Guidelines on Wireless Networks for Schools (March 2015)

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Guidelines on Wireless Networks for Schools (March 2015)"

Transcription

1 Guidelines on Wireless Networks for Schools (March 2015) Scope and purpose There is a significant shift in schools where the newer computing devices being introduced by schools for learning are increasingly mobile wireless devices and not fixed or desktop computers. To support this change schools will need to have a suitable and fit-for-purpose wireless networks in place. This document has been created to provide advice and guidance regarding wireless networks in post-primary schools in Ireland. The target audience includes school principals and management, ICT coordinating teachers, board of management members, and other parties who are involved in the planning, provision and support of wireless in schools. The document includes both non-technical and technical sections. These guidelines may be updated as new and updated information becomes available. Overall Context In the overall schools context two main scenarios apply, though there are variants within each of these scenarios. The guidelines cover both scenarios: a) First a new school build scenario, either for a new school or for an extension to an existing schools ICT Infrastructure. In this case the planning and design stage should include a wireless network (throughout the school) as part of the overall network design. b) Secondly in an existing school scenario, where a new (or upgraded) wireless network is being considered. A variant of this scenario could involve upgrading from an existing wireless network to a more comprehensive wireless solution. The document addresses five main areas namely: Introduction to Wireless Networks Pre-procurement planning stage Procurement Stage Implementation and Installation Stage Post-installation management and support In addition a Request for Tender (RFT) template for schools is available. The sub-sections covered in the five areas are as follows: Introduction to Wireless Networks How ICT can support learning Key technology shifts Tablet computers Potential benefits of wireless networks What is a wireless network New challenges introduced by wireless networks Communications with stakeholders Selecting mobile devices and ownership models Centralised and Distributed Wireless Architectures Pre-procurement planning stage The importance of planning Planning for wireless-summary process Summary procurement steps Procurement related challenges with wireless networks Planning considerations Costs of school wireless Procurement Stage Guidelines for a Wireless Network RFP Request for Tender Template PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 1

2 Procurement Process Site Survey Other points for consideration Implementation and Installation Stage Managing user access Wireless Security Considerations Key areas regarding wireless security policy Post-installation management and support New challenges introduced by wireless Selecting mobile devices and ownership models On-going Operational Support Considerations On-going support of the WLAN On-going Security Mobile Device Management solutions (MDM) List of Acronyms Wireless networking introduces many new acronyms. A glossary of terms is included at the end of this document. The glossary at the end of this document includes definitions. Acronym BYOD ICT IEEE IPv4 Ipv6 LAN MDM NIC PC PoE RFP SSID AP Wi-Fi WLAN WNIC WEP WPA2 Meaning Bring Your Own Device Information and Communication Technology Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Internet Protocol Version 4 (existing IP standard) Internet Protocol Version 6 (new IP standard) Local Area Network Mobile Device Management Network Interface Card Personal Computer Power Over Ethernet Request for Proposal Security Set Identifier Access Point Wireless Fidelity Wireless (Local Area) Network Wireless Network Interface Card Wired Equivalent Privacy (older wireless security standard) Wi-Fi Protected Access version 2 (more recent wireless security standard) PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 2

3 Introduction to Wireless Networks Guidlines on Wireless Networks for Schools This section will cover the following areas: How ICT can support learning Key technology shifts Tablet Computers (wireless only devices) Potential benefits of wireless networks What is a wireless network Potential benefits of wireless networks New challenges introduced by wireless networks Communications with stakeholders Selecting mobile devices and ownership models Centralised and Distributed Wireless Architectures How ICT can support learning Wireless networks used to support the use of mobile learning devices in schools have the combined potential to support, enhance and transform learning. In recent years there have been advancements in our understanding of how learning takes place, as well as our understanding of pedagogy and knowledge construction. As a result there is now a greater emphasis on student centred learning, and a greater acceptance of the diversity of student learning styles. It is generally accepted that using ICT improves student motivation for learning, enhances engagement, and has the potential to improve conceptual understanding. Specifically the combination of wireless networks and better access to student devices facilitate mobile and flexible access to a range of resources which were not accessible heretofore. Wireless access will help to reduce demand for computer rooms, and free up computer room use for specific activities such as computer aided design (CAD) which requires a specific combination of technologies in one area. Improved wireless access provides new opportunities to increase access to online resources for learning throughout the school which in turn facilitates anytime, anywhere learning. Wireless connectivity for staff and student devices is being seen as essential in more and more schools. As the number of computing devices increases to one (or more) per student in the coming years, wireless networks will become critical to delivering high quality online content and real-time data. Wireless networks that worked in the past for a small number of mainly teacher wireless laptops will no longer be able to support with this increasing demand, and will need to be replaced. Schools don't have the luxury or funds to invest in wireless solutions that are not fit-for- purpose and instead require scalable solutions that can be grow as student demand grows. Key Technology Shifts In addition to improvements in wireless networking technologies there have been significant positive shifts to support learning in other technology areas including broadband, cloud based applications and computing devices. In a school scenario, there are strong linkages between wireless networks, broadband and the increasing use by schools of cloud based applications. Introducing a wireless network to support and connect a large number of teacher and student devices will inevitably generate greater levels of traffic and demand on the school broadband connection. As the range of cloud based applications grows there is greater demand on both the wireless network and on the broadband connection. As they are both situated between the user and the cloud based applications being used, they need to be as effective as possible delivering data and content across the network. The 100Mbit/sec fast broadband programme for post-primary schools is critical in facilitating this to take place, especially as the number of student devices in schools grows in the coming years. Tablet Computers (wireless only devices) The introduction to the market of the first tablet computing devices in 2010 provided schools with a new and significant alternative to both desktops PCs and more conventional laptops. Unlike previous laptops these devices typically do not have physical LAN port as they are designed to operate wirelessly. Tablets computing devices bring a significant number of new and additional attributes to the learning experience. PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 3

4 These lightweight, touchscreen tablets, can be turned on instantly, are highly portable and their multifunction capability is effective in supporting a range of student-centred learning activities both within and outside of the classroom. Their range of capabilities means that tablets can be used without any start-up delays in a wide variety of situations, and this facilitates their use in areas where ICT might not have been considered before. This coupled with their wireless capability provides them with the potential to be a more effective computing device for learning than previous learning computing devices. Potential benefits of wireless networks Wireless networks have the potential to deliver educational benefits to support teaching and learning in a number of ways in schools. It can help to facilitate classroom situations which are more supportive of a student centred active learning model. The main benefits are: More flexible access to learning opportunities and online resources for teacher and student via mobile wireless devices (tablets, laptops, netbooks, etc.,) Teachers can access and incorporate e-learning curriculum relevant resources into lessons on a regular basis. Students will be given the maximum opportunities for mobile, flexible e-learning, including access to curriculum relevant resources with guidance of the teacher. Students experience e-learning activities regularly. LAN coverage can be extended to areas which are difficult or expensive to cable. Examples include older buildings, remote buildings, temporary classrooms, open plan areas such as halls and libraries, and outdoor areas. Visitors to the school can be provided with internet access. What is a Wireless Network? A wireless network enables teachers and students using wireless (or wi-fi) enabled devices, such as such as laptops, tablets, smartphones or other wireless devices to connect to the school computer network without needing a network cable. Wireless networks connect the wireless work to the fixed network and as such consist of a combination of wired and wireless elements. Schools generally have a fixed computer network used to connect to the Internet, as well as services such as printing, and file sharing, and wireless networks connect into this network, to provide one integrated network to users. Wireless networking is being deployed in schools around the world. The extent to which wireless networks are implemented varies widely, from small ad-hoc access in parts of some schools, to schools that have a school-wide wireless network. Wireless is a shared medium in that user devices share frequency channels to communicate. As such, requires careful planning for dynamic usage profiles and capacity variations. The network needs to have the capacity to handle a dynamically changing load throughout the school day. WLANs operate in a license-free band allowing the market to develop products and technologies through open competition. One of the drawbacks with WLANs is that they operate in unlicensed bands, which results in increasing radio interference from other devices such as cordless phones. Wi-Fi stands for Wireless Fidelity. The IEEE (The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), controls the relevant standards for computer networks, including wireless. The IEEE wireless specification defines how wireless networks communicate. The Wi-Fi Alliance, to which all the main wireless product manufacturers belong, supports the development of standards. The core components of any WLAN are: 1. Access Points (APs): these incorporate radio antenna technologies to connect and communicate over the air with mobile computing devices such as tablets and laptops. 2. Wireless Controllers: these control and coordinate all Access Points, and a wide range of the associated network functions including roaming, authentication, encryption/decryption, load balancing, RF monitoring, and performance monitoring. 3. Centralised Management System: this is a tool to allow the systems administrator to manage the system. Controllers consolidate functions for centralised management software to perform updates and configuration of APs. Radios are typically configurable across any of the 2.5Ghz and 5Ghz frequency bands. Each radio supports multiple Basic Service Set Identifiers (BSSIDs). Wireless vendors provide a variety of antennae from basic to more advanced high performance versions such as multiple input, multiple output (MIMO) PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 4

