SW806: Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy Fall 2010

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1 SW806: Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy Fall 2010 I. Overview Youth violence is a pervasive reality in our society and in our world. Every year, thousands of youth are victimized by violence and/or perpetrate acts of violence against others, negatively impacting the health and well-being of individuals, families, communities, and nations. This course is designed to help students understand youth violence within a public health framework, identify important risk and protective factors, and conceptualize and articulate effective youth violence prevention programs and policies. Drawing heavily from the framework of public health and social epidemiology, the aim of this course is to move away from individual-centered explanations of violence and to understand youth violence in the context of social and environmental variables. The course begins with a conceptual overview of high-risk youth, violence, and public health perspectives on youth violence. Subsequently, specific risk factors for violence in multiple risk domains -- social, individual, family, school, and peer -- will be examined in detail. Finally, violence prevention approaches will be examined as appropriate for varying levels of risk: primary, secondary, and tertiary. Working from within the public health framework, students will become familiar with specific risk factors and corresponding intervention strategies aimed at addressing these risks. The impact of racism, poverty, gender, and oppression on youth and youth violence will be examined from a critical perspective. Informed by a public health framework, this course explores the context of youth violence and seeks to promote effective policy and learning through the following course objectives: II. Course Objectives Knowledge 1. Students will be able to conceptualize how high risk youth and youth violence can be understood within the framework of public health and social epidemiology 2. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of how concepts of risk, protection, and resilience relate to policy and program approaches targeting youth violence 3. Students will become conversant in the multiple risk domains (community, individual, family, school, and peer) and levels of risk factors (primary, secondary, and tertiary) for youth violence

2 Skills 1. Students will be able to apply knowledge of policy to the design and implementation of social work interventions for high-risk youth 2. Students will have the capacity to demonstrate knowledge of macro and community-level intervention approaches that seek to prevent youth violence 3. Students will be able to locate resources, including government documents, professional literature, and statistical reports, that inform dialogue on policy issues 4. Students will demonstrate the ability to engage in thoughtful, critical dialogue concerning major issues related to policies and services for high-risk youth 5. Students will be able to develop and articulate positions on policy pertaining to high-risk youth Values 1. Understand how social policies and programs aimed at preventing or treating adolescent problem behavior affect youth, families, and communities 2. Understand adolescent problem behavior in the context of social work values and ethics that place an emphasis on awareness of individual and social needs, rights, and responsibilities 3. Understand the impact of racial, cultural, sexual, and gender bias and insensitivity in policy approaches aimed at high-risk adolescents III. Student/Faculty Responsibilities Course Expectations for the Student: 1. Students are expected to attend all class sessions regularly and on time. Students are expected to notify the instructor (in advance, whenever possible) regarding unavoidable absences and make appropriate arrangements to cover the missed course material. 2. Students are expected to complete all assigned readings prior to the class and are expected to be able to integrate that reading into class discussions and activities. 3. Students are expected to make use of academic libraries and resources for assignments. 4. Students are expected to offer the instructor clear constructive feedback regarding course content and teaching methods. Students are also expected to complete confidential evaluations of the course using the University s standardized forms and Survey Monkey. See also the MSW Student Handbook for additional School policies and procedures. Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 2

3 Course Expectations for the Instructor: 1. The instructor will use a variety of instructional methods including lectures, large and small group exercises, and discussions. 2. The instructor will provide a clear structure for the course and each class session through the use of handouts, clarification of objectives, guiding discussion, providing appropriate linkages between topics, and summarizing progress throughout the quarter. 3. Student assignments will include clear expectations and opportunities for student selection of alternatives. When possible, student assignments will be returned within one week of submission. 4. The instructor will be available as a resource person on issues related to class assignments or content during office hours, by phone, , or by appointment 5. The instructor will work to facilitate an atmosphere in the classroom that is conducive to learning, is non-threatening, and is respectful of a variety of learning styles. 6. When students are asked to work together in groups the instructor will be available for consultation and to assist groups in completing their tasks. 7. The instructor will provide students feedback that identifies strengths and areas for improvement in a constructive manner. Further Comments Regarding Class Dialogue/Discussion/Participation: The development of a supportive learning environment reflecting the expressed values of the social work profession is fundamental to this course. Listening with respect and an open mind and striving to understand others views, and articulating your own point of view using direct communication will help foster the creation of this environment. Being conscious of not monopolizing discussion and/or interrupting will help create this environment as well. The following guidelines can add to the richness of our discussion [Adapted from Lynn Weber Cannon (1990). Fostering positive race, class and gender dynamics in the classroom. Women Studies Quarterly, 1 & 2, ] 1. We assume that persons are always doing the best that they can, including the persons in this classroom. 2. We acknowledge that systematic oppression exists based on privileged positions and specific to race, gender, class, religion, sexual orientation, and other social variables. 3. We posit that assigning blame to persons in socially marginal positions is counterproductive to our practice. We can learn much about the dominant culture by looking at how it constructs the lives of those on its social margins. Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 3

