Call for Research Proposals. Innovation, R&D Investment and Productivity in Latin American & Caribbean Firms. The Chilean Case

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Call for Research Proposals. Innovation, R&D Investment and Productivity in Latin American & Caribbean Firms. The Chilean Case"

Transcription

1 Latin American & Caribbean Research Network INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK (IDB) Research Department (RES) Call for Research Proposals Innovation, R&D Investment and Productivity in Latin American & Caribbean Firms The Chilean Case INTELIS Department of Economics University of Chile -1-

2 MOTIVATION 3 The Global and Regional Context 3 The Chilean Case 4 OBJECTIVES 6 DATA 7 DESCRIPTION OF THE DATA 7 SUMMARY OF THE DATA 8 EIT QUESTIONNAIRE (See Annex-1 zip-file) 9 ENIA QUESTIONNAIRE (F1 & F3) (See Annex-1 zip-file) 9 METHODOLOGY 10 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 10 CASE STUDY 15 CURRICULUM VITAE 18 CLAUDIO BRAVO-ORTEGA 18 JOSÉ MIGUEL BENAVENTE 20 ROBERTO ALVAREZ 22 LUCAS NAVARRO 24 CARMEN CONTRERAS 26 JOSÉ LUIS CONTRERAS 27 BUDGET (See Annex-2 pdf-file) 28 ANNEX A 29 REFERENCES 34-2-

3 I. MOTIVATION The relationship between productivity and R&D has been a topic of inquiry since the early work of Schultz (1953) and Griliches (1958). Since then, this area of research has produced a significant amount of empirical and subsequent theoretical work. While Zvi Griliches posed and approached most of the empirical questions, recent theoretical works credit a substantial role to R&D as an engine of productivity and hence economic growth. (see, for example Romer, 1990; Helpman and Grossman 1991; Rivera-Batiz and Romer, 1991; Aghion and Howitt, 1992). From an empirical perspective, the literature has found that close to one half of the income per capita and growth rates differentials across countries can be explained by differences in TFP (See Hall and Jones (1999)), but most importantly it has also found that R&D activities could explain up to seventy five percent of TFP growth rates, once externalities are considered (See Griliches (1995)). Our research proposal aims to contribute to understand the relationship between R&D and productivity in Latin America, by focusing in the Chilean experience. In the next paragraphs we first revise the regional and global context of R&D activities and then we develop our empirical and case study methodologies. The Global and Regional Context The rapid economic growth of East Asian economies has called into attention the role that R&D activities might have over the course of development. Let s take Korea as an example, while in the sixties its R&D over GDP ratio was closed to 0.35%, during the four subsequent decades this figure increased almost constantly around 2.4% during recent years. This increment has been credited as one of the causes of the significant TFP and GDP per capita growth experienced by Korea since the sixties. While TFP s yearly growth averaged 1.11% for the period , the income per capita grew over 6% each year during the same period 1. In contrast, Latin American and Caribbean countries have shown during the last decade a very modest rate of economic growth despite unusually favorable economic conditions. Unfortunately, this poor performance it is not new in the region. Indeed, during the last four decades of the twentieth century the income per capita in the region grew a 1.44% per year, while TFP did so in a modest 0.29%. Chile shadows when compared with East Asian countries over the same time period (See Table 1 in the Annex A). The previous figures on the poor economic performance of Latin America can be better understood by looking the R&D effort of the region compared with other regions of the world. (See Table 2 in the Annex A). Indeed, this indicator shows that the OECD s 1 See Bravo-Ortega and García (2007) -3-

4 decade-average during the period fluctuated between 1.87% and 2.25%. In the case of Scandinavian countries the R&D effort increased from 1.12% in the sixties to 2.71% in the nineties. In contrast, R&D expenditure in Latin America fluctuated between 0.36% and 0.52% of GDP during the same period of time. In theory, R&D expenditure could increase productivity through different channels. First, it makes it possible to produce new goods and services that bring with them more effective use of existing resources. Second, it may make it easier and faster to adapt the benefits of technological progress elsewhere in the world to local realities. Third, R&D activities elsewhere in the world may increase domestic productivity through learning embodied in new technologies and productive processes and the import of goods and services with technology incorporated. Notwithstanding this, the relationship between R&D and productivity does not seem so obvious in the Latin American countries. Thus, the unavoidable question that we will try to answer is: Why is the R&D effort in Latin America and in Chile particularly so low? So far, low private-sector investment in R&D+I in the Region has been explained by financial market failures, low human capital endowments, macro-economic volatility, insufficient provision of public goods, and shortcomings in the regulatory framework, among other reasons 2. The Chilean Case At first glance, the Chilean case does not deviate much from the historical pattern of Latin America. Although for some indicators Chile ranks on top regional positions during the nineties, this has not been necessarily true during the preceding decades. Furthermore, when compared to developed countries in most of the R&D measures Chile lags behind in a VERY significant manner. Table 3 in the Annex A shows the R&D expenditure over GDP and R&D per capita (in 1996 constant dollars). Although in recent years Chilean R&D expenditure has surpassed the 0.6% of GDP, still below the 0.84% that Brazil averaged for the nineties and very close to the 0.52% regional average during the same period. By the same token the average R&D per capita in the region was close to 33 dollars during the nineties and the Chilean average was 46 dollars, still below the 54 dollars that Brazil spent on average over the same period. With respect to the sources of funding for R&D and according to UNESCO by the year 2004 the main source was the private sector with 46% percent, the government and universities financed the rest. By the same token Chilean R&D capacity as measured by the number of researchers performs relatively well in the regional context, without deviating much of 2 Innovation Strategy, National Innovation for Competitiveness Council of Chile, Vol. I and Vol

5 the figures shown by Argentina or Brazil once you control by scale. However, when comparing Chilean capacity with those of developed countries the gap in R&D capacity turns out to be very significant. Let s take as an example the number of researchers (head count) per million inhabitants. According to UNESCO by the year 2004 Chile had 1,139 researchers per million inhabitants, Argentina had 1,203 and Brazil had 782. In contrast Korea had 4,908 researchers per million inhabitants and Japan even more with 6,492 researchers per million inhabitants. On the side of the R&D output there seems to be a very poor performance of the region when compared to leading countries and a very poor performance of Chile when compared with regional leading countries. We consider the number of patents granted in the US to Latin American researchers not living in the US a good indicator of this performance. Table 4 shows the regional performance at this regard. While an average of 858 patents were granted annually to Australian researchers during the period , Latin America as a whole obtained 258 patents. According to Bravo-Ortega and Garcia (2007) within Latin America Brazil obtained an average of 108 patents, Argentina 53.6 and Chile a modest 13 patents per year. Chile maintains a big gap in other indicators as the number of publications with respect to developed countries. For example, Australian researchers publish close to 1,000 articles per million inhabitants per year, similar figure is obtained in the case of Finland, whereas Chilean researchers publish 160 articles per million inhabitants a year 3. In the year 2005 and due to the poor indicators of innovative activity shown by Chile the government decided to modernize the national innovation system. Since then Chile has been designing and implementing a national strategy of innovation for competitiveness. In addition to what has been already mentioned. The general diagnosis is that the institutional setup for promoting R&D, innovation and related activities suffers of severe coordination problems between agents even within government agencies. Critical mass in some research fields and also at the productive level are almost non existent, and research in general is driven by curiosity from academics and scientists. As expected, the link between university and its demand from the productive sectors is very weak. Agencies like technology brokers, technology transfer offices or even technology extension offices are almost non existent in the country. These issues raise interesting questions for the case of Chile despite the fact that the country shows successful economic results at the aggregate level. It seems that more work has to be done in order to achieve the government goal of becoming a developed country in 15 years as suggested by the National Innovation for Competitiveness Council. In our study cases will focus in verifying this diagnosis and understanding better its origins and implications. 3 Figures collected by the National Innovation for Competitiveness Council of Chile. -5-

6 With the exception of a few studies, there is not much evidence on the impact of research activities on productivity in Chile (See Benavente (2006)). Previous results show that the link between both is very weak without getting into much detail on the causes of such weakness. In our empirical section we develop a methodology that will allow us to obtain the most up to date estimations of the link between R&D and productivity and its determinants in Chile. On the other hand, we observe several productive sectors that have performed quite well in recent years like salmon farming, pulp and paper, pork production and wine without having a clear idea about the role played by research on their performance. Moreover, despite the existence of public support in promoting research activities at the university level and partially at the firm level, evidence is not clear that these successful stories are due to or despite public support. Alternatively, it is not clear if this performance was directly or indirectly related with the creation and use of new knowledge at the firm level that gave these sectors a competitive advantage in the world markets. We will also cover these issues in the study cases we propose. II. OBJECTIVES In order to tackle our research questions including those suggested by the call for research proposals, our study will share the three main objectives suggested by the IADB team with a particular focus in policy design. Thus our main objectives will be: 1. To establish whether Chilean private investment in R&D+I has an impact on productivity growth, the extent and characteristics of that impact, and how and why such an impact is taking place; 2. To produce a thorough characterization of the innovative behavior of Chilean firms by exploiting the information provided in the national innovation surveys and other relevant sources; 3. To establish the main determinants of innovative behavior at the firm level, following a consistent methodology and a comparable analytical framework. 4. To accomplish the previous objectives providing useful directions for policy design. -6-

