments p1. Contents Foreword 4 1. Introduction 7 2. Purpose

More information

ASFA Policy and Industry Practice

ASFA Policy and Industry Practice ASFA Policy and Industry Practice Investing in transport infrastructure Discussion Paper September 2012 Association of Superannuation Funds of Australia ASFA Secretariat Level 6 66 Clarence Street Sydney

More information

Roads Task Force - Technical Note 10 What is the capacity of the road network for private motorised traffic and how has this changed over time?

Roads Task Force - Technical Note 10 What is the capacity of the road network for private motorised traffic and how has this changed over time? Roads Task Force - Technical Note 10 What is the capacity of the road network for private motorised traffic and how has this changed over time? Introduction This paper forms one of a series of thematic

More information

Footpath Extension Policy

Footpath Extension Policy 16.6.9 Footpath Extension Policy 1.0 FOOTPATH EXTENSION POLICY - INTENTION The Footpath Extension Policy provides for the ranking of new footpaths in the Council s footpath construction programme. The

More information

Page 1 of 24. To present the Asset Management Policy 2014 for Council adoption.

Page 1 of 24. To present the Asset Management Policy 2014 for Council adoption. Page 1 of 24 COMMUNITY AND SERVICES SPECIAL COMMITTEE REPORT 9 DECEMBER 2104 AGENDA ITEM 6.1 ASSET MANAGEMENT POLICY 2014 REVIEW Director: Manager: Ian Butterworth Director Infrastructure and Engineering

More information

ATTACHMENT 3. PLAN MELBOURNE REFRESH DISCUSSION PAPER City of Port Phillip Submission

ATTACHMENT 3. PLAN MELBOURNE REFRESH DISCUSSION PAPER City of Port Phillip Submission ATTACHMENT 3 PLAN MELBOURNE REFRESH DISCUSSION PAPER City of Port Phillip Submission February 2016 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The City of Port Phillip welcomes the State Government s preparation and release of

More information

NICTA Response to the Public Infrastructure Productivity Commission Issues Paper and Draft Report March 2014

NICTA Response to the Public Infrastructure Productivity Commission Issues Paper and Draft Report March 2014 NICTA Response to the Public Infrastructure Productivity Commission Issues Paper and Draft Report March 2014 Page 2 Introduction NICTA thanks the Productivity Commission for the opportunity to submit a

More information

Ne w J e r s e y Tr a f f i c Co n g e s t i o n :

Ne w J e r s e y Tr a f f i c Co n g e s t i o n : Ne w J e r s e y Tr a f f i c Co n g e s t i o n : A Growing Crisis January 2008 Cover photo : Route 3, Passaic County introduction A rising tide of traffic congestion threatens to increase roadway gridlock,

More information

Customer Satisfaction Index 2014

Customer Satisfaction Index 2014 Customer Satisfaction Index 01 Contents Executive summary Customer satisfaction methodology Initiatives to improve customer satisfaction November 01 results Overall train network Overall bus regions Overall

More information

21.04 LAND USE. Managing amenity through land use strategies

21.04 LAND USE. Managing amenity through land use strategies 21.04 LAND USE This section contains objectives and strategies for land use, under the themes of: Housing and community Retail, entertainment and the arts Office and commercial use Industry Education and

More information

Demand for Long Distance Travel

Demand for Long Distance Travel Demand for Long Distance Travel April 2011 Demand for long distance travel 1 Structure of this paper 1.1 This paper is structured as follows: Section 2 sets out past trends in the demand for long distance

More information

Evaluation Criteria and Mode Progression for RouteAhead Rapid Transit Projects

Evaluation Criteria and Mode Progression for RouteAhead Rapid Transit Projects Evaluation Criteria and Mode Progression for RouteAhead Rapid Transit Projects C2012-0684 ATTACHMENT 2 The RouteAhead draft 30-year rapid transit plan was developed in coordination with the Investing in

More information

TITLE A CTS FOR THE NEW ROME EXHIBITION

TITLE A CTS FOR THE NEW ROME EXHIBITION CityMobil2 - Socio-economic impact study Reference Group Meeting Lausanne 23 June 2015 TITLE A CTS FOR THE NEW ROME EXHIBITION Carlo Sessa Gabriele Giustiniani, ISIS ITR 30/3/2015 1 Envisioning AUTOMATED

More information

Cost and Financial Analysis

Cost and Financial Analysis Chapter 19: Cost and Financial Analysis A. INTRODUCTION The purpose of this chapter is to present examples of financial resources available to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), which may

