MESOTHELIOMAS - ASBESTOS EXPOSURE AND LUNG BURDEN

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "MESOTHELIOMAS - ASBESTOS EXPOSURE AND LUNG BURDEN"

Transcription

1 MESOTHELIOMAS - ASBESTOS EXPOSURE AND LUNG BURDEN G. Berry Department of Public Health, University of Sydney, Australia A.J. Rogers National Occupational Health and Safety Commission, University of Sydney, Australia F.D. Pooley Department of Mining, Geological and Minerals Engineering, University College, Cardiff, Wales, UK Summary. The assessment of asbestos fibres in the lungs at post mortem in groups of mesotheliomas, groups occupationally exposed to asbestos, and controls has shown that all these groups contain significant levels of asbestos as a lung burden. The amounts in each group are dependent on the degree of past exposure, being highest in those cases with a known or extrapolated occupational exposure, less in those cases with recorded neighbourhood or environmental exposure, and less again in those cases with no evidence of exposure to asbestos and in controls. Relative risk estimates and the use of models developed for occupational situations do not provide good estimates of the relevance of environmental fibres in producing mesotheliomas in the general population. This may be the result of differences between the groups in their time periods of exposure and long-term elimination of asbestos from the lungs. The number of mesotheliomas that might be due to low-level environmental exposure to asbestos cannot be determined from lung contents alone, but an assessment based on detailed occupational histories from the Australian Mesothelioma Surveillance Program show that the problem is not one of great importance when compared with other public health issues. Introduction Since the work of Wagner et al. (1960), the link between asbestos exposure and mesothelioma has become well established. Most of the evidence has come from studies of groups with known occupational exposure to asbestos, although it has also been shown that para-occupational exposure, such as household contact with exposed workers, or residence near to an asbestos source can result in mesothelioma (Newhouse & Thompson, 1965; Anderson et al., 1976). Studies on asbestos-exposed groups have indicated that the risk of mesothelioma induction is dependent on the type of asbestos as well as the severity and duration of exposure. National or regional studies indicate that mesotheliomas also occur in those for whom no evidence of either occupational or environmental exposure was obtained from a detailed history. Greenberg and Davies (1974) gave data on 234 mysotheliomas occurring in England, Wales or Scotland in , for whom it had been possible -486-

2 Mesotheliomas - asbestos exposure and lung burden 487 to obtain a history of possible as bestos exposure. Of these, 183 (78%) had definite or possible occupational exposure, 13 (6%) had neighbourhood, domestic or hobby exposure, whilst for 38 (16%) careful enquiry failed to elicit any exposure. Ferguson et al. (1987) reported on 690 mesotheliomas occurring in Australia in for whom an adequate history was available. Definite, probable or possible occupational exposure was found for 456 (66%), neighbourhood, domestic or hobby exposure for 43 (6%), but there remained 191 (28%) with no history of exposure. The annual mesothelioma rate in adults with no history of asbestos exposure is about 1.5 per million (McDonald & McDonald, 1977; Peto, 1984). The etiology of these cases is unknown although some local isolated clusters have similar exposures to environmental agents (Peterson et al., 1984). Low-level environmental exposure to asbestos and asbestiform minerals has been postulated as a factor in these cases (Omenn et al., 1986). One problem in assessing the effect of general environmental asbestos exposure is that of obtaining a measure of the amount of such exposure and relating this to the exposure experienced by those occupationally exposed. Since exposure to asbestos leads to the inhalation and retention of fibres in the lungs, the amount of asbestos in the lungs is, to some extent, a measure of exposure during life. The study of women employed in the assembly of gas-masks (Jones et al., 1980b) showed that there was considerable crocidolite in the lungs (median 86 million fibres per g) years after a short period of exposure. In this paper, an attempt is made to estimate differences in exposure by comparing the lung contents of those with mesothelioma and controls in Australia with similar data from previous series. Attention is restricted to the two commercial amphibole fibres, amosite and crocidolite, because of their known strong association with the induction of mesothelioma. Materials and methods The sources of lung tissue obtained post mortem have been described previously and are only briefly summarized here. Australian series This consists of 189 cases of mesothelioma obtained during by the Australian Mesothelioma Surveillance Program (Ferguson et al., 1987). Based on the examination of a detailed occupational history, these cases were divided into 3 groups: those with occupational exposure to asbestos, those with identified environmental exposure to asbestos, and those with no identified exposure to asbestos. A control series of 50 cases was also included, consisting of male urban dwellers aged from a series of consecutive necropsies (Rogers, 1984). United Kingdom series (1976) A series of 86 mesothelioma cases was obtained from pathologists (Jones et al., 1980a). The pathologists also supplied 56 age-matched controls who had died either of bronchial carcinoma or cerebrovascular disease.

3 488 Berry et ai. United Kingdom series (1977) This series contained three groups (Wagner et al., 1982), the first being a group of 145 cases from the Pneumoconiosis Medical Panels (PMP) in which exposure to asbestos had been considered a factor in the cause of death. About 30% ofthis group had a mesothelioma and another 30% lung cancer. The second group consisted of 25 mesotheliomas. Some of these cases were known to have had occupational exposure to asbestos. The third group was made up of94 controls from consecutive necropsies in adults from 6 hospitals, chosen to represent areas of severe, moderate and low industrial pollution. North American series This series consisted of 99 mesotheliomas collected from pathologists in the USA and Canada in 1976, and from 100 controls matched for age and sex (McDonald et ai., 1982). Tissue analysis Preparation of the specimens for electron microscopy was described in the earlier reports (Jones et al., 1980a; McDonaldet ai., 1982; Rogers, 1984; Wagner et al., 1982). Mineral fibre analysis was carried out on the United Kingdom and North American series in Cardiff using transmission electron microscopy and an energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA) system (Pooley & Clark, 1979, 1980). Fibres of all sizes that were resolved by the electron microscope were included in the counts, provided that they had an aspect ratio greater than 3 to 1. The Australian series was analysed in Sydney using a transmission electron microscope fitted with the EDXA system. Because of problems of minor contamination from short fibres on the collection filter, only fibres longer than 2,urn were reported (Rogers, 1984). Presentation of results Fibre counts are expressed in units of millions per gram of dry tissue. Results are presented for amosite, crocidolite, and amosite plus crocidolite combined. The distribution of counts is given as relative frequencies (%) in the categories less than 1, 1-9.9, , and 100 million fibres or more per gram. The median fibre counts and interquartile range (25 and 75 percentiles) are also given. In some cases, the lower quartile (and the median) could not be estimated directly since" for more than 25% (or 50%) of the samples, no fibres of the type being considered were identified. In these cases, the quartile (and median) were estimated from a cumulative probability plot on log-probability paper. Such plots showed that the distributions of counts were approximately lognormal. Results The distributions, medians and interquartile ranges are given in Tables 1,2 and 3 for amosite, crocidolite, and amosite and crocidolite combined, respectively. For the Australian series, the occupationally exposed mesotheliomas contained the highest levels of crocidolite and amosite. The environmentally exposed mesotheliomas

