May is Drug Court Month! Celebrating National Drug Court Month

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1 NEWSLETTER Executive Committee The Honorable Jack Espinosa, Jr. Chair, 13 th Judicial Circuit The Honorable Marcia Beach Vice Chair, 17th Judicial Circuit The Honorable Gisele Pollack Past Chair, 17 th Judicial Circuit Jennifer Grandal Treasurer, Statewide Jane Muir-Isherwood Secretary, 16 th Judicial Circuit Dena Geraghty At-Large, 20 th Judicial Circuit James R. McDonough At-Large, Statewide May is Drug Court Month! Celebrating National Drug Court Month Staff Eve Janocko, Executive Director Board Members Kenneth Arnold 4th Judicial Circuit Sheree Beau-Wells 20 th Judicial Circuit Anita Cocoves 19 th Judicial Circuit The Honorable Jeri B. Cohen 11 th Judicial Circuit James Downum 13 th Judicial Circuit Aaron Gerson Statewide Michael E. Hayes 16 th Judicial Circuit Gary Hilko 17 th Judicial Circuit Michael Jewell 7 th Judicial Circuit The Honorable Melanie G. May Past Chair, 4 th District Court of Appeal Georgina Rullo 6th Judicial Circuit Toby Olson 19 th Judicial Circuit Frank C. Rabbito 11 th Judicial Circuit The Honorable Jeffrey Rosinek Past Chair, 11 th Judicial Circuit Daniel J. Schafer 7 th Judicial Circuit Clara Smith 1 st Judicial Circuit Dorrie Tyng Fifteenth Judicial Circuit The Honorable Deborah White-Labora 11 th Judicial Circuit The Honorable Joseph Will 7 th Judicial Circuit The Volusia County Council poses with judges, drug court graduates, participants and others to celebrate May as National Drug Court Month. On May 3rd, more than 100 stakeholders came to the County Council meeting to thank Volusia County for supporting drug courts for the past fifteen years. Photo by Jeff Crumbley, Volusia County Government The National Motorcycle Relay for Recovery Follow the Motorcycle Relay for Recovery organized by the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP) and other drug court month activities around the nation! Annual Conference and Justice Institute! Please Save the Date and Mark Your Calendars for July in Orlando! The FADCP Training Committee is collaborating with Florida Partners in Crisis (FLPIC) to develop the program agenda for their 2012 Annual Conference and Justice Institute. The conference will be held July 12-13, 2012 at the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld in Orlando, Florida. See the following website for details May is National Drug Court Month

2 May is National Drug Court Month by Eve Janocko, FADCP Executive Director The National Association of Drug Court Professionals is recognizing National Drug Court Month in a new way this year by organizing a motorcycle rally across the country to showcase drug courts rather than a state competition of who highlights drug courts best. See for the latest posts on the event. The photo below is from the blog. With these changes, the Florida Association of Drug Court Professionals (FADCP) and the Office of the State Courts Administrator (OSCA) have decided to evaluate how Florida recognizes National Drug Court Month. The OSCA has decided to readdress the coordination of the statewide drug court graduation due to the limited participation from drug court programs over the past few years and the significant staff time required to manage the event. We will continue to address how to celebrate this important recognition of our drug courts in Florida. The FADCP and the OSCA encourage our drug court programs to recognize National Drug Court Month during May to showcase the positive impact drug courts have on our communities. We hope that you will continue to adopt local proclamations and resolutions through your court, county commissions and local governments to celebrate May as National Drug Court Month. Chief Justice Charles Canady signed a proclamation and appeared in a video proclaiming May as National Drug Court Month which is available at Last year, Florida adopted the statewide initiative where our drug court programs selected a community service project that best fit their focus. We wish to continue this initiative which impacted so many of our communities with a positive message and great outreach to support service through our Drug Courts Make A Difference Day. Please reach out to your community organizations to organize a service project during May to promote National Drug Court Month. Last year, our drug court programs collected food to stock local pantries, collected toiletries for homeless shelters, collected school supplies for after school programs and served meals at local shelters. We appreciate all your efforts to coordinate a community collaboration to support a local justice system partner who works alongside your drug court program. We encourage you to contact your local media to get coverage of your worthwhile service outreach projects. National Association of Drug Court Professionals 18 th Annual Training Conference Where Accountability Meets Compassion May 30 th June 2 nd Nashville, TN Page 2 of 24