More information

Bedford s Network Management Strategy (2011 2021) November 2010

Bedford s Network Management Strategy (2011 2021) November 2010 Bedford s Network Management Strategy (2011 2021) November 2010 Page 1 of 13 1. Introduction 1.1. The Bedford Borough Council Network Management Strategy has been developed to support local and national

More information

Alternatives to the Circ Project Prioritization Methodology Prepared for Circ Task Force July 28, 2011

Alternatives to the Circ Project Prioritization Methodology Prepared for Circ Task Force July 28, 2011 Alternatives to the Circ Project Prioritization Methodology Prepared for Circ Task Force July 28, 2011 CCRPC staff has developed a draft methodology described below and detailed in the attached pages for

More information

directions2031 and beyond metropolitan planning beyond the horizon August 2010

directions2031 and beyond metropolitan planning beyond the horizon August 2010 directions2031 and beyond metropolitan planning beyond the horizon August 2010 directions2031 and beyond metropolitan planning beyond the horizon August 2010 Department of Planning directions 2031 directions2031and

More information

Planning Policy Statement 2015

Planning Policy Statement 2015 Planning Policy Statement 2015 Introduction It is just over 50 years since national planning legislation was first implemented in Ireland. The Government wishes to reaffirm its strong belief in the value

More information

Integrated Public Transport Service Planning Guidelines. Sydney Metropolitan Area

Integrated Public Transport Service Planning Guidelines. Sydney Metropolitan Area Integrated Public Transport Service Planning Guidelines Sydney Metropolitan Area December 2013 CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 3 1.1 Purpose 3 1.2 Background 3 1.3 Travel in Sydney Metropolitan Area 5 1.4 Objectives

More information

Overview of the Travel Demand Forecasting Methodology

Overview of the Travel Demand Forecasting Methodology Overview of the Travel Demand Forecasting Methodology Prepared by the Central Transportation Planning Staff (CTPS) Authors: Scott A. Peterson, Manager Ian Harrington, Chief Planner March 29, 2008 1 OVERVIEW

More information

St Albans Local Development Framework. Core Strategy: Spatial Strategy Options

St Albans Local Development Framework. Core Strategy: Spatial Strategy Options Centre for Sustainability St Albans Local Development Framework Core Strategy: Spatial Strategy Options Sustainability Appraisal (incorporating Strategic Environmental Assessment) Working Note September

More information

An airport for Western Sydney. Building Western Sydney s future

An airport for Western Sydney. Building Western Sydney s future Building Western Sydney s future Western Sydney is already Australia's third largest economy and, in its own right, would be our fourth largest city. The fourth largest city in Australia should have its

More information

The Mobility Opportunity Improving urban transport to drive economic growth

The Mobility Opportunity Improving urban transport to drive economic growth , CEO Infrastructure & Cities Sector, Siemens The Mobility Opportunity Improving urban transport to drive economic growth Answers for infrastructure and cities. We are in the "urban millennium" Population

More information

RE: SUBMISSION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL UPGRADE FINANCE CONSULTATION (SA)

RE: SUBMISSION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL UPGRADE FINANCE CONSULTATION (SA) 16 July 2012 Environmental Upgrade Finance Consultation Sustainability and Climate Change Branch Department of Environment and Natural Resources GPO Box 1047 Adelaide SA 5001 Dear Sir/Madam, RE: SUBMISSION

More information

VISION, DESIGN PRINCIPLES & OVERALL PLANNING STRATEGY

VISION, DESIGN PRINCIPLES & OVERALL PLANNING STRATEGY 3 VISION, DESIGN PRINCIPLES & OVERALL PLANNING STRATEGY The overall planning strategy for the Bank Street CDP is to ensure that future development is undertaken in a coordinated and planned approach, supported

More information

Capturing Value Uplift Benefiting from the Private Sector

Capturing Value Uplift Benefiting from the Private Sector Capturing Value Uplift Benefiting from the Private Sector April 2013 Contents Understanding the wealth effect of Infrastructure Current Initiatives Transit Oriented Development The Challenge: Move away

More information

2. The costs of natural disasters

2. The costs of natural disasters 2. The costs of natural disasters Key Points Without action, the forecast annual cost in real terms of natural disasters (across government, business and communities) in Australia is expected to reach

More information

MELBOURNE METRO Business Case Key Findings FEBRUARY 2016

MELBOURNE METRO Business Case Key Findings FEBRUARY 2016 MELBOURNE METRO Business Case Key Findings FEBRUARY 2016 Major investments in transport infrastructure lay the foundation for a highly liveable and well-connected city. represents a generational change