4 Mesotheliomas - asbestos exposure and lung burden 489 contained slightly more crocidolite than those with no known exposure to asbestos. The mesotheliomas not exposed to asbestos contained a similar quantity of amosite and crocidolite to that of the controls. The median content of amosite and crocidolite combined was 5 times higher for mesotheliomas with occupational exposure than for controls, and there was considerable overlap between the distributions. Table O.lOa a 0.03a 0.09a Distribution <O.Olb-1.7 Interquartile concentration 96.0 Relative < Omb-O.27 O.05b b-O b-O b-O.26 >100 b-o.35 b-0.20 frequency (million of amosite (%) No. Median 50 fibres atof a in lungs range Panel Mesotheliomas: Occupationally cases amosite Medical for nevertheless differences bestimated The than Panel United North from crocidolite. between acases lognormal exposed considerable Kingdom American had thealso plot; groups more series in the overlap more amosite amounts were for differed than both between larger 25% and mesotheliomas ofrom than amosite samples crocidolite indistributions. no other andamosite Australian crocidolite than series controls. fibres the byseries were controls. were containing detected. but lessthere than The more was <1Pneumoconiosis Medical re detected. Series Inand thegroup United Kingdom series, the mesotheliomas and the Pneumoconiosis

5 490 Berry et al. Discussion In an attempt to determine the proportion of mesotheliomas that may be a result of exposure to low levels of asbestos fibres present in the general environment, two approaches were tried. Relative risk based on amphibole lung burden The Australian, United Kingdom 1976 and North American series are essentially case-control studies of mesotheliomas. In a similar study of mesothelioma in Norway, Mowe et al. (1985) calculated an odds ratio (relative risk) of 8.5 (95% confidence interval (CI), ) for a lung content of more than 1 million fibres per gram of dry tissue compared with lower lung contents. A similar approach here, using amosite and crocidolite combined, gave a relative risk of 8.0 (95% CI, ) for Australia, 7.4 (95% CI, ) for the United Kingdom in 1976 and 3.8 (95% CI, ) for North America. The usefulness of such an approach depends on the extent to which the amount of asbestos fibre in the lungs at post mortem is a valid measure of the risk of mesothelioma as a result of exposure to as best os. If it is assumed that the amount of fibre deposited at any time is proportional to the concentration offibre in the air, and long-term elimination is ignored, then the amount of asbestos in the lungs is proportional to the cumulative exposure. One of the disadvantages of this measure is that it does not take into account the time at which the exposure took place, and it is well established that mesothelioma incidence increases with time since exposure. Occupational exposure to asbestos has often come to an end several years, or even decades, before a mesothelioma occurs. The greater part of the cumulative exposure will have taken place by the end of the occupational exposure. In contrast, background environmental exposure continues throughout life. Thus the ratio of asbestos in the lungs after occupational exposure to that after environmental exposure will be less than the ratio of the mesothelioma incidences. If there is also long-term elimination of dust from the lungs, then the discrepancy between asbestos lung burden and mesothelioma incidence noted above will be greater, since the lung burden of those who have ceased to be occupationally exposed will decline, whilst the mesothelioma incidence increases. Elimination has been demonstrated in animal experiments to take place at a rate of about 20% per year (Wagner et al., 1974). Another difference between occupational and environmental exposures is that the fibres are shorter and generally finer in environmental situations. Studies on the relative rates of clearance from the lung of fibres of various sizes indicates that short fibres are more rapidly removed and that a higher proportion of long fibres remain even after extended periods (Morgan et al., 1978). Risk based on degree of exposure and lung clearance Peto (1984) gave a mathematical formula relating mesothelioma incidence, level of exposure and time since exposure. This formula may be applied to the gas-mask workers studied by Jones et al. (1980b), who had a mesothelioma incidence 1500 times

6 0.02b lb Interquartile concentration <0.01 Relative a-o Ia-o a-o a-1.0 >100 a-o.47 a-o.07 a-o.40 Mesotheliomas frequency (million 140 (%) No. Median fibres atof a- Panel cases Pneumoconiosis Mesotheliomas: OccupationallyMedical exposed <1 Series and group asbestos range exposure and lung burden 491 aestimated from lognormal plot; in more than 25% of samples no crocidolite fibres were detected. bestimated from lognormal plot; in more than 50% of samples no crocidolite fibres were detected. that in the unexposed, to give an estimated asbestos level in the factory about times that in the general environment, if it is assumed that all mesotheliomas are the result of exposure to asbestos (see Appendix). However, the gas-mask workers had at the most 150 times more amphibole fibre in their lungs than controls. This could occur if the elimination rate was about % a year (see Appendix). The gas-mask workers are atypical of the occupationally exposed in both their high mesothelioma incidence and short duration of exposure. As a more typical situation consider occupational exposure leading to a 250-fold relative risk of mesothelioma (this corresponds to about 2% of deaths being due to mesothelioma) and suppose exposure from age 25 to age 35 gives this excess at age 60. Then the

7 b < / Interquartile Relative 16.6 concentration >100 frequency (million 140 (%) No. Median fibres atof a range Berry et a/. Panel cases Mesotheliomas: Pneumoconiosis Occupationally exposed <1 Medical Series and group on of amosite and crocidolite in lungs 0Estimated from lognormal plot; in more than 25% of samples no amosite or crocidolite fibres were detected. bestimated from lognormal plot; in more than 50% of samples no amosite or crocidolite fibres were detected. occupational exposure level would be 2500 times that in the environment. With an elimination rate of 15% per year, the occupational cases would contain about 50 times more asbestos in their lungs than the unexposed population whilst, if the elimination rate was 17.5% per year, the ratio would only be 25. These ratios are greater than that found for the Australian cases (Table 3), where the occupationally exposed had median lung contents only 5 times that of controls. This could be either because the category of occupational exposure corresponded to an average relative risk ofless than 250, or because the elimination rate was higher. In the former case, a greater proportion of the population would have had to be exposed

8 Mesotheliomas - asbestos exposure and lung burden 493 in order for about two-thirds of the mesotheliomas to occur in the occupationally exposed (for a relative risk of 250, 1 person in 125 would have to be occupationally exposed). In the Australian study, the term occupational exposure did not necessarily imply that asbestos processing or handling was a main activity nor that exposure was necessarily high. For the Pneumoconiosis Medical Panel cases in the United Kingdom in 1977, the median content was 60 times that of controls. To be accepted by the Pneumoconiosis Medical Panel, there would have had to be evidence of considerable exposure. The above calculations are based on the assumption that all mesotheliomas are due to asbestos exposure. If only a proportion of mesotheliomas are due to asbestos, then a higher level of occupational exposure and a higher elimination rate would be necessary to fit the data. This analysis does not provide an answer to the question of what proportion of mesotheliomas without occupational or para-occupational exposure to asbestos may be due to background environmental exposure to asbestos. What it does suggest is that there may not be any major discrepancy between the different relative amounts of asbestos in the lungs and the relative risks of mesothelioma. Such differences, as well as the overlap ofthe distributions ofthe occupationally exposed and controls, may be explained by different time patterns of exposure and long-term elimination of fibres from the lungs. The assessment of lung fibre burden at post mortem is important in detecting or confirming heavy exposure, and in identifying the types of asbestos to which there has been exposure. Examination of controls periodically could be useful in monitoring environmental pollution due to asbestos. However, such determinations alone cannot indicate the number of mesotheliomas due to low levels of asbestos in the environment. Extrapolation of the risk data for air-borne exposures, even at relatively high environmental levels, as in asbestos-containing buildings, only accounts for a relatively small proportion of non-occupational mesotheliomas (Doll & Peto, 1985). An upper limit to the number of mesotheliomas due to background environmental exposure is provided by ascertainment of most cases and detailed occupational histories. By such means (Ferguson et al., 1987), it has been found that about 45 mesotheliomas occur each year in Australia without known asbestos exposure. The importance of this in public health terms is not high when compared with 2900 deaths annually due to motor vehicle accidents, and with 5700 bronchogenic cancers, many attributable to cigarette smoking. The differences between these figures indicate the relative priorities to be assigned to preventive measures aimed at reducing road accidents and smoking, as compared with the removal of asbestos from buildings. Acknowledgements The Australian data come from the Australian Mesothelioma Surveillance Program, and we are grateful to Professor D. Ferguson for permission to use these data.