4 4. While we may question or take issue with another class member s ideology, we will not demean, devalue, or attempt to humiliate another person based on her/his experiences, value system, or construction of meaning. 5. We have a professional obligation to actively challenge myths and stereotypes about our own groups and other groups so we can break down the walls that prohibit group cooperation and growth. We are a learning community. As such, we are expected to engage with difference. Part of functioning as a learning community is to engage in dialogue in respectful ways that supports learning for all of us. Here are some guidelines that I try to use in my learning process: 1. Listen well and strive to be present to each member of our group and class. 2. Assume that I might miss things others see and see things others miss. 3. Raise my views in such a way that I encourage others to raise theirs. 4. Inquire into others' views while inviting them to inquire into mine. 5. Extend the same listening to others I would wish them to extend to me. 6. Surface my feelings in such a way that I make it easier for others to surface theirs. 7. Regard my views as a perspective onto the world, not the world itself. 8. Beware of either-or thinking. 9. Beware of my assumptions of others and their motivations. Test my assumptions about how and why people say or do things. 10. Be authentic in my engagement with all members of our class. IV. Textbooks Guerra N.G. & Smith, E.P. (2006), Preventing youth violence in a multicultural society. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Herrenkohl, T., Aisenberg, E., Williams, J.H., & Jensen, J. (2010). Violence in context: Current evidence on risk, protection, and prevention. New York: Oxford University Press. Klein, M.W. (2007), Chasing after street gangs: A forty year journey. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall. Thorton. T.N., Craft, C.A., Dahlberg, L.L., Lynch, B.S., & Baer, K. (2006). Youth violence prevention: A sourcebook for community action. Atlanta: Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Available for free at: (All other required readings will be available through the Blackboard Vista site for this course OR on reserve in the Social Work Library). Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 4

5 Locating Course Readings Books, journal articles and other readings are placed on reserve by the Social Work Library staff. To locate the readings, use the Course/Online Reserves catalog, which can be viewed from the link in your course Blackboard Vista site or from the BC Libraries Quest catalog. The Social Work Library homepage at has links to Blackboard Vista and Quest. Books Whenever possible, all books mentioned in GSSW course syllabi are placed on reserve for 2-hour use in the Social Work Library. If no more than two chapters of a particular book are assigned as required reading for the course, those chapters may also be available as PDF files in the Course/Online Reserves catalog. Journal articles All journal articles listed as required readings in GSSW course syllabi can be accessed online in full text in the Course/Online Reserves catalog. Articles which are designated as supplemental or recommended readings are usually not available in the Course/Online Reserves catalog. Contact the library staff at for assistance in locating those articles. IV. Course Evaluations and Assignments: Grades for this course will based on class participation (15%) which includes regular attendance, constructive evaluation of fellow students, and active involvement in discussion and critique of assigned readings both in and out of class, including the online discussion board. The requirements for the discussion board are detailed in the Appendix section of this syllabus. Students will be required to take part in one experiential learning exercise (25%) which includes an experiential component as well as a research/theory-informed and reflective reaction paper. This assignment is explained in detail in the Appendix to this syllabus. A two-part policy consultant assignment will consist of a demographic briefing (20%) as well as a policy briefing (40%) with concrete recommendations for youth violence prevention. A detailed explanation of the final assignment is included in the Appendix to this syllabus. Class Attendance. If an emergency should arise, please inform the instructor as soon as possible so that arrangements can be made to accommodate your absence in class exercises. Having one unexcused absence will lower your grade by 5%. Two unexcused absences will result in the loss of all credit for participation. If you have more than two unexcused absences, the instructor will discuss withdrawal from the course with you. Late Assignments and Incompletes. All assignments are due on the date noted. In fairness to students who turn their work in on time, late assignments will receive a minimum 5% deduction. You must make PRIOR arrangements with the instructor to turn in an assignment late with minimal penalty. Assignments turned in late without prior authorization will be accepted with an additional 2% deduction for each day late. Assignments more than 1 week late will not receive credit unless PRIOR arrangements have been made with the instructor. Please make ADVANCE arrangements with the instructor for any due dates that you may miss. HIPPA Guidelines All social workers are required to adhere to HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996, Public Law ) regulations regarding the privacy of client information outside of the agency setting. Unless you have the Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 5