7 III. DATA A. DESCRIPTION OF THE DATA As we mentioned before we will use three main sources of information for the quantitative section, as well as personal interviews and ad hoc questionnaires for the case study section. The following paragraphs describe briefly each of them. A.1 ENIA This survey is available for every year since 1979 and is conducted by the Instituto Nacional de Estadísticas (INE). Observations come from the manufacturing plants according to ISIC. In our case we will use the main characteristics that come from Formulario Número 1 (Form 1, from now on F1) which captures economic and accounting information about the firm 4 such as (i) Labor inputs, (ii) Wages, (iii) Capital goods, (iv) Costs, and (v) Revenues. The information contained in Formulario Número 3 (Form 3, from now on F3) allows us to identify the specific goods that the plants produce and export. In particular F3 includes information on value and quantities of each of the produced and eventually exported plants' products following CPC 5 and other specific product codes 6. These two forms can be linked at the plant-level using the so called Número Único Identificador (Unique Identification Number, from now on NUI). The period that we will use is for the case of F1, and for for the case of F3. A.2 EIT This survey initially used as a sampling framework the ENIA, now also includes: (i) the mining sector, (ii) the electric sector, and (iii) others. The survey is taken every three years since The questionnaire follows the guidelines of the Frascati s Manual from OECD associated to R&D and Innovation. The main information that we can obtain from each survey consists of the last two periods of the firm. That is, for the 1995-survey we have the previous history of 1994 and 1993, and so on. The variables that we will use are associated with: (i) The kinds of 4 Almost 400 variables that describes the dynamics of the firm. 5 Which fulfills the same requirements than ISIC, but tit helps to identify raw materials used in the production as well as the main goods produced by the firm. 6 For detailed information on the mix of commodities used as plants inputs we may also need to use Form 4 from ENIA. -7-

8 innovations that the firm has done the past two years, (ii) The goals of those innovations, (iii) Property rights and Know-how, (iv) Difficulties to innovate, (v) Relevance of the innovation in the business, (vi) Innovative activities, (vii) Financing innovation, (viii) Expenditure in R&D, (ix) Labor skills, and (x) Perspectives concerning future innovations. In our case we have access to each of the surveys, that is: , , , , and In each case we can matched these observations with the F1 and F3 using for that the NUI code. B. SUMMARY OF THE DATA Table 6. ENIA SUMMARY (FORM 3, TOTAL) Year Plants Products ISIC7 ISIC6 ISIC Table 7. EIT SUMMARY Year Plants Variables

9 Table 8. ENIA SUMMARY (FORM 1) Year Plants C. EIT QUESTIONNAIRE (See Annex-1 zip-file) D. ENIA QUESTIONNAIRE (F1 & F3) (See Annex-1 zip-file) -9-

10 IV. METHODOLOGY This research will be structured in two parts. The first part will analyze the impact of several indicators of innovation on productivity. To do that we will use two different sources of information: (i) Encuesta Nacional Industrial Anual (ENIA), and (ii) Encuesta de Innovación Tecnológica (EIT). It is important to notice that these surveys will be matched at the plant-level using an identification number provided by the Instituto Nacional de Estadísticas 7 (INE). The second part of our research will focus on innovation and productivity using a case study methodology at the firm-level/clusters/ value of chains. We will proceed with these two parts sequentially due to the fact that our empirical section will certainly provide additional and relevant information for the study cases. Nonetheless, we have to mention that we aim to have by beginning of December of 2008 the methodology and the basic description for the firm-level/cluster/value chains that we will use in our case study. A. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS A.1 Introduction This part of the project will follow the empirical research line started by Crépon, Duguet and Mairesse (1998) about the impact of R&D on innovation and innovation on firms' productivity. It is based on a model which takes into account the whole process of innovation that includes decisions of firms to engage in R&D activities, the results of these efforts and their impact on productivity. There are several empirical studies analyzing the determinants of innovation in Chile using different numbers of the EIT. Crespi and Katz (1999) and Crespi (1999) have analyzed how industry and plant characteristics may explain differences in innovation using the first version of this survey. Benavente (2005) extends this analysis using three versions of the EIT. Alvarez (2001) and Alvarez and Roberson (2004) focus on trade-related variables as main drivers of innovation activity. There is, however, little evidence on the effects of innovation on productivity in the Chilean case 8. One exception is the work by Benavente (2006) and for this reason we will use his paper as our benchmark of analysis for the case of Chile. Following Crépon et al. (1998), Benavente (2006) finds that research and innovative activities are related with firm size and 7 National Institute of Statistics. 8 For Argentina there is a work by Chudnovsky, López, and Pupato (2006) -10-

11 market power. Also he finds that firm s productivity is not affected by innovative results nor by research expenditures in the short run. On the first hand, we may replicate the results previously obtained and significantly extend the analysis by the use of new and more detailed information. To do that, we have two main information sources: (i) ENIA plants panel data (Form 1, ), and ENIA plants and products panel data (Form 3, ). The last data set includes detailed information on the mix of products produced and exported by plants as documented by Navarro (2008), and (ii) 5 versions of the EIT (1995, 1998, 2001, 2005 and 2007) One strength of this information is that we can analyze not only the impact of innovation on current productivity, but also whether there are lagged effects. Since ENIA only covers industries in manufacturing, the relationship between innovation and productivity will be constrained to the manufacturing sector. On the second hand, given that we have information on quantity and values for the plants' product mix, we may improve the procedure to measure firms productivity taking into account firms decisions about which goods to produce. This is an emerging issue in the literature as pointed out by Bernard, Redding and Schott (2005) and De Loecker (2005). Decisions about which product markets to enter are often made at a more disaggregate level than the data normally used for econometric studies. This mismatch is important for the measurement of productivity because the products that firms switch into may utilize different production techniques than the products firms leave behind. As a result, variation in firms observed performance may be driven by unobserved product choices in addition to underlying (and observable) firm characteristics. In order to control for this sort of problems and other traditional ones in the measurement of productivity, we will follow recent work done by Levinsohn and Petrin (2000), Levinsohn and Melitz (2002), Katayama, Lu and Tybout (2003), De Loecker (2005), Martin (2005), and Bernard, Redding and Schott (2005). Given the data available, we aim to test most of the traditional hypotheses related with industrial innovation. Many studies stressed that large firms are in a favorable position for innovation due to their size, market share and market power. Market concentration allows the existence of monopolistic rents that enable firms within the industry to finance R&D projects. In a perfectly competitive world private investment in R&D would not be feasible. Additionally, when imperfections in capital markets are recognized, large firms tend to have greater capabilities of securing the necessary resources to finance R&D projects baring uninsurable risk. Moreover, the potential total impact of the results of an R&D project can be significantly greater in large firms given larger sale volumes. However, there exist several external forces which stimulate firms to innovate despite their size and market power. The first of such forces is based on demand factors, such as market growth. On the other side, the role of scientific advancements in stimulating industrial innovative efforts may influence the path and rate of technology advance. -11-

12 At the same time we will incorporate in our analysis other aspects which determine firms to innovate. Those include mainly buying vs. originating know-how; adopting vs. creating technologies; formal vs. informal innovation activities. These issues are generally associated to the innovation costs and the time it takes to perceive the returns of innovation, especially for SMEs. In these cases the EIT survey will be a key input in our analysis which hopefully will give some light on these issues. The empirical estimation procedure aims to capture the effect of some of these variables over the research and innovation effort by firms. We will estimated a four-equation model to explain the determinants of research and development, innovation, and finally productivity. Given the design of the surveys some restrictions need to be imposed on the data requiring a different econometric treatment. A.2 The Model As in Benavente (2006) and Crépon et al. (1998), we will empirically model the whole innovation process. We will assume that firm characteristics, market structure and technological variables affect not only investments in R&D but also the successful introduction of new products and processes into markets. The baseline model consists of four equations 9, two for research, one for innovation and one for productivity, each of them requiring a different econometric treatment. We will rely on a Generalized Tobit framework to model the decision to invest and the amount invested in research activities. It consists of two separate equations: (i) one related to the decision to invest in R&D, and (ii) the other to the amount of resources involved. More precisely, we assume that there exists a latent dependent variable g i for the firm i given the following equation, g i = x i0 b 0 + u i0 (1) where x i0 is a vector of explanatory variables 10, b 0 the associated coefficient vector and u i0 an error term, where represent some decision criterion like the expected present benefits associated with a research project. The econometrician observes that resources are invested in R&D activities if gi is positive or bigger than a given threshold. 9 Here we follow the expressions of Crépon, Duguet and Mairesse (1998). 10 In our case we will use variables such as: employment, average market share, number of industry segments, demand pull and technology push dummies. -12-

13 We then assume that a latent or true intensity of research k i equation: for firm i is determined by a second k i = x i1 b 1 + u i1 (2) where k i = k i the current R&D expenditure of firm i when it is engaged in research activities i.e. when g i is bigger than the minimum industrial threshold. Here k i and k i are both expressed in logarithms, x i1 is a vector of the explanatory variables, b 1 the associated coefficient vector and u i1 an error term that summarizes omitted determinants and other sources of unobserved heterogeneity. In general, it is assumed that innovative output is related to enhancements in the productivity capacity of the firm. However, in empirical work there exist several ways to proxy innovation output. More common proxies are the number of patents 11 or share of innovative sales. The EIT only provides information on the later. In that case the firm is asked what is the percentage share of its sales coming from products launched in the last three years and/or what are the results of the implementation of absolutely new production techniques during the same period 12. In our case we may also use as another proxy some questions associated to product innovations as well as process innovation from F3 (ENIA). Hence, we will assume that the underlying (unobserved) true share of sales t i can be viewed as an innovation intensity variable where innovation may be measured: (i) by the number of sales weighted innovations using for that EIT, or (ii) by the share of the new products/processes made by firm, whether it is new for the market or for the firm only, using for that F3. We can also use the plants-products information of F3 to obtain another measure of innovation at annual frequency. Potential measures involve number of products per plant, product entry by plant, or alternatively product churning, i.e. the simultaneous add and drop of products by a plant. Navarro (2008) presents information on the prevalence of these activities in the sample period. In addition to this, we can consider the creation and destruction of products not only at the plant level but also at the market level. That is, we would be able to identify the dynamics of product lives not only at the plant level but also at the aggregate level. This would allow us to obtain more detailed information on the product innovation process by plants. Since the share is only known by intervals, we can specify the innovative sales equation as an Ordered/Simple Probit model: t i = α K k i + x i2 b 2 + u i2 (3) 11 EIT mention about number of patents, but only on average a 10% of the sample respond positively. 12 The firm has to answer on a four-point scale: 0-10%,10-30%, 30-70%, and %. -13-