9 494 Berry et al. References Anderson, H.A, Lilis, R., Daum, S.M., Fischbein, A.S. & Selikoff, I.J. (1976) Householdcontact asbestos neoplastic risk. Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci., 271, Doll, R. & Peto, J. (1985) Effects on Health of Exposure to Asbestos, London, Her Majesty's Stationery Office Ferguson, D., Berry, G., Jelihovsky, T., Andreas, S., Rogers, A., Fung, S.e., Grimwood, A. & Thompson, R. (1987) The Australian Mesothelioma Surveillance Program, Med. J. Aust., 147, Greenberg, M. & Davies, T.AL. (1974) Mesothelioma Register Br. J. Ind. Med., , Jones, J.S.P., Pooley, F.D., Clark, N.J., Owen, W.G., Roberts, G.H., Smith, P.G., Wagner, J.C., Berry, G. & Pollock, D.J. (l980a) The pathology and mineral content oflungs in cases of mesothelioma in the United Kingdom in In: Wagner, J.C., ed., Biological Effects of Mineral Fibres (farc Scientific Publications No. 30), Lyon, International Agency for Research on Cancer, pp Jones, J.S.P., Smith, P.G., Pooley, F.D., Berry, G., Sawle, G.W., Wignall, B.K., Madeley, R.J. & Aggarwal, A (l980b) The consequences of exposure to asbestos dust in a wartime gas-mask factory. In: Wagner, J.e., ed., Biological Effects of Mineral Fibres (farc Scientific Publications No. 30), Lyon, International Agency for Research on Cancer, pp. McDonald, J.C. & McDonald, A.D. (1977) Epidemiology of mesothelioma from estimated incidence. Prevo Med., 6, McDonald, AD., McDonald, J.e. & Pooley, F.D. (1982) Mineral fibre content of lung in mesothelial tumours in North America. Ann. Occup. Hyg., 26, Morgan, A, Talbot, R.J. & Holmes, A. (1978) Signficance of fibre length in the clearance of asbestos fibres from the lung. Br. J. Ind. Med., 35, Mowe, G., Gylseth, B., Harviet, F. & Skaug, V. (1985) Fiber concentration in lung tissue of patients with malignant mesothelioma - a case-control study. Cancer, 56, Newhouse, M.L. & Thompson, H. (1965) Mesothelioma of the pleura and peritoneum following exposure to asbestos in the London area. Br. J. Ind. Med., 22, Omenn, G.S., Merchant, J., Boatman, E., Dement, J.M., Kuschner, M., Nicholson, W., Peto, J. & Rosenstock, L. (1986) Contribution of environmental fibers to respiratory cancer. Environ. Health Perspect., 70,51-56 Peterson, J.T., Greenberg, S.D. & Buffler, P.A (1984) Non-asbestos related malignant mesothelioma - a review. Cancer, 54, Peto, J. (1984) Dose and time relationship for lung cancer and mesothelioma in relation to smoking and asbestos exposure. In: Fischer, ryf. & Meyer, E., eds, Zur Beurteilung der Krebsgefahr durch Asbest, Mtinchen, MMV Medizin Verlag, BGA Schriften, 2/84, pp. Pooley, F.D. & Clark, N.J. (1979) Quantitative assessment of inorganic fibrous particulates in dust samples with an analytical transmission electron microscope. Ann Occup. Hyg., 22, Pooley, F.D. & Clar k, N.J. (1980) The chemical and physical characteristics of fibrous particles detected in human post-mortem lung tissue. In: Wagner, J.C., ed., Biological Effects of Mineral Fibres (farc Scientific Publications No. 30), Lyon, International Agency for Research on Cancer, pp Rogers, AJ. (1984) Determination of mineral fibre in human lung tissue by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Ann. Occup. Hyg., 28, 1-12 Wagner, J.C., Berry, G., Skidmore, J.W. & Timbrell, V. (1974) The effects of the inhalation of asbestos in rats. Br. J. Cancer, 29,

10 Mesotheliomas - asbestos exposure and lung burden 495 Wagner, J.e., Pooley, F.D., Berry, G., Seal, R.M.E., Munday, D.E., Morgan, J. & Clark, N.J. (1982) A pathological and mineralogical study of asbestos-related deaths in the United Kingdom in Ann. Occup. Hyg., 26, Wagner, J.C., Sleggs, e.a. & Marchand, P. (1960) Diffuse pleural mesothelioma and asbestos exposure in the North Western Cape Province. Br. J. Ind. Med., 17, Appendix Following the formulation given by Peto (1984), the mesothelioma incidence t years after the beginning of continuous exposure to a level d is dt3 5 If the environmental level is denoted by d, then the mesothelioma incidence at age t, me, is given by: Now consider occupational exposure to level do from ages t1 to t2 Assuming that do> >de so that environmental exposure can be ignored, then the mesothelioma risk, mo, at age t(>t2) is: The corresponding amounts of fibre in the lungs, A E and Ao, in the absence of long-term elimination, are: (1) (2) and (3) where k is a constant representing the retention rate. If elimination takes place exponentially at a rate of A per year, then the amounts would become: (4) and AE'=kdl-1(1-e-At) (5) Applying the above to the gas-mask workers (Jones et al., 1980b), the mesothelioma incidence 30 years after a mean exposure of 1 year was 2200 per million per year, about 1500 times the incidence in the unexposed, that is: molme=1500 If the mesotheliomas in the unexposed represent 55 years of environmental exposure, then using equations (1) and (2) we find: (6) dol de = Fibre burdens are available for 14 cases with mean duration of employment 22.5 months. The median lung burden was 120 million amphibole fibres per g, compared

11 496 Berry et al. with about 0.4 for United Kingdom controls. The ratio of lung contents is 300, but scaling down the lung contents of the mesotheliomas to a mean duration of exposure of 1 year gives approximately: A~/A ~ = 150 Then from equations (5) and (6), A = Although these calculations are based on assumptions that are probably oversimplistic, and lung burdens in the gas-mask workers were not available from a representative sample of the group but mainly from those who had died of mesothelioma, they give some indication of the situation. The relative mesothelioma incidence was 10 times the relative amounts of asbestos in the lungs, and this could have occurred as a result of long-term elimination of fibre from the lungs at a rate of 15% per year. If the lung burden in the group as a whole was less than that of the mesotheliomas, then a higher elimination rate would be estimated, e.g., A ~/ A ~ = 75 gives A = An elimination rate of 15% per year means that only 22% offibre in the lungs at the cessation of exposure remains 10 years later; for an elimination rate of 17.5%, only 17% would remain.

