GUIDELINES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT USE OF RECLAIMED WATER

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1 GUIDELINES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT USE OF RECLAIMED WATER

2 GUIDELINES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT USE OF RECLAIMED WATER EPA Victoria 40 City Road, Southbank Victoria 3006 AUSTRALIA Publication ISBN EPA Victoria, June 2003 Cover photograph A photograph of one of the many current reclaimed water schemes operating in Victoria. Photograph courtesy of North East Water Authority.

3 FOREWORD The release of this updated guideline comes at a time when reclaimed water is an established part of the journey towards sustainable management of our resources and environment. The use of reclaimed water can provide many benefits, including the stimulation of economic growth through providing a guaranteed supply of defined quality water. Reclaimed water can also make significant contributions to sustainability by reducing pressure on our existing water supplies and transferring nutrients to beneficial uses rather than discharges to our waterways. The important contribution that reclaimed water can make to sustainability is reflected in a number of recent initiatives to further integrate this product into holistic water resource management. In planning for Melbourne s future water resource needs, the Water Resources Strategy for the Melbourne Area Committee recommended increase use of reclaimed water for non-potable uses. Likewise, a recently established whole-of-government Water Recycling Committee is leading the development of a Victoria wide strategic framework for increased water recycling. This updated guideline has resulted from a review of the Guidelines for Wastewater Reuse (EPA Victoria, 1996, Publication 464) taking into account advances in technology and scientific knowledge, community expectations, stakeholder feedback on the 1996 guidelines, and the development of the national framework - the National Water Quality Management Strategy (NWQMS). The retitled Guidelines for Environmental Management: Use of Reclaimed Water widely adopts the approaches described in the recently released NWQMS Guidelines for Sewerage Systems Reclaimed Water (ANZECC, 2000). However, in some instances, the Victorian guideline advocates higher order practices to better reflect our environmental and/or regulatory requirements. The Victorian guideline is focused on reclaimed water from the sewerage system as well as providing guidance for other potential sources. An important feature of the updated guideline is its endorsment by the Department of Human Services, the Department of Sustainability and Environment and the Department of Primary Industries. As such, this document provides integrated guidance from the key Government agencies with responsibilities associated with reclaimed water management. This guideline provides a framework for best practice management of reclaimed water use and the exemption of reuse schemes from EPA Victoria s works approval and licensing provisions. The guideline focuses on desired performance objectives and outcomes through appropriate management practices, allowing scope for innovation. Suppliers and users of reclaimed water are able to consider and implement alternative measures to those suggested, provided an equivalent, or better, site-specific solution is achieved. At the same time, those seeking greater direction or certainty can simply apply the suggested measures. i

4 The underlying philosophy of EPA Victoria s Guidelines for Environmental Management (GEM) is to provide a forward-looking approach rather than simply reflecting current trends. By focusing on those elements that represent best practice and providing a systematic approach to achieving these, the GEM encourage suppliers and users of reclaimed water to strive for continuing improvement in environmental performance. MICK BOURKE CHAIRMAN ii

5 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This guideline was prepared in consideration of feedback from a wide range of government (Victorian and interstate) departments, industry and other relevant stakeholders resulting from the release of the Guidelines for Wastewater Reuse (EPA Victoria, 1996 Publication 464). This guideline refers to a number of key information sources, including: NWQMS Guidelines for Sewerage Systems Use of Reclaimed Water (ANZECC, 2000); NWQMS Australian and New Zealand Guidelines for Fresh and Marine Water Quality (ANZECC, 2000); Guidelines for Wastewater Irrigation (EPA Victoria, 1991, Publication 168); and Guidelines for Environmental Management: Disinfection of Reclaimed Water (EPA Victoria, 2003, Publication 730.1). A large number of other information sources were referenced during the development of these guidelines. A more comprehensive list is appended to this document. iii