14 where t i is the underlying (unobservable) true share expressed as a logarithm, x i2 is a vector of explanatory variables 13, b 2 the associated coefficient vector and u i2 an error term which we will assume to be normally distributed with mean zero and variance σ 2 2. The coefficient α K is the elasticity of the percentage share of innovative sales relative to research expenditure, a measure of the return or impact of research on innovation output, x i2 is a vector of exogenous variables. The last equation of the system is that for productivity. Following the above mentioned literature we have: q i = α I t i + x i3 b 3 + u i3 (4) where q i stands for productivity measured as a logarithm, x 3i is a vector of explanatory variables 14. The coefficient α I is the elasticity of total factor productivity with respect to innovation output, and b 3 is a vector of coefficients related to the elasticity of scale, that of physical capital and the skill composition parameters, reflecting percentage differences in efficiency of skilled labour relative to unskilled labour respectively. As we mentioned above, one strength of the information available is that we may capture lagged effects of innovation using productivity measured at lead years. As suggested, despite the fact that the essence of the empirical strategy follows closely previous work done by participants of the proposal, there are several new issues that we want to explore in the estimation strategy, among them: (i) new information from the Form 3 of ENIA which now includes a interesting product disaggregation that may enrich the definition of innovation by its results, and at the same time be matched at the plant level with new information related with innovation practices and procedures which will permit building a panel structure database following firms from almost a decade. (ii)we may explore biases in productivity looking at multi-product plants versus one-product plants trying to correct for non productivity biases like price movements, quality improvements or the like. 13 In our case we will use variables such as: employment, average market share, number of industry segments, demand pull and technology push dummies. 14 In our case we will use variables such as: physical capital per employee, shares of skill labor and unskilled. -14-

15 B. CASE STUDY Case studies may enrich and complement the analysis made from quantitative data because it allows to check the main findings of the previous analysis. Notwithstanding this, we are going to additionally study some sectors that do not appear in the data. Thus, we will have the opportunity not just to analyze but also complement our research on the impact on productivity in relevant sectors beyond the scope that the survey have considered so far. In this project we would like to realize in-depth interviews in at least three main areas or sectors of interest. The main objective of this section will be to understand the role of innovation for the growth and the development process of successful sectors, checking whether the econometric finding are considered valid by the firms. Since mid-70s a significant number of new exporting sectors have emerged in Chile (See Agosin and Bravo-Ortega (2007)). These new activities have had a significant role in economic growth in Chile (See Meller (1995)). The emergence of these sectors makes Chile an interesting country to look for study cases due to the fact that they are dynamic sectors that demand constant improvements, associated to innovation, as well as having strong exposition to shocks commonly associated to trade. Some important factors that have been studied in the literature are: (i) the impact of trade liberalization, (ii) the effect of exchange depreciation, (iii) the entrepreneurial activity of the state, (iv) state-sponsored accumulation of factors of production, and (v) the encouragement of FDI where there was potential comparative advantages. These dynamic sectors have arisen almost entirely in segments of the food and forestry, such as: (i) pulp and paper, (ii) fruits and vegetables, (iii) fishmeal, (iv) other marine products, (v) cultivated salmon, (vi) pork meat, (vii) poultry, (viii) milk products, and (ix) wine 15. Besides that these sectors have been successful in terms of growth, economic relevance or world positioning, there are also new sectors that have appeared associated to technologies/services mainly due to government policies through public institutions 16. The first sector to be studied requires permanent product (or services) innovation in order to growth, the IT sector. Firms to be interviewed show significant sales growth during the last five years, both at national and international level. The second sector to be analyzed will be the Salmon cluster. This sector, based in natural resources, has been growing since beginning of 1980 s, and it has always generated a demand for innovation, especially in technology adaptation and in their processes. Additionally, the government has played a significant role in its development, especially government agencies like CORFO and Fundación Chile, which makes this sector particularly relevant for a case study. 15 Agosin and Bravo-Ortega (2007). 16 Towards an Innovation National Strategy. Vol II. National Innovation for Competitiveness Council of Chile. -15-

16 Finally, the third, forestry, is very relevant for the country exports, while the fourth sector, pork farming, has developed quite strongly during recent years. The growth of these two sectors apparently has not been necessarily related to innovation. Apparently, during the first years of their development most of the innovations within those sectors are related to a management strategies as well as marketing strategies 17. For example, the take off of the pork industry came with the arrival of Nippon Meat 18, which started to export frozen pork meat to the Japanese and South Korean market 19. In economic terms pork meat has been very successful since mid-1990s. Before that, there were some exports of this product since the late 1980s mainly to Latin American markets, obtaining at that time revenues for US$ 6.6 million (in 2000 US dollars). In recent years the exports of this sector has reached US$ million (in 2000 dollars). In recent years the pork and forestry sectors appear to be increasing their investments on R&D. For example, the two main forestry companies established in 2004 a technological consortium. This behavior is certainly a good example of the limits in productivity growth that might have taken place without investing in R&D, and that could have driven the decision to change their innovative behavior. We will focus our case study in the biggest companies in terms of exports, within each sector. Expected in-depth interviews will consider firms detail on Table 5 (See Annex A). The methodology for the case studies will consist of doing in-depth interviews, using as criteria Chilean ownership of the firms and relevant amount of exports within the sector. In case that it is not possible to materialize any interview we will opt by changing the sector rather than looking for new companies. We will contact at least one relevant person of each company (CEO or Plant Manager), who should know the history and the main changes made by the firm through the years. However, previous experiences had taught us that to obtain these types of interviews is not an easy task. Mainly because managers lack of time and also since there are many studies and surveys related with innovation in the country at the moment, which implies that managers disposition to answer long interviews is reduced 20. Additionally we will obtain information from other sources (for example, relevant institutions), interviewing other experts in those sectors like researchers or government employees in charge of national programs aimed to encourage innovation and production (CORFO, Fundación Chile, INNOVA, etc.). 17 The Emergence of New Successful Export Activities in Latin America: The Case of Chile, Agosin and Bravo- Ortega (2007). 18 A subsudiary of a major Japanese multinational. Source, Agosin and Bravo-Ortega (2007). 19 Japan and South Korea have represented on average during this 10 years of exportation growth almost 80% of the exports. 20 in order to increase our chances to interview we may request the IADB support for sending formal letters to the companies. -16-

17 Topics to be treated during the interviews will be contrasted with results for these sectors from ENIA and EIT where applicable. Main topics will be: 1. The local form of industrial organization prevailing within each unit of analysis; 2. How firms/clusters/value chains relate to the country s innovation systems which seek to enhance enterprise learning and innovation strategies (local/regional/sectorial); 3. The role played by specific actors/agents/organizations in stimulating or inhibiting innovation (This will be contrasted with data from EIT, section 9 and 10); 4. The technology sourcing strategies of firms and how governance patterns in value chains determine technology diffusion and absorption among firms (This will be contrasted with data from EIT, section 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 11); 5. The role played by the dynamics of the technological frontier at the world and country level, that is, whether firms/clusters/value chains are in sectors that around the world or in the country experience a rapid expansion in the technological frontier; 6. The role played by comparative advantages that is, whether these are industries/activities in which the country is a main player; 7. The role of coordination failures in systematically hindering innovative behavior and how these failures affect each unit of analysis differently (This will be contrasted with data from EIT, section 3 and 6); 8. The role of financial and other market failures and how they impose different constraints on each group of firms/cluster/value chain (This will be contrasted with data from EIT, section 6); 9. The role of the regulatory and overall business environment and how it constrains each group of firms/cluster/value chain (This will be contrasted with data from EIT, section 3 and 6). -17-

18 V. CURRICULUM VITAE A. CLAUDIO BRAVO-ORTEGA MAIN FIELDS OF RESEARCH. -Economics of Innovation and Growth, International Economics, Development Economics. -Professional and academic references: Maurice Obstfeld (UC at Berkeley), Daniel Lederman (World Bank), Daniel Hojman (Harvard). PRE AND GRADUATE STUDIES DEGREE DATE FIELD -UC at Berkeley Ph.D Economics -Universidad de Chile M.Sc Industrial Engineering (Max. Distinctions) -Universidad de Chile Engineering 1998 Industrial (Maximum Distinctions) -Universidad de Chile B.Sc Engineering Sciences (Distinction). PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE, RESEARCH & CONSULTING -Visiting Professor, Science and Technology Policy Research (SPRU), University of Sussex. September up to date. -Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, Universidad de Chile. July 2004-up to date. -Consultant World Bank, June 2007-November Topic: Governance in the Chilean NIS. -Consultant Korean Development Institute, Spring Topic: Free Trade Liberalization in Chile. -Consultant, Inter American Development Bank, March 2006-March Topic: The Emergence of New Successful Export Activities in Latin America: The Case of Chile. (Sectors Studied: Wine, Blueberries, Pork) -Consultant, Pro-Chile (Export Promotion Agency), Ministry of Foreign Affairs, March 2005-March Topic: Estimation of Direct and Indirect Employment in Exporting Sectors. (Sectors: Wine, Salmon, Pulp). -Consultant, World Bank, Chief Economist Office for Latin America and the Caribbean region. Research Topics: International Economics, Development and Innovation. June (several occasions), based in Washington DC-USA and Santiago- Chile. -Summer Internship, World Bank, Chief Economist Office for Latin America and the Caribbean region. Research Topic: Wages, Trade and Geography in Brazil. (Supervisor Daniel Lederman), Summer Summer Internship, Chilean Government. Advisor of the Minister of Economics, Mining and Energy, Mr. Jose De Gregorio. Topic: Modeling the impact of Natural Resources on Economic Growth and Human Capital Accumulation, Summer Researcher, Center for Applied Economics at the Universidad de Chile, 1998 June Research Assistant, CIEPLAN (Corp. de Investigación Económica para Latinoamérica), TEACHING -Professor Master and Ph.D. course on Trade, Innovation and Growth (with Roberto Alvarez, CBCh), Universidad de Chile, Spring Professor Master and Ph.D. course on Macroeconomic Theory II, Universidad de Chile, Spring Professor of undergraduate International Trade Theory, Universidad de Chile, Fall and Spring Professor of Macroeconomics, MBA Universidad de Chile, Teacher Assistant of Macroeconomics, Department of Economics, UC at Berkeley, Fall Teacher Assistant of Public Finance, Department of Economics, UC at Berkeley, Spring