3 Letter from the Chair Dear FADCP Members, Florida Association of Drug Court Professionals We have had a busy 2012 thus far in advancing FADCP initiatives. The legislative session began early this year, in January and concluded March 9th. The FADCP Legislative Committee chaired by Chief Judge Melanie May, Fourth District Court of Appeal, was very successful during session to get three very important bills to pass through the Legislature. I would like to extend my sincere appreciation and thanks to Judges Melanie May, Marcia Beach and Gisele Pollack for their tireless efforts in championing these bills the FADCP advocated. Governor Rick Scott has signed into law the Misdemeanor Drug Court and the Veterans Treatment Court bills. However, Governor Scott chose to veto the reentry drug court bill which passed the Legislature overwhelmingly with bipartisan support. Although this setback is very disappointing, the committee will convene in the summer to map out strategies for next session. We thank them for their steadfast dedication to legislative priorities of the FADCP. Under the direction of Judge Deborah White-Labora, the FADCP Training Committee is working with the Office of the State Courts Administrator (OSCA) and Florida Partners in Crisis to coordinate a conference which will be held July in Orlando. Through a collaborative partnership with Florida Partners in Crisis we are developing a training track during their annual conference which will focus on drug court issues. We thank Gail Cordial, executive director of Florida Partners in Crisis for teaming with the FADCP to coordinate training for our drug court teams. The OSCA identified funding streams to pay for travel and accommodations for drug court teams. We are excited about this training opportunity which is long overdue; our last statewide conference was in April As you know, May is National Drug Court Month. Last year, Florida adopted the statewide initiative where each drug court program selected a community service project that best fit their focus. We wish to continue this initiative which impacted so many of our communities with a positive message and great outreach to support service in our Drug Courts Make A Difference Day. We hope that you will continue to adopt local proclamations and resolutions through your court, county commissions and local governments to celebrate May as National Drug Court Month. The FADCP is also focusing its efforts to include training for judges on how to utilize drug court concepts and problem solving techniques across legal disciplines. I currently sit on the Supreme Court's Task Force on Substance Abuse and Mental Health Issues in the Court, chaired by Judge Steve Leifman. The task force met in May and identified several areas to include in the proposed charges for the term. I am hopeful that we will be able to continue to address the needs of individuals and veterans with substance abuse and/or mental health disorder through judicial leadership and training. The FADCP continues to support the Post-adjudicatory Drug Court Expansion Program which has made great strides. The data is showing the cost savings realized by the expansion drug courts which is critical for sustainability of our drug court programs. We thank Jennifer Grandal for her excellent management oversight and to the many staff at the OSCA who work tirelessly to support this program. We recognize and thank all the drug court programs at the local level who are part of the Post-adjudicatory Drug Court Expansion Program whose efforts are making a significant impact on substance abuse and providing the platform for drug courts to be recognized as a cost savings and beneficial program for our state. Congratulations to the FADCP Board of Directors. I would like to recognize and thank outgoing directors, Colonel Jim McDonough and Michael Jewell who have served on the FADCP board for multiple terms. Page 3 of 24

4 (Continued from previous page) Colonel McDonough has been an avid supporter of Florida's drug courts for the past 13 years in his previous positions as secretary of the Florida Department of Corrections and as the first director of the Office of Drug Control Policy under Governor Jeb Bush. Michael Jewell is a founding member of the FADCP and has served admirably since We thank both Jim and Mike for their dedicated service and many contributions to advance the FADCP. We wish them great success in their future endeavors. We welcome our newest board member, Christopher Thomas, drug court coordinator, in the Eighth Judicial Circuit. Mr. Thomas has served as the coordinator for Baker County's drug court programs for the past six years. We are delighted to have Mr. Thomas serve on the FADCP board. The FADCP board advocates for Florida s drug courts and addresses initiatives on the local, state and national level that will help advance and sustain our programs. The work that the FADCP accomplishes on behalf of its membership has been critical to the growth and sustainability our drug courts. Without a strong membership base, the FADCP cannot address these initiatives and provide support through training and advocacy. If we all join the FADCP, there is a strong commitment from everyone that Florida s drug courts are important. Please encourage members of your drug court teams to join the FADCP, so we can continue to provide the strong voice of support and advocacy for Florida s drug courts. As I close, I wish to recognize Mike Jewell and Georgina Rullo for their immense contributions to developing and editing our newsletter. Each edition contains a wealth of information that serves as a helpful resource for our drug court professionals in so many areas related to Florida's Drug Courts. Many kudos to both of them for their dedication. We encourage our FADCP members to get involved with our various committees which are the backbone to the great work and success the FADCP is able to accomplish. It is my pleasure to serve as your chair and thank all of you for your hard work and dedication to Florida s drug courts. Best Regards, Jack Espinosa, Jr., FADCP Chair CNN Heroes Spotlight those Staying Sober Through Sport In a February 9, 2012 article CNN.com placed a spotlight on the Phoenix Multisport and the attributes of physical activity in sobriety. Anyone who has been sober for 48 hours is welcome to come to one of Phoenix's open sessions to participate in an activity and learn about the group. After attending several events, individuals are invited to join, provided they sign a pledge to treat everyone respectfully and stay sober. Some members are hard-core athletes, but the group welcomes people of all fitness levels. Most participants have never been active. Page 4 of 24

5 2012 Annual Conference and Justice Institute Florida Partners in Crisis and FADCP Collaboration By Judge Deborah White-Labora, Miami-Dade County Please Save the Date and Mark Your Calendars for July in Orlando! The FADCP Training Committee is collaborating with Florida Partners in Crisis (FLPIC) to develop the program agenda for their 2012 Annual Conference and Justice Institute. The conference will be held July 12-13, 2012 at the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld in Orlando, Florida. See the following website for details The OSCA is working to approve five team members per circuit to attend the conference using a myriad of funding sources. In addition, grant funding is being requested to cover travel for all eight expansion program teams to attend the conference. This year s conference will integrate plenary sessions, workshops, exhibits and networking opportunities to provide attendees with the chance to share best practices and innovations in community-based criminal justice programs to enhance recovery for individuals with mental illnesses and substance use disorders and create safer communities. The FADCP is developing specific sessions to target our drug court professionals. Many of the topic areas relate to all professionals that will attend. Several plenary speakers have been confirmed: 1) Fred Osher, MD, who is currently the director for the Health Systems and Services Policy for the Council of State Governments (CSG) Justice Center. 2) Sharon Wise an advocate who has experienced the mental health care system first hand and who is now an expert in trauma informed care. 3) Douglas B. Marlowe, J.D., Ph.D., who is the chief of science, policy & law for the National Association of Drug Court Professionals, a senior scientist at the Treatment Research Institute, and an adjunct associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. 4) Helen Harberts, who is the assistant district attorney assigned to the problem solving courts in Butte County, California. Ms. Harberts has expertise in the areas of drug testing, sanctions and incentives, drug trends, and best practices. Dr. Marlowe will present on Targeting High Risk High Needs Offenders. His presentation will dovetail Fred Osher's content which will be of similar information. A call for presentations was distributed on April 11, 2012 to solicit proposals for educational sessions at the conference based on the areas identified by the Florida Partners in Crisis (FLPIC) Planning Committee and from the needs assessment results that the Office of the State Courts Administrator (OSCA) compiled. Several key themes emerged such as targeting high risk/high need populations, implementing best practices, drug testing, sanctions and incentives, team building, drug trends, co-occurring, and veterans courts. Several of these areas overlap with the FLPIC topic areas identified. We are coordinating an FADCP general membership meeting which will be held on Thursday, July 12th at 5:00 pm for Florida s drug court teams to come together and discuss the latest happenings in drug courts and to provide a networking opportunity. We will certify, CJE, CLE, and CEUs for continuing education credits for judges, attorneys, and treatment professionals. Education hours earned is based on individual sessions and length of program. Don't Forget!!! Mark Your Calendars for July 12-13! I look forward to seeing all of you in Orlando! Page 5 of 24