5 options. Wireless interference can become a problem in high-density areas or buildings with many APs. Additionally, other wireless devices such as microwave ovens, security cameras, bluetooth devices, cordless phones, generally operating in the 2.4 GHz band and can cause interference. However experienced providers will be able to assist schools in managing these situations. Wi-Fi allows mobile device to connect to the network or internet wirelessly using radio waves via a wireless access point or (WAP or AP). The Wi-Fi Alliance defines Wi-Fi as any wireless local area network (WLAN) products that are based on the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers' (IEEE) standards. The term Wi-Fi is also used for wireless local area network or WLAN. Wi-Fi networks have limited range. A typical WAP using b or g might have a range of 35 m (120 ft) indoors and 100 m (300 ft) outdoors. IEEE n, however, can more than double the range. Range also varies with frequency band. Wi-Fi in the 2.4 GHz frequency block has slightly better range than Wi-Fi in the 5 GHz frequency block which is used by a and optionally by n. Data Security/ Encryption Unsecured wi-fi is less secure than wired connections (such as Ethernet) because a rogue intruder does not need to have physical connection to the network, hence networks need to be secured. As wireless content travels through the air, it is at risk of being intercepted by other wireless devices, hence the need to encrypt it. Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) was the initial basic wireless encryption-standard to be widely adopted, however in more recent years, it has been shown to be easily compromised and is therefore no longer recommended or considered to be fit-for-purpose. Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA and WPA2) encryption, which became available in devices in 2003, resolved this problem, and is the current recommended de-facto standard. How does a WLAN Work? In a wired network the network interface card (NIC) inside the PC provides an interface to the wired Ethernet local area network (LAN). A network cable connects the NIC to a wall data outlet/ethernet port, which is wired to a port on an Ethernet switch. The Ethernet switch establishes a connection to the network and onwards to the Internet. Figure 1: A basic wireless network A wireless network is composed of similar components as those used in a wired network except that: The NIC is replaced with a wireless NIC (WNIC), which is integrated into the tablet or laptop. The network cable in a fixed network is replaced by a wireless connection PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 5

6 The wireless access point (WAP), which communicates with the WNIC by radio frequency (wireless) signals, is connected to a data outlet/ethernet port. A wireless network needs to be capable of supporting a number of separate networks simultaneously, such as networks for staff, students and visitors. The different networks would typically have different services available and different security safeguards for example there may be a guest network that allows access to the internet only and cannot reach any school file servers, printers etc. Each different network will have a name this is called the Security Set Identifier or SSID. The SSID is usually the network name your device will find and display when you search for a wireless network to connect to. Some form of wireless network management device/system is recommended for schools. It can be software running on an existing server, a separate server, or in the cloud (on an external server typically accessed via the internet). Wireless network management devices/systems provide remote management of WAPs, can provide historical reporting, provide visibility of users on the WLAN and enable control over their activities/access. New challenges introduced by wireless networks Along with the potential benefits associated with wirelessly enabled mobile devices for staff and students there are a number of new challenges. These include: The management of wireless system itself Controlling levels of user access to management, staff, students Managing the additional mobile devices for teachers and students (tablets, laptops etc.,) Managing access to online digital resources, storage, e-books etc., Increasing dependency on broadband internet access Classroom management issues for students Monitoring student usage, and management Resolving any technical or other related issues Communications with stakeholders In order for all school stakeholders (teachers, parents, students, management etc.,) to be part of the decision making process on whether the schools makes a fundamental change to engage with wireless and mobile learning it is essential to develop an engagement and communications plan. The objective of the plan should be to ensure that the overall objectives, benefits and challenges are clearly outlined, understood, and accepted by all parties. Selecting mobile devices and ownership models Putting in place a fit for purpose wireless network is one essential part of the solution. The other key aspect involves selecting the type of mobile learning devices which are to be used by teachers and students in the school. The main decisions to be made are regarding: the type of devices to be deployed to help meet the learning objectives and outcomes. There are a range of providers available. The model of ownership to be used in terms of who owns the devices for teachers and for students for example : o one mobile device (tablet, laptop etc.,) for every teacher o a schools owned set of mobile devices to be used as a shared resource o one device per student (1:1) o a variation of these options For additional information refer to Guideline on selecting mobile devices for schools (this is currently being developed by PDST Technology in Education) Centralised and Distributed Wireless Architectures There have been two main approaches or architectures used by the companies who design and build wireless networks, and these are a) centralised and b) distributed. In centralised WLANs, functionality or intelligence PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 6

7 such as security, node management, and power level are controlled by a wireless controller which in turn controls the 'thin' Access Points (APs) in the wireless network. In a distributed approach, the functionality or intelligence for each AP resides within the 'fat' AP itself. Access points within centralised systems are called 'thin' because they contain little intelligence, while APs within distributed systems are called fat because they contain such intelligence. The distributed 'fat-ap' approach historically dominated the wireless market, however the centralised, 'thin AP' approach is now the norm. In the last 5-7 years there has been a major shift away from fat APs towards a more centralised approach that uses a wireless 'controller'. A centralised controller (either local or cloud based) architecture is recommended as the most suitable for schools. A distributed architecture is not recommended as fit-for-purpose for schools. Controller - local or cloud-based Though almost all wireless providers now use the centralised controller architecture, the location of the controller can differ. Some providers use a local controller while others use a cloud based model. Some providers have both models available depending on the customer requirements. In a centralised wireless network, thin APs have much simpler responsibilities. Most of the functionality is performed by a centralised controller, also known as a wireless switch, which handles roaming, authentication, encryption/decryption, load balancing, RF monitoring, and performance monitoring. As configuration is managed by the controller, and is standard across APs, adding additional APs for new areas or to support additional computing devices is as simple as connecting them into the network. This kind of network can be characterised as follows: AP activity is coordinated by a wireless centralised controller. Encryption/decryption and authentication are performed at the controller, instead of at the individual APs To maintain the health of the network, the controller can reconfigure AP parameters as needed, providing a self-healing WLAN (e.g. if an AP fails, neighbouring APs can increase signal strength to make up for the lost coverage of the failing AP) The wireless LAN controller performs tasks such as configuration control, fault tolerance and network expansion Redundancy can be provided through redundant controllers in separate locations that can assume control in the event of a switch or controller failure, and Support for Power over Ethernet (PoE). Centrally coordinated solutions are becoming the de facto standard. As wireless LAN deployments continue to grow larger, accommodating ever greater numbers of users, there will be an increasing demand to centrally manage a wide range of security, performance and configuration attributes as a single system from a single dashboard or software interface. A centrally controlled network offers many benefits, including: Centralised management facilitates ease of deployment and ongoing management Greater flexibility - it is easier to respond in real-time to changes in the network performance and spikes in user demand such as new students or temporary staff Fast client roaming between APs Enhancements in Quality of Service (QOS) ensure better performance and reliability for more demanding applications such as video streaming and voice communications (over VoIP). As for all of their attractions in terms of performance, flexibility and affordability, WLANs also pose management challenges which are very different from those of wired networks. These challenges increase as WLANs grow in size, scope and complexity. The recommended strategy is to automate as many of these management tasks as possible by implementing best practice service level management processes and tools. Emerging field tools are also complementing IT toolkits in filling the need to effectively manage the wireless environments. These tools provide the ability to detect rogue APs, determine security levels, determine where there are potential interference sources for wireless, such as cordless phones, and analyse wireless data. PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 7

