VSACplanning guide for grades 7 12

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1 planning for college VSACplanning guide for grades 7 12 Gear up for your future!

2 Parents and guardians are the most important and influential people in their children s lives. Children need parents and other adults to be interested and involved in their activities, their academic progress, and their planning for the future. This publication provides the basic information you ll need to help children succeed in middle school, in high school, and beyond. It explains: helpful terms types of degrees and colleges Vermont high school graduation requirements the high school coursework necessary for college career exploration the college search process standardized testing college selection the college application process It also includes worksheets you can easily download from our website, along with online tools & resources; and for information on upcoming events and programs, check regularly. Start at any point in the guide that matches your student s progress in the planning process. Consider this your A-to-Z guide to getting your student college ready.

3 This booklet was produced by the Vermont Student Assistance Corporation, a public nonprofit corporation established by the Vermont Legislature in 1965 to help Vermonters plan and pay for education or training beyond high school. Planning for college: A guide for grades 7 12 VSACWhy college? Exploring careers Self-exploration checklist, Naviance and PLPs, online resources Getting started Important terms, types of colleges and degrees, two-plus-two programs, types of admissions, college admissions criteria, the four-year high school plan Paying for college Options, types of financial aid, saving for college, sources of financial aid, financial aid forms, FAFSA4caster Grades 7 and Student task list, parent/adult task list Grades 9 and Student task list, parent/adult task list, academic preparation Grade Student task list, parent/adult task list, standardized tests The college search Factors to consider, college fairs, questions to ask at college fairs, using costs as part of your college search Grade Student task list, parent/adult task list, the college visit Applying to college Admissions categories, applications timeline, the application process, the college major, the gap year Checklists and worksheets Undergraduate institutions in Vermont cover illustration 2015 Doug Ross Glossary

4 VSAC has the resources you need and the experts to help you use them. Paying for College presentations free at Vermont high schools throughout the fall College Pathways free events on Vermont college campuses for Vermont high school students and their parents Free online career exploration & planning tools SAT, ACT, and graduate exam prep tools to identify interests, skills, and work values links between careers, majors, and education college and scholarships searches monthly college planning tips and to-do items at VSAC s website for students and families who are planning for, applying to, and paying for college VSAC Resource Center in downtown Winooski with more than 9,000 books, DVDs, and other resources that you can borrow Grants & scholarships state grants for full-time and part-time degree programs state grants for non-degree courses to improve employability or to try a college class information on more than 140 scholarships for Vermont residents Financial aid applications & details online at FAFSA CSS Profile Vermont grant application for full-time and part-time degree study Vermont non-degree grant application Unified Scholarship Application for all VSAC-assisted scholarships Education loans for students for out-of-state students attending Vermont colleges for Vermont residents attending eligible colleges anywhere Vermont s 529 college savings plan the Vermont Higher Education Investment Plan (VHEIP) a Vermont state income tax credit federal and state tax-free earnings and withdrawals

5 Why college? Even with higher tuition and other costs, a college degree is still considered a very good investment. Education beyond high school is likely to mean: more job opportunities. Most good jobs require more than a high school diploma. A college degree or other training will open more doors for your student because employers need people who can think critically, communicate well, and solve problems creatively. financial rewards. Over a lifetime, a person with a four-year degree can earn twice as much money as someone with only a high school diploma, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. In addition, most jobs that provide paid benefits such as sick time, vacation time, retirement plans, and health insurance require training or college beyond high school. These benefits add up to thousands of dollars of income that don t appear in a paycheck. a sense of accomplishment. College can provide the satisfaction of personal growth. Meeting new people and participating in new activities enable young people to feel comfortable, competent, and accomplished. Reports show that college graduates experience higher earnings over a lifetime, higher job satisfaction, and healthier lifestyles. (Source: College Board) National median weekly earnings in 2014 $1,101 $1,326 $668 $741 $792 $488 Less than a HS diploma High school diploma Some college, no degree Associate s degree Bachelor s degree Master s degree 9.0% 6.0% 6.0% 4.5% 3.5% 2.8% National unemployment rate in 2014 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1