6 Prescription Data Base Monitoring Program Heats Up by Frank Russo, Esquire Florida s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program is off and running like a Kentucky Derby winner leaving the starting gate. The Electronic Florida Online Reporting of Controlled Substances Evaluation Program (E-FORCSE) recently released some surprising statistics. These initial numbers reflect that the medical profession has quickly embraced the system by both inputting and accessing data. As you may know, Florida Statute Section now requires health care practitioners to timely make an entry into the computer system each time certain controlled substances are dispensed. The idea behind the legislation is to use technology to uncover patients who are committing felony offenses by doctor shopping, drug trafficking, or committing prescription fraud. The online system pertains to all Schedules II, III, and IV controlled substances. Popular Pain Killers and Depressants Maintained in the Database OxyContin, Roxicodone, Percocet, Percodan, Ativan, Klonopin, Valium, Xanax The Data Inputted into the System is Growing at an Astonishing Rate Although the Florida Prescription Database just recently went live on September 1st, 2011, the records being uploaded into the system increased nearly ten-fold during the period of last October and mid-november. The process of electronically collecting and dispensing information is gathering steam. By November 28th, 2011, 21.8 million dispensing records had been received, which constituted a jump of 2 million prescription records in less than two weeks! These numbers reveal both the staggering number of controlled substance prescriptions and the high compliance rate on the part of those dispensing these spotlighted prescription drugs. Many doctors are now checking their patient s prescription history What has not been widely focused on is the number of inquiries being made to the database. Under the current status of the law, health care professionals are not required to access the database prior to prescribing a controlled substance. Use of the database system by prescribing physicians is merely voluntary. Although general members of the public cannot access the Prescription Drug Database, it is clear; many doctors are taking advantage of the opportunity to look into their patients background. In addition, despite patient confidentiality, and federal HIPAA requirements, Florida law now provides that a law enforcement agency can also access the data during their active investigations of potential criminal activity, fraud, or theft of prescribed controlled substances. It is important to note, that in this context, the definition of an active investigation is somewhat unclear. Records released by the Florida Department of Health reveal that queries into the system, which is overseen by Health Information Designs, Inc. have grown immensely. These are searches made by both medical practitioners and law enforcement investigators for the purpose of reviewing an individual s prescription history. Newly released statistics reveal that searches for patient prescription information grew from approximately 11,000 Patient Advisory Reports as of October 25th, to more than 160,000 as of November 28th. This 1,454% increase in only one month suggests that this information is being used as intended. Doctors using the prescription database had approved in excess of 6,000 prescriptions and denied more than 590. Page 6 of 24

7 Quick & Easy Access to Prescription History Data (Continued from previous page) Our law office reviewed the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Fact Sheet that has been provided to doctors by the Florida Department of Health. This advisory, encourages physicians to take advantage of the system in identifying patients who are doctor shopping or trying to obtain multiple prescriptions for the same controlled substance from multiple health care practitioners. The same document points out that if the database program manager observes a pattern that indicates a patient may be doctor shopping, or attempting to obtain multiple prescriptions for controlled substances from multiple health care practitioners, the information may be provided to law enforcement. E-FORCSE can make the Patient Advisory Reports available for viewing within a matter of only a few minutes after the online request is received. Likewise, this service is operational twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Given easy access to a patient s prescription history and the acceptance of E-FORCSE by the medical community, there is hope that strides are finally being made to address Florida s pain pill epidemic. About the Author: St. Petersburg criminal defense Attorney Frank Russo is a former state prosecutor with twenty-eight years of experience working within the criminal justice system. He is a friend of Pinellas County drug court and long term supporter of Operation PAR, Inc. Frank is a partner with the law firm of Russo and Russo which has been included in the prestigious Martindale Hubbell Bar Registration of preeminent Lawyers. National Survey Shows Friends and Family Are Primary Sources of Abused Painkillers ONDCP Press Release; April 25, 2012 According to the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) Over 70% of Americans Misusing Painkillers Obtain them from Friends or Relatives; White House Drug Policy Director Urges Americans to Help Save Lives by Taking Advantage of Upcoming National Take Back Day to Dispose of Unused, Excess, or Expired Medications in Homes National Rx Drug Abuse Summit April 10-12, 2012 in Orlando The National Prescription Drug Abuse Summit was held in Orlando this past April During the summit, Attorney General Pam Bondi shared Florida s Prescription Drug Diversion and Abuse Roadmap, which included an entire chapter on how Florida s drug courts can reduce prescription drug abuses. Click on the pdf link below to download the roadmap: If you were not able to attend, you may want to download the presentation materials. Audio/video presentations should be added to the website soon. Click on this link to access the summit website: Page 7 of 24