6 GLOSSARY OF TERMS Term Definition 1 ML/d One megalitre per day (equivalent to 1,000,000 litres per day). This value has significance as it represents a threshold level for reclaimed water schemes needing an Environment Improvement Plan to be endorsed by EPA Victoria or an appointed Auditor. The value is based on expected use (for example, irrigation) of greater than 1 ML/d on any day. Reclaimed water flows into storage are not considered in this definition. Activated sludge ARMCANZ ANZECC BOD Chlorination Coagulation Controlled access Crop factor Direct potable Disinfection A sludge made by continuous recirculation of solids from a secondary sedimentation tank to an aeration tank, thus acquiring many useful aerobic bacteria. Agriculture and Resource Management Council of Australia and New Zealand. Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council. Biochemical oxygen demand - a measure of the amount of oxygen used in the biochemical oxidation of organic matter. The BOD test is typically conducted over a period of five days under specified conditions and may then also be referenced as BOD 5. The application of chlorine or chlorine compounds to water, usually for the purpose of pathogen reduction. In some circumstances, chlorination may also provide chemical oxidation and odour control. The addition of a chemical to a colloidal dispersion resulting in particle destabilisation by a reduction of the forces tending to keep the particles apart. The limitation of public or livestock access to a site for defined periods of time so as to minimise the likelihood of direct physical contact with reclaimed water and, where required, to ensure adequate reductions in pathogen levels. A factor relating crop water use to pan evaporation or potential evaporation over the same time. In the context of these guidelines, the derivation of drinking water directly from reclaimed water without an intermediate stage of storage or mixing with surface or groundwater. A process that destroys, inactivates or removes micro-organisms. iv

7 E.coli EIP Ensiling Filter Flocculation Furrow irrigation GEM HACCP Indirect potable Membrane filtration Escherichia coli. A bacterium found in the gut of warm blooded animals that indicates faecal contamination. Environment Improvement Plan. A plan covering the use of reclaimed water that manages identified risks and thereby ensures protection of the environment and human health. Process for preservation of animal fodder crops by storage in silos, pits or trenches with exclusion of air. A device or structure for removing solid or colloidal material from liquids by physically trapping the particles and removing them. The formation of settleable particles from destabilised colloidal-sized particles. A method of irrigation whereby water is applied via small ditches or furrows that lead from the supply channel, thus wetting only part of the ground surface. Guideline for Environmental Management. Publication released by EPA Victoria to provide a best practice framework for managing environmental obligations. Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point. An industry recognised risk management system that identifies, evaluates and controls hazards including those aspects of food quality and production significant for food safety. In the context of these guidelines, the derivation of drinking water from surface or groundwater storages that have been supplemented by the addition of reclaimed water. Reclaimed water is passed through porous membranes, with differentiation between classes of membranes typically on the basis of the maximum molecular weight or size of compound capable of passing through the membranes. Membrane techniques such as microfiltration typically have pores from 50 to 10,000 nm, ultrafiltration usually involves pores from 1 to 100 nm, while nanofiltration and reverse osmosis typically have filtration equivalent to pores of 0.1 to 1 nm. 90 th percentile When expressed as a limit, ninety percent of the samples taken over a specified period must not exceed the prescribed value, that is, the 90 th percentile of the available data s statistical distribution. NHMRC NWQMS National Health and Medical Research Council. National Water Quality Management Strategy. v