6 Exploring careers Planning for education after high school starts with paying attention to and exploring interests and skills. Students should begin exploring career options years before attending a college fair or filling out college applications. Naviance and PLPs Beginning in fall 2015, all students in seventh and ninth grades will be required to have a personalized learning plan (PLP), and many schools are implementing them sooner. A PLP is an excellent career and college planning tool that encourages each student to reflect on his or her learning and future. To assist schools with PLPs, VSAC with the support of the VT Agency of Education offers Naviance, an online career- and college-planning program with built-in PLP capacity, to all public schools in the state. Naviance allows students to collaborate with educators and parents to set goals and tasks, search for colleges, and explore careers based on personal skills and interests. Check with your school to see if Naviance is part of its plan for PLPs. Career planning starts by learning about oneself. For your student, this means taking a realistic look at who he is, what he s good at, and what he enjoys. Through self-assessment, your student can identify his values, interests, abilities, and skills. While there is no test that can determine what someone should be or do, the resources on the following pages, along with the worksheets on pages 35 37, can help your student identify academic or career fields that match her interests, skills, values, personal traits, and desired lifestyle. Help your student research careers to learn more about education requirements, salaries, working conditions, future outlook, and other factors that can help narrow his or her list of potential careers. Online resources Find information and links on college readiness, career exploration, college admissions and the application process, and college costs and financial aid. Sign up for timely info and reminders about free college planning events and important dates and deadlines. Explore communities and meet local leaders to learn the steps they took to get where they are. Create your own roadmap based on your interests and selfassessment activities. Find links to the trades, apprenticeships, and alternatives to four-year college. Learn about scholarships for trades in Vermont. Connect to the Trade Hub for every state in the nation. 2

7 Self-exploration checklist Use the questions below to help your student begin to think about what he or she is good at and enjoys doing. Interests c What gives you energy? c What activities do you enjoy in your free time? c What do you like to read about, learn about, or explore? Abilities c What are you good at? c What abilities and talents would you like to develop? c What are your strengths? Values and environment c What is most important to you in school: support, competitive challenges, reputation, flexibility? c What is most important to you outside of school: creativity, security, independence, helping others, free time? c What role do you want work to play in your life? Will it simply be a source of income? Will it be a creative outlet? Will it be a way to improve your community? Important relationships c Whom do you look up to? c Whose lifestyle do you admire? c List three important people in your life, along with your reasons for having chosen them. Personality c What makes you unique? c How would people describe you? c What gives you energy? 3

8 Getting started Many students assume that education after high school means four years at a residential college. Not true. Students and their parents can choose from many different types of degrees in different learning environments. Career schools may offer six-month courses that improve employability; community colleges within commuting distance may provide two-year associate s degrees; and part-time, evening, and online classes are alternatives to full-time education on residential campuses. Students are more likely to be college-bound and careerready when their families are involved in their schooling and education. Types of colleges College or university a school that offers associate-, bachelor-, or advanced-degree programs and requires students to take liberal arts courses in addition to courses in their areas of interest private: a college or university that is usually self-supporting and not for profit, meaning that incoming funds are put back into running the school. All students pay the same tuition, whether they re in-state or out-of-state students. public: a not-for-profit college or university partially supported financially by the state in which it s located, allowing the school to offer lower tuition to in-state students Community college a two-year institution that offers flexible schedules and/or lower fees; often has a smaller campus and most do not have residence halls. Students can earn their associate s degrees here, or they can begin their studies here and transfer to four-year colleges to complete their bachelor s degrees. Technical college a two- or four-year college that prepares students for technical or hands-on careers through a traditional college schedule; often requires courses (such as English or social studies) outside a student s field of study Trade or vocational school a one- to two-year school that offers programs in specific fields such as culinary arts, cosmetology, or refrigeration; often in session year-round, with schedules resembling a typical workday. Although shorter term, it can be as expensive as a year at a two- or fouryear college. proprietary school: a privately owned trade or vocational school that often has a recruiter who works on commission 4