8 FADCP Board of Directors Congratulations to our newly elected board of directors! Ken Arnold, 1 st DCA, Treatment, 4 th Circuit Judge Marcia Beach, Circuit Judge, 4 th DCA, 17 th Circuit Sheree Beau-Wells, 2 nd DCA, Treatment, 20 th Circuit Anita Cocoves, 4th DCA, Treatment. 19 th Circuit Judge Jeri Beth Cohen, 3 rd DCA, Circuit Court Judge, 11 th Circuit Jim Downum, 2 nd DCA, Coordinator, 13 th Circuit Judge Jack Espinosa, Jr., 2 nd DCA, Circuit Court Judge, 13 th Circuit Aaron Gerson, 1 st DCA, Statewide Coordination Dena Geraghty, 2 nd DCA, Coordinator, 20 th Circuit *Jennifer Grandal, 1 st DCA, Statewide Coordinator Michael Hayes, 3 rd DCA, Treatment, 16 th Circuit Gary Hilko, 4 th DCA, Coordinator, 17 th Circuit Judge Melanie May, 4 th DCA, DCA Judge, 17 th Circuit Georgina Mpetas-Rullo, 2 nd DCA, Treatment, 6 th Circuit Jane Muir-Isherwood, 3 rd DCA, Coordinator, 16 th Circuit Toby Olson, 4 th DCA, Law Enforcement, 19 th Circuit *Judge Gisele Pollack, 4 th DCA, County Court Judge, 17 th Circuit Frank Rabbito, 3 rd DCA, Treatment, 11 th Circuit Judge Jeffrey Rosinek, 3 rd DCA, Circuit Court Judge (ret.), 11 th Circuit Daniel J. Schafer, 5 th DCA, Assistant Public Defender, 7 th Circuit Clara Smith, 1 st DCA, Assistant State Attorney, 1 st Circuit Christopher Thomas, 1st DCA, Coordinator, 8th Circuit Dorrie Tyng, 4 th DCA, Coordinator, 15 th Circuit Judge Deborah White-Labora, 3rd DCA, County Court Judge,11th Circuit Judge Joseph Will, 5 th DCA, Circuit Court Judge, 7 th Circuit *Ex-Officio Directors. Florida Association of Drug Court Professionals Khat, YaBa, JWH-015, Kratom, Lazy Cakes and All Kinds of Fascinating Information about Alternative Drugs By Sheree Beau Wells MS, CPP, Southwest Florida Addictions Services (SWFAS) Alternative drugs can be defined as any substance that is used as an alternative to illicit street drugs. The majority of alternative drugs is not approved by the FDA for human consumption and remains legal to purchase because of the way that they are marketed. Each alternative drug that is listed in this presentation has been reported being used in the community according to our clinicians, law enforcement, as well as the adult and youth client populations. To learn more about these alternative drugs, view this presentation as provided by SWFAS. Page 8 of 24

9 Pictured above in the DCAP session on is Assistant State Attorney Vincent Petty, Dee R., Bailiff Bill Flanigan, Judge Shawn Crane, Georgina Rullo, Dominick D., Drug Court Grad Jessica B., Drug Court Grad Rebecca J., Pastor Marcus C., Court Liaison Billy Major, Counselor, Janelle B., and Counselor Leah R. Drug Court Ambassador Program By Georgina Rullo C.A.P. - Photo by Jennifer Rullo. I had the honor and privilege of attending Judge Shawn Crane s DCAP court session. Judge Shawn Crane is our drug court judge in the 6 th Judicial Circuit in Pasco County. The acronym DCAP stands for Drug Court Ambassador Program. This is a program that was developed in an effort to reach out to juveniles who have entered the criminal justice system. The drug court graduates share their life experiences and their success stories with the young folks who are very hard to reach. On this particular day, there were about 50 young folks in attendance. It really was a very moving experience, and clearly these folks caught the attention of some of the young little faces sitting there. You could really see who was at first rolling their eyes and towards the end of this session there were tears flowing. I commend the graduates and employees for taking their precious time away from their schedule to give back in such a meaningful and powerful arena by sharing their story. I would like to share what I do know about Judge Shawn Crane. I had the opportunity of working side by side with him while he presided over the Pinellas County Drug Court. Judge Crane is a dedicated jurist who is very fair and takes the time to listen to the human suffering that is associated with becoming addicted to drugs and alcohol. Judge Crane also fully understands the human condition and that bad things happen to good folks. While Judge Crane was a prosecutor for the 6 th Judicial Circuit for eighteen years, he was well respected by the Defense Bar and his colleagues. I recall on different occasions asking for a non-violent client to be sentenced to drug treatment after articulating how their addiction paralleled their criminal justice charges. If my request was feasible, then Assistant State Attorney Shawn Crane would agree to the departure. Prior to becoming the drug court judge for Pasco County, Judge Crane was a county court judge, felony division judge, and family law judge. He has been the drug court judge since January 2011 and it has benefitted the community. He splits his drug court schedule between New Port Richey and Dade City. He also presides over the juvenile division in New Port Richey. We are so grateful and proud to have Judge Shawn Crane as our drug court judge in the 6 th Judicial Circuit in Pasco County. Page 9 of 24