8 NTU Pathogens Primary treatment Reclaimed water Reuse Secondary treatment SEPP SS Sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) Storage lagoon Supplier Tertiary treatment Thermotolerant coliforms (also known as faecal Nephelometric Turbidity Unit unit of measure of the turbidity of water due to suspended, colloidal and particulate matter. Organisms capable of causing disease. In untreated sewage, the key potential pathogens are bacteria, viruses, protozoans and helminths. Treatment involving sedimentation (sometimes preceded by screening and grit removal) to remove gross and settleable solids. The remaining settled solids, referred to as sludge, are removed and treated separately. Water that has been derived from sewerage systems or industry processes and treated to a standard that is appropriate for its intended use. The utilisation of reclaimed water for some further beneficial purpose. Generally, a level of treatment that removes 85 percent of BOD and suspended solids via biological or chemical treatment processes. Secondary treated reclaimed water usually has a BOD of < 20 mg/l and suspended solids of < 30 mg/l, but this may increase to > 100 mg/l due to algal solids in lagoon systems. State Environment Protection Policy. These policies are adopted by Government, and gazetted pursuant to the Environment Protection Act The SEPP describe environmental objectives for defined environmental segments (for example, water and land). These objectives must not be exceeded through reclaimed water use. Suspended Solids. An expression of the relative concentrations of sodium ions in reclaimed water to calcium and magnesium ions, indicating a potential sodium or alkali hazard to the soil. A lagoon used to store treated reclaimed water prior to application, either to maintain adequate supplies, or to assist meeting the SEPP (Waters of Victoria) requirement for on-site retention of all wastes up to a 90 th percentile wet year. A person or organisation that supplies reclaimed water for use. The treatment of reclaimed water beyond the secondary biological stage. This normally implies the removal of a high percentage of suspended solids and/or nutrients, followed by disinfection. It may include processes such as coagulation, flocculation and filtration. A subset of coliforms found in the intestinal tract of humans and other warmblooded animals. They can produce acid and gas from lactose at C; vi

9 coliforms) Treatment lagoon Uncontrolled access User hence the test for them is more specific than for total coliforms and selects a narrower range of organisms. E.coli are typically the major proportion of thermotolerant coliforms. Any large pond or holding used to contain reclaimed water while treatment processes including sedimentation and biological oxidation occur. Stabilisation and maturation lagoons are examples of treatment lagoons. Members of the public have unrestricted access to areas where reclaimed water is in use. A person or organisation that uses reclaimed water. vii

10 TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD...I ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS... III GLOSSARY OF TERMS...IV 1. INTRODUCTION OBJECTIVES SCOPE WHAT ARE GUIDELINES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT? STATUTORY FRAMEWORK LEGISLATION REUSE EXEMPTION FROM WORKS APPROVAL AND LICENSING PROVISIONS ROLES, RESPONSIBILITIES & RISK ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES RISK IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT RECLAIMED WATER TREATMENT AND QUALITY TREATMENT AND CLASSIFICATION OVERVIEW TREATMENT PROCESSES PHYSICAL-CHEMICAL AND PATHOGEN LIMITS CLASS A RECLAIMED WATER TREATMENT MEASURES FOR SPECIFIC PATHOGENS CONTAMINANTS AND ALGAE SUPPLY ISSUES TREATMENT & DISTRIBUTION TREATMENT RELIABILITY DISTRIBUTION RELIABILITY ACCEPTABLE USES & SITE SPECIFIC CONTROLS DETERMINING ACCEPTABLE USES AGRICULTURAL REUSE URBAN (NON-POTABLE) DIRECT & INDIRECT POTABLE USES ENVIRONMENTAL FLOWS, GROUNDWATER RECHARGE INDUSTRIAL USE SENSITIVE LAND USES SITE SELECTION & ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT IRRIGATION MANAGEMENT EMERGENCY DISCHARGES OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY MONITORING AND REPORTING RECLAIMED WATER MONITORING GROUNDWATER AND SOIL MONITORING SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS CESSATION OF SUPPLY... 57