19 PUBLICATIONS AND WORKING PAPERS Exploring the Relationship between R&D and Productivity: A Country-Level Study (with Alvaro García). Documento de Trabajo Nº 282, Departamento de Economía de la Universidad de Chile Intellectual Property Rights, Human Capital and the Incidence Of R&D Expenditures (with Daniel Lederman). Documento de Trabajo Nº 277, Departamento de Economía de la Universidad de Chile Agriculture and National Welfare Around the World: Causality and International Heterogeneity since 1960 (with Daniel Lederman). Forthcoming Trimestre Económico. (World Bank working paper 3499, February 2005) Trade Liberalization in Chile: A historical Perspective. In FTA and Structural Changes: Experiences and Implications. Edited by MoonJoong Tcha. Korean Development Institute, Seoul Korea Cerrando la brecha innovativa latinoamericana: Qué podemos aprender de Corea, Israel y Finlandia? Serie Estudios Socio Económicos Nº35, CIEPLAN, Santiago, Chile Remoteness and Real Exchange Rate Volatility (with Julian di Giovanni) IMF Staff Papers, September. (IMF working paper 05/01, January 2005) -2006, "The Relative Richness of the Poor? Natural Resources, Human Capital and Economic Growth." in Neither Curse Nor Destiny: Natural Resources and Development. Edited by Daniel Lederman and William F. Maloney. Stanford University Press.(with Jose De Gregorio). (World Bank working paper 3484, January 2005) Agricultural Productivity and its Determinants: Revisiting International Experiences (With Daniel Lederman). Estudios de Economia 31(2): Does Asymmetric Information Cause the Home Equity Bias?. World Bank working paper Trade Costs and Real Exchange Rate Volatility: The Role of Ricardian Comparative Advantage (with Julian di Giovanni) IMF working paper No. 05/5r Macroeconomic Dimensions of Integration and Trade: A comment, in Issues Papers Second Annual Conference, Euro-Latin Study Network on Integration and Trade. Published by INTAL, ITD, and SOE of the Inter American Development Bank Multinationals and Linkages. An Empirical Investigation: A comment," in Economía, LACEA and Brookings Institution eds., Spring, volume 4 number 2.. FELLOWSHIPS, AWARDS AND GRANTS Fondecyt Grant Number Topic of research: Heterogeneity in the Returns to R&D (joint with Jose Miguel Benavente) Fondecyt Grant Number Topic of research: Export Diversification and Economic Growth (joint with Manuel Agosin and Roberto Alvarez) Fondecyt Grant Number Topic of research: Institutions, Imitation and R&D Best Economic Professor Award, Department of Economics, Universidad de Chile (undergraduate level) Dean s Normative Time Fellowship, UC Berkeley , Fulbright Commission Fellowship , President of the Republic of Chile, Fellowship. -19-

20 B. JOSÉ MIGUEL BENAVENTE Posición Actual. Profesor Asistente, Jornada Completa. Departamento de Economía. Universidad de Chile. Educación. -Licenciado en Ciencias de la Ingeniería, Universidad Católica de Valparaíso Ingeniero Civil Industrial, Universidad Católica de Valparaíso Magister en Economía, Universidad de Chile Master of Science in Economics, University of Oxford Doctor of Philosophy in Economics, University of Oxford Areas de interés. -Microeconometría Teórica y Aplicada, Economía de la Innovación y Política Tecnológica, Evaluación de Programas Públicos, PYMEs, Criminalidad y Emprendimiento. Artículos Publicados con Comité Editorial -Benavente J.M. y R. Lauterbach (2008) Technological Innovation and Employment: Complements or Substitutes?. European Journal of Development Research 20 (2) : Junio -Benavente J.M. (2006) The Role of Research and Innovation in Promoting Productivity in Chile. Economics of Innovation and New Technology 15 (4-5) : Junio. -Benavente J.M., Galetovic, A, Sanhueza, R y P. Serra (2005) El costo de falla residencial en Chile : una estimación usando la curva de demanda. Análisis Económico 20 (2): Diciembre. -Benavente J.M. (2005) Self-Discovery in a Development Strategy for El Salvador. A Comment. Economia The Journal of the Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association, 6 (1) : Otoño. -Benavente J.M. (2005) Investigación y Desarrollo, Innovación y Productividad : Un Análisis Econométrico a nivel de la Firma. Estudios de Economía 32 (1): Junio. -Benavente J.M., Galetovic, A. y R. Sanhueza (2005) La Dinámica Industrial y la Financiación de las PYMEs, Trimestre Económico, LXXII (2) : Abril-Junio. -Benavente J.M., Galetovic, A, Sanhueza, R y P. Serra (2005) Estimando la demanda residencial por electricidad en Chile: El Consumo es Sensible al Precio. Cuadernos de Economía (42): Mayo. -Benavente J.M. (2005) Innovación Tecnológica en Chile, Dónde Estamos y Qué se Puede Hacer. Economía Chilena. (8): Abril. Banco Central de Chile. -Benavente J.M. (2005) The Free Market Innovation Machine por W. Baumol. Comentario de libro. Economía Chilena. (8): Abril. Banco Central de Chile. -Benavente J.M. (2004) Empresario Chileno durante los Noventa : a self-made man?, Economía y Administración (148): Benavente J.M., Johnson C. y F. Morandé (2003) Debt composition and balance sheet effects of exchange rate depreciations : a firm-level analysis for Chile, Emerging Markets Review (4): Benavente J.M., Crespi G., Katz J. y Stumpo G. (1997) New Problems and Opportunities for Industrial Development in Latin America, Oxford Development Studies 25 (3): Contribuciones en Libros -Benavente J.M. (2008) Dinámica Empresarial Chilena Ministerio de Economía, INTELIS, FUNDES y Foro Pro Innovación. Santiago. -Arellano S. y J.M. Benavente (2008) Sustitución entre Telefonía Fija y Móvil en Chile en A. González (ed.) Telecomunicaciones : Convergencia y Nuevos Desafíos. Subsecretaría de Telecomunicaciones y Facultad de Economía y Negocios, Universidad de Chile. -Benavente J.M. (2006) Wine Production in Chile en V. Chandra (ed) Technology, Adaptation, and Exports. How developing countries got it right. Banco Mundial. Washington. -20-

ROBERTO ALVAREZ E. Department of Economics and Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship INTELIS, University of Chile e-mail: robalvar@fen.uchile.

ROBERTO ALVAREZ E. Department of Economics and Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship INTELIS, University of Chile e-mail: robalvar@fen.uchile. ROBERTO ALVAREZ E. Department of Economics and Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship INTELIS, University of Chile e-mail: robalvar@fen.uchile.cl EDUCATION Ph. D. in Management. UCLA Anderson School

More information

Innovation, R&D Investment and Productivity in Chile

Innovation, R&D Investment and Productivity in Chile IDB WORKING PAPER SERIES No. IDB-WP-190 Innovation, R&D Investment and Productivity in Chile Roberto Alvarez Claudio Bravo-Ortega Lucas Navarro October 2010 Inter-American Development Bank Department of

More information

Documento de Trabajo. Trade Liberalization and Wage Inequality. Time Series Evidence from Chile.

Documento de Trabajo. Trade Liberalization and Wage Inequality. Time Series Evidence from Chile. Documento de Trabajo Trade Liberalization and Wage Inequality. Time Series Evidence from Chile. Rodrigo Navia Carvallo 1997 El autor es Ph.D in Economics, Tulane University, EEUU. Máster of Arts in Economics,

More information

Ph.D. Economics, University of Maryland at College Park, 2004. Master in Economics, University of Maryland at College Park, 2002.