9 Types of degrees Associate s degree awarded after completing planned coursework that usually involves two years of full-time study (about 60 credit credit hours required; varies by program). Bachelor s degree awarded upon completion of planned coursework that usually involves four years of full-time study (about 120 credit hours) Master s degree earned after the completion of a bachelor s degree; involves a prescribed course of study in a specific field. The length of each program depends on full- or part-time status and the number of Doctorate awarded for advanced, intensive study in a specific field Two-plus-two programs A two-plus-two program enables a student to earn an associate s degree from one college and apply those credits toward a bachelor s degree from the same school or another school. Many two-year schools have agreements with four-year colleges for easy transfer of credits. Often, starting at a twoyear college will lower tuition bills for the first two years of classes while a student explores career fields or academic areas of interest. Since many two-year colleges offer precollege English and math courses, your student can begin at a community college or junior college, where he can improve academic performance and develop strong study skills. This may increase the likelihood of acceptance at a four-year college as a transfer student. If your student likes the idea of a two-plus-two program, it s important that she work closely with an academic counselor to plan courses and credits that will be accepted at the target four-year school. College admissions criteria The most important factors colleges consider in the admissions process are high school coursework and grades. Colleges look at courses taken, grades received, and course level difficulty in all four years of high school. It s important for students to take the most challenging courses they can handle. The more challenging the courses and the higher the grades, the greater the college and scholarship options available to the student. Important terms Accreditation: an endorsement or approval by an organization that reviews the qualifications and standards of educational institutions or academic degree programs Certificate: a credential awarded upon completion of a specific shortterm course of study Credit hour: amount of time per week spent in a class. A certain number of credit hours is required for graduation; one course is usually three or four credit hours, meaning that classes are held three to four hours each week. Degree: a credential awarded to a student who has successfully completed a required course of study Dual enrollment: an option that allows high school students to take college courses for both high school and college credit Grade point average (GPA): the average grade earned throughout a course of study; calculated by adding the grade points received in all classes and then dividing by the number of credit hours taken Major or concentration: a specific area of study in which a student specializes and receives a degree Minor: a specific area of study requiring fewer credits than the major Professional license: a credential received for study and training in a particular area or skill 5

10 There are many ways that students can continue their education or training after high school. To learn more about options in Vermont and beyond, go to: Define your goals. Identify your interests, strengths, and preferences. Explore careers and connect them to further education. Get reminders, feeds, and tips on important dates, deadlines, and local events. Find Vermont schools. Find statewide degree programs. Find out what s happening on Vermont campuses. Factors considered may include: academic preparation: whether or not the student has taken the necessary high school courses to prepare for her major standardized tests: primarily the SAT and/or ACT (covered in more detail on pages 18 21), taken junior and/or senior year essay: a writing sample that reflects a student s ability to think and write; also provides the student with an opportunity to express something about himself as an individual letters of recommendation: describe what school counselors, teachers, or other important adults think about a student s potential to handle college-level learning (see page 31) interview: a chance for college staff and a prospective student to ask questions of each other; can be conducted in person or on the telephone with a college admissions officer or a graduate of the college (see page 28) co-curricular activities, leadership roles, and jobs: show what a student has accomplished outside the classroom Online resources for online tools and self-assessments for students 6

11 The four-year high school plan School counselors can help students create a four-year course plan that meets high school graduation requirements, college admissions requirements, and career plans. Requirements for Vermont high school graduation and college admissions Vermont high school graduation requirements Two-year vocational/ technology programs Two-year community colleges and business schools Most four-year colleges Highly competitive four-year colleges Four-year nursing and allied health programs Four-year engineering and science programs Four-year business programs English Math Science Social Foreign Fine Arts/ Studies Lang. (one) Computer Ed. 4 years 3 years 3 years 3 years; 1 in 1 year U.S. history/ government 4 years 3 years 2 3 years 3 years 4 years 3 years 2 years 3 years 2 years (for liberal arts transfer programs) 4 years years 3 years 2 3 years 1 2 years years 4 years 4 years 4 years 3 years 3 4 years 1 2 years (2 lab sciences) 4 years years 3 years 2 years years (including lab sciences) 4 years 4 years 3 4 years 3 years 2 3 years 1 year (including lab sciences) 4 years 4 years 2 3 years 3 years 2 3 years Other courses 1 1 /2 years physical education, plus any local requirements 2 years related technology courses Related technology programs (computer, accounting) Lab sciences Honors & Advanced Placement courses (recommended) 1 2 years health science (recommended); 1 year human anatomy & physiology (recommended) Related engineering courses Related business courses Note: Check with your high school counselor to find out how to meet state graduation requirements through block scheduling. Standards and admissions policies vary from college to college. Students should review college catalogs for specific entrance requirements. Highly competitive colleges may require specific levels and courses in math and science. Check with your school counselor and college admissions offices for specifics. 7