6 client s written permission, confidentiality must be strictly maintained when discussing or writing about clients in the classroom and in assignments. Request for Disability Accommodations for Exams If you have a disability and will be requesting accommodations for this course, please register with either Kathy Duggan, Associate Director, Academic Support Services, The Connors Family Learning Center (learning disabilities and ADHD) or Suzy Conway Assistant Dean for Students with Disabilities (all other disabilities). Advance notice and appropriate documentation are required for accommodations. You may contact Regina O'Grady-LeShane Assistant Dean, Academic and Student Services, if you want clarification on specific procedures related to such requests. The grading system for courses in the Graduate School of Social Work is as follows: Grade Range GPA Qualitative Description of Grades: A The high passing grade of A is awarded for superior work. A B B The passing grade of B is awarded for work that clearly is satisfactory at the graduate level. B C The low passing grade of C is awarded for work that is minimally acceptable at the graduate level. P 70 or above 0.00 F Below The failing grade of F is awarded for work that is unsatisfactory. I Incomplete 0.00 I (Incomplete) - Given at discretion of instructor (See Student Guide) Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 6

7 V. Course Outline SESSION 1: Introduction to High Risk Youth Who are high risk youth? What do we know about high risk youth? The rights of children and youth. Required Readings: Readings with ** will be divided among small groups. Barker, G., and M. Fontes Review and Analysis of International Experience with Programs Targeted of At-Risk Youth. LASHC Paper Series 5, Washington D.C.: World Bank. (pp. 1-14) UNICEF. (1989). Convention on the rights of the child. Retrieved from SESSION 2: Youth Violence Defining violence The context of violence The magnitude of youth violence Web Fieldtrip: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2010). Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS). Atlanta: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Required Readings: **Aisenberg, E., Gavin, A., Mehrotra, G., & Bowman, J. (2010). Defining Violence. In T. Herrenkohl, E. Aisenberg, J.H. Williams, & J. Jensen (Eds.). Violence in Context: Current Evidence on Risk, Protection, and Prevention (pp ). New York: Oxford University Press. **Gabarino, J. (1999). The epidemic of youth violence. In J. Gabarino, Lost boys: Why our sons turn violent and how we can save them (pp. 1-29). New York: The Free Press. **Herrenkohl, T.I., Aisenberg, E., Williams, J.H., Jenson, J.M. (2010). The context of violence. In T. Herrenkohl, E. Aisenberg, J.H. Williams, & J. Jensen (Eds.). Violence in Context: Current Evidence on Risk, Protection, and Prevention (pp. 5-12). New York: Oxford University Press. **Jackson, A.L., Veneziano, C., & Ice, W. (2005). Violence and trauma: The past 20 and next 10 years. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 20, 4, Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 7

8 Loeber, R. & Stouthamer-Loeber, M. (1998). Development of juvenile aggression and violence: Some common misconceptions and controversies. American Psychologist, 53, Additional Reading: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2010). Understanding youth violence: fact sheet. Retrieved from the World Wide Web at: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2010). Youth violence: facts at a glance. Retrieved from the World Wide Web at: SESSION 3: Public Health Frameworks and Youth Violence Youth violence is a public health issue Risk and Protective Factors How can a public health approach shape policies and programs? Required Readings: Farrington, D.P. (2000). Explaining and preventing crime: The globalization of knowledge. The American Society of Criminology 1999 presidential address. Criminology, 38, Fraser, M.W., Kirby, L.D., Smokowski, P.R. (2004). Risk and resilience in childhood. In M.W. Fraser, Risk and resilience in childhood: An ecological perspective, 2 nd edition (pp ). Washington, D.C.: NASW Press. Hammond, W.R., Haegerich, T.M., & Saul, J. (2009). The public health approach to youth violence and child maltreatment prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Psychological Services, 6, 4, Krug, E.G., Mercy, J.A., Dahlberg, L.L., & Zwi, A.B. (2002). The world report on violence and health. The Lancet, 360, Additional Reading: Browne, A., Barber, C., Stone, D., & Meyer, A. (2005). Public health training on the prevention of youth violence and suicide. An overview. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 29, 5S2, Johnson, R. (2006). The National Institutes of Health (NIH) State-Of-the-Science Conference on Preventing Violence and Related Health-Risking Social Behaviors Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 8