11 8.5 REPORTING AUDITING ENVIRONMENT IMPROVEMENT PLANS WHEN IS AN EIP REQUIRED? PREPARING AN EIP EIP SIGN-OFF...63 APPENDIX A REUSE SCHEME CHECKLIST APPENDIX B SPECIFIC MEASURES FOR REUSE SCHEMES THAT USE RECLAIMED WATER GENERATED FROM SOURCES OTHER THAN SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS APPENDIX C GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS & AGENCIES APPENDIX D KEY ACTS AND REGULATIONS APPENDIX E ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN CHECKLIST...80 APPENDIX F INDICATIVE NUTRIENT UPTAKE RATES FOR SELECTED CROPS...82 APPENDIX G SALINITY CLASSES OF IRRIGAT ION WATERS AND SALT TOLERANT PLANTS...83 APPENDIX H - SELECTED REFERENCES... 85

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13 1. INTRODUCTION Reclaimed water is increasingly viewed as a valuable resource for the agricultural, industrial and municipal sectors, rather than as a waste that requires disposal. The safe and sustainable use of reclaimed water involves: (a) taking what was regarded as a waste and treating it to a level appropriate for its intended use; and (b) using the reclaimed water resource in a manner that provides some direct or indirect economic or social benefit, whilst still being protective of the environment, public and animal health, and food/produce safety. Incentives to use reclaimed water include: potential treatment and disposal cost savings by turning a waste into a resource that can provide economic or social benefits; attractiveness of reclaimed water in terms of reliability of supply (quantity and quality) versus the variability associated with other traditional water sources; capacity to supplement potentially limited or costly traditional primary water sources. In many areas, access to reclaimed water should have significant economic benefits; minimisation of the diversion of water from watercourses, groundwater, etc; and reduction (ultimate aim is for avoidance) of discharges to surface waters, unless there are sufficient environmental benefits to justify the continuing discharge. The concept of safe and sustainable reclaimed water reuse is different from that of disposal to land. The primary purpose of disposal to land is to discharge waste in a controlled manner so as not to cause surface or groundwater pollution. In contrast, the primary purpose of reuse is to accept reclaimed water as a resource and ensure safe and sustainable uses. In terms of irrigation reuse schemes, this means applying water at a rate that does not exceed the plant s water or nutrient needs, and maintaining soil conditions for optimum plant growth/yield (year after year). 1.1 Objectives The overall objective of this guideline is to maximise the reuse of reclaimed water through minimising and managing any risks associated with its use. To meet this objective, the guideline: encourages the sustainable and safe use of reclaimed water; sets clear performance objectives for the use of reclaimed water; establishes the obligations of the suppliers and users of reclaimed water; and suggests best practice environmental measures (based on available experience) for treatment, quality, site selection, application, site management, monitoring and reporting in order to meet the performance objectives. This guideline provides the basis for exemption of reuse schemes from EPA Victoria works approval and licensing requirements (refer section 2.2). Guidelines for Environmental Management 1

14 1.2 Scope Primarily, this GEM applies to the use of reclaimed water from sewage treatment plants. This includes both municipal sewerage facilities treating mainly human sewage and industrial process water accepted via trade waste agreements, as well as those serving individual commercial premises (for example, hotels, motels, schools and caravan parks). Additional guidance for the treatment and disinfection of sewage is covered separately in the Code of Practice for Small Wastewater Treatment Plants (EPA Victoria, 1997, Publication 500), and Guidelines for Environmental Management (GEM): Disinfection of Reclaimed Water (EPA Victoria, 2003, Publication 730.1). This guideline does not specifically address domestic reuse from individual household systems (for example sullage, greywater or effluent from residential septic tanks). Requirements for these systems are covered separately in the Code of Practice - Septic Tanks (EPA Victoria, 1996, Publication 451). The principles (that is, performance objectives and suggested measures) of this guideline may be applied to the reuse of appropriately treated industrial process water. Reuse will occur in areas including intensive animal industries (feedlots, piggeries and dairies), abattoirs, stockyards, food and beverage manufacturing, winemaking and other industry. Appendix B provides guidance for these reclaimed water categories and highlights areas where additional issues may need to be addressed. As an example, the use of abattoir or saleyard effluent on grazing land poses specific risks that need to be assessed and managed. From time to time EPA Victoria develops environmental guidelines for specific reuse activities (for example, Guidelines for Wastewater Irrigation) as well as waste generating industries (for example, Environmental Guidelines for the Dairy Processing Industry). Where available, these additional guidelines should be consulted. The Department of Primary Industries (DPI) also has guidelines that should be consulted, such as the Code of Practice Piggeries, and the Agriculture Notes series (for intensive animal industries, dairy shed effluent management, etc). For information about other guidelines or publications refer to Appendix H, or EPA Victoria s website (www.epa.vic.gov.au), DPI s website (currently or electronic information resource: Land Channel (www.land.vic.gov.au). 1.3 What Are Guidelines For Environmental Management? The Guidelines for Environmental Management (GEM) series outlines key environmental objectives relevant to particular industries or activities, and provides suggested measures to achieve these objectives. The GEM: Use of Reclaimed Water provides a framework of best practice management for the supply and reuse of reclaimed water. This guideline includes the following chapter topics: statutory framework for reuse schemes (Chapter 2); 2 EPA Victoria