8 Pre-Procurement Planning Stage Guidlines on Wireless Networks for Schools This section will cover the following areas: The importance of planning Planning for Wireless-Summary Process Summary procurement steps Procurement related challenges with wireless networks Planning considerations Costs of School Wireless The importance of planning As with most critical decisions, proper planning is of the utmost importance. A WLAN deployment is no different. This section is meant to help you go through the decision making process of procuring a wireless solution. Planning for Wireless-Summary Process The plan to introduce wireless should be aligned and integrated with overall school priorities for improvements in learning outcomes. The NCTE s e-learning handbook and Roadmap planning process is available online to assist schools in this area at: Summary procurement steps The main summary procurement steps specific to wireless include: Review this guideline document including the Request for Tender (RFT) template in Appendix 1. Develop a summary outline plan for wireless deployment in the school Consult with stakeholders on the plan (teachers, students, parents, board of management) Where possible it is advisable to contact or visit other post-primary schools who may already have successfully implemented a wireless solution Develop a more detailed plan. Include items such as objectives, benefits, challenges, project plan, costs, etc.,) to be shared with stakeholders Complete the RFT using the RFT template provided in Appendix 1 Issue a Request for Tender (RFT) to a minimum of 4 to 5 companies so as to have a good spread of provider responses to help achieve best value for money. Evaluate responses (guidelines will be available in this area to schools) Award contract to successful tenderer Installation and on-going support Procurement related challenges with wireless networks There are a number of procurement related challenges facing schools who are considering purchasing a wireless network. The main ones are listed here: There are a range of wireless solutions available from providers, however only some are suitable and fit-for-purpose for schools Wireless networks are relatively new in schools, and requirements and standards are still evolving Wireless networks are very different from fixed networks and as such there is a deficit of high quality expertise and guidance available The wireless requirements for post-primary schools are significantly different and more demanding than the requirements in business, home and other solutions. As such wireless providers do not have previous experience of This is due to o the large number of students and associated student devices that need to be supported in relatively small areas o the degree of movement among students and staff that takes place in a school is very high, given that in general most users move to a different location in the school every 40 minutes. The timing and simultaneous nature of this movement (ie., on the bell) does not have an equivalent in office/business/ home and as such this factor alone makes schools the most demanding environment to support. PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 8

9 Some industry sector solutions are not suitable (e.g. wireless for a large warehouse may have a wide coverage but be only required to support a small number of users) There is a deficit of truly independent advice as some consultants may have associations with specific wireless vendors/manufacturers. Only scalable wireless solutions are recommended as fit-for-purpose for schools as more student devices will need to be supported over the coming years Planning Considerations When planning a wireless network to deliver educational outcomes for a school, the requirements should be carefully defined. Asking the question, what do we want to deliver by installing a WLAN and then breaking this down into specific questions will greatly assist a school in identifying important factors. A comprehensive and clear set of requirements will assist with both the product and integrator selection process. Planning factors to consider include: Who: which members of the school community will use the wireless network? Some options might be staff only, groups of shared laptops, certain years of students, or for all students. Will guests and visitors to the school be catered for? Should there be separate networks available for different types of users e.g., staff, students, guests etc. Where: what areas of the school need to have wireless network available? Are outdoor areas included? Will the school campus be completed or will it be a staged approach? A site plan of the campus and floor plans for buildings (to scale) are useful planning tools and will be required for the WLAN design. What are the school s future plans for growth/new buildings over the next five years? How many: understanding the location and density of users on a WLAN is critical to proper planning. It is essential to define not just the total number of users expected on the wireless network but where they may be located (e.g. if high density wireless network coverage is required for certain areas). What are the school s plans for growth in student and teacher numbers over the next five years? What type of devices: having a good understanding of the types of devices the network needs to support is important (tablet, laptop, netbook, smartphone etc.). It may be that a school develops a policy of supporting a select number of different types of school owned client devices including laptops or it may consider a BYOD policy in the future. Areas/Buildings requiring wireless: Careful consideration should be given to the areas requiring wireless. It is important to clearly identify areas where wireless is essential (such as priority 1 areas for teaching and learning, staffroom, classrooms, laboratories, workshops) and other areas which might not be as critical initially, and which might be considered at a subsequent expansion phase. Take temporary or remote buildings into account. PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 9

10 Figure 2: Prioritisation of certain school areas, based on demand, budget etc., Costs of School Wireless Costs will vary depending on a number of factors such as size of school, type of school building and building layout, age of building, thickness of walls, existing fixed infrastructure including cabling and existing network switching infrastructure. When considering information technology investment, all costs need to be included including the up-front investment and on-going costs. Wireless deployments in schools can vary greatly depending on the requirements of each school. Establishing the total cost of ownership in this way will minimise unforeseen expenses and complications. When budgeting for wireless technology the following factors should be quantified. These are captured in the RFT template. Equipment costs for wireless controller and WAPs Licensing and software support/update costs Design and installation costs Cabling if required Training Costs PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 10

11 Procurement Stage This section will cover the following areas: Guidelines for a Wireless Network RFP Request for Tender Template Procurement Process Site Survey Other points for consideration Guidelines for a Wireless Network RFT Planning, purchasing, deploying and supporting a suitable and fit-for-purpose wireless network in a school is a significant step. It is also a relatively expensive process for a school. The procurement process could be managed by the school itself and this guideline was designed to assist schools in this process. Schools may also decide to engage with an external party with technical expertise on wireless network in schools. To assist schools in the actual procurement process a template Request for Tender (RFT) is attached in appendix 1. This document was written and structured for a non-technical schools audience, so that the listed technical requirements are appropriate and relevant for schools. Though the generic technical requirements are common to all schools, the template RFT is written in such a way that it can be used for a wide range of schools, large and small, single building to multi-building schools etc. It includes a section that schools need to complete themselves and that gives potential suppliers some of the necessary relevant information they require to allow them to decide to contact the school, respond to the proposal etc. As all schools are different in terms of layout, building materials, furniture, number of pupils etc., before making a formal proposal it would be necessary for potential suppliers to visit the school and carry out a site survey. Request for Tender Template The purpose of the Request for Tender (RFT) template (refer to Appendix1) is to clearly define the requirements that providers need to meet. In addition to these largely generic technical requirements listed, the RFT template has a section in which the school can enter specific and relevant information about their own school environment. The combination of generic wireless requirements in the RFT template along with specific school information added to the RFT template by the school will assist providers in better ensuring the requirements of the school. Procurement Process: Schools should complete the RFT using the template provided in Appendix 1 Ensure that school specific details are added before the tender document is finalised A single point of contact should be provided for any queries from providers All queries should be handled by so as to have a clear record of correspondence Once the RFT final draft is available for review, circulate it internally in the school for final inputs, to others involved in the procurement. Once the RFT is issued the school may receive requests for clarification on requirements. If clarifications are issued they should be issued to all providers that received the initial RFT. Issue the Tender: Once finalised, issue the final RFT to a minimum of 3-5 wireless providers so as to have a good spread of provider responses and to help achieve best value for money. Evaluate Responses: (Further guidelines will be made available in this area to schools from PDST-Technology in Education Inform unsuccessful and preferred bidders of evaluation outcomes. Provide bidders with necessary details subject to current best practice/irish law. Indicate that a stand-still period of 2 weeks shall apply. If no issues arise within the stand-still period, the contract may then be awarded to the provider of the successful tender response. Following contract award, the successful provider should be in a position to provide the school with proposed dates installation details. If equipment is not in stock and needs to be ordered. PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 11

12 Site Survey Site surveys by prospective providers are an important part of the procurement process. It is recommended that all prospective wireless network providers visit the school at an agreed time with the school, and carry out a detailed wireless network site survey. This is to ensure that they are familiar with the school layout, and other details which may affect how wireless will work in the school. The site survey is necessary to review the existing network set-up and to identify optimum locations for APs. A high quality site survey is much more than a simple physical walk-through of a school. An experienced wireless provider will use a combination of specialised wireless measurement and analysis tools, their practical experience along with schools layout drawings to determine a suitable wireless network design and implementation. The outputs from the site survey should then be used by the wireless providers as input to their responses to the RFT issued by the school in areas such as: 1. An analysis of the physical environment for wireless deployment 2. Areas within a school building or buildings that can be supported 3. Calculation of the number of APs needed. 4. The optimum placement of APs, including a map of the preferred placement of APs based on the site survey. 5. Possible problems areas. 6. Density of users recommended per AP, and on which coverage is based. 7. List coverage areas 8. Given that most APs should be mounted at ceiling height the site survey should identify any areas where the placement of APs might be challenging and provide a proposed solution. 9. To avoid risks of vandalism Access Points (APs) should be out of sight and out of reach. Other points for consideration Cabling requirements, building structure and powering of APs are other important considerations. Cabling Requirements: Each AP requires connectivity to a PoE switch on the network. This may require additional or new cabling runs must be added. Where this is the case CAT6 or a higher rated cable should be used to future requirements. Using CAT6 instead of CAT5e, for example, ensures higher data rates reliably when required. You must also consider the distance between the AP and the switch. The maximum range for 100BaseT Ethernet is 100 metres. Building structure can be a significant source of interference. Most schools are constructed with concrete or brick walls, both of which attenuate (ie., decrease the signal strength) of WLAN signals. Furthermore, when deploying WLAN into older or listed buildings, attenuation and cabling problems can dramatically increase and may require the deployment of more APs than initially planned, and as such a detailed site survey of school buildings is required to address these matters. Powering of Access Points Power over Ethernet (PoE) should be used to power all APs, as it avoids the need and associated costs for a separate power socket to power each AP. PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 12