Epidemiology of Malignant Mesothelioma An Outline

Epidemiology of Malignant Mesothelioma An Outline Commentary Ann. Occup. Hyg., Vol. 54, No. 8, pp. 851 857, 2010 Ó The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society doi:10.1093/annhyg/meq076 Epidemiology

More information

ASBESTOS FIBRES IN THE LUNGS OF CHRYSOTILE MINERS AND MILLERS A PRELIMINARY REPORT

ASBESTOS FIBRES IN THE LUNGS OF CHRYSOTILE MINERS AND MILLERS A PRELIMINARY REPORT Ann. occup. llyy.. Vol.. Mos. I 4. pp. 4-4. 98. Primed in Great Bnlain. Inhaled Panicles V 0003 4878/8,004-OSO3.00/O Pergamon Press Lid. (' 98 British Occupational Hygiene Society. ASBESTOS FIBRES IN THE

More information

Table 2.4. Summary of design and findings from mesothelioma case-control studies

Table 2.4. Summary of design and findings from mesothelioma case-control studies categories Agudo et al. (2000) Barcelona and Cadiz, Spain 32 cases (77% males) of histologically con rmed malignant pleural mesothelioma identified from hospital in the region between //993 and 2/3/996.

More information

PATTERNS OF MORTALITY IN ASBESTOS FACTORY WORKERS IN LONDON*

PATTERNS OF MORTALITY IN ASBESTOS FACTORY WORKERS IN LONDON* PATTERNS OF MORTALITY IN ASBESTOS FACTORY WORKERS IN LONDON* M. L. Newhouse TUC Centenary Institute of Occupational Health London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine London WCIE 7HT. England G. Berry

More information

Scientific Update on Safe Use of Asbestos. Robert P. Nolan, PhD International Environmental Research Foundation New York, New York www.ierfinc.

Scientific Update on Safe Use of Asbestos. Robert P. Nolan, PhD International Environmental Research Foundation New York, New York www.ierfinc. Scientific Update on Safe Use of Asbestos Robert P. Nolan, PhD International Environmental Research Foundation New York, New York www.ierfinc.org When We Talk about Asbestos What Do We Mean? Anthophyllite

More information

Influence of Fiber Type, Size, and Number in Human Disease: Conclusions from Fiber Burden Analysis

Influence of Fiber Type, Size, and Number in Human Disease: Conclusions from Fiber Burden Analysis Influence of Fiber Type, Size, and Number in Human Disease: Conclusions from Fiber Burden Analysis Andrew Churg, MD Department of Pathology University of British Columbia Vancouver, BC, Canada Techniques,

More information

Relationship Between Lung Asbestos Fiber Type and Concentration and Relative Risk of Mesothelioma

Relationship Between Lung Asbestos Fiber Type and Concentration and Relative Risk of Mesothelioma Reprinted from CANCER, Vol. 67, No.7, April I, 1991. Copyright 1991, by the American Cancer Society, Inc. J. B. Lippincott Company. Printed in U.SA Relationship Between Lung Asbestos Fiber Type and Concentration

More information

Mesothelioma among brake mechanics: an expanded analysis of a casecontrol

Mesothelioma among brake mechanics: an expanded analysis of a casecontrol 1 Risk Anal. 2004 Jun;24(3):547-52. Related Articles, Links Mesothelioma among brake mechanics: an expanded analysis of a casecontrol study. Hessel PA, Teta MJ, Goodman M, Lau E. Exponent, Wood Dale, IL

More information

EFFECT OF CHILDREN'S AGE AND LIFE EXPECTATION ON MESOTHELIOMA RISK 1

EFFECT OF CHILDREN'S AGE AND LIFE EXPECTATION ON MESOTHELIOMA RISK 1 EFFECT OF CHILDREN'S AGE AND LIFE EXPECTATION ON MESOTHELIOMA RISK 1 Robin Howie 2, Robin Howie Associates, Edinburgh It is generally accepted that the major risk from "low" level exposures to asbestos

More information

Mesothelioma mortality in Great Britain 1968-2009. Summary 2. Overall scale of disease including trends 3. Region 6. Occupation 7

Mesothelioma mortality in Great Britain 1968-2009. Summary 2. Overall scale of disease including trends 3. Region 6. Occupation 7 Health and Safety Executive Mesothelioma Mesothelioma mortality in Great Britain 1968-2009 Contents Summary 2 Overall scale of disease including trends 3 Region 6 Occupation 7 Estimation of the future

More information

Current Usage and Health Significance of the Modern Use of Chrysotile Products: Review of Recently Published Evidence

Current Usage and Health Significance of the Modern Use of Chrysotile Products: Review of Recently Published Evidence Current Usage and Health Significance of the Modern Use of Chrysotile Products: Review of Recently Published Evidence John Hoskins Health & Safety Consultant, Haslemere, Surrey, UK ASBESTOS SERPENTINE

More information

Lung cancer and asbestos

Lung cancer and asbestos Lung cancer and asbestos Bureau Veritas Training Bill Sanderson For the benefit of business and people To begin with.. There are known knowns, that is there are things we know that we know. There are known

More information

In the course of this work we observed:

In the course of this work we observed: $6%(67265(/$7('',6($6(6 7+(,1685$1&(&267 SUHSDUHGE\ 7LP$QGUHZVDQG*HRII$WNLQV,QWURGXFWLRQ The ideas for this paper evolved out of studies we were asked to undertake by a number of insurers involving estimation

More information

Actuarial projections for mesothelioma: an epidemiological perspective Mark Clements, Geoffrey Berry and Jill Shi

Actuarial projections for mesothelioma: an epidemiological perspective Mark Clements, Geoffrey Berry and Jill Shi Actuarial projections for mesothelioma: an epidemiological perspective Mark Clements, Geoffrey Berry and Jill Shi 27 slides to go Who are we? I am an epidemiologist/biostatistician from the Australian

More information

Compensation for Environmental and Domestic Exposure Cases

Compensation for Environmental and Domestic Exposure Cases Table of Contents PL-5-01 Bob Ruers Compensation for Environmental and Domestic Exposure Cases Bob Ruers Former Dutch Senator, founding member of Dutch Asbestos Committee and Solicitor, the Netherlands

More information

strength. Thus, the development and validation of in vitro screening tests and animal bioassays for these fibers

strength. Thus, the development and validation of in vitro screening tests and animal bioassays for these fibers Environmental Health Perspectives Vol. 7, pp. 51-56, 1986 Contribution of Environmental Fibers to Respiratory Cancer by Gilbert S. Omenn,* James Merchant,t Edwin Boatman,* John M. Dement, Marvin Kuschner,"

More information

Uses and Abuses of Pathology in Asbestos-exposed Populations

Uses and Abuses of Pathology in Asbestos-exposed Populations Uses and Abuses of Pathology in Asbestos-exposed Populations Jerrold L. Abraham, MD Department of Pathology State University of New York Upstate Medical University Syracuse, NY, 13210 USA The term: Asbestosis,

More information

Update of the scientific evidence on asbestos and cancer. Kurt Straif, MD MPH PhD. The IARC Monographs

Update of the scientific evidence on asbestos and cancer. Kurt Straif, MD MPH PhD. The IARC Monographs Update of the scientific evidence on asbestos and cancer Kurt Straif, MD MPH PhD International Agency for Research on Cancer Lyon, France World Health Organisation Asturias, 17 March 2011 The IARC Monographs

More information

MODELS FOR MESOTHELIOMA INCIDENCE FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO FIBERS IN TERMS OF TIMING AND DURATION OF EXPOSURE AND THE BIOPERSISTENCE OF THE FIBERS