9 in Adolescents. A commentary. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 34, Kawachi, I. (2002). Social epidemiology. Social Science & Medicine, 54, Palermo, G.B. (2009). Editorial: Delinquency: Risks and protective factors. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 53, 3, SESSION 4: Institutional Risk Factors: Race, Ethnicity and Social Class Race, ethnicity, and social class as risk factors The potential pitfalls of race and risk Required Readings: Boutakidis, I., Guerra, N.G. & Soriano, F.(2006). Youth violence, immigration, and acculturation. In N.G. Guerra & Smith, E.P. (Eds.), Preventing youth violence in a multicultural society (pp ). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Guerra, N.G. & Williams, K.R. (2006). Ethnicity, youth violence, and the ecology of development. In N.G. Guerra & Smith, E.P. (Eds.), Preventing youth violence in a multicultural society (pp ). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Sampson, R.J., Morenoff, J.D., & Raudenbush, S. (2005) Social anatomy of racial and ethnic disparities in violence. Public Health Matters, 95, 2, Williams, J.H., Bright, C.L. & Petersen, G. (2010). Racial and ethnic differences in risk and protective factors associated with youth violence. In T. Herrenkohl, E. Aisenberg, J.H. Williams, & J. Jensen (Eds.). Violence in Context: Current Evidence on Risk, Protection, and Prevention (pp ). New York: Oxford University Press. Hughes, L. (1951). Harlem. Retrieved from the World Wide Web at: Additional Reading: Brooks-Gunn, J., & Duncan, G.J. (1997). The effects of poverty on children. The Future of Children, 7, Carter, R. (2007). Racism and Psychological and Emotional Injury: Recognizing and Assessing Race-Based Traumatic Stress. The Counseling Psychologist, 35, 13-41, Golembeski, C., & Fullilove, R. (2005). Criminal (In)Justice in the City and Its Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 9

10 Associated Health Consequences. American Journal of Public Health, 95, Sampson, R.J. & Raudenbush, S.W. (2004). Seeing disorder: Neighborhood stigma and the social construction of broken windows. Social Psychology Quarterly, 67, 4, SESSION 5: Community Risk Factors The impact of neighborhood crime, violence, and disorganization Collective Efficacy as a conceptual lens Exposure to community violence Required Readings: **Barroso, C.S., Peters Jr., R.J., Kelder, S. Conroy, J. Murray, N. & Orpinas, P. (2010). Youth exposure to community violence: Association with aggression, victimization, and risk behaviors. Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment, & Trauma, 17, 2, **Finkelhor, D., Turner, H., Ormrod, R., Hamby, S., & Kracke, K. (2009). Children s Exposure to Violence: A comprehensive National Survey. Washington, D.C.: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. **Sampson, R.J. (2003). Collective Efficacy. In Encyclopedia of Community, Vol. 1 (pp. 205). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. **Sampson, R.J. (2006). Collective efficacy theory: Lessons learned and directions for future inquiry. In F.T. Cullen, J.P. Wright, & Blevins, K.R., Taking stock: The status of criminological theory (Vol. 15). New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers. Additional Reading: Sampson, R.J.; Raudenbush, S; and Earls, F (1997). Neighborhoods and violent crime: a multilevel study of collective efficacy. Science 277: SESSION 6: Individual Level Risk Factors Dispositional Risk Factors Behavioral Risk Factors Biological Risk Factors Required Readings: Bright, C.L., Williams, J.H. & Petersen, G. (2010). Gender differences in risk and protective factors associated with youth violence. In T. Herrenkohl, E. Aisenberg, Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 10

11 J.H. Williams, & J. Jensen (Eds.). Violence in Context: Current Evidence on Risk, Protection, and Prevention (pp ). New York: Oxford University Press. Catalano, R.F. & Hawkins, J.D. (1996). The Social Development Model: A theory of antisocial behavior. In JD Hawkins (Ed.) Delinquency & Crime: Current Theories (pp ). New York: Cambridge University Press. Jolliffe, D. & Farrington, D.P. (2006). Examining the relationship between low empathy and bullying. Aggressive Behavior, 32, Sampson, R.J. & Laub, J.H. (2005). A life-course view of the development of crime. AAPSS, 602, Additional Reading: Bufkin, J. L., & Luttrell, V. R. (2005). Neuroimaging Studies of Aggressive and Violent Behavior: Current Findings and Implications for Criminology and Criminal Justice. Trauma, Violence, and Abuse, 6, Kazdin, A.E., Kraemer, H.C., Kessler, R.C., Kupfer, D.J, & Offord, D.R. (1997). Contributions of risk-factor research to developmental psychopathology. Clinical Psychology Review, 17, 4, Maschi, T. (2006). Unraveling the link between trauma and male delinquency: The cumulative versus differential risk perspectives. Social Work, 51, 1, Neigh, G. N., Fillespie, C. F., & Nemeroff, C. B. (2009). The Neurobiological Toll of Child Abuse and Neglect. Trauma, Violence, and Abuse, 10, 4, Ungar, M. (2004). A constructionist discourse on resilience: Multiple contexts, multiple realities among at risk children and youth. Youth & Society, 35, 3, SESSION 7: Family and School Level Risk Factors Family and Domestic Risk Factors School-related risk factors Required Readings: **Herrenkohl, T.I. (2010). Family violence and co-occurring risk factors for children exposed to violence. In T. Herrenkohl, E. Aisenberg, J.H. Williams, & J. Jensen (Eds.). Violence in Context: Current Evidence on Risk, Protection, and Prevention (pp ). New York: Oxford University Press. Ruchkin, V. (2002). Family impact on youth violence. In R. Corrado, R. Roesch, S.D. Hart, & J.K. Gierowski (Eds.), Multi-problem violent youth: A foundation for me comparative research on needs, interventions, and outcomes (pp ). Washington, D.C.: IOS Press. Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 11