10 2012 Legislative Overview By Chief Judge Melanie G. May, 4th DCA Two out or three isn t bad! We had a fruitful legislative session allowing us to check off two of FADCP s legislative priorities. I would like to thank Judges Marcia Beach and Gisele Polack for their steadfast dedication to FADCP s legislative priorities. Their efforts were the key to our success this year. Judge Pollack championed the Misdemeanor Drug Court bill (SB 186), which was signed into law by Governor Rick Scott on April 6, This legislation now aligns the misdemeanor drug court statute with the adult pre-trial statute and deletes the exclusion for persons who have previously participated in a pre-trial intervention program and adds other non-violent misdemeanor charges to the eligible population. The T. Patt Maney Veterans' Treatment Act (SB 922) passed and was signed into law by Governor Scott on April 27, It adds sections and (7). This legislation now mirrors the language of the adult pre-trial statute. The bill encompasses many aspects of the problem-solving court process that will help support our veterans involved in the justice system, who have so admirably served our country. A ceremonial signing of the bill is in the planning process. The reentry drug court bill (HB 177), which we have advocated for over the past decade passed overwhelmingly in the Senate with a 40-0 vote and with a vote in the House. Needless to say, the strong bipartisan support for this bill was outstanding and unified. However, Governor Scott vetoed the bill on April 6, 2012 claiming that the bill would be unfair to victims. Efforts were made to educate Governor Scott on the enhancement to public safety, the effectiveness of rehabilitation, and the cost savings associated with the bill, but to no avail. Although this was very disappointing, we will charge the hill once again to make our case for this important legislation. We encourage our membership to educate Governor Scott and his team on the importance of drug courts and the successful outcomes realized through restored lives and families which make our communities safer. As General Douglas MacArthur once said, "We are not retreating - we are advancing in another direction." Remember, our message must remain a positive one drug courts are part of the solution for the financial crisis in our State. Thank you for supporting them in the past and help us help you by supporting them in the future. NADCP Hailed as Nonprofit Organization Champion in April 4th Press Release In How Information Matters: Networks and Public Policy Innovation, a new book from Georgetown University Press, Auburn University Professor Kathleen Hale concludes after exhaustive research that the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP) is a prototypical example of how a nonprofit organization can forge successful public and private partnerships to initiate significant policy change and innovation. Hale writes, As the champion, the NADCP developed several tools that provided stability and consistency for government administrators who became interested in drug court as federal grants for programs came online. The sustained commitment of the NADCP to the drug court mission was an important factor in the diffusion and implementation of drug court programs at the local level and in state government during a period of twenty years. Page 10 of 24

11 Be the Change Leon County Juvenile Drug Court Mural Unveiling March 19, 2012 By Martha Sheetz, Juvenile Drug Court Coordinator The Leon County Juvenile Drug Court in the Second Judicial Circuit, offers gender specific, therapeutic group counseling. The girls portion of group therapy is lead by counselor, Jackie Mack. The group itself focuses on living a clean life while being of service to others and having fun while participating. The group began a community arts project with the idea of a mural to be painted in the lobby where the juvenile drug court program is held. With funding from DISC Village, Inc. and Lowes, the girls began to plan and secure supplies needed for the mural. The theme, Be the Change, was inspired by the dramatic change in season from summer to fall in Tallahassee, Florida. The group discussed how change will always happen, like the seasons. It is an active process to be a part of change, rather than sitting back and watching it happen. The girls made this decision, to be a part of the change they wanted to see in their lives and in the community. So, our idea blossomed into a tree, behind a window, which separates the changing of the four seasons. Every girl who was a part of this project, not only had a blast painting but was able to be a part of change. Our plain white wall amazingly transformed into a colorful message of hope which will inspire current and future participants. Standing in front of the newly revealed mural in the photo on the left is: Martha Sheetz, Coordinator; Summer S, painter; Jackie Mack, counselor; Ellie J, painter; and Judge Karen Gievers, the circuit court judge who presides over juvenile drug court. The handprints on your right belong to Jackie Mack, Counselor, Summer S. and Ellie J. - painters. Page 11 of 24

12 Family Drug Court & FDC Learning Academy Children and Family Futures This one is for those who are out there that claim that resources for family drug courts are too slim. The ongoing training series that this organization is sharing is exceptional. Webinars and presentations over the last few years are archived here. New training sessions are being offered often. The topics are spot on, the information is rich and the presenters are knowledgeable. These sessions are a wonderful gift. Family drug court team members who do not take advantage of these sessions may be working in the wrong field. Examples of the topics include: Use of Jail as a Sanction in FDC - The Great Debate Role of Judicial Leadership and Ethical Considerations in Family Drug Courts Enhanced Community, Special Topics Webinar: Engaging Defense Attorneys What You Need to Know in Becoming a Trauma-Informed FDC Please review beyond page one of the link below. Advance to the second and third pages. NADCP Responds to April 22 nd Wall Street Journal Article Rethinking the War on Drugs by Mark A.R. Kleiman, Jonathan P. Caulkins and Angela Hawken from the Wall Street Journal on April 22nd discussed alternatives to incarceration and legalization. Notably, drug court programs did not receive mention as part of the solution. The response from the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP) was authored by the Honorable John R. Schwartz from New York, which concisely states the following: Unfortunately, the calls for reform are based on the false premise that our criminal-justice system is filled with individuals whose behavior can be changed through more punishment. While 80% of inmates have a history of substance abuse, 50% are serious addicts. As a drug court judge with 30 years of experience behind the bench, I have seen countless individuals come before me again and again, unable to change their behavior despite the catastrophic personal suffering that result from addiction. Individuals who are addicted to drugs or alcohol require treatment in order to find long-term recovery, not the threat of punishment. We can all agree that the time has come for this nation to adopt a more sensible, humane and costeffective drug policy. Our capacity for meaningful change is contingent on understanding the nature of the problem. If we are serious about reducing substance abuse, crime and recidivism, and saving taxpayers money, then we must accept that our criminal-justice system is filled with seriously addicted people who need treatment to change their behavior. Drug courts must be the foundation of reform. Page 12 of 24