Ph.D. Economics, University of Maryland at College Park, 2004. Master in Economics, University of Maryland at College Park, 2002. PERSONAL INFORMATION EDUCATION Name: Diego Saravia Tamayo. Email: dsaravia@bcentral.cl Phone: (56) (2) 2 388-2298 (work) Home: (56) (2) 2 813-3257 (home). Ph.D. Economics, University of Maryland at College

More information

Department of Economics, University of Chile, Assistant Professor, 2007-present. Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL), Research Fellow, 2009-Present

Department of Economics, University of Chile, Assistant Professor, 2007-present. Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL), Research Fellow, 2009-Present CLAUDIA MARTINEZ A. cmartineza@econ.uchile.cl http://works.bepress.com/claudia_martinez_a Affiliations Department of Economics, University of Chile, Assistant Professor, 2007-present Jameel Poverty Action

More information

EXTERNAL SOURCES OF TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION IN CHILEAN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY*

EXTERNAL SOURCES OF TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION IN CHILEAN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY* External Estudios sources de Economía. of technological Vol. 28 - Nº innovation 1, Junio 2001. / Roberto Págs. 53-68 Alvarez 53 EXTERNAL SOURCES OF TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION IN CHILEAN MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY*

More information

CURRICULUM VITAE. LEOPOLDO LABORDA CASTILLO llabordacastillo@gmail.com Phone: +34 697259827 or +34 91 8820399

CURRICULUM VITAE. LEOPOLDO LABORDA CASTILLO llabordacastillo@gmail.com Phone: +34 697259827 or +34 91 8820399 CURRICULUM VITAE LEOPOLDO LABORDA CASTILLO llabordacastillo@gmail.com Phone: +34 697259827 or +34 91 8820399 Education: Finalized: Ph.D. in Economic and Business Sciences. University of Alcalá, UA (Spain).

More information

Esteban Puentes Curriculum Vitae. Esteban Puentes. Address: Diagonal Paraguay 257, Oficina 1601. Santiago, Chile.

Esteban Puentes Curriculum Vitae. Esteban Puentes. Address: Diagonal Paraguay 257, Oficina 1601. Santiago, Chile. Esteban Puentes CONTACT INFORMATION Full Name: Esteban Enrique Puentes Encina. Address: Diagonal Paraguay 257, Oficina 1601. Santiago, Chile. email: epuentes@fen.uchile.cl phone: (56 2) 29772233 Current

More information

Associate Professor in Economics, University Jaume I (since March 2004).

Associate Professor in Economics, University Jaume I (since March 2004). Cuadros Ramos, Ana February, 2015 Office: Cuadros Ramos, Ana Department of Economics, University Jaume I Av. de Vicent Sos Baynat, s/n 12071 Castellón (Spain) Tel.: 34 964 387169 Fax.: 34 964 728591 E-mail:

More information

FELIPE BALMACEDA. Lecturer in Economics, Department of Economics

FELIPE BALMACEDA. Lecturer in Economics, Department of Economics FELIPE BALMACEDA OBJECTIVE EXPERIENCE General Purpose 2002 CEA-Universidad de Chile Santiago, Chile Assistant Professor of Economics, Industrial Engineering Department, Center of Applied Economics Dic.

More information

JOSE EDUARDO GOMEZ-GONZALEZ

JOSE EDUARDO GOMEZ-GONZALEZ JOSE EDUARDO GOMEZ-GONZALEZ Work Address: Carrera 7 14-78 Piso 11, Bogota, Colombia Telephone: (571) 3430359 E-Mail Address: jgomezgo@banrep.gov.co Fields of Specialization: Financial Economics; Macroeconomics;

More information

CURRICULUM VITAE Julio Florentino del Corral Cuervo 26 th September, 2008

CURRICULUM VITAE Julio Florentino del Corral Cuervo 26 th September, 2008 CURRICULUM VITAE Julio Florentino del Corral Cuervo 26 th September, 2008 Personal Data Birth Date: 23/11/1980 Personal Adress: Proffesional Adress: Homepage: E-mail adress: C/ Electra 17, 1º Izquierda,

More information

2007- present: Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, University of Chile.

2007- present: Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, University of Chile. CLAUDIA MARTINEZ A. Department of Economics, University of Chile Diagonal Paraguay 257, of. 1506. Santiago. Chile. Phone: (562) 2978-3384 cmartineza@econ.uchile.cl http://works.bepress.com/claudia_martinez_a

More information

Education. Academic Possitions

Education. Academic Possitions MARTIN G. RAPETTI Department of Economics Center for the Study of the State and Society (CEDES) Sánchez de Bustamante 27 (C1173AAA), Buenos Aires, Argentina www.martinrapetti.net Education 2006-2011 Ph.D.

More information

Associate Professor in Economics, University Jaume I (since March 2004).

Associate Professor in Economics, University Jaume I (since March 2004). Cuadros Ramos, Ana September, 2015 Office: Cuadros Ramos, Ana Department of Economics, University Jaume I Av. de Vicent Sos Baynat, s/n 12071 Castellón (Spain) Tel.: 34 964 387169 Fax.: 34 964 728591 E-mail:

More information

Developing and Analyzing Firm-Level Indicators on Productivity and Reallocation

Developing and Analyzing Firm-Level Indicators on Productivity and Reallocation Policy brief 2024 February 2011 John Haltiwanger and Eric Bartelsman Developing and Analyzing Firm-Level Indicators on Productivity and Reallocation In brief Productivity growth is the main driver of long-run

More information

CINTIA MONICA MARTINEZ

CINTIA MONICA MARTINEZ CINTIA MONICA MARTINEZ Age: 46. Citizenship: Argentine and Italian. Address: Rojas 1539 8 B. C1416CPK - Buenos Aires, Argentina. Telephone:+54 11 4586 1577 (Cell.) +54 11 15 6132 2091 E-mail: cintiam34@yahoo.com

More information

CURRICULUM VITAE J. RODRIGO FUENTES 2015

CURRICULUM VITAE J. RODRIGO FUENTES 2015 CURRICULUM VITAE J. RODRIGO FUENTES 2015 PERSONAL DATA Address : Instituto de Economía Vicuña Mackena 4860, Macul Santiago, CHILE Phone Numbers : (56-2) 2354-4308, 2354-4303, 2553-6472 (fax) E-mail : Rodrigo.fuentes@uc.cl

More information

JUAN PABLO TORRES CEPEDA

JUAN PABLO TORRES CEPEDA JUAN PABLO TORRES CEPEDA Contact Information Department of Business Administration Phone: + 56 (2) 9 781 987 E-mail: jtorresc@unegocios.cl 257 Diagonal Paraguay, Santiago, Chile Research Interests Operational

More information

Personal information. Taborda, Rodrigo. Education. Surname(s) / First name(s)

Personal information. Taborda, Rodrigo. Education. Surname(s) / First name(s) Personal information Surname(s) / First name(s) Address(es) Email(s) Nationality(-ies) Taborda, Rodrigo Calle 14 # 4-69. Departamento de Economía, Universidad del Rosario. Bogotá, Colombia rodrigo.taborda@urosario.edu.co,

More information

Warwick Business School Phone: + 44 (0) 24 7652 8220. Operational Research, System Dynamics, Strategic Management

Warwick Business School Phone: + 44 (0) 24 7652 8220. Operational Research, System Dynamics, Strategic Management JUAN PABLO TORRES Contact Information Warwick Business School Phone: + 44 (0) 24 7652 8220 The University of Warwick E-mail: j.p.torres@warwick.ac.uk Coventry, CV4 7AL, United Kingdom Research Interests

More information

Associate Professor, Department of Economics, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile

Associate Professor, Department of Economics, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile CLAUDIA MARTINEZ A. Department of Economics, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Macul, Santiago, Chile clmartineza@uc.cl http://works.bepress.com/claudia_martinez_a Education

More information

Nº 252 Diciembre 2003

Nº 252 Diciembre 2003 Nº 252 Diciembre 2003 Documento de Trabajo ISSN (edición impresa) 0716-7334 ISSN (edición electrónica) 0717-7593 Social Security Financial Crises Rodrigo Cerda www.economia.puc.cl Versión impresa ISSN:

More information

Curriculum Vitae. Transport Engineer (Bsc.), Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, 1998.

Curriculum Vitae. Transport Engineer (Bsc.), Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, 1998. Curriculum Vitae 1 Personal Information Name : Miguel Ángel Vargas Román. Date of Birth : 27th October 1971. Citizenship: Chilean. Address : 253 Manuel Rodríguez Sur, Santiago, Chile Fone : +56-2-6762252.

More information

VALERIA PIÑEIRO. 2033 K Street NW Tel: 1.202.462.1620 Washington, D.C. 20006-1002 USA

VALERIA PIÑEIRO. 2033 K Street NW Tel: 1.202.462.1620 Washington, D.C. 20006-1002 USA VALERIA PIÑEIRO International Food Policy Research Institute Email: v.pineiro@cgiar.org 2033 K Street NW Tel: 1.202.462.1620 Washington, D.C. 20006-1002 USA GRADUATE STUDIES AND ACADEMIC DEGREES - Ph.D.

More information

HUMAN SETTLEMENT DEVELOPMENT Vol. IV - The Five Cities of Buenos Aires: poverty and Inequality in Urban Argentina - Michael Cohen, Darío Debowicz

HUMAN SETTLEMENT DEVELOPMENT Vol. IV - The Five Cities of Buenos Aires: poverty and Inequality in Urban Argentina - Michael Cohen, Darío Debowicz THE FIVE CITIES OF BUENOS AIRES: POVERTY AND INEQUALITY IN URBAN ARGENTINA Michael Cohen Director, Graduate Program in International Affairs, New School University, New York, USA Darío Debowicz Economist,

More information

Ricardo Lillo. Marcel Duhaut 2965, Providencia, Santiago, Chile (+56) 9 79996267 ricardo.lillo@mail.udp.cl / lillo2014@lawnet.ucla.

Ricardo Lillo. Marcel Duhaut 2965, Providencia, Santiago, Chile (+56) 9 79996267 ricardo.lillo@mail.udp.cl / lillo2014@lawnet.ucla. Ricardo Lillo Marcel Duhaut 2965, Providencia, Santiago, Chile (+56) 9 79996267 ricardo.lillo@mail.udp.cl / lillo2014@lawnet.ucla.edu Education University of California, Los Angeles, United States Aug.