15 risk identification and risk assessment (Chapter 3); roles and responsibilities for suppliers and users (Chapter 3); permissible end uses of reclaimed water based on reclaimed water treatment and quality (Chapter 4); treatment and distribution reliability (Chapter 5); site selection and site management practices (Chapters 6 and 7); monitoring, reporting and auditing programs (Chapter 8); and environment improvement plans (Chapter 9). Reclaimed water use in accordance with this guideline will contribute to sustainability by: establishing an additional cost effective water supply, enabling more efficient use of scarce resources, providing opportunities for increased productivity (agriculture, for example), and reducing the impacts of disposal activities. As previously stated and detailed in section 2.2, this guideline is significant as it provides the basis for exemption of reclaimed water reuse schemes from EPA Victoria s works approval and licensing requirements. Guidelines for Environmental Management 3

16 2. STATUTORY FRAMEWORK 2.1 Legislation The current Acts, policies and regulations administered by EPA Victoria and other Government agencies that are relevant to the use of reclaimed water are listed in Appendix D. Acts Acts of particular significance to reclaimed water use are: Environment Protection Act 1970; Health Act 1958; Livestock Disease Control Act 1994; Food Act 1984; and Australian New Zealand Food Authority Act Under the Environment Protection Act 1970 discharges to the environment must be managed so that they do not adversely affect the receiving environment (for example, land, surface water or groundwater). This Act includes works approval and licensing requirements administered by EPA Victoria, to ensure appropriate control of such discharges. The Health Act 1958 makes provision for the prevention and abatement of conditions and activities, which are, or may be offensive or dangerous to public health. The Livestock Disease Control Act 1994 outlines requirements for livestock grazing land irrigated with sewage or nightsoil, in order to protect health of stock (specifically cattle and pigs grazing pasture or fed fodder from that land), and humans (consuming meat and milk products). Taeniasis (also known as Beef Measles - refer to section 3.2) is specifically addressed by this Act. The Food Act 1984 legislates on food quality standards. Food is considered "adulterated" under the Act if it does not meet prescribed standards. Victoria complies with these national quality standards by enforcing the Australian New Zealand Food Authority (ANZFA) Food Standards Code. Developed under the Australia New Zealand Food Authority Act this code specifies maximum residue limits (MRLs) and maximum permitted concentrations (MPCs) permitted to be present in food. MRLs are normally associated with pesticide resides, whilst MPCs are associated with metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and certain other organic chemical contaminants. It is an offence under the Food Act 1984 to sell food that is adulterated. Refer to Appendix D for other important legislation, including the Occupation Health and Safety Act 1985 and the Trade Practices Act 1974 Policies Government declares the SEPP and Industrial waste management policy (IWMP) under the Environment Protection Act. The SEPP provide ambient environmental quality objectives and attainment programs for achieving them. Compliance with the relevant policies must be attained for all activities that involve reclaimed water treatment and use. The SEPP and the IWMP of relevance to the use of reclaimed water include: SEPP (Waters of Victoria) 2003 and its schedules; and SEPP (Groundwaters of Victoria) EPA Victoria