More information

Infrastructure: The Routemap for Regional Growth

Infrastructure: The Routemap for Regional Growth Infrastructure: The Routemap for Regional Growth Civil Engineering Contractors Association South West Supporting the South West: The Importance of Infrastructure South West England is the largest English

More information

INDOT 2000-2025 Long Range Plan

INDOT 2000-2025 Long Range Plan Chapter 9 INDOT 2000-2025 Long Range Plan Highway Needs Analysis Overview The statewide transportation planning process provides for the identification of highway needs through a comprehensive process

More information

Professional transport planning, traffic engineering, transport economics and program management solutions

Professional transport planning, traffic engineering, transport economics and program management solutions Professional transport planning, traffic engineering, transport economics and program management solutions PSA Consulting (Australia) commenced in 2004 and over the PSA Consulting (Australia) is a specialist

More information

TRANSPORT FOR LONDON BOARD CROXLEY RAIL LINK PROPOSED TRANSPORT AND WORKS ACT ORDER

TRANSPORT FOR LONDON BOARD CROXLEY RAIL LINK PROPOSED TRANSPORT AND WORKS ACT ORDER AGENDA ITEM 8 TRANSPORT FOR LONDON BOARD SUBJECT: CROXLEY RAIL LINK PROPOSED TRANSPORT AND WORKS ACT ORDER DATE: 7 DECEMBER 2011 1 PURPOSE AND DECISION REQUIRED 1.1 The purpose of this paper is to update

More information

ROADS ALLIANCE ASSET MANAGEMENT COMMUNIQUÉ AUGUST 2010 LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION OF QUEENSLAND LTD

ROADS ALLIANCE ASSET MANAGEMENT COMMUNIQUÉ AUGUST 2010 LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION OF QUEENSLAND LTD ROADS ALLIANCE ASSET MANAGEMENT COMMUNIQUÉ AUGUST 2010 LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION OF QUEENSLAND LTD Contents 4 Glossary 6 Background 9 Purpose of Communiqué 9 Australian and State Government Drivers

More information

Journey to Work Patterns in the Auckland Region

Journey to Work Patterns in the Auckland Region Analysis of Census Data for 2001-2013 1 INTRODUCTION... 1 DEFINITIONS OF WORKERS, JOBS AND EMPLOYMENT... 1 2 SCOPE OF THE ANALYSIS... 2 2.1 LEVELS OF ANALYSIS... 2 2.2 DATA INCLUDED IN THE ANALYSIS...

More information

to Asset Management Policy and Guidance Draft Version 1.4 9 July 2015

to Asset Management Policy and Guidance Draft Version 1.4 9 July 2015 D to Asset Management Policy and Guidance Draft Version 1.4 9 July 2015 This page has been left blank intentionally Page 2 of 24 Page 3 of 24 This page has been left blank intentionally Page 4 of 24 Strategic

More information

STOP CONSOLIDATION TRANSIT STRATEGIES

STOP CONSOLIDATION TRANSIT STRATEGIES TRANSIT STRATEGIES STOP CONSOLIDATION Transit stops are the places where people access transit service, and greatly impact many elements of passengers transit experiences. They are typically thought of

More information

Long Term Financial Plan 2014/15 2023/24

Long Term Financial Plan 2014/15 2023/24 Long Term Financial Plan 2014/15 2023/24 May 2014 1 Index Executive Summary... 3 Background... 5 What is Financial Sustainability?... 6 Key Financial Issues and Challenges... 8 Responding to the Challenges...

More information

ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY

ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY City of Salisbury ASSET MANAGEMENT STRATEGY Version 6 June 2015 City of Salisbury Asset Management Strategy Document Control Document Control NAMS.PLUS Asset Management www.ipwea.org/namsplus Document

More information

Traffic and Revenue Forecasting for Privately Funded Transport Projects

Traffic and Revenue Forecasting for Privately Funded Transport Projects Traffic and Revenue Forecasting for Privately Funded Transport Projects Dr Alan Brett and Mr Peter Snelson WS Atkins Introduction The private sector has an increasing role in the provision and financing

More information

MELBOURNE METRO RAIL NEWSLETTER

MELBOURNE METRO RAIL NEWSLETTER Commercial Rd MELBOURNE METRO RAIL NEWSLETTER SHAPING MELBOURNE S RAIL FUTURE Welcome to the first edition of Melbourne Metro Rail News. This newsletter will keep you up-to-date on progress of the Melbourne

More information

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION & TRAINING. TEACHER SUPPLY AND DEMAND for government schools