12 Paying for college Finding the right combination of financial aid for your family circumstances requires research, discussion, and decision making. Talk with a school counselor or a VSAC representative about available resources. Myth: College is out of the question because it can cost more than $25,000 a year. Fact: What you ve heard is true college is expensive. However, two out of every three students attending four-year colleges in the United States are receiving some form of financial aid (to help meet college expenses. Before you decide, investigate and explore likely aid packages. At you ll find: questions to help determine how your family will plan to pay college costs ways to use net price calculators to estimate what families like yours receive in grants and scholarships suggestions for lowering college costs Consider the options To pay for college, families usually rely on several options, starting with their own resources. The least expensive way to pay for college is to use savings and investments. Saving for college does not have to be restricted to parents. Contributions to college savings programs (see page 9) make great birthday and holiday gifts from relatives and friends. Students can also be encouraged to put aside their own earnings toward college expenses. Another way to meet college expenses is to use current income, which may include using tuition payment plans offered by many colleges. These plans allow families to spread payments over the school year rather than pay a lump sum each term. This approach can save families money by reducing the amount required in education loans. In addition, many students receive financial aid (for which they will need to apply). Need-based aid takes into consideration a family s financial situation. Aid that is not based on need may be awarded for unique achievements in athletics, art, music, or leadership; or for factors such as desired field of study, residence in a particular county or town, volunteer work, or extracurricular activities. Types of financial aid Grants awards that generally are based on need and do not have to be repaid Scholarships awards based on factors that may include academic achievement, degree program, extracurricular activity, and sometimes financial need. These do not have to be repaid. Work-study student employment for wages that may be applied to the college bill or used for personal expenses Education loans money borrowed by students and/or parents to pay for school. Loans must be repaid with interest. 8

13 Financial aid packages almost always include education loans. Since education loans may have fees and are repaid with interest, borrowing is the most expensive way to pay for college and should be done wisely. The federal government provides education loans that students and parents can use for education or training beyond high school. federal Direct loans for students enrolled at least half time: Direct subsidized loans You are not responsible for the interest on these loans while you re in school, or during any periods of deferment. To obtain a subsidized loan, you must demonstrate financial need. Direct unsubsidized loans The interest on these loans accrues even while you re in school and during deferment; on the other hand, you don t need to demonstrate financial need to obtain an unsubsidized loan. federal PLUS loans for parents: These are loans that parents can take out to help pay education costs for a student enrolled in an undergraduate degree program. Because PLUS loans are based on credit, the application will require a credit check. To meet education costs, some students may need additional funds over and above the federal Direct loan. VSAC s Vermont Advantage loan is available to make up the difference. Visit or contact VSAC to discuss availability and your options. Sources of financial aid Financial aid is available from: your college or institution: Your school can offer grants and scholarships, which may vary from school to school, depending on each school s available funding and eligibility criteria. the federal government: Federal programs provide grants, work-study, and education loans. private foundations and organizations: These groups often provide scholarships, administered privately or through VSAC, that can be found through your local high school, VSAC, town offices and libraries, parent employers, or local businesses. the state government: In Vermont, state grants funded by the Vermont Legislature are available through VSAC. Saving for college One way to save for college is to use a qualified tuition program (a 529 plan). Nearly every state has its own 529 plan with its own features. The Vermont Higher Education Investment Plan (VHEIP) is Vermont s official 529 plan. It s the only 529 plan through which Vermont residents qualify for a Vermont income tax credit on contributions and a Vermont income tax exemption on earnings when withdrawals are used for qualified higher education expenses, which include costs for tuition and fees, certain room and board charges, and required books and supplies. VHEIP provides an affordable way for Vermonters to invest for college. You can enroll with only $25, and after that you can make automatic contributions of as little as $25 from a savings or checking account, or $15 per pay period through payroll deduction. For more information, call or visit 9