More information

Professor María Ines BARBERO CURRICULUM VITAE March 2015

Professor María Ines BARBERO CURRICULUM VITAE March 2015 PERSONAL INFORMATION Name, Surname: María Inés, Barbero CURRENT EMPLOYMENT 2006- Present Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas Full Professor of Economic History 2007- Present Universidad

More information

CURRICULUM VITAE OF MARIA GARCIA-VEGA

CURRICULUM VITAE OF MARIA GARCIA-VEGA CURRICULUM VITAE OF MARIA GARCIA-VEGA PERSONAL DATA Name: Address: María García de la Vega University of Nottingham, School of Economics Sir Clive Granger Building, Room C30 University Park, Nottingham

More information

Curriculum Vitae. Current Position Personal Doctor Investigador, LEE, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón, Spain

Curriculum Vitae. Current Position Personal Doctor Investigador, LEE, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón, Spain Curriculum Vitae Dr. Maria Ruiz-Martos Academic Address: Universitat Jaume I Laboratorio de Economía Experimental Edificio de Investigación II, 12071 Castellón, Spain Email: martosm@eco.uji.es Telephone:

More information

Pablo Fleiss. 2005: Suficiencia Investigadora - Diploma de Estudios Avanzados. Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain.

Pablo Fleiss. 2005: Suficiencia Investigadora - Diploma de Estudios Avanzados. Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain. Pablo Fleiss Contact Information Inter-American Development Bank - Office of the Executive Director for Uruguay, Paraguay and Bolivia. 1300 New York Avenue NW, Washington DC, 20577, USA. +(1) 202-623-1438.

More information

FDI as a source of finance in imperfect capital markets Firm-Level Evidence from Argentina

FDI as a source of finance in imperfect capital markets Firm-Level Evidence from Argentina FDI as a source of finance in imperfect capital markets Firm-Level Evidence from Argentina Paula Bustos CREI and Universitat Pompeu Fabra September 2007 Abstract In this paper I analyze the financing and

More information

Dr. Paloma Lopez-Garcia Curriculum Vitae (November 2012)

Dr. Paloma Lopez-Garcia Curriculum Vitae (November 2012) Dr. Paloma Lopez-Garcia Curriculum Vitae (November 2012) Current position: Senior Economist Central Bank of Spain Eurosystem Research Department Economic Analysis and Forecasting Contact: Alcalá 48, 28014

More information

FREE TRADE AND MEXICO S MEAT SECTOR. September 27, 2012

FREE TRADE AND MEXICO S MEAT SECTOR. September 27, 2012 FREE TRADE AND MEXICO S MEAT SECTOR September 27, 2012 Contents I. Trade Agreements signed by Mexico II. Benefits of Foreign Trade III. External Challenges of Foreign Trade IV. Foreign Trade and the Mexican

More information

Marcos Sanso-Navarro Curriculum Vitae February 2015

Marcos Sanso-Navarro Curriculum Vitae February 2015 Marcos Sanso-Navarro Curriculum Vitae February 2015 Office Contact Information: Departamento de Análisis Económico Facultad de Economía y Empresa Gran Vía 2. 50005 Zaragoza (Spain) Phone: (+34) 976 876

More information

IGNACIO FERRERO MUÑOZ

IGNACIO FERRERO MUÑOZ IGNACIO FERRERO MUÑOZ PERSONAL INFORMATION First name/surnames: Ignacio Ferrero Muñoz Date of birth: Málaga, 24.11.1968 Nationality: Spanish Address: Facultad de Económicas. Universidad de Navarra 31009

More information

Citizenship: Chilean and German Current position: Associate Professor, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

Citizenship: Chilean and German Current position: Associate Professor, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile Tomás Rau CONTACT INFORMATION Full Name: Tomás Andrés Rau Binder Address: Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Macul, Santiago Phone: +562-23544326 email: trau@uc.cl Citizenship: Chilean and German Current position:

More information

ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE 2003-Present, Assistant Professor of Economics and Statistics, California State University, Los Angeles

ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE 2003-Present, Assistant Professor of Economics and Statistics, California State University, Los Angeles Ramon A. Castillo Ponce I. EDUCATION/CERTIFICATIONS Ph.D. University of California, Irvine M.A. University of California, Irvine B.A. California State University, Northridge II. ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE 2003-Present,

More information

GINO LOYOLA FUENTES Curriculum Vitae

GINO LOYOLA FUENTES Curriculum Vitae GINO LOYOLA FUENTES Curriculum Vitae ADDRESS Diagonal Paraguay 257 Office 1303 Santiago, Chile Ph: 562-978 37 68 E-mail: gloyola@fen.uchile.cl CITIZENSHIP Chilean GRADUATE STUDIES 2003-2008 Ph.D. in Economics,

More information

Higher Education in Business Administration in Spain: Adapting to the European Area of Higher Education *

Higher Education in Business Administration in Spain: Adapting to the European Area of Higher Education * Higher Education in Business Administration in Spain: Adapting to the European Area of Higher Education * Leandro Cañibano Professor of Financial Economics and Accounting Autonomous University of Madrid

More information

ECONOMIC RELATIONS BETWEEN SPAIN AND MEXICO: THE ROLE OF INDUSTRIAL SMES 1

ECONOMIC RELATIONS BETWEEN SPAIN AND MEXICO: THE ROLE OF INDUSTRIAL SMES 1 ARTICLES Boletín de la A.G.E. N.º Economic 45-2007, relations págs. 375-378 between Spain and Mexico: the role of industrial SMEs ECONOMIC RELATIONS BETWEEN SPAIN AND MEXICO: THE ROLE OF INDUSTRIAL SMES

More information

Markups and Firm-Level Export Status: Appendix

Markups and Firm-Level Export Status: Appendix Markups and Firm-Level Export Status: Appendix De Loecker Jan - Warzynski Frederic Princeton University, NBER and CEPR - Aarhus School of Business Forthcoming American Economic Review Abstract This is

More information

CURRICULUM VITA BYUNGCHAE JIN

CURRICULUM VITA BYUNGCHAE JIN CURRICULUM VITA BYUNGCHAE JIN University of Maryland 3330J Van Munching Hall College Park, 20742 USA Phone: 240-994-0216 E-mail: bcjin3@gmail.com EDUCATION 2006~2011 (expected) University of Maryland,

More information

Documento de Trabajo. ISSN (edición impresa) 0716-7334 ISSN (edición electrónica) 0717-7593. Taxation and private investment : evidence for Chile.

Documento de Trabajo. ISSN (edición impresa) 0716-7334 ISSN (edición electrónica) 0717-7593. Taxation and private investment : evidence for Chile. Nº 268 Julio 2004 Documento de Trabajo ISSN (edición impresa) 0716-7334 ISSN (edición electrónica) 0717-7593 Taxation and private investment : evidence for Chile. Rodrigo Vergara www.economia.puc.cl Versión

More information

Profesor Adjunto, Departamento De Humanidades, Universidad De San Andres, Victoria, Argentina (Promoted to Profesor Adjunto July 2003)

Profesor Adjunto, Departamento De Humanidades, Universidad De San Andres, Victoria, Argentina (Promoted to Profesor Adjunto July 2003) CURRICULUM VITAE Robert J. Barros, Profesor Adjunto Departamento de Humanidades Universidad de San Andrés Vito Dumas 284 1644 Victoria, Argentina (54-11)-4725-7004 e-mail: barros@udesa.edu.ar I. Education

More information

Claudio A. Bonilla School of Economics and Business, University of Chile www.claudiobonilla.cl / cbonilla@fen.uchile.cl

Claudio A. Bonilla School of Economics and Business, University of Chile www.claudiobonilla.cl / cbonilla@fen.uchile.cl Claudio A. Bonilla School of Economics and Business, University of Chile www.claudiobonilla.cl / cbonilla@fen.uchile.cl Education Ph.D. in Economics, University of Texas at Austin, 2002 (Main advisor Melvin

More information

Our proposal: An integrated approach to

Our proposal: An integrated approach to Our proposal: An integrated approach to development For equality it is necessary to Close economic and social gaps, both internal and external Spread throughout the economic and social structure: Production

More information

Competitive Advantage of Libyan Business Environment

Competitive Advantage of Libyan Business Environment Economics World, ISSN 23287144 May 2014, Vol. 2, No. 5, 325332 D DAVID PUBLISHING Competitive Advantage of Libyan Business Environment Salem Abdulla Azzaytuna University, Tripoli, Libya The economic development

More information

Official University. Postgraduate. Program. Degree. in Macroeconometrics. Madrid. Master/60 ECTS. Executive Program. and Finance.

Official University. Postgraduate. Program. Degree. in Macroeconometrics. Madrid. Master/60 ECTS. Executive Program. and Finance. Postgraduate Program Official University Degree Master/60 ECTS Executive Program Madrid M3F Master in Macroeconometrics and Finance Summary M3F Program Objectives / 2 Structure / 2 Courses / 3 Directors

More information

DIMENSIONS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Vol. I - Human Capital for Sustainable Economic Develpment - G. Edward Schuh

DIMENSIONS OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Vol. I - Human Capital for Sustainable Economic Develpment - G. Edward Schuh HUMAN CAPITAL FOR SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT G. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, Minneapolis, USA Keywords: Economic development, sustained development, induced development, increasing returns,

More information

International Economics (ECON - 0323) (48 hours, 3 credits)

International Economics (ECON - 0323) (48 hours, 3 credits) 1 Universidad Americana College of University Studies in English, CUSE Course Syllabus International Economics (ECON - 0323) (48 hours, 3 credits) SEMESTER: Aug - Dec 2015 Days: Tuesday Thursday 17:45-19:15

More information

Explaining Bank Efficiency: Bank Size or Ownership Structure? Rodrigo Fuentes Central Bank of Chile. Marcos Vergara Universidad de Chile.