13 Implementation and Installation Stage This section will cover the following areas: Managing user access Wireless Security Considerations Key areas regarding wireless security policy Managing user access Usernames and passwords for all users will be required, so a decisions are required if these are to be the same or separate to other usernames and passwords used in the school. Wireless Security Considerations Because of the nature of wireless signals, it is impossible to stop anyone within the signal range from attempting to access the data or the entire WLAN. This is the nature of wireless technology. Fortunately, there are security methods available today to address these security concerns. It is typically a matter of policy, will and budget. In reality, not all WLANs are configured and deployed in an ideal manner with secure access and authentication. As such, one of the main issues with that WLANs is unauthorised access to network resources and unnecessary traffic. The inherently open nature of wireless access, compared to the wired world, creates significant security concerns, chief among them, user authentication, rights enforcement and data encryption. Without the recommended level of security as defined in the RFT Template, wireless signals can be broadcast into public areas that can be accessed by eavesdropping individuals. The security solution must provide Network Access Control in different ways for different types of users who may require connecting at the same school, such as a teacher, student or visitor. Other users, such as guests or students, may be entitled only to more limited access, like filtered Internet browsing. Deploying wireless to a school introduces new security issues. In order to manage these additional aspects of security schools needs to review their school policies which relate to ICT and security. When deploying wireless it is vital to take steps to lock down wireless security by implementing written policies to guide users and administrators alike. It is essential to running a secure WLAN. If a policy is already in place, review and expand this policy to ensure it includes wireless specific and mobile user centric aspects. A school policy broadly consists of a set of statements which define what should happen in relation to the level of access or permissions that certain groups have to data or resources within and outside of the schools. Wireless solutions should provide standards-based authentication and encryption methods that satisfactorily address security concerns including authentication and data privacy. Examples of high level policy statements might be: School management have access to all school data, and have unfiltered internet access Teachers have access to teaching resource areas on the school server Students have access to online resources which are accessible via the schools content filtered broadband connection PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 13

14 Key areas regarding wireless security policy Guidlines on Wireless Networks for Schools 1. Identify user groups Clearly identify groups (or individuals) who can use the WLAN and what level of access each particular group of users will have to both your local school network and the Internet. Use the existing school policy as a starting point. 2. Acceptable usage After identifying the wireless network user community, identify the type of information that users can and cannot send over the wireless network. This may already be detailed in the school Acceptable Usage Policy (AUP). Schools may wish to refer to AUP guidelines which are contained on the Webwise website at 3. Secure the physical installation Identify named individuals who are responsible for managing the wireless within the network. Determine who will have physical access to the wireless equipment and to the APs. Ideally, try to place your APs in controlled areas within the school building. Direct the wireless installer to adjust wireless coverage areas to within the external school boundary, and not beyond, especially not into public areas such as nearby roads, as this reduces the risk of unauthorised wireless access. 4. Establish wireless security standards Define the minimum security levels on the wireless network. Disable the service set identifier (SSID) broadcast feature, and change the default SSID to something that does not reveal a school or district's name. Enable the specified levels of wireless authentication and encryption. 5. Training of staff and users Two levels of training are required. School staff who may have specific roles in relation to the management or administration of the wireless system need to be trained in order to carry out these functions. Also end user training needs to take place for staff and students on how to access the system via their wireless mobile devices. 5. Standard Operating Procedure/Documentation: The provider should provide copies of all relevant specifications, operations and management user manuals for the system and software. 6. Guest Access Guest WLAN access is convenient for visitors who increasingly require Internet access to do their jobs. This could include temporary administrative staff or substitute teachers, or other visitors who may need internet access. PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 14

15 Post Installation Management and Support This section will cover the following areas: New challenges introduced by wireless Selecting mobile devices and ownership models On-going Operational Support Considerations On-going support of the WLAN On-going Security Mobile Device Management solutions (MDM) New challenges introduced by wireless Along with the potential benefits associated with wirelessly enabled mobile devices for staff and students there are a number of new challenges. These include: The management of wireless system itself Controlling levels of user access to management, staff, students Managing the additional mobile devices for teachers and students (tablets, laptops etc.,) Managing access to online digital resources, storage, e-books etc., Increasing dependency on broadband internet access Classroom management issues for students Monitoring student usage, and management Resolving any technical or other related issues Selecting mobile devices and ownership models Putting in place a fit for purpose wireless network is one essential part of the solution. The other key aspect involves selecting the type of mobile learning devices which are to be used by teachers and students in the school. The main decisions to be made are regarding: the type of devices to be deployed to help meet the learning objectives and outcomes. There are a range of providers available. The model of ownership to be used in terms of who owns the devices for teachers and for students for example : o one mobile device (tablet, laptop etc.,) for every teacher o a schools owned set of mobile devices to be used as a shared resource o one device per student (1:1) o a variation of these options For additional information refer to Guideline on selecting mobile devices for schools (this is currently being developed by PDST Technology in Education) On-going Operational Support Considerations After the completion of a wireless installation, there will be further considerations during operation of the network. This section describes on-going considerations. On-going support of the WLAN In planning for the on-going support, maintenance and management of the WLAN it is important to understand the requirements for uptime or availability of the network and the process for resolving issues. These requirements, processes and timeframes are defined in the service level agreement (SLA), refer to the RFT template for details. PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 15

16 On-going Security Security is always a balance between risks (perceived and actual) and mitigation costs. Various factors need to be considered including the vulnerability of the network, the threat of attack, the value of the data to be secured and the costs involved. Wireless networks are often perceived as particularly vulnerable because anyone with a suitable wireless device can detect the presence of a wireless LAN. Some risks are specific to wireless, but in general a security plan that provides good protection to a wired network will also mitigate many risks from wireless. Securing WLANs, as with all networks, needs to be seen as a continuous process rather than a one-off step. Any security solution needs to be consistently and properly implemented with regular monitoring. The wireless LAN should be configured so that anyone trying to gain access has at least the same access restrictions as a wired network workstation. Schools should be implementing a comprehensive security policy and incorporating best practices standards. Mobile Device Management solutions (MDM) Mobile Device Management (MDM) systems are designed to assist in the management of the mobile devices such as tablets, laptops. They are different to the wireless controller and Wireless management system that was discussed earlier. MDM systems monitor, manage and support how mobile devices are deployed, including configuration settings on mobile devices themselves. They could be used for example to distribute applications (ie., apps) to mobile devices. They are fast becoming essential tools to manage mobile devices in schools. Some free MDMs are available. MDMs are especially critical where a BYOD model is being used. By controlling and protecting the data and configuration settings for all mobile devices in the network, MDM can reduce support costs and security risks. With mobile devices becoming more common in schools and a range of growing applications mobile monitoring is growing in importance. End of Document PDST Technology in Education (March 2015) 16

Wireless Ethernet LAN (WLAN) General 802.11a/802.11b/802.11g FAQ

Wireless Ethernet LAN (WLAN) General 802.11a/802.11b/802.11g FAQ Wireless Ethernet LAN (WLAN) General 802.11a/802.11b/802.11g FAQ Q: What is a Wireless LAN (WLAN)? Q: What are the benefits of using a WLAN instead of a wired network connection? Q: Are Intel WLAN products

More information

Secure Wireless Networking

Secure Wireless Networking Secure Wireless Networking In today s connected world, people expect seamless connectivity to their networks and the Internet. That s why Cisco Small Business Wireless s offer expanded range and coverage

More information

Technology in Schools. School Wireless LAN Guidelines: Understanding Wireless Guide. Version 1.2