14 Need-based financial aid is awarded according to a family s financial situation; it s determined through a federal formula based on a family s financial data. Merit aid is awarded for a special academic, artistic, or athletic talent, or for certain criteria defined by the donor. Be aware that your student will need to reapply for financial aid every year. Financial aid forms Students and families need to complete several forms to be considered for financial aid from state, federal, and private sources. Most forms can be completed online, although paper copies are available if you need them. Each of the major online forms has its own website that provides instructions and worksheets. Read instructions carefully, gather necessary financial information, and fill out the worksheets before completing the form. Meet all deadlines for submitting forms. You may lose out on aid if you re not prompt in filing forms or if you miss deadlines. To meet application deadlines, families can use estimated tax information on forms and then update forms after taxes have been completed. Since circumstances differ from household to household, some families will be eligible for more need-based aid than other families. Some will not qualify for need-based aid, though their students may qualify for merit aid. The only way to find out what you re eligible for is to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA); this will help ensure that you get the maximum amount of financial aid possible. Plan to complete: Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA): This is required in order to be considered for federal financial aid, a Vermont grant administered by VSAC, and aid from the college your student may be attending. Vermont grant application: This is required in order to be considered for a need-based Vermont grant. VSAC Unified Scholarship Application (USA): This is required for VSAC-assisted scholarships listed in the VSAC scholarships booklet (see Resources, below). Important: Even if your family income is too high to qualify you for need-based aid, fill out the FAFSA so you can qualify for federal education loans; these loans have better interest rates and terms than private loans do. You can file both the FAFSA and the Vermont grant application online at the VSAC website (www.vsac.org) on or after January 1 of the student s senior year. (You can obtain a paper FAFSA by calling the Federal Student Aid Information Center toll-free at , but online applications are faster and easier.) 10

15 You may also need to complete: CSS (College Scholarship Service) Profile : Check with each college s financial aid office to see if this form is required. Log on at A limited number of waivers are granted to first-time college applicants from low-income families. supplemental forms that may be required by the college you plan to attend applications for scholarships not administered by VSAC Online resources VSAC s scholarships booklet, detailing approximately 140 scholarships for Vermont residents, other scholarship resources, and tips on scholarship scams VSAC s paying for college guide, with details about the financial aid process. See the Paying for college section at for the online version. For a printed copy, contact your high school guidance office

16 Grades 7 and 8 Many parents think about college long before their children do, and the goals they develop for and with their children are the most important influence in their children s plans. Although middle school grades do not count in the college admissions process, a student s performance in middle school does provide the foundation for success in high school and college. Course choices are important, so parents and teachers should provide advice about the most appropriate challenging classes. By taking Algebra 1 or a foreign language in eighth grade, students can get a leg up on their high school graduation and college admissions requirements. There s an app for that iprocrastinate enables students to create to-do lists in sequential order (for Macs and iphone). Quizlet provides digital flash cards for studying. Student task list c Complete the career interest checklist on pages c Complete the personality and values worksheet on page 37. c Get organized. Learn to use a day planner or calendar to keep track of assignments, due dates, test dates, and other commitments. c Think about how you like to spend your time what do you do for fun, adventure, learning? Your experiences can give you clues to careers you might enjoy. c Talk to adults in your life about their careers. Think about the ones that seem interesting to you and why. Talk to your school counselor, teachers, and others about: c classes to take in ninth and tenth grade, based on your interest in preparing for and attending college c the importance of grades for college admissions c finding extracurricular activities (sports, performing arts, volunteer work, mentoring, or other activities) that interest you 12

17 Parent/adult task list c Help your student complete the student task list (above). c Monitor and encourage your student s academic progress by: 1) taking an active role in helping your student choose classes and activities for ninth grade 2) making sure that your student has a place to study and that homework gets done 3) helping your student organize schoolwork and practice good study habits: sitting close to the front of the room in class, joining class discussions, and asking questions keeping up with homework and completing assignments before they re due asking teachers for help, when needed (teachers want students to be successful in their classes!) learning keyboarding, note-taking, proofreading, and test-taking skills c If you can, visit a college campus. Middle school students often do better academically when they realize that college can be a goal. It doesn t have to be an official visit; go a ball game or performance, or simply take a lunch to have on campus. c Help your student to learn good financial management habits. Visit to get started. Books Raising a Thinking Preteen: The I Can Problem Solve Program for 8- to 12-Year-Olds by Myrna B. Shure Good Friends are Hard to Find: Help Your Child Find, Make, and Keep Friends by Fred Frankel Talk with your child early and often about choices after high school. Students are more likely to aspire to college if their parents let them know it s important. Many students who attend college made the decision to do so by the time they were in seventh or eighth grade. If you don t know how to start a conversation, try this: Talk with your student about five expectations you have of him or her upon beginning high school. Then ask your child what five expecations he or she has of you. 13