MODELS FOR MESOTHELIOMA INCIDENCE FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO FIBERS IN TERMS OF TIMING AND DURATION OF EXPOSURE AND THE BIOPERSISTENCE OF THE FIBERS MODELS FOR MESOTHELIOMA INCIDENCE FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO FIBERS IN TERMS OF TIMING AND DURATION OF EXPOSURE AND THE BIOPERSISTENCE OF THE FIBERS G. Berry Department of Public Health and Community Medicine,

More information

Asbestos and Mesothelioma in Thailand

Asbestos and Mesothelioma in Thailand MD, DScMed, FRCP, FRACP, hon. FACP Emeritus Professor and Fellow of the Academy of Science, the Royal Institute of Thailand Abstract Chrysotile, a serpentile asbestos, has been used in a number of Thai

More information

Malignant Mesothelioma in Australia, 1945 2000

Malignant Mesothelioma in Australia, 1945 2000 Ann. occup. Hyg., Vol. 46, Supplement 1, pp. 160 165, 2002 2002 British Occupational Hygiene Society Published by Oxford University Press DOI: 10.1093/annhyg/mef669 Malignant Mesothelioma in Australia,

More information

Asbestos Health Risks. Dr Andrew Pengilley Acting Chief Health Officer

Asbestos Health Risks. Dr Andrew Pengilley Acting Chief Health Officer Asbestos Health Risks Dr Andrew Pengilley Acting Chief Health Officer Asbestos Asbestos is a name given to several different fibrous minerals Three main commercial types are Chrysotile (white asbestos)

More information

NHS Barking and Dagenham Briefing on disease linked to Asbestos in Barking & Dagenham

NHS Barking and Dagenham Briefing on disease linked to Asbestos in Barking & Dagenham APPENDIX 1 NHS Barking and Dagenham Briefing on disease linked to Asbestos in Barking & Dagenham 1. Background 1.1. Asbestos Asbestos is a general name given to several naturally occurring fibrous minerals

More information

Emerging evidence that the ban on asbestos use is reducing the occurrence of pleural mesothelioma in Sweden

Emerging evidence that the ban on asbestos use is reducing the occurrence of pleural mesothelioma in Sweden 596500SJP0010.1177/1403494815596500B. Järvholm and A. BurdorfAsbestos ban reduces mesothelioma incidence research-article2015 Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 1 7 Original Article Emerging evidence

More information

Producing Analytical Data, Microscopy and Analytical Procedures

Producing Analytical Data, Microscopy and Analytical Procedures 1 The Role of Fiber Analysis in Asbestos Induced Lung Disease: TEM vs. SEM. Is There Controversy Elizabeth N. Pavlisko, M.D., Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center I. Introduction to

More information

THE TIMES OF OCCURRENCE OF MESOTHELIOMAS IN RATS FOLLOWING INOCULATION WITH ASBESTOS

THE TIMES OF OCCURRENCE OF MESOTHELIOMAS IN RATS FOLLOWING INOCULATION WITH ASBESTOS 582 THE APPLICATION OF A MATHEMATICAL MODEL DESCRIBING THE TIMES OF OCCURRENCE OF MESOTHELIOMAS IN RATS FOLLOWING INOCULATION WITH ASBESTOS G. BERRY AND J. C. WAGNER From the Medical Research Council's

More information

Asbestos and Mesothelioma a briefing document for the Metropolitan Police

Asbestos and Mesothelioma a briefing document for the Metropolitan Police Asbestos and Mesothelioma a briefing document for the Metropolitan Police Prepared by Professor John Cherrie, Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh, UK. Introduction The purpose of this document is to provide

More information

PROTOCOL TO ASSESS ASBESTOS-RELATED RISK

PROTOCOL TO ASSESS ASBESTOS-RELATED RISK Contract No. DTRS57-01-C-10044. DRAFT PROTOCOL TO ASSESS ASBESTOS-RELATED RISK Prepared for: Mark Raney Volpe Center U.S. Department of Transportation 55 Broadway Kendall Square Cambridge MA 02142 and

More information

D.M. Bernstein * WHO review Page 1 of 8

D.M. Bernstein * WHO review Page 1 of 8 A review of the WHO s document on the adverse health effects of exposure to asbestos and WHO's recommendations on the prevention of asbestos-related diseases D.M. Bernstein * The WHO s Programme on Occupational

More information

The expected burden of mesothelioma mortality in Great Britain from 2002 to 2050

The expected burden of mesothelioma mortality in Great Britain from 2002 to 2050 British Journal of Cancer (25) 92, 587 593 & 25 Cancer Research UK All rights reserved 7 92/5 $3. www.bjcancer.com The expected burden of mesothelioma mortality in Great Britain from 22 to 25 JT Hodgson*,1,

More information

Changing Trends in Mesothelioma Incidence. Hans Weill, M.D. Professor of Medicine Emeritus Tulane University Medical Center

Changing Trends in Mesothelioma Incidence. Hans Weill, M.D. Professor of Medicine Emeritus Tulane University Medical Center Changing Trends in Mesothelioma Incidence Hans Weill, M.D. Professor of Medicine Emeritus Tulane University Medical Center International Conference on Chrysotile Montreal, May 23, 2006 Global Mesothelioma

More information

Asbestos related cancers

Asbestos related cancers New cancer cases 1954-215 in Finland, Men Pukkala et al. 26 Asbestos related cancers Panu Oksa, MD, docent Course on asbestos-related diseases Tartu 4-5.12.26 Asbestos related cancer / FIOH / PO / 1.1.27

More information

June 20, 2002. 2002.06.20: Wagner Testimony on Workplace Exposure to Asbestos. This is an archive page. The links are no longer being updated.

June 20, 2002. 2002.06.20: Wagner Testimony on Workplace Exposure to Asbestos. This is an archive page. The links are no longer being updated. Page 1 of 6 skip navigational links This is an archive page. The links are no longer being updated. Statement by Gregory R. Wagner, M.D. Director, Division of Respiratory Disease Studies National Institute

More information

Asbestos: health effects and risk. Peter Franklin Senior Scientific Officer, EHD Senior Research Fellow, UWA

Asbestos: health effects and risk. Peter Franklin Senior Scientific Officer, EHD Senior Research Fellow, UWA Asbestos: health effects and risk Peter Franklin Senior Scientific Officer, EHD Senior Research Fellow, UWA What is asbestos Naturally occurring mineral that has crystallised to form long thin fibres and

More information

Frequently asked questions

Frequently asked questions Frequently asked questions Asbestos investigation An investigation into asbestos-related health concerns has found that there is no evidence of elevated asbestos-related health risk to residents who have

More information

ANNEX 2: Assessment of the 7 points agreed by WATCH as meriting attention (cover paper, paragraph 9, bullet points) by Andy Darnton, HSE

ANNEX 2: Assessment of the 7 points agreed by WATCH as meriting attention (cover paper, paragraph 9, bullet points) by Andy Darnton, HSE ANNEX 2: Assessment of the 7 points agreed by WATCH as meriting attention (cover paper, paragraph 9, bullet points) by Andy Darnton, HSE The 7 issues to be addressed outlined in paragraph 9 of the cover

More information

Mesothelioma Trends as Predictors of the Asbestos- Related Lung Cancer Burden

Mesothelioma Trends as Predictors of the Asbestos- Related Lung Cancer Burden Mesothelioma Trends as Predictors of the Asbestos- Related Lung Cancer Burden Valerie McCormack UICC World Cancer Congress Montreal August 2012 Outline Background Estimating the lung cancer mortality burden