Technology in Schools. School Wireless LAN Guidelines: Understanding Wireless Guide. Version 1.2 Technology in Schools School Wireless LAN Guidelines: Understanding Wireless Guide Version 1.2 May 2015 Document Information Acknowledgements The Ministry of Education, New Zealand, acknowledges with thanks

More information

ADDENDUM 12 TO APPENDIX 8 TO SCHEDULE 3.3

ADDENDUM 12 TO APPENDIX 8 TO SCHEDULE 3.3 ADDENDUM 12 TO APPENDIX 8 TO SCHEDULE 3.3 TO THE Overview EXHIBIT T to Amendment No. 60 Secure Wireless Network Services are based on the IEEE 802.11 set of standards and meet the Commonwealth of Virginia

More information

12. INDOOR INSTALLATION

12. INDOOR INSTALLATION 12. INDOOR INSTALLATION 1. Introduction Previous editions of this book have focused on wide-area outdoor wireless as a means of connecting communities with each other and to the Internet. However, with

More information

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE LIVINGSTON, NJ WWW.LIVINGSTONNJ.ORG ITMC TECH TIP ROB COONCE, MARCH 2008

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE LIVINGSTON, NJ WWW.LIVINGSTONNJ.ORG ITMC TECH TIP ROB COONCE, MARCH 2008 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE LIVINGSTON, NJ WWW.LIVINGSTONNJ.ORG What is wireless technology? ITMC TECH TIP ROB COONCE, MARCH 2008 In our world today, this may mean sitting down at a coffee

More information

White Paper. Wireless Network Considerations for Mobile Collaboration

White Paper. Wireless Network Considerations for Mobile Collaboration White Paper Wireless Network Considerations for Mobile Collaboration Table of Contents I. Introduction... 3 II. Wireless Considerations... 4 Channel Selection... 4 Interference... 4 Coverage... 5 Covering

More information

Chapter 2 Configuring Your Wireless Network and Security Settings

Chapter 2 Configuring Your Wireless Network and Security Settings Chapter 2 Configuring Your Wireless Network and Security Settings This chapter describes how to configure the wireless features of your DG834N RangeMax TM NEXT Wireless ADSL2+ Modem Router. For a wireless

More information

Cisco Wireless Control System (WCS)

Cisco Wireless Control System (WCS) Data Sheet Cisco Wireless Control System (WCS) PRODUCT OVERVIEW Cisco Wireless Control System (WCS) Cisco Wireless Control System (WCS) is the industry s leading platform for wireless LAN planning, configuration,

More information

CISCO WIRELESS CONTROL SYSTEM (WCS)

CISCO WIRELESS CONTROL SYSTEM (WCS) CISCO WIRELESS CONTROL SYSTEM (WCS) Figure 1. Cisco Wireless Control System (WCS) PRODUCT OVERVIEW Cisco Wireless Control System (WCS) Cisco Wireless Control System (WCS) is the industry s leading platform

More information

1.2 The Policy is maintained and regulated by the University s Information Services department.

1.2 The Policy is maintained and regulated by the University s Information Services department. WIRELESS POLICY 1 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Wireless networking is a fast emerging technology and is set to continue to grow for the foreseeable future. It is recognised that wireless networking could offer benefits

More information

Enabling the Wireless School Challenges & Benefits of Wireless LANs in Primary Education

Enabling the Wireless School Challenges & Benefits of Wireless LANs in Primary Education WHITE PAPER Enabling the Wireless School Challenges & Benefits of Wireless LANs in Primary Education Date: February 2009 Copyright 2010 Meru. All rights reserved. TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION... 3 GROWING

More information

APPENDIX 3 LOT 3: WIRELESS NETWORK

APPENDIX 3 LOT 3: WIRELESS NETWORK APPENDIX 3 LOT 3: WIRELESS NETWORK A. TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS MAIN PURPOSE The Wi-Fi system should be capable of providing Internet access directly to a user using a smart phone, tablet PC, ipad or Laptop

More information

Designing, Securing and Monitoring 802.11a/b/g/n Wireless Networks

Designing, Securing and Monitoring 802.11a/b/g/n Wireless Networks Designing, Securing and Monitoring 802.11a/b/g/n Wireless Networks The importance of Wireless today Increasingly in the Corporate Environment, Wireless is becoming an enabling technology to facilitate

More information

How To Unify Your Wireless Architecture Without Limiting Performance or Flexibility

How To Unify Your Wireless Architecture Without Limiting Performance or Flexibility w h i t e p a p e r How To Unify Your Wireless Architecture Without Limiting Performance or Flexibility So much is happening today to give you a chance to rethink your wireless architecture. Indeed, you

More information

Guide for wireless environments

Guide for wireless environments Sanako Study Guide for wireless environments 1 Contents Sanako Study... 1 Guide for wireless environments... 1 What will you find in this guide?... 3 General... 3 Disclaimer... 3 Requirements in brief...

More information

Mobility Challenge. Challenge #1: User Experience:

Mobility Challenge. Challenge #1: User Experience: Mobility Challenge Challenge #1: User Experience: Explosion of wireless devices drives wireless access needs and issues Need for video support for distance learning, rich digital content and professional

More information

Wireless Network Standard and Guidelines

Wireless Network Standard and Guidelines Wireless Network Standard and Guidelines Purpose The standard and guidelines listed in this document will ensure the uniformity of wireless network access points and provide guidance for monitoring, maintaining

More information

Best Practices for Outdoor Wireless Security

Best Practices for Outdoor Wireless Security Best Practices for Outdoor Wireless Security This paper describes security best practices for deploying an outdoor wireless LAN. This is standard body copy, style used is Body. Customers are encouraged

More information

Wireless Network Policy

Wireless Network Policy Wireless Network Policy Purpose Guide the deployment and integrity of wireless networking on the Kettering University campus to ensure reliable, compatible, and secure operation Protect the security of

More information

Cloud-based Wireless LAN for Enterprise, SMB, IT Service Providers and Carriers. Product Highlights. Relay2 Enterprise Access Point RA100 Datasheet

Cloud-based Wireless LAN for Enterprise, SMB, IT Service Providers and Carriers. Product Highlights. Relay2 Enterprise Access Point RA100 Datasheet Cloud-based Wireless LAN for Enterprise, SMB, IT Service Providers and Carriers The Relay2 Smart Access Point (RA100) is an enterprise-class access point designed for deployment in high-density environments

More information

Best Practices for Deploying Wireless LANs

Best Practices for Deploying Wireless LANs Best Practices for Deploying Wireless LANs An overview of special considerations in WLAN implementations As wireless LANs (WLANs) continue to grow in popularity, particularly in enterprise networks, the

More information

Monitoring & Measuring: Wi-Fi as a Service

Monitoring & Measuring: Wi-Fi as a Service Monitoring & Measuring: Wi-Fi as a Service Parker Smith, Director of Business Development, ProCloud Services, ADTRAN IT Professional Wi-Fi Trek 2015 Agenda Wireless Trends and Impacts How Cloud Wireless

More information

WIRELESS INFRASTRUCTURE & MOBILE DEVICE MANAGEMENT REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI)

WIRELESS INFRASTRUCTURE & MOBILE DEVICE MANAGEMENT REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI) Pflugerville Independent School District Department of Technology WIRELESS INFRASTRUCTURE & MOBILE DEVICE MANAGEMENT REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI) Attention: Craig Pruett, Director of Purchasing 1401 W.

More information

Wireless Services. The Top Questions to Help You Choose the Right Wireless Solution for Your Business. www.megapath.com

Wireless Services. The Top Questions to Help You Choose the Right Wireless Solution for Your Business. www.megapath.com Wireless Services The Top Questions to Help You Choose the Right Wireless Solution for Your Business Get Started Now: 877.611.6342 to learn more. www.megapath.com Why Go Wireless? Today, it seems that

More information

LTE, WLAN, BLUETOOTHB

LTE, WLAN, BLUETOOTHB LTE, WLAN, BLUETOOTHB AND Aditya K. Jagannatham FUTURE Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur Commonwealth of Learning Vancouver 4G LTE LTE (Long Term Evolution) is the 4G wireless cellular standard developed

More information

INDEPENDENT TECHNOLOGY SPECIALISTS IN EDUCATION

INDEPENDENT TECHNOLOGY SPECIALISTS IN EDUCATION INDEPENDENT TECHNOLOGY SPECIALISTS IN EDUCATION CONSIDERATIONS FOR DEVELOPING AND DEPLOYING A MOBILE LEARNING STRATEGY Many schools we are working with are looking to extend their use of tablet technology,

More information

Setting Up Your Wireless Network

Setting Up Your Wireless Network Setting Up Your Wireless Network 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Wireless Tips... 3 Terminology... 4 Motorola 2247... 5 Logging In:... 5 Changing the SSID/network name... 6 Westell Model 7500... 12 Configuration of

More information

Wireless Network Standard

Wireless Network Standard Last Modified: 10/20/15 Wireless Network Standard Purpose The standard and guidelines described in this document will ensure the uniformity of wireless network access points at the University of Georgia.