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION & TRAINING. TEACHER SUPPLY AND DEMAND for government schools DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION & TRAINING TEACHER SUPPLY AND DEMAND for government schools State of Victoria, Department of Education & Training 2004 Published by the Communications Division Department of Education

More information

Rate Setting, Asset Management and Financial Sustainability. A guide for local governments June 2013

Rate Setting, Asset Management and Financial Sustainability. A guide for local governments June 2013 Rate Setting, Asset Management and Financial Sustainability A guide for local governments June 2013 1 Rate Setting, Asset Management and Financial Sustainability A guide for local governments June 2013

More information

RE: PRECINCT STRUCTURE PLANNING GUIDELINES CONSULTATION DRAFT OCTOBER 2008

RE: PRECINCT STRUCTURE PLANNING GUIDELINES CONSULTATION DRAFT OCTOBER 2008 Our File: IN2008/25160 [HC07/492] Enquiries: David Keenan Telephone: 9205 2300 Mr Peter Seamer Chief Executive Officer Growth Areas Authority Level 6, 35 Spring Street MELBOURNE 3000 Dear Mr Seamer RE:

More information

CROYDON MAJOR ACTIVITY CENTRE PARKING STUDY

CROYDON MAJOR ACTIVITY CENTRE PARKING STUDY CROYDON MAJOR ACTIVITY CENTRE PARKING STUDY December 2011 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Strategic Context The Croydon Town Centre has been classified as a Major Activity Centre (MAC) in the Melbourne 2030 metropolitan

More information

How should we prioritise incident management deployment?

How should we prioritise incident management deployment? Marschke, Ms Kath and Ferreira, Dr Luis and Bunker, Dr Jonathan (2005) How should we prioritise incident management deployment?. In Proceedings Australasian Transport Research Forum, Sydney 2005. How should

More information

Goals & Objectives. Chapter 9. Transportation

Goals & Objectives. Chapter 9. Transportation Goals & Objectives Chapter 9 Transportation Transportation MISSION STATEMENT: TO PROVIDE A TRANSPORTATION NETWORK CAPABLE OF MOVING PEOPLE AND GOODS EFFICIENTLY AND SAFELY. T he transportation system

More information

SUMMARY OF GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT TRENDS For THE CENTRAL AREA OF CHICAGO. The Parking Industry Labor Management Committee (PILMC)

SUMMARY OF GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT TRENDS For THE CENTRAL AREA OF CHICAGO. The Parking Industry Labor Management Committee (PILMC) SUMMARY OF GROWTH & DEVELOPMENT TRENDS For THE CENTRAL AREA OF CHICAGO Prepared for The Parking Industry Labor Management Committee (PILMC) August 7, 2003 Prepared by Metro Transportation Group, Inc. 70

More information

Managing the Transit Network A Primer on Key Concepts

Managing the Transit Network A Primer on Key Concepts Managing the Transit Network A Primer on Key Concepts translink.ca Introduction As the integrated, multi-modal transportation authority for Metro Vancouver, TransLink plans and delivers the transit network

More information

A Greener Transport System in Denmark. Environmentally Friendly and Energy Efficient Transport

A Greener Transport System in Denmark. Environmentally Friendly and Energy Efficient Transport A Greener Transport System in Denmark Environmentally Friendly and Energy Efficient Transport Udgivet af: Ministry of Transport Frederiksholms Kanal 27 DK-1220 København K Udarbejdet af: Transportministeriet

More information

Issue Number 3 Representor Number - 635815. Canary Wharf Group Position Statement

Issue Number 3 Representor Number - 635815. Canary Wharf Group Position Statement Issue 3 Are employment policies consistent with the NPPF, the London plan and the Core Strategy and/or supported by clear and robust evidence; are they reasonable and realistic and clear, deliverable and

More information

Saving energy, growing jobs

Saving energy, growing jobs Saving energy, growing jobs Victoria s energy efficiency and productivity statement June 2015 Contents Minister s foreword 1 Why energy efficiency matters for Victorians 2 Our plan for energy efficiency

More information

FUTURE SOCIAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE AND ITS IMPACT ON TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT

FUTURE SOCIAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE AND ITS IMPACT ON TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT FUTURE SOCIAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE AND ITS IMPACT ON TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT EDWARD A. BEIMBORN, Director, Center for Urban Transportation Studies, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee

More information

LONDON BOROUGH OF HAVERING

LONDON BOROUGH OF HAVERING LONDON BOROUGH OF HAVERING CORPORATE ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN 2015-2019 Sections LONDON BOROUGH OF HAVERING CORPORATE ASSET MANAGEMENT PLAN CONTENTS 1 Introduction and Context 2 Corporate Vision 3 Policy