More information

Asbestos related health risks

Asbestos related health risks Asbestos related health risks Pascal DUMORTIER *,** & Paul DE VUYST** *a-ulab ** Chest Department Hopital ERASME Asbestos related health risks Asbestos : some facts Asbestos related diseases Detection

More information

Call for an International Ban on Asbestos

Call for an International Ban on Asbestos Call for an International Ban on Asbestos To eliminate the burden of disease and death that is caused worldwide by exposure to asbestos, The Collegium Ramazzini calls for an immediate ban on all mining

More information

NISG Asbestos. Caroline Kirton

NISG Asbestos. Caroline Kirton NISG Asbestos Caroline Kirton 1 The Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012, Regulation 10 requires every employer to ensure that adequate information, instruction and training is given to their employees

More information

Asbestos, Asbestosis, and Lung Cancer

Asbestos, Asbestosis, and Lung Cancer Asbestos, Asbestosis, and Lung Cancer David Weill, M.D. Stanford University Medical Center Stanford, CA David Weill, M.D., is a professor of medicine in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine

More information

Asbestos Presence in a Factory that Produced Asbestos-Containing Products

Asbestos Presence in a Factory that Produced Asbestos-Containing Products Asbestos Presence in a Factory that Produced Asbestos-Containing Products Hana Fajkovi Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Horvatovac 95, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia, e-mail: (hanaf@geol.pmf.hr)

More information

Occupational respiratory diseases due to Asbestos. Dirk Dahmann, IGF, Bochum

Occupational respiratory diseases due to Asbestos. Dirk Dahmann, IGF, Bochum Occupational respiratory diseases due to Asbestos Dirk Dahmann, IGF, Bochum Contents Introduction Diseases Further Effects Preventive Strategies Conclusion Asbestos minerals Woitowitz, 2003 Imports (+

More information

Worldwide mesothelioma mortality trends

Worldwide mesothelioma mortality trends Worldwide mesothelioma mortality trends Harvard Symposium 24 th July 2009 Julian Peto London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and Institute of Cancer Research Asbestos-related diseases Asbestosis

More information

Mesothelioma Incidence and Community Asbestos Exposure

Mesothelioma Incidence and Community Asbestos Exposure ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH 75, 34 40 (1997) ARTICLE NO. ER973770 Mesothelioma Incidence and Community Asbestos Exposure Michael Berry Consumer and Environmental Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health

More information

The Carcinogenicity of Chrysotile Asbestos A Review

The Carcinogenicity of Chrysotile Asbestos A Review Industrial Health 2001, 39, 57 64 Review Article The Carcinogenicity of Chrysotile Asbestos A Review William J. NICHOLSON Mount Sinai School of Medicine, NY, NY, USA Received December 23, 2000 and accepted

More information

Malignant Mesothelioma Among Employees of a Connecticut Factory that Manufactured Friction Materials Using Chrysotile Asbestos

Malignant Mesothelioma Among Employees of a Connecticut Factory that Manufactured Friction Materials Using Chrysotile Asbestos Ann. Occup. Hyg., Vol. 54, No. 6, pp. 692 696, 2010 Ó The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society doi:10.1093/annhyg/meq046 Malignant Mesothelioma

More information

Asbestos Diseases. What Is Asbestos?

Asbestos Diseases. What Is Asbestos? 1 Asbestos Diseases What Is Asbestos? Asbestos is a term applied to a group of minerals formed into rock and mined in a similar way to coal. In this form, asbestos is made up of strong, fine and flexible

More information

Asbestos and the diseases it causes

Asbestos and the diseases it causes Asbestos and the diseases it causes October 2013 Liz Darlison Mesothelioma UK University Hospitals of Leicester Contents What is asbestos Why is it such an issue in the UK Disease Statistics Asbestos Related

More information

The Trend in Airborne Asbestos Concentrations at Plants Manufacturing Asbestos-Containing Products in Japan

The Trend in Airborne Asbestos Concentrations at Plants Manufacturing Asbestos-Containing Products in Japan Industrial Health 2001, 39, 127 131 Original Article The Trend in Airborne Asbestos Concentrations at Plants Manufacturing Asbestos-Containing Products in Japan Koji YOSHIZUMI 1 *, Hajime HORI 2, Toshihiko

More information

MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 2009 MORTALITY 1997 TO 2011

MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 2009 MORTALITY 1997 TO 2011 MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 29 MORTALITY 1997 TO 211 OCTOBER 213 Safe Work Australia Mesothelioma in Australia Incidence 1982 to 29 Mortality 1997 to 211 OCTOBER 213 Acknowledgement Disclaimer

More information

Asbestos Fibre Concentrations in the Lungs of Brake Workers: Another Look

Asbestos Fibre Concentrations in the Lungs of Brake Workers: Another Look Ann. Occup. Hyg., Vol. 52, No. 6, pp. 455 461, 2008 Ó The Author 2008. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society doi:10.1093/annhyg/men036 Asbestos Fibre

More information

HEALTH CARE FOR EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS. 2010 The SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research Memorial University www.safetynet.mun.

HEALTH CARE FOR EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS. 2010 The SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research Memorial University www.safetynet.mun. HEALTH CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS 2010 The SafetyNet Centre for Occupational Health and Safety Research Memorial University www.safetynet.mun.ca HEALTH CARE FOR PATIENTS WITH EXPOSURE

More information

EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ASBESTOS

EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ASBESTOS Wagner, Gilson, Berry & Timbrell EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ASBESTOS CANCERS J. C. WAGNER M.D. M.R.C.Path. J. C. GILSON F.R.C.P. G. BERRY M.A. V. TIMBRELL Ph.D. F.Inst.P. Medical Research Council's Pneumoconiosis

More information

Science-Based Facts Relevant Health Issues 2015. For environmental occupational health safe and responsible use

Science-Based Facts Relevant Health Issues 2015. For environmental occupational health safe and responsible use Science-Based Facts Relevant Health Issues 2015 For environmental occupational health safe and responsible use SCIENCE-BASED FACTS AND RELEVANT HEALTH ISSUES 2015 ON THE DIFFERENT ASBESTOS FIBER TYPES:

More information

Determination of Asbestos Exposure by Pathology and Clinical History

Determination of Asbestos Exposure by Pathology and Clinical History 16 Determination of Asbestos Exposure by Pathology and Clinical History Allen R. Gibbs The determination of whether an abnormal asbestos exposure took place is important in mesothelioma cases because of

More information

HANDLING LUNG CANCER CLAIMS

HANDLING LUNG CANCER CLAIMS HANDLING LUNG CANCER CLAIMS JENNIFER S. KILPATRICK SWANSON, MARTIN & BELL, LLP 330 North Wabash Avenue Suite 3300 Chicago, Illinois 60611-3604 (312) 321-3517 (312) 321-0990 jkilpatrick@smbtrials.com 1

More information

Lessons learned from the Western Australian experience with mesothelioma

Lessons learned from the Western Australian experience with mesothelioma Lessons learned from the Western Australian experience with mesothelioma Alison Reid, Western Australian Institute for Medical Research In partnership with Nick de Klerk, Nola Olsen, Jan Sleith, Geoffrey

More information

MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 2008 MORTALITY 1997 TO 2007

MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 2008 MORTALITY 1997 TO 2007 MESOTHELIOMA IN AUSTRALIA INCIDENCE 1982 TO 28 MORTALITY 1997 TO 27 August 212 Safe Work Australia Mesothelioma in Australia Incidence 1982 to 28 Deaths 1997 to 27 August 212 Acknowledgement Data on the

More information

Executive summary. Background

Executive summary. Background Executive summary Health Council of the Netherlands. Asbestos: Risks of environmental and occupational exposure. The Hague: Health Council of the Netherlands, 2010; publication no. 2010/10. Background

More information

The Australian Mesothelioma Surveillance Program 1979-1985

The Australian Mesothelioma Surveillance Program 1979-1985 166 August 17, 1987 Vol. 147 THE MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA The Australian Mesothelioma Surveillance Program 1979-1985 David A. Ferguson, Geoffrey Berry, Tatiana )elihovsky, Sally B. Andreas, Alan ).