18 Grades 9 and 10 Grades 9 and 10 are times of transition and personal growth. These years are just as important as the junior and senior years, since the courses from all four are included on a student s transcript and all grades go into the cumulative grade point average, or GPA. Students have more homework and face higher expectations in high school, and the support of adults can help students deal with changing relationships and responsibilities. In addition to working hard in school, your student should start to identify and develop his abilities, interests, and values. Help your student select courses in high school that support her plan for the future. Taking courses to meet Vermont high school graduation requirements is not the same as taking courses to prepare for college study. Even if your student hasn t decided on college, encourage her to take courses that will put her in good standing for college admission if she chooses it later. There s an app for that Khan Academy provides instruction and practice in academic skill areas. Ace Your Next Test offers unique study tips and other resources to improve testing skills. Student task list c Talk to a friend or relative about his or her career. c Get involved! Sign up for an extracurricular activity or non-academic activity. This is a good way to meet new people, learn skills, and explore interests. c Reality Check: Do you know how much money you ll need to have in order to support the lifestyle you want? Take the Reality Check quiz at c Take the PSAT or ASPIRE (if offered at your school). Visit for information, practice tests, and resources. Talk to your school counselor, teachers, and others about: c the classes you need to take to ensure that you re on track for college entrance requirements c Advanced Placement/honors classes courses, eligibility requirements, and enrollment procedures c participation in academic enrichment programs, summer workshops, and camps with special emphasis on music, arts, science, etc. Many of these programs offer scholarships for students with financial need. 14

19 c what it takes to be a member of the National Honor Society or National Technical Honor Society. Make it a goal! c opportunities to earn college credit while you re still in high school c taking an Intro to College Studies course for free at a CCV center near you. Visit for details. Parent/adult task list c Have fun with and enjoy the person your teen is becoming. c Start the school year off right by helping your student organize schoolwork and practice good study habits: 1) joining class discussions and asking questions 2) keeping up with homework and completing assignments early 3) asking teachers for help (teachers want students to be successful!) 4) learning keyboarding, note-taking, proofreading, test-taking, time-management, and study skills c Monitor academic progress by making sure that your student has a good place to study and that homework gets done. c Stay connected with teachers and the school. Call or teachers with questions about your student s progress. Ask for ways you can help at home. c Help your student become involved in a variety of activities in and outside of school; encourage him to participate in an activity of interest. c Check with the school to see if sophomores need to register for the PSAT or the ASPIRE. Visit for information, practice tests, and resources. c Use the monthly planning tips at to stay on track. c Start to learn about the financial aid process. View our online presentation Paying for College at online-presentations. c Begin to explore and discuss college options. Attend a college fair with your child and/or visit a college campus. c Help your student find meaningful summer activities. Options include summer programs on college campuses, summer camps, paid work, and volunteer opportunities. Here are ways you can help your student become better prepared for college studies: Pay attention to math and foreign language requirements for college admission. Students should take as many of both as they can in middle school and high school. This will show that they can manage a challenging college preparatory program. There are typically two chances to double up in math in 8th and 10th grades. However, make sure your child is interested, developmentally ready, and working at the proper skill level. 15

20 Academic preparation Act 77, Vermont s new education mandate, offers many opportunities for students to achieve postsecondary readiness through high-quality educational experiences that acknowledge individual goals, learning styles, and abilities. Also known as Flexible Pathways legislation, Act 77 allows student to create their own paths to graduation through dual enrollment, work-based learning, early college, and personalized learning plans. Learn more about Act 77 at flexible-pathways#components. c Help identify classes that may be necessary as preparation for certain college-prep courses in eleventh and twelfth grades. c A student s grades, attitude, and performance during the first year of high school will influence teachers recommendations for higherlevel classes. c Studies show that students who are involved in extra curricular activities do better academically. c Free tutoring is available in many schools. Students should seek help if it s needed. Books Uncommon Sense for Parents with Teenagers by Michael Riera Fighting Invisible Tigers: Stress Management for Teens by Earl Hipp The Path to Purpose: How Young People Find Their Calling in Life by William Damon 16

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