More information

Lessons in Wireless for K-12 Schools

Lessons in Wireless for K-12 Schools White Paper Education Lessons in Wireless for K-12 Schools Don Reckles Introduction The Growing Need for the Network Primary and secondary (K-12) educational institutions are increasingly turning to computer

More information

Chapter 3 Safeguarding Your Network

Chapter 3 Safeguarding Your Network Chapter 3 Safeguarding Your Network The RangeMax NEXT Wireless Router WNR834B provides highly effective security features which are covered in detail in this chapter. This chapter includes: Choosing Appropriate

More information

Deploying the ShoreTel IP Telephony Solution with a Meru Networks Wireless LAN

Deploying the ShoreTel IP Telephony Solution with a Meru Networks Wireless LAN Deploying the ShoreTel IP Telephony Solution with a Meru Networks Wireless LAN Copyright 2005, Meru Networks, Inc. This document is an unpublished work protected by the United States copyright laws and

More information

Robust security is a requirement for many companies deploying a wireless network. However, creating a secure wireless network has often been

Robust security is a requirement for many companies deploying a wireless network. However, creating a secure wireless network has often been Robust security is a requirement for many companies deploying a wireless network. However, creating a secure wireless network has often been difficult and time-consuming. This paper describes the security

More information

NSW Government. Wireless services (WiFi) Standard

NSW Government. Wireless services (WiFi) Standard NSW Government Wireless services (WiFi) Standard May 2014 CONTENTS 1. CONTEXT 2 1.1. Background 2 1.2. Purpose 2 1.3. Scope and application 2 2. STANDARDS GOVERNANCE 2 2.1. Standards to support the ICT

More information

Wireless Networking for Small Businesses, Branches and Home Offices

Wireless Networking for Small Businesses, Branches and Home Offices Wireless Networking for Small Businesses, Branches and Home Offices Whether one believes in the Internet revolution or not, it is true that the Internet today has become an essential element in running

More information

Cisco Outdoor Wireless Network Serves Up Automatic Meter Reading

Cisco Outdoor Wireless Network Serves Up Automatic Meter Reading Cisco Outdoor Wireless Network Serves Up Automatic Meter Reading Summary Cisco outdoor wireless solutions make it practical to deploy and manage Wi-Fi on a citywide scale. This application note describes

More information

Readying Your Campus for Mobile Learning and BYOD

Readying Your Campus for Mobile Learning and BYOD Readying Your Campus for Mobile Learning and BYOD A Guide to Strategy and Planning Produced by For additional copies or to download this document, please visit: www.convergemag.com/mobilelearning 2012

More information

Chapter 2 Wireless Settings and Security

Chapter 2 Wireless Settings and Security Chapter 2 Wireless Settings and Security This chapter describes how to set up the wireless features of your WGT624 v4 wireless router. In planning your wireless network, select a location for the wireless

More information

Enterprise WiFi System. Datasheet. Models: UAP, UAP-LR, UAP-PRO, UAP-AC UAP-Outdoor, UAP-Outdoor5

Enterprise WiFi System. Datasheet. Models: UAP, UAP-LR, UAP-PRO, UAP-AC UAP-Outdoor, UAP-Outdoor5 Enterprise WiFi System Models: UAP, UAP-LR, UAP-PRO, UAP-AC UAP-Outdoor, UAP-Outdoor5 Unlimited Indoor/Outdoor AP Scalability in a Unified Management System Breakthrough Speeds up to 1300 Mbps (802.11ac)

More information

SECURING ENTERPRISE NETWORK 3 LAYER APPROACH FOR BYOD

SECURING ENTERPRISE NETWORK 3 LAYER APPROACH FOR BYOD SECURING ENTERPRISE NETWORK 3 LAYER APPROACH FOR BYOD www.wipro.com Table of Contents Executive Summary 03 Introduction 03 Challanges 04 Solution 05 Three Layered Approach to secure BYOD 06 Conclusion

More information

Cisco Outdoor Wireless Mesh Enables Alternative Broadband Access

Cisco Outdoor Wireless Mesh Enables Alternative Broadband Access Cisco Outdoor Wireless Mesh Enables Alternative Broadband Access Cisco ServiceMesh defines a network design for service providers delivering valueadded municipal wireless services over a mesh network.

More information

Three Best Practices to Help Enterprises Overcome BYOD Challenges

Three Best Practices to Help Enterprises Overcome BYOD Challenges WHITE PAPER Three Best Practices to Help Enterprises Overcome BYOD Challenges Nearly 80% of white-collar workers in the United States use a mobile device for work and approximately 95% of IT organizations

More information

Supporting Municipal Business Models with Cisco Outdoor Wireless Solutions

Supporting Municipal Business Models with Cisco Outdoor Wireless Solutions Supporting Municipal Business Models with Cisco Outdoor Wireless Solutions EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Outdoor wireless networks are playing a vital role in helping municipalities deliver critical services to citizens.

More information

Wireless e-business by IBM Wireless Local Area Networks

Wireless e-business by IBM Wireless Local Area Networks IBM Global Services October 2001 Wireless e-business by IBM Wireless Local Area Networks Jyrki Korkki Global Offerings Development Executive, Global Services Page No. 2 Contents 2 Unwiring the business

More information

Outdoor Edge Equipment Wireless Applications. APX-120N5 Preconfigured Wireless Bridge APX-110N5 All-in-One Wireless Access Point / Client / Bridge

Outdoor Edge Equipment Wireless Applications. APX-120N5 Preconfigured Wireless Bridge APX-110N5 All-in-One Wireless Access Point / Client / Bridge Outdoor Edge Equipment Wireless Applications APX-120N5 Preconfigured Wireless Bridge APX-110N5 All-in-One Wireless Access Point / Client / Bridge By: Brian Roth, Product Marketing Engineer May 06, 2014

More information

Enterprise WiFi System. Datasheet. Models: UAP, UAP-LR, UAP-Pro, UAP-Outdoor, UAP-Outdoor5

Enterprise WiFi System. Datasheet. Models: UAP, UAP-LR, UAP-Pro, UAP-Outdoor, UAP-Outdoor5 Enterprise WiFi System Models: UAP, UAP-LR, UAP-Pro, UAP-Outdoor, UAP-Outdoor5 Unlimited Indoor/Outdoor AP Scalability in a Unified Management System Breakthrough Capacity up to 750 Mbps Intuitive UniFi

More information

WHITE PAPER. Wireless LAN Security for Healthcare and HIPAA Compliance

WHITE PAPER. Wireless LAN Security for Healthcare and HIPAA Compliance WHITE PAPER Wireless LAN Security for Healthcare and HIPAA Compliance Wireless LAN Security for Healthcare and HIPAA Compliance Wireless deployments in healthcare institutions have accelerated as mobility

More information

Relay2 Enterprise Cloud Controller Datasheet

Relay2 Enterprise Cloud Controller Datasheet Relay2 Enterprise Cloud WLAN Network Controller Provides the power of enterprise network services without the complexities and cost of traditional hardware- based Wi- Fi controllers The Relay2 Enterprise

More information

The Cisco Mobility Express Solution

The Cisco Mobility Express Solution The Cisco Mobility Express Solution A business-grade, affordable mobility solution for small and medium-sized businesses with up to 250 employees. Executive Summary This document presents the Cisco Mobility

More information

The next generation of knowledge and expertise Wireless Security Basics

The next generation of knowledge and expertise Wireless Security Basics The next generation of knowledge and expertise Wireless Security Basics HTA Technology Security Consulting., 30 S. Wacker Dr, 22 nd Floor, Chicago, IL 60606, 708-862-6348 (voice), 708-868-2404 (fax), www.hta-inc.com

More information

Wireless Threats To Corporate Security A Presentation for ISACA UK Northern Chapter