13 Faces and Voices of Recovery Are you familiar with the Faces and Voices of Recovery? Faces & Voices of Recovery is dedicated to organizing and mobilizing the over 20 million Americans in recovery from addiction to alcohol and other drugs, our families, friends and allies into recovery community organizations and networks, to promote the right and resources to recover through advocacy, education and demonstrating the power and proof of long-term recovery. This organization developed and supports the Recovery Bill of Rights. To learn more you may want to visit the website: September will be Recovery Month! What is your local community doing? Will your problem solving court be participating in activities? For more information, visit the website: DEA sees sharp drop in Florida oxycodone sales In January, the Sun-Sentinel reported progress associated with the launching of the prescription drug database. Sales of the painkiller oxycodone, one of the most-abused prescription drugs, dropped 20 percent last year in Florida, according to data released this week by the Drug Enforcement Administration. The article is available for review: _1_oxycodone-drug-abusers-pdmp HIV Rapid Testing in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs Blending Initiative Learn about the Addictions Technology Transfer Center Network s initiative concerning rapid HIV testing by following the link below. New alcohol product raises concerns You may want to see the film clip from Orlando s WKMG May 14 th report about little portable bags of alcohol that are easy to hide. Page 13 of 24

14 From NADCP: Administration Releases 2012 National Drug Control Strategy Highlights drug courts as key alternative to incarceration for drug-addicted offenders Last week, the Office of National Drug Control Policy released the administration s 2012 National Drug Control Strategy. Once again, drug courts are a priority in deterring drug use, reducing drug availability, steering users toward the help they need, and making our neighborhoods safer. National Association of Drug Court Professionals CEO West Huddleston applauded the administration s support for drug courts and its emphasis on using evidenced-based prevention and treatment efforts to break the cycle of drug abuse, crime and incarceration. There is no doubt that drug courts must be the foundation of our criminal justice reform and drug policy efforts, Huddleston said. The 2012 National Drug Control Strategy is a testament to the continued leadership of Director Gil Kerlikowske, who has been an ardent supporter of drug courts and champion for the drug court field. The national strategy is available for review at the following link: View Flagler County Drug Court Graduations Heroes: Giving veterans a second chance WTSP in Tampa Bay reports on the progress of veterans treatment court in Clearwater. Saylor says he was never a drug user while he was in the Army. But after retirement, he was prescribed painkillers for service-related injuries and started associating with the wrong crowd when he returned home. Click on the link below for the full story. Are you Familiar with Naloxone? MSNBC recently ran a series of articles concerning a generic drug named naloxone that has been around for years and is more widely known by its trade name: Narcan. This medication can apparently save the lives of some who are close to death due to opiate related overdoses. You may want to read this fascinating conversation on MSNBC. Page 14 of 24

15 Gender Differences: Women and Men with Trauma in the Justice System by Niki Miller, MS CPS Police, correctional facilities, problem solving courts and community corrections are becoming aware of the impact of trauma on the people entering the criminal justice system and struggle to find ways to apply the principles of trauma-informed care to these environments. Some of this awareness is a result of increased numbers of women entering the criminal justice system; however, understanding trauma in the lives of men and boys and its impact on increasing numbers of veterans that become involved in the criminal justice system is also important. The best way to understand the differences between justice-involved men and women s trauma histories is to think qualitatively rather than quantitatively. In other words there are many differences between the types of traumatic events males and females in the justice system experience, a number of differences in their typical response to those events, and in the rate at which they develop trauma-related disorders-- and even differences in the PTSD symptoms they tend to exhibit. Trauma, PTSD and Men and Women in the General Population It is also useful to distinguish the rate of traumatic events males and females experience from the rate of trauma-related disorders. Studies estimate that one in four adolescents will experience at least one traumatic event in their lifetime before the age of 16. Not everyone who experiences a traumatic event develops PTSD. Only about 8% of men and 20% of women who experience a traumatic event will develop PTSD (National Center for PTSD, 2007). Females are more than twice as likely as males to develop the disorder. In the general population, 10.4% of women and 5% of men experience PTSD at one time or another in their past (NIMH, 2008). In the general population, men are slightly more likely than women to be exposed to any type of traumatic event but less likely to develop PTSD as a result. Data from the Adverse Childhood Experience study showed women were 50% more likely to have five or more types of adverse childhood experiences than men (Feletti, 2007); these experiences of multiple traumatic events in childhood are correlated with chronic health conditions, addictive and mental disorders and other lasting effects. Women are four times more likely than men to have long-lasting PTSD and to have accompanying depression and anxiety (National Center for PTSD, 2007). Research suggests they may also take longer to recover from trauma. Typically, the events that women and men report differ in nature: Men are most commonly exposed to traumatic events that involve seeing someone killed or critically injured or being physically assaulted themselves. Women are more likely to have been sexually victimized than men and to have developed PTSD as a result of sexual violence (National Center on PTSD, 2007). The experience of rape appears to be one of the traumatic most likely to result in PTSD for both men and women. In one study of almost 6,000 subjects approximately 65% of men and 46% of women said that rape was the most upsetting traumatic event they had experienced and developed PTSD as a result (Kessler et al., 1995; Ozer, Best, Lipsey, and Weiss, 2003). Page 15 of 24