12 **Smith, C.A. & Thornberry, T.P. (1995). The relationship between childhood maltreatment and adolescent involvement in delinquency. Criminology, 33, **Wegner, E.L., Garcia-Santiago, O. Nishimura, S.T., & Hishinuma, E.S. (2001). Educational performance and attitudes toward school as risk-protective factors for violence: A study of the Asian/Pacific Islander youth violence prevention center. Psychology in the Schools, 47, 8, SESSION 8: Peer Risk Factors & Youth Gangs How do we define a youth gang? Youth gang members Gang membership and violence Gangs as international phenomena Required Readings: Decker, S. H. & Pyrooz, D.C. (2010). Gang violence worldwide: Context, culture, and country. In Small Arms Survey 2010: Gangs, groups, and guns (pp ). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Esbensen, F.A., Peterson, D., Taylor, T.J., Freng, A. (2009). Similarities and differences for violent offending and gang membership. The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, 42, 3, Klein, M.W. (2007). Street gangs and other groups. In M.W. Klein, Chasing after street gangs: a forty year journey (pp ). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall. Klein, M.W. (2007). Street gang members and non-gang youth. In M.W. Klein, Chasing after street gangs: a forty year journey (pp ). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall. Rocha, J.L. (2008). From telescopic to microscopic: Three youth gang members speak. In J.L. Rocha & Rodgers, D. Gangs of Nicaragua (pp ). Manchester, UK: Brooks World Poverty Institute. Additional Reading: Klein, M.W. & Maxson, C.L. (2006). Individual level context: Risk factors for joining gang. In M.W. Klein & C.L. Maxson, Street gang patterns and policies (pp ). New York: Oxford University Press. Ribando Seelke, C. (2009). Gangs in Central America. Congressional Research Service. Washington, D.C.: The Library of Congress. Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 12

13 Arana, A. (2005). How the street gangs took Central America. Foreign Affairs. May/June. Cruz, J.M. (2007). Street gangs in Central America. San Salvador, El Salvador: UCA Editores. SESSION 9: Programs, Policies, and Primary Risk What do we mean by primary risk? A review. Neighborhood Level Interventions Interpersonal Approaches The strengths and limitations of primary risk interventions Required Readings: Barker, G., and M. Fontes Review and Analysis of International Experience with Programs Targeted of At-Risk Youth. LASHC Paper Series 5, Washington D.C.: World Bank. (pp ). Farrington, D.P. & Welsh, B.C. (2005). Randomized experiments in criminology: What have we learned in the last two decades? Journal of Experimental Criminology, 1, Moser, C. & van Bronckhorst, B. (1999). Youth violence in Latin America and the Caribbean: Costs, causes, and interventions. LCR Sustainable Development Working Paper No 3. Washington D.C.: World Bank. Sampson, R. (2004). Neighborhood and community: Collective efficacy and community safety. New Economy, 11, Read chapter on prevention with 1 or more ethnic/racial groups: Section 2: Youth violence and prevention in specific ethnic groups. In N.G. Guerra & Smith, E.P. (Eds.), Preventing youth violence in a multicultural society (pp ). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Each group reviews one segment: Thorton. T.N., Craft, C.A., Dahlberg, L.L., Lynch, B.S., & Baer, K. (2006). Youth violence prevention: A sourcebook for community action. Atlanta: Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Available for free at: Parent and family (pp ) ** Home visiting (pp ) ** Social cognitive (pp ) ** Mentoring strategy (pp ) ** Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 13