Explaining Bank Efficiency: Bank Size or Ownership Structure? Rodrigo Fuentes Central Bank of Chile. Marcos Vergara Universidad de Chile. Explaining Bank Efficiency: Bank Size or Ownership Structure? Rodrigo Fuentes Central Bank of Chile Marcos Vergara Universidad de Chile Abstract This paper uses cost and profit functions to estimate efficiency

More information

The Mexican Economy: Facts and Opportunities

The Mexican Economy: Facts and Opportunities Manuel Sánchez Santander Global Fixed Income Summit London, England, September 20, 2012 Contents 1 Structural features 2 Recent developments and outlook 3 Inflation and monetary policy 4 Economic challenges

More information

NATURAL RESOURCES WEALTH AND DIVERSIFICATION CREATING JOBS AND SHARING PROSPERITY WIDELY

NATURAL RESOURCES WEALTH AND DIVERSIFICATION CREATING JOBS AND SHARING PROSPERITY WIDELY NATURAL RESOURCES WEALTH AND DIVERSIFICATION CREATING JOBS AND SHARING PROSPERITY WIDELY Ndiame Diop Lead Economist, Indonesia World Bank WHY IMPORTANT? Jobs! Quality of specialization Long-term growth

More information

ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises. I. Introduction

ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises. I. Introduction ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY Small- and Medium-Sized Enterprises I. Introduction I.1 Current Challenge: Most countries in the region are undergoing reforms that are opening their economies to greater

More information

Executive Summary. Specifically, the project gathered both primary and secondary data to meet four main research objectives:

Executive Summary. Specifically, the project gathered both primary and secondary data to meet four main research objectives: Executive Summary The overall goal of the research reported here is to provide an objective and credible assessment of the future workforce needs for lawyers in the state of California through the year

More information

Doctor of Philosophy in Economics (English Program) Curriculum 2006

Doctor of Philosophy in Economics (English Program) Curriculum 2006 Doctor of Philosophy in Economics (English Program) Curriculum 2006 1. Program Title Doctor of Philosophy Program in Economics (English Program) 2. Degree Title Doctor of Philosophy (Economics) Ph.D. (Economics)

More information

New publications of the Centre for Sociological Research, 15.30 to 16.00 (Centro de Investigaciones Sociológicas, CIS)

New publications of the Centre for Sociological Research, 15.30 to 16.00 (Centro de Investigaciones Sociológicas, CIS) MESA HISPANA The Development of Social Network Analysis in Latin America 1st European Social Networks Conference (EUSN) http://jornades.uab.cat/eusn/ Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 1 de julio de 2014

More information

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF UBC FACULTY SALARIES: INVESTIGATION OF

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF UBC FACULTY SALARIES: INVESTIGATION OF STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF UBC FACULTY SALARIES: INVESTIGATION OF DIFFERENCES DUE TO SEX OR VISIBLE MINORITY STATUS. Oxana Marmer and Walter Sudmant, UBC Planning and Institutional Research SUMMARY This paper

More information

Universities in National Innovation Systems. David C. Mowery Haas School of Business, University of California - Berkeley

Universities in National Innovation Systems. David C. Mowery Haas School of Business, University of California - Berkeley Universities in National Innovation Systems David C. Mowery Haas School of Business, University of California - Berkeley Outline Universities and industrial innovation in knowledge-based economies. Characteristics

More information

IOANA E. MARINESCU. Harris School of Public Policy, 1155 E. 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637 773-789-8447 ioanamarinescu@uchicago.edu www.marinescu.

IOANA E. MARINESCU. Harris School of Public Policy, 1155 E. 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637 773-789-8447 ioanamarinescu@uchicago.edu www.marinescu. IOANA E. MARINESCU Ioana E. Marinescu - September 2015 Harris School of Public Policy, 1155 E. 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637 773-789-8447 ioanamarinescu@uchicago.edu www.marinescu.eu EDUCATION Ph.D Economics,

More information

GUILLERMO PARAJE, PhD

GUILLERMO PARAJE, PhD GUILLERMO PARAJE, PhD PERSONAL DETAILS Avenida Diagonal Las Torres 2640, Peñalolen Santiago de Chile CHILE P: (56) (2) 2331 13 80 M: (56) (9) 8289 35 19 E: G.Paraje@cantab.net DOB: 21 May 1971 Nationality:

More information

Visiting Scholar, Research Department, Inter-American Development Bank, September 2012- August 2013

Visiting Scholar, Research Department, Inter-American Development Bank, September 2012- August 2013 CURRENT POSITION VIRGINIA OLIVEROS Department of Political Science 420 W 118th St., 7th Floor lab NewYorlç NY 10027 vo2110@columbia.edu www.columbia.edu/ vo2llo Visiting Scholar, Research Department, Inter-American

More information

HECTOR CHADE Curriculum Vitae January 2016

HECTOR CHADE Curriculum Vitae January 2016 HECTOR CHADE Curriculum Vitae January 2016 PERSONAL Address: Department of Economics, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-9801, P.O. Box 879801. Phone: 480-965-4714. Email: hector.chade@asu.edu.

More information

HOW IMPORTANT IS BUSINESS R&D FOR ECONOMIC GROWTH AND SHOULD THE GOVERNMENT SUBSIDISE IT?

HOW IMPORTANT IS BUSINESS R&D FOR ECONOMIC GROWTH AND SHOULD THE GOVERNMENT SUBSIDISE IT? HOW IMPORTANT IS BUSINESS R&D FOR ECONOMIC GROWTH AND SHOULD THE GOVERNMENT SUBSIDISE IT? Rachel Griffith THE INSTITUTE FOR FISCAL STUDIES Briefing Note No. 12 Published by The Institute for Fiscal Studies

More information

JOSEPH P. JOYCE EDUCATION

JOSEPH P. JOYCE EDUCATION Ph.D., Economics, Boston University, 1984 M.A., Economics, Boston University, 1976 JOSEPH P. JOYCE Department of Economics Wellesley College Wellelsey, MA 02481-8203 Tel: (781) 283-2160 E*mail: JJoyce@wellesley.edu

More information

The Recent Fall in Inequality in LAC: Searching for an Explanation

The Recent Fall in Inequality in LAC: Searching for an Explanation The Recent Fall in Inequality in LAC: Searching for an Explanation A. de la Torre, D. Lederman, and J. Silva Office of the Chief Economist Latin American & the Caribbean The World Bank Group Madrid, June

More information

DIFFERENCES OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION SYSTEMS BETWEEN JAPAN AND GERMANY CONSIDERATION ABOUT BEFORE AND AFTER GRADUATION

DIFFERENCES OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION SYSTEMS BETWEEN JAPAN AND GERMANY CONSIDERATION ABOUT BEFORE AND AFTER GRADUATION DIFFERENCES OF ENGINEERING EDUCATION SYSTEMS BETWEEN JAPAN AND GERMANY CONSIDERATION ABOUT BEFORE AND AFTER GRADUATION Takashi SATO 1, Christine SOBCZYK 2, Shuichi SAKAMOTO 1, Nozomu ISHII 1, Yuji TANABE

More information

Joint PhD-Program in Agricultural Economics (J-PPAE)

Joint PhD-Program in Agricultural Economics (J-PPAE) Curriculum The PhD-candidates that fulfill minimum requirements in economic formation are required to participate in PhD modules equivalent to 24 ECTS-credits in the fields of methods, specialization and

More information

Martín Ignacio Arias Loyola University College of London, London, United Kingdom.

Martín Ignacio Arias Loyola University College of London, London, United Kingdom. Martín Ignacio Arias Loyola University College of London, London, United Kingdom. Email: marias@ucn.cl Current position: Director Regional Obsevatory of Human Development ORDHUM, Universidad Católica del

More information

KENNETH KASA. Macroeconomics and International Finance

KENNETH KASA. Macroeconomics and International Finance 1 KENNETH KASA Address: 4626 W. 13th Avenue Birthdate: January 10, 1959 Vancouver, BC V6R 2V7 Citizenship: USA Telephone: (604)733-0223 (home) Social Security #: 549-04-1738 (604)291-5406 (office) email:

More information

PUBLICATIONS PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS

PUBLICATIONS PEER-REVIEWED PUBLICATIONS VIRGINIA OLIVEROS Political Science Department Tulane University 6823 St. Charles Avenue Norman Mayer Building, Room 311 New Orleans, LA 70118 Phone: (504) 862-8306 Email: volivero@tulane.edu Website:

More information

Predicting the Performance of a First Year Graduate Student

Predicting the Performance of a First Year Graduate Student Predicting the Performance of a First Year Graduate Student Luís Francisco Aguiar Universidade do Minho - NIPE Abstract In this paper, I analyse, statistically, if GRE scores are a good predictor of the

More information

1985 Licenciatura in Psychology (MSc). Universidad de Buenos Aires. Buenos Aires, Argentina.

1985 Licenciatura in Psychology (MSc). Universidad de Buenos Aires. Buenos Aires, Argentina. Florencia ROITSTEIN - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - e mail:

More information

Total Factor Productivity

Total Factor Productivity Total Factor Productivity Diego Comin NewYorkUniversityandNBER August 2006 Abstract Total Factor Productivity (TFP) is the portion of output not explained by the amount of inputs used in production. The

More information

Curriculum Vitae Emili Tortosa-Ausina

Curriculum Vitae Emili Tortosa-Ausina Curriculum Vitae Emili Tortosa-Ausina Business Address: Departament d Economia Facultat de Ciències Econòmiques i Jurídiques Campus del Riu Sec 12071 Castellón Spain Tel.: +34 964728606 Fax: +34 964728591

More information

Pablo Fleiss. Proficiency in Eviews, Latex, Microsoft Office, and Stata

Pablo Fleiss. Proficiency in Eviews, Latex, Microsoft Office, and Stata Pablo Fleiss Contact Information International Labour Organization, Department of Statistics 4 route des Morillons, CH-1211 Geneve 22, Switzerland +(41) 22 799 7226 fleiss@ilo.org Personal Information

More information

Mario Quintanilla Gatica

Mario Quintanilla Gatica Development of Teacher Students Thinking Skills and Its Relation to Acquisition of Pedagogical Content Knowledge for Science Teaching in High School Mario Quintanilla Gatica Laboratorio de Investigación

More information

B.A. in Economics. Universidad de Cantabria, Spain. 1996.