16 (Continued from previous page) Trauma and PTSD among Women and Men in Jail Diversion Programs The TAPA Center for Jail Diversion completed a study of 2,251 offenders across 21 sites and found high levels of reported exposure to traumatic events among both men and women WOMEN MEN 96% lifetime trauma exposure 92% lifetime trauma exposure 65% current trauma exposure 58% current trauma exposure in jails, suggesting high rates of exposure found among women offenders are also found among men in the justice system (Sarchiapone, Carli, Cuomo, Marchetti & Roy, 2009). These data also suggest that many more offenders have histories of exposure to trauma, even if they are not diagnosed with a trauma-related disorder. In recent studies of incarcerated populations, rates of PTSD have been as high as 48% for female inmates and 30% for male inmates (Tull, 2005). Men in the Criminal Justice System The most common traumatic experiences reported by men in the criminal justice system are related to witnessing a killing, followed by directly experiencing a physical assault, often with a weapon (Johnson, Ross, Taylor, Williams, Carvajal, and Peters, 2006), flowed followed? by childhood sexual abuse (Weeks and Widom, 1998). In a national survey of more than 4,800 male inmates in jails concluded the following: 52% had been attacked with a knife or other sharp object. 47% had been shot at (excludes military combat). 10% had been physically or sexually abused (Greenberg and Rosenheck, 2008). Research on male death row inmates has also found significant rates of PTSD among them (Freedman and Hemenway, 2000). Women Offenders Sexual abuse is the most common type of abuse in the lives of women offenders, followed by intimate partner violence (Battle, Zlotnick, Najavits, Gutierrez and Winsor, 2002; Zlotnick, Najavits, Rohsenow and Johnson, 2003). In justice-involved populations, women appear to be slightly more likely to have experienced a traumatic event than their male counterparts. The vast majority of women with substance use disorders in jails and prisons have experienced interpersonal or sexual violence in their lives, with estimates as high as 90% (WPA, 2006). Women offenders are most likely to have been victimized during childhood. In studies on childhood sexual abuse among women in prison, rates as high as 55% have been reported (Blackburn, Mullings and Marquart, 2008; Miller and MacDonald, 2009; Raj et al., 2008). Intimate partner violence is very common among women offenders and has been associated with an increased risk of recidivism. Trauma and mental health problems have been found to contribute to risk of institutional difficulties and recidivism (Brennan 2007; Salisbury & Van Voorhis, 2009; Van Voorhis, Salisbury, Wright and Bauman, 2008). Women entering the justice system are also more likely than men to report injection drug use and homelessness in the past six months and to have past psychiatric hospitalizations and suicide thoughts, feelings or attempts (Clements-Nolle, Wolden and Bargmann-Losche, 2009). Page 16 of 24

17 (Continued from previous page) For both men and women entering prisons and jails Men and women in the prison system are both motivated to under-report trauma. Men are more likely than women to have a same sex perpetrator in cases of sexual assault or abuse, which can add to shame and stigma. Women are less likely to categorize experiences of sexual victimization as assaultive or non-consensual due to self-blame, especially if they were drinking or using drugs at the time of the assault. Both male and female inmates are motivated to hide any information that may make them more vulnerable. Overall, higher rates of trauma and earlier age of trauma onset is associated with increased violence and victimization in prison for both men and women (Komarovskaya, 2009). The prison environment is quite traumatizing and triggering for both men and women, although their responses, the nature of their past trauma and the behaviors they exhibit that are aimed at keeping them safe may be very different (Miller, 2011). Addictions and Trauma Studies reveal that two-thirds of men and women in substance abuse treatment report childhood physical or sexual abuse (NIDA, 1998). Often, substance use becomes one of the primary coping mechanisms a trauma survivor relies on. For some, abstinence from substances combined with the stressors of the correctional environment, increases the effects of unaddressed trauma. Traditional substance abuse treatment programs that are not designed to address the co-occurrence of trauma and related mental health issues, often are limited in their ability to engage and retain offenders or result in lasting treatment gains (Messina, Grella, Cartier and Torres, 2010). There is a high correlation between trauma and the risk for substance abuse later in life. Teens that experience both trauma and substance abuse have much higher incidence of academic, psychological and social impairments and juvenile justice involvement (Costello, et al., 2002). The National Institute on Drug Abuse indicates that two of the major risk factors for early onset of addiction are the following: 1. Childhood psychological trauma; 2. Co-occurring disorders preceding the onset of addiction (NIDA, 2008). Addiction is increasingly seen, by many researchers, as a developmental disorder (with its roots in childhood and adolescence, potentially mediated by early trauma). Both result in changes to brain functions about which we know precious little. Whatever causes and connections may exist, we do know that high rates of trauma among offenders requires an integrated approach that combines drug abuse treatment with trauma-specific interventions and specialized transitional services as they re-enter communities in order to reduce the likelihood of recidivism (Osher and Steadman; 2009 Prins and Draper, 2009). Trauma Screening Guidelines Screening for the effects of trauma, current safety and trauma related disorders do not require extensive questioning about the past. Effective screens may consist of as little as four questions. Some screening tools Page 17 of 24