Wireless Threats To Corporate Security A Presentation for ISACA UK Northern Chapter Wireless Threats To Corporate Security A Presentation for ISACA UK Northern Chapter Introduction Who are we? Matt Moore, Senior Consultant @ PenTest Ltd. Mark Rowe, Technical Director @ PenTest Ltd. What

More information

Security in Wireless Local Area Network

Security in Wireless Local Area Network Fourth LACCEI International Latin American and Caribbean Conference for Engineering and Technology (LACCET 2006) Breaking Frontiers and Barriers in Engineering: Education, Research and Practice 21-23 June

More information

Meru MobileFLEX Architecture

Meru MobileFLEX Architecture Meru MobileFLEX Architecture Bringing new levels of choice and control to enterprise wireless LANs Mobility has transformed work from a location to an activity. Smartphones, tablets, and laptops enable

More information

Avaya WLAN Orchestration System

Avaya WLAN Orchestration System Avaya WLAN Orchestration System Overview The Avaya WLAN Orchestration System (WOS) is a wireless network management platform that provides full monitoring and management of the Avaya WLAN 9100 Series network

More information

Wireless Home Networking Fundamentals

Wireless Home Networking Fundamentals P a g e 1 Wireless Home Networking Fundamentals This course is designed to provide a comprehensive understanding of wireless home network fundamentals. Students will gain an understanding of: WiFi standards,

More information

Cisco WAP121 Wireless-N Access Point with Single Point Setup

Cisco WAP121 Wireless-N Access Point with Single Point Setup Data Sheet Cisco WAP121 Wireless-N Access Point with Single Point Setup Secure, Easy-to-Deploy, Affordable Wireless-N Connectivity Highlights Provides affordable high-bandwidth 802.11n wireless connectivity

More information

Mechanic Handheld Wireless Access Point Setup Guide

Mechanic Handheld Wireless Access Point Setup Guide Pre-Installation Manual Mechanic Handheld Wireless Access Point Setup Guide February 2014 / 10-095400-085 Mechanic Handheld Wireless Access Point Setup Guide Pre-Installation Manual February 2014 by the

More information

Avaya WLAN Orchestration System

Avaya WLAN Orchestration System Avaya WLAN Orchestration System Overview The Avaya WLAN Orchestration System (WOS) is a wireless network management platform that provides full monitoring and management of the Avaya WLAN 9100 Series network

More information

EKT 331/4 COMMUNICATION NETWORK

EKT 331/4 COMMUNICATION NETWORK UNIVERSITI MALAYSIA PERLIS SCHOOL OF COMPUTER & COMMUNICATIONS ENGINEERING EKT 331/4 COMMUNICATION NETWORK LABORATORY MODULE LAB 5 WIRELESS ACCESS POINT Lab 5 : Wireless Access Point Objectives To learn

More information

Datasheet. Enterprise Wi-Fi System. Models: UAP-IW, UAP, UAP-LR, UAP-PRO, UAP-Outdoor+, UAP-Outdoor5

Datasheet. Enterprise Wi-Fi System. Models: UAP-IW, UAP, UAP-LR, UAP-PRO, UAP-Outdoor+, UAP-Outdoor5 Enterprise Wi-Fi System Models: UAP-IW, UAP, UAP-LR, UAP-PRO, UAP-Outdoor+, UAP-Outdoor5 Unlimited Indoor/Outdoor AP Scalability in a Unified Management System Reliable Throughput up to 750 Mbps Intuitive

More information

BLACK BOX. Why intelligent mesh is the best enterprise wireless solution. Wireless Mesh. 724-746-5500 724-746-5500 blackbox.

BLACK BOX. Why intelligent mesh is the best enterprise wireless solution. Wireless Mesh. 724-746-5500 724-746-5500 blackbox. Why intelligent mesh is the best enterprise wireless solution. BLACK BOX SmartPath Enterprise Indoor Wireless with Integrated Antennas SmartPath Enterprise Wireless, Hardened 724-746-5500 724-746-5500

More information

Managed WiFi. Choosing the Right Managed WiFi Solution for your Organization. www.megapath.com. Get Started Now: 877.611.6342 to learn more.

Managed WiFi. Choosing the Right Managed WiFi Solution for your Organization. www.megapath.com. Get Started Now: 877.611.6342 to learn more. Managed WiFi Choosing the Right Managed WiFi Solution for your Organization Get Started Now: 877.611.6342 to learn more. www.megapath.com Everyone is going Wireless Today, it seems that everywhere you

More information

This document describes how the Meraki Cloud Controller system enables the construction of large-scale, cost-effective wireless networks.

This document describes how the Meraki Cloud Controller system enables the construction of large-scale, cost-effective wireless networks. This document describes how the Meraki Cloud Controller system enables the construction of large-scale, cost-effective wireless networks. Copyright 2009 Meraki, Inc. All rights reserved. Trademarks Meraki

More information

The 2014 Wi-Fi Challenge

The 2014 Wi-Fi Challenge Network World and Robin Layland present The 2014 Wi-Fi Challenge Guide to Understanding and Choosing a Wi-Fi Solution for Today's Mobile Worlds 2014 What It Takes for Wi-Fi to Conquer the Mobile Revolution

More information

Securing Your Wireless Network

Securing Your Wireless Network Choosing A Wireless Router You might already have a wireless router provided to you by your Internet Service Provider. Otherwise, if you are intending to get one or decide to upgrade your old router, look

More information

WHITEPAPER. Wireless LAN Security for Healthcare and HIPAA Compliance

WHITEPAPER. Wireless LAN Security for Healthcare and HIPAA Compliance WHITEPAPER Wireless LAN Security for Healthcare and HIPAA Compliance Wireless LAN Security for Healthcare and HIPAA Compliance Wireless deployments in healthcare institutions have accelerated as mobility

More information

Best practices for WiFi in K-12 schools

Best practices for WiFi in K-12 schools Best practices for WiFi in K-12 schools Contents Introduction... 3 The top 10 list... 3 1. Create a five-year plan for the network.... 3 2. Identify wireless coverage requirements... 3 3. Opt for 802.11ac

More information

Deploying secure wireless network services The Avaya Identity Engines portfolio offers flexible, auditable management for secure wireless networks.

Deploying secure wireless network services The Avaya Identity Engines portfolio offers flexible, auditable management for secure wireless networks. Table of Contents Section 1: Executive summary...1 Section 2: The challenge...2 Section 3: WLAN security...3 and the 802.1X standard Section 4: The solution...4 Section 5: Security...4 Section 6: Encrypted

More information

300Mbps Wireless N Ceiling Mount Access Point

300Mbps Wireless N Ceiling Mount Access Point Datasheet Ceiling Mount Access Point 110 Highlights Wireless N speed up to 300Mbps Controller Software enables administrators to easily manage hundreds of s Supports passive PoE for convenient installation

More information

The evolution of data connectivity

The evolution of data connectivity Leveraging the Benefits of IP and the Cloud in the Security Sector The CCTV and alarm industry has relied on analogue or Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) communications to provide data connectivity

More information

How Cisco Tracks RFID with Active RFID and Wireless LANs

How Cisco Tracks RFID with Active RFID and Wireless LANs How Tracks RFID with Active RFID and Wireless LANs Active RFID tags and WLANs ensure compliance with corporate finance and government regulations. IT Case Study / Wireless / RFID Solutions: Maintaining

More information

300Mbps Wireless N Gigabit Ceilling Mount Access Point

300Mbps Wireless N Gigabit Ceilling Mount Access Point Datasheet 300Mbps Wireless N Gigabit Ceilling Mount Access Point 120 Highlights Wireless N speed up to 300Mbps The Controller Software enables administrators to manage hundreds of s easily from any PC

More information

Case Study of Wireless Networking for Small Business

Case Study of Wireless Networking for Small Business International Journal of Engineering Works Kambohwell Publishers Enterprise www.kwpublisher.com Vol. 1, PP. 20-25, Sept. 2014 Case Study of Wireless Networking for Small Business Rehan Jamil, Irfan Jamil,

More information

Wireless in the Data Centre becomes best practice!