More information

Mesothelioma in Australia: Incidence (1982 to 2013) and Mortality (1997 to 2012)

Mesothelioma in Australia: Incidence (1982 to 2013) and Mortality (1997 to 2012) Mesothelioma in Australia: Incidence (1982 to 213) and Mortality (1997 to 212) 215 Disclaimer The information provided in this document can only assist you in the most general way. This document does not

More information

Asbestos - Frequently Asked Questions

Asbestos - Frequently Asked Questions Asbestos - Frequently Asked Questions 1. What is asbestos? Asbestos is the name given to a group of fibrous minerals which occur naturally in the earth. These are grouped into two mineral types known as

More information

CARCINOGENICITY TESTING OF ASBESTOS FIBRES - A PRELIMINARY STUDY

CARCINOGENICITY TESTING OF ASBESTOS FIBRES - A PRELIMINARY STUDY CARCINOGENICITY TESTING OF ASBESTOS FIBRES - A PRELIMINARY STUDY Extensive data is available on lung cancer and pleural mesothelioma caused by asbestos in man and animals. The object of the present work

More information

Estimates of the impact of extending the scope of the Mesothelioma payment scheme. December 2013

Estimates of the impact of extending the scope of the Mesothelioma payment scheme. December 2013 Estimates of the impact of extending the scope of the Mesothelioma payment scheme December 2013 Contents Introduction... 6 Background... 7 Estimated volumes and costs if the scheme started on particular

More information

All About Asbestos. Read this booklet to learn more about:

All About Asbestos. Read this booklet to learn more about: All About Asbestos Read this booklet to learn more about: identifying asbestos-containing material in you home the health risks of asbestos what you can do about asbestos. What Is Asbestos? Asbestos is

More information

The British Occupational Hygiene Society Faculty of Occupational Hygiene INTERNATIONAL MODULE SYLLABUS W504 ASBESTOS AND OTHER FIBRES

The British Occupational Hygiene Society Faculty of Occupational Hygiene INTERNATIONAL MODULE SYLLABUS W504 ASBESTOS AND OTHER FIBRES The British Occupational Hygiene Society Faculty of Occupational Hygiene INTERNATIONAL MODULE SYLLABUS W504 ASBESTOS AND OTHER FIBRES Aim: Learning Outcomes: This module enhances the student s knowledge

More information

between occupations and asbestos-fibre content of the lungs in patients with pleural

between occupations and asbestos-fibre content of the lungs in patients with pleural Thorax, 1977, 32, 377-386 Relationship between occupations and asbestosfibre content of the lungs in patients with pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, and other diseases F. WHITWELL, JEAN SCOTT, AND MYRA

More information

Asbestos Lung Content Analysis and Human Mesothelioma. Bibliography

Asbestos Lung Content Analysis and Human Mesothelioma. Bibliography Gibbs GW (1970) Qualitative aspects of dust exposure in the Quebec asbestos mining and milling industry. Inhaled Part III 2:783-799. Sebastien P, Janson X, Gaudichet A, Hirsch A, Bignon J (1980) Asbestos

More information

Nonoccupational Exposure to Chrysotile Asbestos and the Risk of Lung Cancer

Nonoccupational Exposure to Chrysotile Asbestos and the Risk of Lung Cancer Coirespon... : 999-100 Page 1 of 10 http ://www.nejm.org/content/1998/0339/0014/0999.asp 10/19/1999 NE3M Home ISeareh I Log On to Full Text -._ Table of Contents I Previous Article I Next Article The New

More information

Review of Eliminating occupational cancer in Europe and globally by J. Takala

Review of Eliminating occupational cancer in Europe and globally by J. Takala Review of Eliminating occupational cancer in Europe and globally by J. Takala There primary concerns of this manuscript are outlined below. More detail discussion of these points is presented on the following

More information

BY THE NUMBERS: THE FUTURE OF MESOTHELIOMA IN AMERICA

BY THE NUMBERS: THE FUTURE OF MESOTHELIOMA IN AMERICA BY THE NUMBERS: THE FUTURE OF MESOTHELIOMA IN AMERICA 1 CUTTING-EDGE ISSUES IN ASBESTOS LITIGATION CONFERENCE Scott Masterson Lewis, Brisbois, Bisgaard & Smith, LLP 1180 Peachtree Street, NE, Suite 2900

More information

Course Specification. Level Foundation Intermediate Advanced Pre-requisites None

Course Specification. Level Foundation Intermediate Advanced Pre-requisites None Course Specification Course Title Asbestos and Other Fibres Code W504 Level Foundation Intermediate Advanced Pre-requisites None Course Material Course manual available from OH learning.com Coordinating

More information

Chrysotile and Lung Cancer Yano et al. Cancer Mortality among Workers Exposed to Amphibole-free Chrysotile Asbestos

Chrysotile and Lung Cancer Yano et al. Cancer Mortality among Workers Exposed to Amphibole-free Chrysotile Asbestos American Journal of Epidemiology Copyright 2001 by the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health All rights reserved Vol. 154, No. 6 Printed in U.S.A. Chrysotile and Lung Cancer Yano et

More information

Mesothelioma and Asbestos Exposure

Mesothelioma and Asbestos Exposure 17 Mesothelioma and Asbestos Exposure J. Corbett McDonald and Alison McDonald Historical Background It was the Conference on the Biological Effects of Asbestos at the New York Academy of Sciences, organized

More information

What has changed to justify the US Senate s bill to ban asbestos now?

What has changed to justify the US Senate s bill to ban asbestos now? Comments of Professor Richard Wilson Department of Physics & Center for Risk Analysis Harvard University Cambridge, Massachusetts On the Proposed Asbestos Ban Senate Employment and Workplace Safety Subcommittee

More information

What is Asbestos? Asbestos was also used in household items, such as: oven gloves ironing board pads simmer mats for stoves fire blankets.