B.A. in Economics. Universidad de Cantabria, Spain. 1996. CURRICULUM VITAE Virginia Sánchez Marcos Date of birth: 26/10/1974 Nationality: Spanish Personal Address: C/Metges 12, 2 08003 Barcelona Spain e-mail: sanchezv@unican.es URL: http://personales.unican.es/sanchezv

More information

ONLINE COURSE ON LEGAL INSTRUMENTS OF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS AND REGIONAL INTEGRATION 11 OCTOBER - 12 DECEMBER, 2010 PROSPECTUS

ONLINE COURSE ON LEGAL INSTRUMENTS OF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS AND REGIONAL INTEGRATION 11 OCTOBER - 12 DECEMBER, 2010 PROSPECTUS ONLINE COURSE ON LEGAL INSTRUMENTS OF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS AND REGIONAL INTEGRATION 11 OCTOBER - 12 DECEMBER, 2010 PROSPECTUS Objectives of the course This International Economic Law (IEL)

More information

Curriculum - Doctor of Philosophy

Curriculum - Doctor of Philosophy Curriculum - Doctor of Philosophy CORE COURSES Pharm 545-546.Pharmacoeconomics, Healthcare Systems Review. (3, 3) Exploration of the cultural foundations of pharmacy. Development of the present state of

More information

3. WHY DOES DOMESTIC SAVING MATTER FOR TURKEY? 26

3. WHY DOES DOMESTIC SAVING MATTER FOR TURKEY? 26 3. WHY DOES DOMESTIC SAVING MATTER FOR TURKEY? 26 23. The analysis so far suggests that saving rates plunged in the 2000s, mainly due to the drop in household saving. It also established that saving in

More information

MARIANA CHUDNOVSKY Centro de Investigación y Acción Social -CIAS /University of San Andrés Av. Callao 542 CABA Tel: 5238-7732 marichud@gmail.

MARIANA CHUDNOVSKY Centro de Investigación y Acción Social -CIAS /University of San Andrés Av. Callao 542 CABA Tel: 5238-7732 marichud@gmail. MARIANA CHUDNOVSKY Centro de Investigación y Acción Social -CIAS /University of San Andrés Av. Callao 542 CABA Tel: 5238-7732 marichud@gmail.com EDUCATION 2009-2014 PH.D IN POLITICAL SCIENCE. MAJOR: COMPARATIVE

More information

Attracting Talent. Location Choices of Foreign-Born PHDs in the US. In brief. Ideas for growth www.theigc.org. Policy brief

Attracting Talent. Location Choices of Foreign-Born PHDs in the US. In brief. Ideas for growth www.theigc.org. Policy brief Policy brief 3008 March 2012 Jeffrey Grogger and Gordon Hanson Attracting Talent Location Choices of Foreign-Born PHDs in the US In brief Graduates of science and engineering (S&E) are key for the production

More information

Roberto Burguet Curriculum vitae March 2015

Roberto Burguet Curriculum vitae March 2015 Roberto Burguet Curriculum vitae March 2015 Phone: 34-93-580-6612 (work) Fax: 34-93-580-1452 e-mail: roberto.burguet@iae.csic.es Education B.A. in Economics, Universidad de Oviedo,1981 M.A. in Economics,

More information

ALEJANDRO AVENBURG. Curriculum Vitae

ALEJANDRO AVENBURG. Curriculum Vitae ALEJANDRO AVENBURG Curriculum Vitae Education Ph.D. in Political Science (2009 Present). Department of Political Science, Boston University, GPA: 3.86. Dissertation Title: Corruption and Electoral Accountability

More information

External Debt and Growth

External Debt and Growth External Debt and Growth Catherine Pattillo, Hélène Poirson and Luca Ricci Reasonable levels of external debt that help finance productive investment may be expected to enhance growth, but beyond certain

More information

ALFREDO MARTIN OLIVER CV February 2011

ALFREDO MARTIN OLIVER CV February 2011 ALFREDO MARTIN OLIVER CV February 2011 NAME Alfredo Martín Oliver BIRTH May,30 th,1979. Balearic Islands (Spain) NATIONALITY Spanish WORK ADDRESS Departamento de Economía de la Empresa, Universidad de

More information

0. CONTACT ADDRESS, PHONE, AND EMAILS

0. CONTACT ADDRESS, PHONE, AND EMAILS JAVIER DELGADO CEBALLOS 0. CONTACT ADDRESS, PHONE, AND EMAILS University of Granada Department of Management School of Economics and Business Campus Cartuja s/n E-18071 Granada (Spain) Phone: + 34 958

More information

European Union - Regional Economics Applications Laboratory

European Union - Regional Economics Applications Laboratory European Union - Regional Economics Applications Laboratory EU-REAL is a research net in Regional Science integrated by European people tied to the Regional Economics Applications Laboratory (REAL) in

More information

PUBLISHED PAPERS IN PEER-REVIEWED JOURNALS

PUBLISHED PAPERS IN PEER-REVIEWED JOURNALS JUAN CARLOS HALLAK Department of Economics, Universidad de San Andrés, Buenos Aires, Argentina Tel: (5411) 4725-7081 Fax: (5411) 4725-7010 Email: jchallak@udesa.edu.ar Last updated: 12/30/2014 CURRENT

More information

Do R&D or Capital Expenditures Impact Wage Inequality? Evidence from the IT Industry in Taiwan ROC

Do R&D or Capital Expenditures Impact Wage Inequality? Evidence from the IT Industry in Taiwan ROC Lai, Journal of International and Global Economic Studies, 6(1), June 2013, 48-53 48 Do R&D or Capital Expenditures Impact Wage Inequality? Evidence from the IT Industry in Taiwan ROC Yu-Cheng Lai * Shih

More information

VI Simposio Internacional sobre Energía y Foro de Innovación y Emprendimiento. Por: Bartolomé Gamundi Cestero

VI Simposio Internacional sobre Energía y Foro de Innovación y Emprendimiento. Por: Bartolomé Gamundi Cestero VI Simposio Internacional sobre Energía y Foro de Innovación y Emprendimiento Por: Bartolomé Gamundi Cestero El empresarismo es convertir ideas en oportunidades Bartolomé Gamundi Cestero EL PROCESO DEL

More information

Trends in Foreign Direct Investment Inflows

Trends in Foreign Direct Investment Inflows Trends in Foreign Direct Investment Inflows This article briefly examines recent trends in foreign direct investment in Australia, both in the context of the longer-term perspective and relative to the

More information

Import Prices and Inflation

Import Prices and Inflation Import Prices and Inflation James D. Hamilton Department of Economics, University of California, San Diego Understanding the consequences of international developments for domestic inflation is an extremely

More information

Curriculum Vitae Wilbur John Coleman II

Curriculum Vitae Wilbur John Coleman II Curriculum Vitae Wilbur John Coleman II updated January 2016 Address Fuqua School of Business, Duke University, Durham NC 27708 Phone: (919) 660-7962 Email: coleman@duke.edu. Web: http://www.duke.edu/

More information

Home: 54 291 48308093 (home) / 54 291 6440377 (cell phone) Office: 54 291 4595101 ext 2735

Home: 54 291 48308093 (home) / 54 291 6440377 (cell phone) Office: 54 291 4595101 ext 2735 Resume Page 1/5 RESUME NAME: Juan M.C. Larrosa ADDRESS: Indio 1037. Bahia Blanca, Buenos Aires, Argentina 8000 TELEPHONE: EMAIL: EDUCATION: ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE: Home: 54 291 48308093 (home) / 54 291 6440377

More information

RESEARCH INTERESTS Business Model Innovation, Business Analytics, Service Innovation, Operations Strategy, Operations-Marketing Interface

RESEARCH INTERESTS Business Model Innovation, Business Analytics, Service Innovation, Operations Strategy, Operations-Marketing Interface Operations and Information Technology Management Haas School of Business, University of California Berkeley 545 Student Services Bldg #1900 Berkeley, CA 94720-1900 Phone: 510-643-4354 e-mail: jguajardo@berkeley.edu

More information

VENTURE CAPITAL: DRIVING DEVELOPMENT IN LATIN AMERICA

VENTURE CAPITAL: DRIVING DEVELOPMENT IN LATIN AMERICA VENTURE CAPITAL: DRIVING DEVELOPMENT IN LATIN AMERICA Multilateral Investment Fund Member of the IDB Group SUMMARY Venture Capital (VC) in Latin America is still in its inception but has enormous potential.

More information

Andrés López and Eugenia Orlicki 1

Andrés López and Eugenia Orlicki 1 REGIONAL INTEGRATION AND FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT: THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF THE FTAA AND THE EU-MERCOSUR AGREEMENT ON FDI FLOWS INTO MERCOSUR COUNTRIES Andrés López and Eugenia Orlicki 1 Although studies

More information