17 Other relevant State government policies include: SEPP (Management and Prevention of Contamination of Land) 2002; and IWMP (Prescribed Industrial Waste) This guideline provides a framework to achieve the objectives of the aforementioned policies. Regulations The Environment Protection (Scheduled Premises and Exemptions) Regulations 1996 outline the premises and activities that are scheduled and subject to works approval and licensing provisions of the Environment Protection Act The regulations also provide exemptions from these works approval and licensing provisions for certain, otherwise scheduled, activities and premises. Guidance documents In addition to the previously mentioned legislation, there is a variety of guidance material of which reclaimed water managers should be aware. Some of this documentation is referenced in the relevant sections of this guideline, with a summary list provided in Appendix D. 2.2 Reuse Exemption From Works Approval and Licensing Provisions Although waste discharges into the environment are typically subject to works approvals and licensing by EPA Victoria, an exemption from these statutory processes is provided for: An effluent reuse scheme or activity which meets discharge, deposit and operating specifications acceptable to the Authority. (Environment Protection Regulations 1996 Scheduled Premises and Exemptions). The exemption reflects that, in contrast to a waste discharge, reclaimed water can be sustained as a resource. This guideline (GEM: Use of Reclaimed Water) defines the acceptable discharge, deposit and operating specifications referred to in the regulations above and therefore forms a critical component of exemptions from EPA Victoria works approval and licensing requirements. (Note: the exemption only extends to the specific reuse scheme, treatment is still subject to works approval requirements. Treatment plants that have 100 per cent recycling and do not have a discharge as part of treatment, that is treatment lagoons, do not have an obligation to hold a licence). These guidelines highlight certain critical measures that need to be met to obtain an exemption. Schemes that do not comply with a guideline requirement will need to either obtain works approval and a discharge licence, or receive a specific exemption from EPA Victoria. Critical guideline measures that must be satisfied to obtain an exemption are indicated by an asterisk in the summary checklist at the end of each section. These measures relate primarily to meeting requirements for: reclaimed water treatment and quality; site selection and management; permitted end-uses and restrictions; monitoring, reporting and auditing; and Environment Improvement Plans (EIPs). Guidelines for Environmental Management 5

18 Although specific measures are stated in this guideline to meet the performance objectives for reuse schemes, it is important to note that these measures are not inflexible. A reuse scheme proponent may propose alternative measures to those suggested, however, the onus of proof rests with them to demonstrate that alternative measures can achieve the required performance objectives. Specific advice and endorsement from EPA Victoria and other Government departments (for example, the Department of Human Services (DHS) and DPI will be necessary if alternative measures to those required for exemption are being considered. Exemption of reuse schemes will be assessed on an individual case basis. Where a proposed scheme does not provide measures equivalent to this guideline, works approval and licensing requirements will apply. The proponent should evaluate the need for further measures (in addition to those required for exemption) according to the size of the scheme, the sensitivity of the surrounding environment and the potential for human and livestock exposure to reclaimed water. Although reuse schemes operated in accordance with this guideline are exempt from works approval and licensing, EPA Victoria and other departments do continue to have a significant role to play. EIPs for schemes requiring Class A reclaimed water must have EPA sign-off (regardless of volumes), while schemes involving greater than 1 ML/d must have sign-off from either EPA Victoria or an EPA Victoria appointed auditor. In specified circumstances, EIPs will also require endorsement from other departments (such as DHS) prior to the schemes commencing (refer section 3.1). While not all schemes require formal endorsement from EPA Victoria or an EPA Victoria appointed auditor, all proposed schemes should be at least discussed at the planning stage with the relevant EPA Victoria regional office (contact details are provided in Appendix C). These initial discussions are important for identifying potential issues and thus avoid the need for EPA Victoria to take action on schemes found to be non-compliant with the guideline. Enforcement action could include such measures as the issuing of a Pollution Abatement Notice, which directs a scheme manager to undertake specified actions, or imposing fines via Pollution Infringement Notices. A summary of the decision sequence for assessing whether a reuse scheme is exempt from works approval and licensing is provided in Figure 1. As noted earlier, treatment is not an exempt activity under the Scheduled Premises and Exemptions Regulations. Treatment plants (greater than 5,000 litres per day), therefore, require works approval and may also require a licence. 6 EPA Victoria