More information

Examples of Eligible Projects. Project Category Description Examples

Examples of Eligible Projects. Project Category Description Examples Examples of Eligible Projects Public Transit Local Roads, Bridges, and Active Transportation Regional and Local Airports which supports a shared passenger transport system which is available for public

More information

MOVING AUSTRALIA 2030

MOVING AUSTRALIA 2030 MOVING AUSTRALIA 2030 A Transport Plan for a Productive and Active Australia Our vision for moving people in Australia by 2030 is: > > An integrated and multi-modal transport system that will safely and

More information

Survey of urban US pedestrian and bicycle projects

Survey of urban US pedestrian and bicycle projects Presentation to Engineers Australia Survey of urban US pedestrian and bicycle projects Rebecca.Lehman@gta.com.au Tuesday 23 July 2013 2 3 4 5 Premise for this presentation People choose to walk and cycle

More information

Federal Guidelines for STP-U Funding

Federal Guidelines for STP-U Funding MPC 5.f Attachment 1 STP-U Eligibility Guidelines Page 1 of 5 Federal Guidelines for STP-U Funding SURFACE TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM (STP) ELIGIBLE EXPENDITURES PERIOD AVAILABLE: FY + 3 Years FUND: Highway

More information

NOTTINGHAM. Workplace Parking Levy

NOTTINGHAM. Workplace Parking Levy Workplace Parking Levy NOTTINGHAM About Nottingham Nottingham is an ambitious and vibrant city. It is designated as a core city and is ranked as a top ten UK retail centre. The Greater Nottingham economy

More information

2009-3. The Preservation of Local Truck Routes: A Primary Connection between Commerce and the Regional Freight Network

2009-3. The Preservation of Local Truck Routes: A Primary Connection between Commerce and the Regional Freight Network 2009-3 The Preservation of Local Truck Routes: A Primary Connection between Commerce and the Regional Freight Network July 2009 This Goods Movement Challenges and Opportunities Report was prepared jointly

More information

OVERVIEW MAJOR FEATURES OF THE MODEL. Some important features of the model set are listed below.

OVERVIEW MAJOR FEATURES OF THE MODEL. Some important features of the model set are listed below. Support to the Casey Overpass Study Central Transportation Planning Staff Support Staff to the Boston Region MPO Overview of the Regional Travel Demand Model Set May 18, 2011 OVERVIEW The model set that

More information

Challenge Melbourne ISSUES IN METROPOLITAN PLANNING FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

Challenge Melbourne ISSUES IN METROPOLITAN PLANNING FOR THE 21ST CENTURY Challenge Melbourne ISSUES IN METROPOLITAN PLANNING FOR THE 21ST CENTURY MINISTERS FOREWORD The planning of Melbourne s future presents many challenges and opportunities. We could let matters take their

More information

Non Government Schools

Non Government Schools Non Government Schools context A comprehensive approach to land use planning for education provision is needed in new suburbs. This includes planning for non government schools, which account for around

More information

Transport Scotland Strategic Transport Projects Review Report 3 Generation, Sifting and Appraisal of Interventions Annex 2

Transport Scotland Strategic Transport Projects Review Report 3 Generation, Sifting and Appraisal of Interventions Annex 2 Detailed Appraisal D9: Integrated Ticketing Estimated total Public Sector Funding Requirement: Capital Costs/grant 50m - 100m Annual Revenue Support Present Value of Cost to Gvt BCR/PVB 1m - N/A - - -

More information

Logan City Council. Strategic Planning and Performance Management Framework

Logan City Council. Strategic Planning and Performance Management Framework Logan City Council Strategic Planning and Performance Management Framework 1 Table of contents 1. Overview 3 a) Purpose 3 b) Key Features 3 2. Context 4 a) National Framework for Sustainability 4 b) Elements

More information

Cool Factor: imaginecalgary

Cool Factor: imaginecalgary CANADA S COOLEST CITIES Calgary & CMA Cool Factor: imaginecalgary Sustainable Energy Solutions Canada s Coolest Cities looked at the question: What are Canada s large cities doing to encourage low-carbon

More information

SOUTH EAST EUROPE TRANSNATIONAL CO-OPERATION PROGRAMME. Terms of reference

SOUTH EAST EUROPE TRANSNATIONAL CO-OPERATION PROGRAMME. Terms of reference SOUTH EAST EUROPE TRANSNATIONAL CO-OPERATION PROGRAMME 3 rd Call for Proposals Terms of reference Efficient access to a SEE coordinated multimodal freight network between ports and landlocked countries

More information