18 (Continued from previous page) measure trauma related symptoms and level of current functioning. These present-day based screenings usually do not cause distress and can be used in correctional settings. Current safety and symptoms and functioning are often more relevant than details of past events. An extensive questioning about the nature of past abuse is undertaken upon entry into the criminal justice system and may contribute to distress. The following guidelines can be helpful. Source: Trauma Informed Correctional Care: Recovery and Rehabilitation (Miller, 2011) Explain the screening in advance, how the information will be used to benefit the client. Let the client know that yes or no answers are fine unless he or she wishes to say more. Use valid screening tools that focus on present-day symptoms such as the Trauma Symptom Checklist or the PTSD-PC. If screening for specific types of past trauma, use a checklist the client can read and mark off rather than asking about past abuse during an interview. Give the client as much control as possible, including time and location, passing on questions and taking breaks. Be aware of your own nonverbal responses during the interview. If the clients become upset or agitated redirect them by asking about strengths, the people and things that helped them get through, how these events affect them today and what works to help them feel better. If staff administering the screen are familiar with grounding techniques such as calming and selfsoothing prompts including those that enlist the clients own strategies, the screening process can be more beneficial. When an individual does appear to have a significant history of trauma, it is never too early in the process to give them information and tools to help them navigate the criminal justice system. Minimizing the Effects of Unavoidable Triggers There will be some environmental triggers that are unavoidable. Obviously, not every trigger can be eliminated but they can be defused. PEACE is an acronym for one approach to cope with unavoidable triggers: Predict and prepare When we go to court, your husband will be in the room. Tell me what steps would make you feel safest in court?what would you like to do to take care of yourself afterward? Enlist What has helped you in the past not to drink when you had to deal with your mother yelling at your kids? Acknowledge Many of us have a difficult time when we have to take a urine sample it feels invasive. I can understand why it makes you anxious. Choice and control We have to go through everyone s belongings to make sure nothing unsafe comes into the facility would you like to be in the room when I check yours or should I do it while you are with the nurse? Page 18 of 24

19 (Continued from previous page) Explain We ask each person to turn in their medications when they are admitted to treatment. This is because it is not safe to have them out when children are around. When you are admitted we will ask you to list all your meds on paper and lock them in the med drawer. You can ask any staff member to get them (Miller, 2010). In a trauma-informed environment, people receive information about the connection between substance use, mental health, and victimization. Education empowers them to make choices about treatment and their lives. People with histories of trauma rely on defensive responses like dissociation and re-enactment, sometimes leaving them more vulnerable and less available for new learning or more prone to unmanageable behavior. Trauma stabilization establishes safety and teaches coping skills to help manage responses. These techniques are easily mastered by non-clinical staff and can be taught to offenders. Some information and tools that can be useful to offenders and easily taught to staff include the following: Grounding directing attention to the here-and-now and away from sensory recall of the past, negative experiences, and emotional states. Self-soothing preparing a menu of comforting and calming procedures in advance of a response that they can use when emotions become dysregulated and arousal is high. Self-care learning to self-monitor emotional states, evaluate choices and actions, and actively pursue emotion, mental, and physical healing. Drug courts, veteran s courts and other problem solving courts perform a valuable service to clients, to correctional staff and to the public by preventing appropriate individuals with trauma from entering correctional facilities. A trauma informed approach to jail diversion has the potential to identify barriers to recovery from substance use disorders, identify co-occurring issues and lesson the burden on correctional staff and administrators who must deal with large numbers of inmates with mental health needs. The next article in this series will focus on trauma and veterans entering the criminal justice system. References available upon request Medical Care for Participants Sometimes hard to find medical care is available to citizens in a community to include drug court participants. For example, in DeLand, FL there is The Good Samaritan Clinic: In Daytona Beach, FL there is The Jesus Clinic: Naturally, participants are not required to access these services; however, medical services are often available to participants at these clinics when no other options are available. Volusia County is grateful to have such services available. There may be similar organizations in your community. Page 19 of 24

20 NADCP, CESAR and Buprenorphine/Naloxone (Suboxone or Subutex ) In January, West Huddleston, CEO of the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP) sent out an message to many that summarized the series of reports from The Center for Substance Abuse Research (CESAR) that highlighted the increased availability, diversion and misuse of buprenorphine (Suboxone). The missive discussed such issues as follows: The amount of buprenorphine legally available for distribution and sale has increased. Buprenorphine diversion and nonmedical use appear to be increasing. Drug users, treatment providers, and law enforcement officers describe increasing Suboxone misuse in Ohio. Why is Suboxone used? Fight withdrawal. Get high. Avoid detection. To read the entire CESAR FAX series concerning Suboxone misuse in Ohio, click here: To read only the CESAR FAX from January 16, 2012, click here: In the spring 2012 edition of the All Rise publication from the NADCP, West Huddleston discussed the topic further, making sure that the position of the NADCP concerning medicated assisted treatment (MAT) was made clear. Quotes from that article include the following: I believe medications should be integrated into their treatment plan, assuming it is part and parcel to a clinical assessment, structured treatment, monitoring, and objective criteria and milestones for tapering the dosage until they can achieve long-term abstinence-based recovery. Drug courts are a premier model for the delivery of MAT. We must be careful that the news of buprenorphine misuse and diversion not cause out views about MAT to migrate from a therapeutic tool to aid in the recovery of addiction to a harmful, addictive drug being abused by clients who wish to avoid a positive drug test. Drug courts should regularly and randomly test for buprenorphine to ensure compliance with its prescribed and intended uses as well as to detect non-medical use among all participants. The article can be read in its entirety at: Juvenile Drug Court Success Covered in the Palm Beach Post Page 20 of 24

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