19 Discuss proposed scheme with EPA Victoria regional office or appointed auditor In consultation with EPA or appointed auditor, proponent assesses whether scheme achieves the guideline requirements Yes No Is scheme EPA Victoria approved as providing equivalent measures to this guideline? Yes No (a) (b) (c) (d) Where required, have EIP approved prior to scheme starting (detailed in 3.1): for schemes requiring Class A reclaimed water (EPA and DHS endorsement); for > 1 ML/d supply (EPA or auditor endoresment); for water with significant quantities of animal effluent (DPI endorsement) (refer Appendix B); for reclaimed water sourced from industrial efluents (EPA or auditor endoresment); Obtain works approval and licence prior to scheme starting Figure 1. Reuse scheme assessment Guidelines for Environmental Management 7

20 3. ROLES, RESPONSIBILITIES & RISK 3.1 Roles and Responsibilities Suppliers and users It is important that suppliers and users of reclaimed water understand and meet their obligations under this guideline. Suppliers of reclaimed water have a responsibility to ensure that the water is of a quality fit for its intended purpose. The supplier should ensure that any reuse scheme claiming water from its premises, either complies with this guideline, has a site-specific exemption granted by EPA Victoria or has an EPA Victoria works approval and licence. Suppliers have a responsibility to assist customers in complying with this guideline (that is by assisting in the development of the EIPs and advising on appropriate management practices for the schemes). Suppliers have a responsibility to keep a register of all schemes to which they supply reclaimed water. This register should include information about enduse site addresses, the quality and quantity of supply, and end-uses of the reclaimed water. Each year, the supplier must provide EPA Victoria with summary details of reclaimed water supply and enduse. A reporting proforma will be available from the EPA Victoria website (www.epa.vic.gov.au). The supplier should also ensure that all schemes have an EIP (refer Chapter 9). In some circumstances, the EIP must have sign-off from the EPA Victoria regional office or an appointed auditor before the supply of reclaimed water commences. There are also circumstances under which the endorsement of other agencies (such as the DHS or the Chief Veterinary Officer (DPI)) will be required prior to the submission of an EIP to EPA Victoria or an appointed auditor. Such circumstances are: uses requiring Class A reclaimed water. These must be endorsed by DHS* and have EPA Victoria sign-off; schemes using more than 1ML/d reclaimed water (on any day). These must have EPA Victoria (or an appointed auditor) sign-off; schemes with grazing on pasture irrigated with significant quantities** of abattoir, stockyard or intensive animal industry effluents generated off-site. These must be endorsed by the Chief Veterinary Officer; or schemes using reclaimed water sourced from industrial process water. These must have EPA Victoria (or an appointed auditor) sign-off. *DHS involvement in Class A schemes is in ensuring the treatment plant is producing Class A reclaimed water quality. Unless Class A reclaimed water uses involve variations from this guideline, DHS is not required to endorse the aspects of an EIP dealing with end-use. **A definition of significant quantities is not presently available. However, based on initial case studies, future guidance is expected to be provided through a technical guidance note published on the EPA Victoria website. In the interim, the measures described in Appendix B should be consulted. 8 EPA Victoria

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