Kristian Estevez. Department of Economics Home: (786) University of Florida Office: (352)

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1 Kristian Estévez 03/05/2010 Home: (786) Office: (352) P.O. Box Gainesville, FL Website: plaza.ufl.edu/kj719/ Experience Education Fields Adjunct Lecturer, International (ECO 3704), Spring 2010 Instructor, International (ECO 3704), Summer 2008 Fall 2010, Department of Food and Resource Economics Macroeconomic Theory in Open Economies II (AEB 6240), Spring 2009 Teaching Assistant, Principles of Microeconomics (ECO 2023), Fall 2005 Spring 2009 Managerial Economics (ECP 3704), Spring 2006 Spring 2009, Gainesville, FL Ph.D. in Economics, September 2005 December 2010, Gainesville, FL B.A. in Economics (with honors), September 2001 May 2005 International Public Economics Game Theory [1]

2 Research Interests International Economic Development Technological Change and Economic Growth Published Papers Estevez, Kristian. Nutritional Efficiency Wages and Child Labor, Forthcoming in Economic Modelling, Job Market Paper Working Papers and Work in Progress Advising Awards Conferences Service Refereeing North-South with Firm Heterogeneity. with Elias Dinopoulos Demand for Child Labor in a North-South Model of. Does Intra-Industry Increase the Incidence of Child Labor? Benjamin Sunshine Honor s Thesis Nominated by Economic Department for a Graduate Teaching Award, Fall 2009 and Spring 2010 Spring Seminar Series,, February 2010 Graduate Student Council Interdisciplinary Research Conference, February 2010 Attended Southern Economic Conference Annual Meetings (November 2010) and American Economic Association Annual Meetings (January 2011) Graduate Student Council Department Representative, Fall 2009 Fall 2010 Economic Modelling [2]

3 Affiliations Skills American Economic Association Southern Economic Association Computing: STATA, Mathematica, SPSS, Matlab Languages: Fluent in English and Spanish References Professor Elias Dinopoulos Professor Jonathan Hamilton 224 Matherly Hall 224 Matherly Hall Department of Economic Gainesville, FL Gainesville, FL (352) (352) Professor Richard Romano Professor Steven Slutsky 224 Matherly Hall 224 Matherly Hall Gainesville, FL Gainesville, FL (352) (352) [3]

4 Research Summary Dissertation: Essays on Child Labor, Productivity, and Nutritional Efficiency Wages and Child Labor This paper formally analyzes the incidence of child labor by employing an overlapping-generations general-equilibrium model of a small open economy. An individual s ability determines whether or not he/she becomes a skilled worker. The supply side of the economy is composed of two sectors: the modern sector produces a homogeneous good using skilled labor and physical capital; and the agrarian sector that produces a traditional good using unskilled adult labor, child labor, and land. An increase in foreign direct investment and improvements in education reduce the incidence of child labor. Emigration of skilled (unskilled) workers reduces (raises) the supply of child labor, while trade sanctions reduce the demand for child labor. Child wage subsidies have an ambiguous effect on the incidence of child labor while education subsidies are effective in reducing the incidence of child labor. Simulation analysis is used to investigate the welfare effects of the aforementioned policies. Does Intra-Industry Increase the Incidence of Child Labor? This paper examines the incidence of child labor in the presence of heterogeneous firms and trade between structurally identical countries. Firms differ in their productivity levels as in Melitz (2003). The effects of stricter enforcement of child-labor laws enforcement and trade liberalization on the incidence of labor are examined. These effects are ambiguous and depend on how a firm s production process affects the relative productivity between adult and child workers. If the productivity elasticity of adult labor is the same as that of child labor, then firms employ the same proportion of child workers independently of their overall productivity level. In this case, trade liberalization does not affect the incidence of child labor, while stricter enforcement of child-labor laws reduces the incidence of child labor. If the productivity elasticity of child labor is higher (lower) than that of adult labor, then trade liberalization decreases (raises) the incidence of child labor. Demand for Child Labor in a North-South Model of This paper examines how international trade affects the incidence of child labor in a North-South model of trade with heterogeneous firms. Innovating firms in the North differ in their marginal costs, while Southern firms are homogeneous, imitate Northern products, and may use child labor in production. The incidence of child labor depends not only on domestic factors such as the wages of adult and child labor in the South, but also on the rates of innovation and imitation. Reductions in trade cost decrease the relative production in the South and the incidence of child labor. An increase in the rate of imitation decreases the incidence of child labor, while an increase in the size or the South, measured by its population, raises the demand for child labor. [4]

5 Teaching Summary The table below summarizes my teaching evaluations for the courses I have taught at the. The fall and spring semesters are 16-week terms and the summer semester is split into two terms lasting 6 weeks each. The upper level undergraduate courses in the are four credit courses. My courses typically have between students. I taught a graduate course which is taken by master-level graduate students in the Department of Food and Resource Economics in the spring of After teaching in the summer of 2008, I was nominated by the for a Graduate Teaching Award, and was renominated after my fall course. The student evaluations for my classes place me near the top among all economics instructors. In addition to teaching, I have also served as the teaching assistant for Principles of Microeconomics (ECO 2023), a course which usually exceeds 2,000 students during the fall and spring semesters. I was also the teaching assistant for Managerial Economics (ECP 3704). Teaching Evaluations Term Summer B 2008 Spring 2008 Summer B 2009 Fall 2009 Spring 2010 Fall 2010 Course AEB Open Macroeconomics II Evaluation (Out of a max of 5) [5]