What is Asbestos? Asbestos was also used in household items, such as: oven gloves ironing board pads simmer mats for stoves fire blankets. All About Asbestos Read this booklet to learn more about: identifying asbestos-containing material in your home the health risks of asbestos what you can do about asbestos. What is Asbestos? Asbestos is

More information

Mortality of workers in a French asbestos cement factory 1940-82

Mortality of workers in a French asbestos cement factory 1940-82 British Journal of Industrial Medicine 1985;42: 219-225 Mortality of workers in a French asbestos cement factory 1940-82 A M ALIES-PATIN AND A J VALLERON Unite de Recherches Biomathematiques et Biostatistiques,

More information

Future Trends of Mesothelioma Mortality in Japan Based on a Risk Function

Future Trends of Mesothelioma Mortality in Japan Based on a Risk Function Industrial Health 2012, 50, 197 204 Original Article Future Trends of Mesothelioma Mortality in Japan Based on a Risk Function Tomoya MYOJIN 1, Kenichi AZUMA 2 *, Jiro OKUMURA 2 and Iwao UCHIYAMA 3 1 Department

More information

- Compensation issues

- Compensation issues Charité- Universitätsmedizin Berlin Institut für Arbeitsmedizin Prof. Dr. med. X. Baur Prevention, recognition and compensation of asbestosinduced diseases (AD) - Which diseases are asbestos-related? -

More information

Quantification of Non-Fibrous and Fibrous Particulates in Human Lungs: Twenty Year Update on Pneumoconiosis Database

Quantification of Non-Fibrous and Fibrous Particulates in Human Lungs: Twenty Year Update on Pneumoconiosis Database Ann. occup. Hyg., Vol. 46, Supplement 1, pp. 397 401, 2002 2002 British Occupational Hygiene Society Published by Oxford University Press DOI: 10.1093/annhyg/mef694 Quantification of Non-Fibrous and Fibrous

More information

Health Effects of Asbestos Exposure

Health Effects of Asbestos Exposure Health Effects of Asbestos Exposure Jill Dyken, PhD, PE John Wheeler, PhD, DABT Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Asbestos Science Seminar Folsom, California August 18-19, 2004 Agency for

More information

Risk factors associated with asbestos-related diseases: results of the asbestos surveillance programme Aachen

Risk factors associated with asbestos-related diseases: results of the asbestos surveillance programme Aachen Risk factors associated with asbestos-related diseases: results of the asbestos surveillance programme Aachen KHATAB, Khaled, FELTEN, Michael K., KANDALA, Nagianga B., GHILAGABER, Gebrenegus, GUMBER, Anil

More information

Occupational Characteristics of Cases with Asbestosrelated Diseases in The Netherlands

Occupational Characteristics of Cases with Asbestosrelated Diseases in The Netherlands Ann. occup. Hyg., Vol. 47, No. 6, pp. 485 492, 2003 2003 British Occupational Hygiene Society Published by Oxford University Press DOI: 10.1093/annhyg/meg062 Occupational Characteristics of Cases with

More information

Asbestos Disease: An Overview for Clinicians Asbestos Exposure

Asbestos Disease: An Overview for Clinicians Asbestos Exposure Asbestos Asbestos Disease: An Overview for Clinicians Asbestos Exposure Asbestos: A health hazard Exposure to asbestos was a major occupational health hazard in the United States. The first large-scale

More information

MESOTHELIOMA MORTALITY IN GREAT BRITAIN: ESTIMATING THE FUTURE BURDEN

MESOTHELIOMA MORTALITY IN GREAT BRITAIN: ESTIMATING THE FUTURE BURDEN MESOTHELIOMA MORTALITY IN GREAT BRITAIN: ESTIMATING THE FUTURE BURDEN December 2003 Mesothelioma mortality in Great Britain: estimating the future burden Summary Mesothelioma deaths in Great Britain continue

More information

Francine Lortie-Monette, MD, MSc, CSPQ, MBA Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics University of Western Ontario 2003

Francine Lortie-Monette, MD, MSc, CSPQ, MBA Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics University of Western Ontario 2003 ASBESTOS Francine Lortie-Monette, MD, MSc, CSPQ, MBA Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics University of Western Ontario 2003 Asbestosis Asbestosis is a model for other dust diseases as well as

More information

B enign pleural disease (discrete plaques and pleural

B enign pleural disease (discrete plaques and pleural 665 ORIGINAL ARTICLE The additional risk of malignant mesothelioma in former workers and residents of Wittenoom with benign pleural disease or asbestosis A Reid, N de Klerk, G Ambrosini, N Olsen, S C Pang,

More information

ASBESTOS DISEASES. Dr Alastair Robertson

ASBESTOS DISEASES. Dr Alastair Robertson ASBESTOS DISEASES Dr Alastair Robertson Occupational Health Department University Hospital Birmingham Birmingham B29 6JF 01216278285 Alastair.robertson@uhb.nhs.uk Occupational Lung Disease Unit Birmingham

More information

Asbestos exposure during Canterbury rebuild unlikely to cause significant health problems for house occupants report finds

Asbestos exposure during Canterbury rebuild unlikely to cause significant health problems for house occupants report finds News release from the Royal Society of New Zealand and the Office of the Prime Minister s Chief Science Advisor 15 April 2015 Asbestos exposure during Canterbury rebuild unlikely to cause significant health

More information

Environmental Asbestos Exposure in Poland

Environmental Asbestos Exposure in Poland Reference Centre for Asbestos Exposure &Health Risk Assessment Material partly was presented on: European Asbestos Conference: Policy, Status & Human Rights European Parliament, Brussels, 22-23 September

More information

ASBESTOS-A NEW HAZARD

ASBESTOS-A NEW HAZARD 6 ASBESTOS-A NEW HAZARD By T. GADIAN, M.A., B.M., B.Ch.(Oxon), D.I.H.* SYNOPSIS In recent years there has been an increase in the incidence of a rare malignant tumour mesothelioma affecting the lining

More information

Toxicity of Amphibole Asbestos

Toxicity of Amphibole Asbestos Toxicity of Amphibole Asbestos Disclaimer: The material presented in these slides has been reviewed by the U.S. EPA and approved for presentation. Approval does not signify that the contents necessarily

More information

The risks of mesothelioma and lung cancer in relation to relatively lowlevel exposures to different forms of asbestos

The risks of mesothelioma and lung cancer in relation to relatively lowlevel exposures to different forms of asbestos WATCH/2008/7 Annex 1 The risks of mesothelioma and lung cancer in relation to relatively lowlevel exposures to different forms of asbestos What statements can reliably be made about risk at different exposure

More information

The quantitative risks of mesothelioma and lung cancer in relation to asbestos exposure a comparison of risk models based on asbestos exposed cohorts

The quantitative risks of mesothelioma and lung cancer in relation to asbestos exposure a comparison of risk models based on asbestos exposed cohorts WATCH/2007/8 Annex 3 The quantitative risks of mesothelioma and lung cancer in relation to asbestos exposure a comparison of risk models based on asbestos exposed cohorts Introduction and aims 1. In 2000,

More information

Malignant mesothelioma: incidence, asbestos

Malignant mesothelioma: incidence, asbestos British Journal of Industrial Medicine 1984;41: 39-45 Malignant mesothelioma: incidence, asbestos exposure, and reclassification of histopathology W E WRIGHT,' R P SHERWIN,2 ELIZABETH A DICKSON,' L BERNSTEIN,'

More information

General Description. (a) mining and milling. (b) manufacture of products. (c) construction activities

General Description. (a) mining and milling. (b) manufacture of products. (c) construction activities Chapter 6.2 Asbestos General Description The term asbestos designates a group of naturally occurring fibrous serpentine or amphibole minerals that have extraordinary tensile strength, conduct heat poorly

More information

ASBESTOS. Know what it is and how you can protect yourself. environmental affairs Department: Environmental Affairs REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

ASBESTOS. Know what it is and how you can protect yourself. environmental affairs Department: Environmental Affairs REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA ASBESTOS Know what it is and how you can protect yourself environmental affairs Department: Environmental Affairs REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA 1 What is asbestos? The term asbestos designates a group of naturally

More information

Health effects of occupational exposure to asbestos dust

Health effects of occupational exposure to asbestos dust Health effects of occupational exposure to asbestos dust Authors: N.Szeszenia-Dąbrowska, U.Wilczyńska The major health effects of workers' exposure to asbestos dust include asbestosis, lung cancer and

More information