14 Additional Reading: Hemphill, S.A., Smith, R., Toumbourou, J.W., Herrenkohl, T.I., Catalano, R.F, McMorris, B.J., Romaniuk, H. (2009). Modifiable determinants of youth violence in Australia and the United States: A longitudinal study. The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, 42, 3, Ohmer, M. & Beck, E. (2006). Citizen participation in neighborhood organizations in poor communities and its relationship to neighborhood and organizational collective efficacy. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 33, 1, SESSION 10: Programs, Policies, and Secondary Risk Interventions School-based interventions Interventions with high-risk youth Required Readings: Barker, G., and M. Fontes Review and Analysis of International Experience with Programs Targeted of At-Risk Youth. LASHC Paper Series 5, Washington D.C.: World Bank. (pp ). Jenson, J.M., Powell, A., & Forrest-Bank, S. (2010). Effective violence prevention approaches in school, family, and community settings. In T. Herrenkohl, E. Aisenberg, J.H. Williams, & J. Jensen (Eds.). Violence in Context: Current Evidence on Risk, Protection, and Prevention (pp ). New York: Oxford University Press. Philips, D. A. (2007). Punking and Bullying: Strategies in Middle School, High School and Beyond. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 22, Additional Reading: Greene, M.B. (2005). Reducing violence and aggression in schools. Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, 6, 3, Catalano, R.F., Loeber, R., & McKinney, K. (1999). School and community interventions to prevent serious and violent offending. Juvenile Justice Bulletin, October. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Washington, DC. SESSION 11: Tertiary Risk Interventions Intervention versus suppression Targeting youth involved in violent behavior Required readings: **Barker, G. &Fontes, M. (1996). Review and Analysis of International Experience with Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 14

15 Programs Targeted of At-Risk Youth. LASHC Paper Series 5, Washington D.C.: World Bank. (pp , ). **Herrenkohl, T.I. (2010). Resilience and protection from violence exposure in children: Implications for prevention and intervention programs with vulnerable populations. In T. Herrenkohl, E. Aisenberg, J.H. Williams, & J. Jensen (Eds.). Violence in Context: Current Evidence on Risk, Protection, and Prevention (pp ). New York: Oxford University Press. **Washington Office on Latin America (2008). Daring to care: community-based responses to youth gang violence in Central America and Central American immigrant communities in the United States. Washington, D.C.: WOLA. **Shaw, M. (2007). Comparative approaches to urban crime prevention focusing on youth. International Centre for the Prevention of Crime. Retrieved on Feb 1, 2010 from the World Wide Web: Additional Reading: Hawkins, J. D., Catalano, R. F., & Arthur, M. W. (2002). Promoting science-based prevention in communities. Addictive Behaviors, 27, SESSION 12: Programs and Policies for Gang Intervention Prevention, suppression, and intervention The dangers of suppression-only approaches Multifaceted Gang Interventions Required readings: Decker, S.H. (2003). Policing gangs and youth violence: Where do we stand, where do we go from here? In S.H. Decker (Ed.), Policing gangs and youth violence (pp ). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning. Greene, J.R. (2003). Gangs, community policing, and problem solving. In S.H. Decker (Ed.), Policing gangs and youth violence (pp. 3-16). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Thomson Learning. Klein, M.W. (2007). Street gang control. In M.W. Klein, Chasing after street gangs: a forty year journey (pp ). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall. Klein, M.W. (2007). The next ten years. In M.W. Klein, Chasing after street gangs: a forty year journey (pp ). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall. Rodgers, D., Muggah, R., & Stevenson, C. (2008). Gangs of Central America: Costs, causes, and interventions. In Small arms survey (pp. 1-44). Geneva: Small Arms Survey. Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 15