Wireless in the Data Centre becomes best practice! Wireless in the Data Centre becomes best practice! Mobile computing has made wireless networking essential almost everywhere. Until recently the Data Centre was excluded from this advance but this is now

More information

IEEE G / B WIRELESS SECURITY. AMX Corporation. Wireless LAN Security: T e c h n o l o g y W h i t e P a p e r

IEEE G / B WIRELESS SECURITY. AMX Corporation. Wireless LAN Security: T e c h n o l o g y W h i t e P a p e r IEEE 802.11G / 802.11B WIRELESS SECURITY AMX Corporation Wireless LAN Security: T e c h n o l o g y W h i t e P a p e r 1 Table of Contents Table of Contents 2 Introduction 3 Wireless LAN Market Overview

More information

Security Requirements for Wireless Local Area Networks

Security Requirements for Wireless Local Area Networks Information Technology Security Guidance Security Requirements for Wireless Local Area Networks Overview ITSG-41 March 2013 Foreword The ITSG-41 Security Requirements for Wireless Local Area Networks document

More information

Which antenna for Wi-Fi?

Which antenna for Wi-Fi? Which antenna for Wi-Fi? Introduction Wi-Fi is a brand originally licensed by the Wi-Fi Alliance to describe the underlying technology of wireless local area networks (WLAN) based on the IEEE 802.11 specifications.

More information

Meru MobileFLEX Architecture

Meru MobileFLEX Architecture Meru MobileFLEX Architecture Bringing new levels of choice and control to enterprise wireless LANs Today, network management is a tug-of-war between user demands and IT requirements. Users are pulling

More information

Network Security Best Practices

Network Security Best Practices CEDIA WHITE PAPER Network Security Best Practices 2014 CEDIA TABLE OF CONTENTS 01 Document Scope 3 02 Introduction 3 03 Securing the Router from WAN (internet) Attack 3 04 Securing the LAN and Individual

More information

AN140011 - ISP router - Ruckus R300 Access Point

AN140011 - ISP router - Ruckus R300 Access Point Application Note:- To introduce a Ruckus R300 Access Point router to function with an ISP (Internet Service Provider) router which is providing broadband internet access and Wi-Fi. The Ruckus R300 Access

More information

9 Simple steps to secure your Wi-Fi Network.

9 Simple steps to secure your Wi-Fi Network. 9 Simple steps to secure your Wi-Fi Network. Step 1: Change the Default Password of Modem / Router After opening modem page click on management - access control password. Select username, confirm old password

More information

HUAWEI Enterprise AP Series 802.11ac Brochure

HUAWEI Enterprise AP Series 802.11ac Brochure Enterprise AP Series 802.11ac Brochure 01 Enterprise AP Series 802.11ac Brochure 1 Overview Release of 802.11ac standards has driven wireless technologies to the era of GE Wi-Fi. Enterprise Wi-Fi networks

More information

Matthew Chu - SR. Technical Architect Channel Technical Sales Enablement

Matthew Chu - SR. Technical Architect Channel Technical Sales Enablement MOTOROLA WLAN OVERVIEW Matthew Chu - SR. Technical Architect Channel Technical Sales Enablement AGENDA Growth Opportunity and Key Drivers WiNG 5 & The Motorola Advantage Vertical Use Cases Resources Q

More information

Alcatel-Lucent In-building Wireless Continuity Solution for Healthcare

Alcatel-Lucent In-building Wireless Continuity Solution for Healthcare S T R A T E G I C W H I T E P A P E R Alcatel-Lucent In-building Wireless Continuity Solution for Healthcare Healthcare facilities are under pressure to provide high-quality wireless coverage using a range

More information

Boosting Business Mobility and Responsiveness with the Cisco Unified Wireless Network

Boosting Business Mobility and Responsiveness with the Cisco Unified Wireless Network Solution Overivew Boosting Business Mobility and Responsiveness with the Cisco Unified Wireless Network EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Today s businesses are turning to wireless networking to give employees immediate

More information

Three Best Practices to Help Government Agencies Overcome BYOD Challenges

Three Best Practices to Help Government Agencies Overcome BYOD Challenges WHITE PAPER This paper discusses how IT managers in government can address the challenges of the new Bring-Your-Own-Device (BYOD) environment as well as best practices for ensuring security and productivity.

More information

Cisco WAP4410N Wireless-N Access Point: PoE/Advanced Security. Cisco Small Business Access Points

Cisco WAP4410N Wireless-N Access Point: PoE/Advanced Security. Cisco Small Business Access Points Cisco WAP4410N Wireless-N Access Point: PoE/Advanced Security Cisco Small Business Access Points Advanced, High-Performance Wireless Access for the Small Business Highlights Supports high-bandwidth applications

More information

This KnowledgeShare document addresses the main types of wireless networking today based on the IEEE 802.11 standard.

This KnowledgeShare document addresses the main types of wireless networking today based on the IEEE 802.11 standard. Wireless Networking Q&A Increased use of laptop computers within the enterprise, and increase in worker mobility have fuelled the demand for wireless networks. Up until recently, wireless technology was

More information

Municipal Mesh Network Design

Municipal Mesh Network Design White Paper Municipal Mesh Network Design Author: Maen Artimy 1 Summary This document provides a wireless mesh network design for the downtown area of the Town of Wolfville, Nova Scotia. This design serves

More information

XX-XXX Wireless Local Area Network Guidelines. Date: August 13, 2003 Date Adopted by NITC: Other:

XX-XXX Wireless Local Area Network Guidelines. Date: August 13, 2003 Date Adopted by NITC: Other: Nebraska Information Technology Commission TECHNICAL STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES Wireless Local Area Network Guidelines Category Title Number Security Architecture Wireless Local Area Network Guidelines Applicability

More information

Pronto Cloud Controller The Next Generation Control

Pronto Cloud Controller The Next Generation Control Pronto Cloud Controller The Next Generation Control www.prontonetworks.com Cloud Managed Wi-Fi Cloud at its Best The Pronto Cloud Controller (PCC) is a next generation cloud Wi-Fi network configuration,

More information

Networking 101 (Networking Basics) Presentation to UCHUG - 1/03/07 G. Skalka

Networking 101 (Networking Basics) Presentation to UCHUG - 1/03/07 G. Skalka Networking 101 (Networking Basics) Presentation to UCHUG - 1/03/07 G. Skalka What is a network? A computer network is two or more computers connected together using a telecommunication system for the purpose

More information

Cisco WAP200E Wireless-G Exterior Access Point: PoE Cisco Small Business Access Points

Cisco WAP200E Wireless-G Exterior Access Point: PoE Cisco Small Business Access Points Cisco WAP200E Wireless-G Exterior Access Point: PoE Cisco Small Business Access Points High-Speed Wireless Access for Exterior Environments Highlights Extends network to exterior business environments,

More information

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: HOMEPLUG

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: HOMEPLUG FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS: HOMEPLUG 1. What is HomePlug / Powerline technology? Beginner 2. How do I set up a network with Aztech HomePlugs? Beginner 3. How will HomePlugs benefit me at home? Beginner

More information

CWNA Instructor Led Course Outline

CWNA Instructor Led Course Outline CWNA Instructor Led Course Outline Enterprise Wi-Fi Administration, Outline v7.0 Introduction The Enterprise Wireless LAN Administration 7.1 course (which prepares students for the CWNA-106 exam), whether

More information

INFORMATION ASSURANCE DIRECTORATE

INFORMATION ASSURANCE DIRECTORATE National Security Agency/Central Security Service INFORMATION ASSURANCE DIRECTORATE IAD Best Practices for Securing Wireless Devices and Networks in National Security Systems IAG U/OO/814639-15 13 October

More information

CABLING REQUIREMENTS:

CABLING REQUIREMENTS: CABLING REQUIREMENTS: All cabling (copper and fiber) should be Belden or be of equivalent specifications. All cabling (copper and fiber) should be installed to meet or exceed manufacturer s warranty requirements.

More information

NXC5200/ NWA5000-N Series Wireless LAN Controller/ 802.11 a/b/g/n Managed Access Point

NXC5200/ NWA5000-N Series Wireless LAN Controller/ 802.11 a/b/g/n Managed Access Point Higherbandwidth, higher density with full range of 802.11n s (NWA5000N Series) Comprehensive guest network management with auto guest account generator and Web authentication support Manage up to 240 APs

More information

VIDEO Intypedia012en LESSON 12: WI FI NETWORKS SECURITY. AUTHOR: Raúl Siles. Founder and Security Analyst at Taddong

VIDEO Intypedia012en LESSON 12: WI FI NETWORKS SECURITY. AUTHOR: Raúl Siles. Founder and Security Analyst at Taddong VIDEO Intypedia012en LESSON 12: WI FI NETWORKS SECURITY AUTHOR: Raúl Siles Founder and Security Analyst at Taddong Hello and welcome to Intypedia. Today we will talk about the exciting world of security

More information