16 Additional Reading: Klein, M.W. & Maxson, C.L. (2006). Six major gang control programs. In M.W. Klein & C.L. Maxson, Street gang patterns and policies (pp ). New York: Oxford University Press. Klein, M.W. & Maxson, C.L. (2006). Multiple goals for gang control programs and policies. In M.W. Klein & C.L. Maxson, Street gang patterns and policies (pp ). New York: Oxford University Press. SESSION 13: The Future of Youth Violence Prevention and Intervention Culture, intersectionality, and interrelatedness of forms of violence Resilience and Protective Factors Unanswered Questions Required Reading: Aisenberg, E., Mehrotara, G., Gavin, A., & Bowman, J. (2010). Culture, intersectionality, and interrelatedness of forms of violence: Considerations in the study of violence and violence prevention. In T. Herrenkohl, E. Aisenberg, J.H. Williams, & J. Jensen (Eds.). Violence in Context: Current Evidence on Risk, Protection, and Prevention (pp ). New York: Oxford University Press. Farrell, A.D. & Flannery, D.J. (2006). Youth violence prevention: Are we there yet? Aggression and violent behavior, 11, Herrenkohl, T.I., Aisenberg, E., Williams, J.H. & Jenson, J.M. (2010). Lessons and challenges in the study and prevention of violence. In T. Herrenkohl, E. Aisenberg, J.H. Williams, & J. Jensen (Eds.). Violence in Context: Current Evidence on Risk, Protection, and Prevention (pp ). New York: Oxford University Press. Jenson, J.M. (2010). Advances and challenges in the prevention of youth violence In T. Herrenkohl, E. Aisenberg, J.H. Williams, & J. Jensen (Eds.). Violence in Context: Current Evidence on Risk, Protection, and Prevention (pp ). New York: Oxford University Press. Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 16

17 APPENDIX COURSE ASSIGNMENTS I: Discussion Board (factored into participation grade) Students will be randomly assigned to groups of five students. You will remain with these other four students throughout the semester as part of an online/in-class learning community. The discussion board conversations are important as they will provide a framework for in class discussions and for the critical exploration of the course material. On five occasions throughout the semester, your group will be asked to discuss a particular reading assignment. Each group member will be assigned one article that she/he will be responsible for as a discussion leader. For these articles, discussion leaders will be expected to write a 1 to 2 page online post that: (1) addresses the main themes discussed by the author(s), (2) offers critical observations and assessment, (3) and poses relevant questions for the discussion of other group members. For every week that you are not a discussion leader, you will be required to respond at least once to either an initial post or another student s comment. You will also be expected to review the discussion board conversations of other groups and to make at least one comment in a discussion board conversation other than their own. Student responses should be thoughtful and can be as short as one well-articulated paragraph, be it a comment or question. While the expression of opposing perspectives is encouraged, all online conversation should be conducted with a respectful tone consistent with that of in class conversation. The instructor will review all posts and participate in online conversations as appropriate. This semester we will become a multifaceted learning community that spends 13 weeks engaging in material relevant to social work practice. Course participation is not measured by how many times a person speaks in class or how many questions they ask. While these are elements of academic engagement, participation involves a semester's worth of engagement with the course content, including the critical analysis of assigned readings and thoughtful involvement class activities. The discussion board is one way that course engagement can reach beyond the 90 minutes that we are together every week in class to allow for multiple means of scholarly and professional dialogue. II: Experiential Learning Exercise (25% of Grade, Due Week 5) Social workers study youth violence and youth gangs not in the abstract or in the pursuit of intellectual curiosity alone, but rather to better understand the socioeconomic realities underpinning these phenomena, the lives of those affected by violence and crime, and the ways in which the problems of violence can be ameliorated. Multiple institutions, organizations, and groups directly impact the lives of youth at risk for violence, those engaged in violence, and those impacted by the consequences of violence. Each student will be asked to submit a 3-5 paper concerning one of the following options: Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 17

18 Option #1 This option is for students who have not participated as members of / participants in a high risk youth development or youth violence prevention organization. With 3 to 5 other students, set up a meeting with an individual or group involved in highrisk youth intervention or youth violence prevention. To facilitate this process, a number of contacts have been established with: (1) youth involved in violence prevention programs, gang intervention programs, and community organizations, (2) social workers and community activists engaged in high risk youth intervention and youth violence prevention on a regular basis, (3) police officers who specialize in high-risk youth and youth violence. If you are interested in meeting with an individual or group involved in youth violence prevention in a different capacity, please see the instructor. If your practicum placement relates to high risk youth or youth violence prevention, do not meet with youth from your organization or with your direct supervisor. You may meet with a social worker within your organization, but you are strongly encouraged to explore other contexts. To prepare for these meetings, you and your group members may want to put together a list of themes or questions that can guide you in your conversation with these "field experts." Components of the paper: 1. Briefly describe the meeting (the person or people you met with, events that took place, theme or themes of discussion). If you met with a young person involved in youth violence or gangs, please change the name of the youth and any important personal identifiers. 2. Identify at least two published research articles relating to the individual(s) you met with, the themes that arose in conversation, or the aspect of youth violence prevention that is most fitting. Write a 1 to 2 paragraph summary of those articles and how those articles fit -- or do not fit -- with your experience. 3. Discuss your overall assessment of the meeting and the aspect of youth violence prevention that the individual(s) you met with is involved in. Be specific about your views concerning strengths, weaknesses, and ethical dilemmas. Finally, what have you learned from this experience, from the process of selecting a meeting to processing your reaction to the meeting itself, that will inform your practice as a social worker? Option #2 This option is for students who have participated as members of / participants in a high risk youth development or youth violence prevention organization. Components of the paper: Please discuss the manner in which you have made use of the support offered to you by any relevant high risk youth organizations, including only that information which you feel comfortable sharing with the instructor. Has participation been positive? Have you any reservations about such organizations? What ought human services professionals to know about high risk youth development and youth violence prevention organizations in order to best serve high-risk youth? Also, identify at least two published research articles related to youth violence prevention and write a 1 to 2 paragraph summary of those articles and how those articles fit with your experiences. Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 18

19 III: Policy Consultant Assignment (60% of Grade) The major assignment for this course is to put together a policy briefing on the topic of youth violence prevention. The final assignment consists of two basic parts: a. A demographic briefing (20% of Grade) b. A policy briefing with concrete recommendations (40% of Grade) The assignment goes as such: You are approached by the mayor and the members of the City Council in the city or town of your choice. You are told that there has been a recent upsurge in youth violence and that many citizens have voiced their concern. There is some concern about youth gangs as well. As an expert in youth violence prevention, the mayor has turned to you as a consultant before she/he formulates a response for the near future and over the next few years. Part One (Due Week 8, in class): Your task for part 1 is as follows: In 3 to 5 pages, put together a briefing that presents the relevant demographic characteristics of the city, town, or neighborhood of your choice. Drawing from appropriate resources (see below), paint a quantitative picture as to the reality of youth violence, crime, and delinquency. Be as succinct as possible and maintain an awareness that quantitative descriptions are very important yet can be quite dull if not presented clearly and creatively. Use graphs or tables where appropriate. There is no shortage of information on the Internet or in select publications as to the levels of violence, delinquency, and victimization in the United States. Some sources will give you great national level data while others will allow you to look at cities and even neighborhoods. Part of being a social worker professional who can serve as a consultant for matters relating to youth violence is a facility in terms of identifying relevant data and presenting it in simple, readily digestible terms. Below are a few Internet sites that may be helpful in getting you started: U.S. Census: American Fact Finder. The U.S. Census puts together the American Fact Finder page which allows for an easy way to get important demographic information on the level of area code or census tract. With just a few mouse clicks you can find out information about the age, race, income, gender, housing status, and much more for the geographic area of your interest. This is a great place to start in terms of demographics. Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 19

20 Federal Bureau of Investigation s Uniform Crime Statistics Page. This page includes national, state, and city statistics on a variety of criminal and violent indicators such as: violent crime, forcible rape, aggravated assault, homicide, and many other particular crimes. One of the benefits of this page is that you can track changes in violent behavior longitudinally such that you can compare levels of violence in 2007, 2008, and 2009 if you are looking to show a trend. There is a wealth of knowledge to be explored in this page. The Bureau of Justice Statistics. This page has nationally representative data as to a variety of criminal activities. Information on this page touches of on a variety of topics relating to crime, violence, gangs, and violent victimization. The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The OJJDP puts together a fantastic statistical briefing book that can give you information about juvenile violence, delinquency, victimization, and violence exposure. There is a wealth of information here. Part Two (Due week 13, in class): Many people, including the mayor her/himself, are quite frightened by the degree of violence in their communities and are looking for a quick and unequivocal response. The chief of police says that he and his officers are ready to fill up the jails whenever they get the green light. You are aware of not-so-subtle racist and classist undertones in the speech of the mayor, city Council, and many active citizens. However, there are many open-minded and soft hearted individuals among this group who are open to what someone like you has to offer. Admittedly, the mayor and the city Council know almost nothing about youth violence and youth violence prevention. In order to orient themselves before taking action, they have turned to you. Your task for part 2 is as follows: In either a written briefing (6-8 pages), a presentation (15-20 minutes), or some other means of communication (consult with the professor), succinctly brief the mayor, city councilmembers, and concerned citizens about the basics youth violence prevention. Then, given your best judgment about the situation and the setting -- and what you have learned this semester about youth violence and violence prevention -- make your best policy recommendations in the interest of the well-being of the city and the city's youth. Be sure to contour your briefing and policy recommendations to the demographic and violence statistics you examined and presented in part one. While some basic violence prevention principles are meaningful in the abstract, most are not and must be rooted in the concrete socioeconomic and cultural realities of the communities in question. Good luck! Youth Violence and Social Welfare Policy, p. 20

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